Ashbourne Flog It!


Ashbourne

Paul Martin and experts Will Axon and Michael Baggott visit Ashbourne in Derbyshire. While he's there, Paul takes time out to enjoy some dry fly fishing on the River Wye.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Beautiful countryside, lots of fresh air and hopefully, some wonderful antiques to value.

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This is Flog It from Ashbourne, Derbyshire. Welcome to the show.

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-Good luck.

-Thank you very much.

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There's a healthy queue outside the Queen Elizabeth Grammar School.

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The sun is shining and hopefully, someone here today will go home with a lot of money.

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Our experts are already dipping through all the bags and boxes.

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On hand is Michael Baggott and Mr Will Axon.

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We value your unwanted antiques and collectables and whisk you off to auction.

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-If you're happy with your valuation, what are you going to do?

-Flog it!

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Keep watching. Somebody is going home with a lot of money. Let's get the doors open and you'll find out.

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Michael and Will might look like a pair of naughty schoolboys,

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but they are expertly qualified to lead our team here

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because before he was even a teenager, Michael was 15 quid up on his first antiques deal.

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His boundless knowledge means he always has an interesting insight to add.

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They're the sort of thing that if you wanted to find these again, you'd probably never be able to.

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Having worked his way up through the business, Will is also a mine of information.

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-I think it's a stool.

-What else could it be?

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Coming up, Will gets his orders.

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-You can say no if you like. I won't take it personally.

-No.

-Well done. I'm hurt.

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No discretion, it's a fixed reserve.

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And a large ginger jar has Michael fearing for his future.

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It's a bit of a wild stab in the dark, which is what I might be getting if it doesn't sell.

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There's always a buzz at the start of the day because you never know what people will bring in.

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-Very nice. The jazz era, isn't it?

-Yes, you can imagine doing the charleston.

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Michael is starting us off with something that could not be overlooked.

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Jill, Bill, thank you for struggling in with this marvellous, huge pot today.

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It is a beast of a thing, isn't it? Where does it live at home?

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It's in the bedroom because I haven't got room for it.

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We often hear, "We haven't got room for it." This is one thing that might apply to as it is a whopper!

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-Where did it come from?

-Scotland.

-His parents lived in Scotland.

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-And they left it to you?

-They left it.

-Yes.

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-If we take this off, this is a super finial, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

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-This is modelled on a Chinese dog of Foo.

-Really?

-The whole thing is a Chinese shape.

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-But you know it's not Chinese, don't you?

-That's right.

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All here on the base for us - Carlton Ware, Rouge Royale, as if we needed to turn it over and find out.

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-That's right.

-I mean, Carlton Ware,

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from Stoke, a factory set up by Wiltshaw and Robinson,

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-producing Rouge Royale in the late '20s, early '30s.

-Yes.

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-But they then continued production on after the war.

-That's right.

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-And this piece probably dates to about 1945, 1950.

-Really?

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It's amongst their later wares, but it's a splendid pot

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-with all these...

-All the designs.

-..quite manic and fantastical Chinese scenes.

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-And these very vibrant, decadent colours.

-Colours.

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-But it has to be said, sometimes size is everything.

-It is.

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And this is an absolute whopper.

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It's sadly dipped from the top of the market, but I still think

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if we put it in at £300 to £500, it's a good piece of Carlton Ware Rouge Royale for a collector.

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It might be the pinnacle in their collection.

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-And if we put a fixed reserve at 250...

-That's fine, isn't it?

-OK.

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-I hope it will do really well when it comes up.

-I hope so too.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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'Well, we'll have to wait and see how that whopper does.

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'I'm next with Keith who's brought in something really interesting.'

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-Keith, heads or tails?

-I don't know...

-I'll flip it. You catch it.

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-Three pence.

-Three pence. Fancy having those in your pocket!

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How did you come across this?

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It was just passed on to me and the wife from a nursing matron

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who was actually nursing in the First World War.

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The wife nursed her till she died. It was just passed through to us.

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It's been sitting in a tin in my wardrobe since I've had it.

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-At least it's been safe.

-Yes.

-And you couldn't spend it.

-No.

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I wouldn't want to carry it around in my pocket with the weight of it.

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You could only spend these up until 1820.

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They were out of circulation after that.

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That's a workhouse in Birmingham on the site of where the police station is now.

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So it's been pulled down like many of the workhouses.

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Yes. The Gilbert's Act came in in 1782 and it enabled all the parishes

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to club together to form a Poor Law Union.

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-Yeah.

-Where they could build workhouses. This one was built in Birmingham two years later in 1784.

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-At the time, there was a shortage of coins, so these were made to pay the workers.

-Yes.

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These were redeemable in certain shops around the area.

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You could spend this token on anything except for alcohol.

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-I see.

-So it encouraged the workers to stay sober.

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-That way, they always got it returned to them because it was no good to anyone else.

-Absolutely.

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These were made right up until 1817.

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They were being used up to 1817, 1820, then taken out of circulation.

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-Have you thought what it's worth, have you done any research?

-No, no.

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I think if it wanted to go into someone's hands who could appreciate it more

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than being stuck in my tin in a wardrobe, I'd like them to have it.

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-What else is in this tin?

-Oh, many things.

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Many kinds of coins and things, but I think this is the oldest.

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Well, in 1813, this coin was worth three pence.

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I think today, if we put it into auction, fingers crossed, £40.

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But let's put it in with a valuation of 20 to 40. It's had a bit of damage.

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It's been dropped. Around the edge, you can see that.

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But the image is very clear, so that's good. It's a nice piece of social history.

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It's a good connection to the past.

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'What a fascinating item! It does give a real sense of history.

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'Will is next, impressing Janet with both his knowledge and his charm.'

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I don't know what's more stylish - the mirror or yourself today.

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You're looking stunning. Tell me, where has this mirror come from?

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I bought it in Eastbourne in... I don't know, '85, '86.

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..to put in a house that was a 1930s house.

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-Let me guess - you've now moved into a Victorian house?

-Yes.

-And it doesn't quite fit?

-No.

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Well, that's what the market for these type of pieces is,

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the decorator's market.

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There are people who are in love with this period and they live, breathe Art Deco.

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That's the sort of styling it is, obviously.

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I suppose it's a cross between a fan and perhaps a sunburst.

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-I can see it sitting quite nicely with one of those sunburst clocks.

-Hmm.

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You bought it in Eastbourne. Did you pay a lot for it in the '80s?

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-I think I paid about £40 for it, near to that.

-Not bad, really.

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When you think of the effect it has when it's hung in a period property, it's not a lot to pay

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for something that could provide a focal point.

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What I like about it is these two strips here,

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this sort of...I'd call it champagne glass, that colour,

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that real Deco colour.

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It's that little detail that just sort of lifts it above the norm.

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And this is nice as well, this sort of convex roundel

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which plays with the light, shall we say, as it reflects off the mirror.

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So, £40 you paid for it in the 1980s...

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I don't think it's going to be as good an investment

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as if you had invested in gold bullion or oil barrels,

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but I think it's still going to be worth around that sort of figure.

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-Would you be happy with that sort of figure at auction?

-Yes. I wouldn't like to lose on it.

-OK.

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That's a canny way to come at it. You don't want to lose money.

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-So you'd be happy at a £40 reserve, would you?

-Yes.

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Can I twist your arm to give us a little bit of discretion on that £40?

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-You can say no if you like. I won't take it personally.

-No.

-Well done. I'm hurt.

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-So it's a fixed reserve at £40?

-Yes.

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So we'll put the estimate at £40 to £60 and we'll hopefully say bye-bye to your mirror

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and hello to your new Victorian one.

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Well done, Janet. It's great when people are selling to re-invest in antiques.

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We're about halfway through our day. Everyone's having a marvellous time, aren't we? Enjoying yourselves?

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-Yes.

-Good. Right now it's time to up the tempo and put our valuations to the test.

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Let's go over to the auction room.

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The sale is being held by Hanson Auctioneers and Valuers Limited.

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And auctioneer Charles Hanson is selling our lots for us.

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And before we start, let's remind ourselves of our lots.

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Who says size isn't everything? It's probably what will sell the ginger jar.

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I love history, so Keith's three pence coin caught my attention.

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I hope I'm not alone.

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Finally, Art Deco has a faithful following these days and I'm optimistic about Janet's mirror.

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It's always great to see a packed saleroom and we certainly have one today.

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First up, it's Keith with his little piece of the past - the three pence coin.

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-I think the story is more important than the value.

-Exactly.

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I relate it to my days in the '30s when I was at school and what you could get for three pence then.

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-I'll just give you one instance.

-Go on then.

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You could get a fish from the fish shop for tuppence.

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For a pound, that was 120 fish.

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-Now we're going back another 115, 120 years.

-Yes.

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-So what could you get for three pence in those days?

-It's a long way back, isn't it?

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Keith, let's find out what value it's going for today. This is it.

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Copper too, it came from a Birmingham workhouse.

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£18 I'm bid. Do I see £20 for it?

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18. 20, ma'am. 2. 24. I'm out.

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26. 28. 30. 2?

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One more. Are you sure?

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2, thank you. 35.

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-A little better than we were saying, isn't it?

-Yes.

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..£35. Yes, we are. All done.

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-Sold in the room, £35.

-You was pretty good at that

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-because you said between 20 and 40.

-I did.

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-What are you going to treat yourself to now? A quick drink in the hotel here?

-I will tell you one thing.

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-Have a gin and tonic.

-It's my diamond wedding next month.

-Is the wife here?

-Yes.

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I've got my eye on a diamond ring and it's a real sparkler.

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-Are you going to have a bid?

-My daughter's going to bid for it.

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-That's what we like to see - people re-investing in antiques.

-Yes.

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'Well, that was worthwhile then.

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'Next, that whopping piece of Carlton Ware.'

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-It belongs to Bill. It was your mum, wasn't it?

-Yes.

-What do you think of this?

-It's not my type of thing.

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-You don't like Carlton Ware?

-No. But she said to me before she died she'd like to give it to me.

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Hopefully, we can send you home with a bit of money in your pocket.

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We're looking for around £300, maybe 4 on a good day?

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It's a bit out of my comfort zone.

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20th century ceramics are not my first love.

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But it's a bit of a wild stab in the dark which is what I might be getting if it doesn't sell off Bill,

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but we will see what happens.

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Very fine Carlton Ware Rouge Royale jar and cover.

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£210. Look at it, it's monumental.

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210.

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I'm bid 210.

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Do I see 220 now? Come on.

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-He's trying his best.

-He is.

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-That's right.

-It's not selling.

-No.

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Once, twice, three times...

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-Not sold.

-No further bids.

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It's a sad reflection

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because that market was at its peak maybe three or four years ago.

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It's just coming down slightly, so maybe the thing to do is pack it up, forget about it for a while.

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-It'll save for another day.

-Yes, thank you.

-Or leave it here.

-Yeah.

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I think Bill is thinking about leaving it here and reducing the estimate.

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-I think Bill is thinking about dropping it.

-I think he is.

-Yes.

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'At least Bill's got a sense of humour. Remember Janet and her mirror? Well, she's up next.'

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-This is my son-in-law Kevin.

-Hello there.

-Hello.

-Someone had to drive you in.

-Yes.

-He's the transport?

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-What do you think of the mirror?

-Not my favourite.

-It's not my cup of tea.

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But in the right setting it would look really good and I understand why you're selling it

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because the decor's changed, you've moved house.

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£40 to £60, is that a true reflection of the value?

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The only thing that lifts it up is that champagne glass panel. That's typical Deco.

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Let's find out what it's worth. It's going under the hammer now.

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A very fine Art Deco-inspired mirror.

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-Bigging this up!

-£40.

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Do I see 5 now? Come on. 45.

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55, the lady. I'm out.

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5 at the back. 60. 5.

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-70. 5. 80. 5...

-It's got the look.

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90. 5. The magical 100.

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105. One more? Are you sure? You've come so far.

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That's because I've got the eye, you see.

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I'll take 115? 115. 120.

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125. 130.

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135...? Are you sure? Thank you.

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That's a death, OK. 130. We say sale!

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£130!

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-That's more like it, isn't it?

-It is indeed.

-Yeah.

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-Quality.

-It's not a lot of money for a period feature.

-No.

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-So now you can treat Kevin.

-No.

-No?

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-No?!

-I bought him some chicken sandwiches.

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-Bought him some chicken nuggets!

-He owes you then!

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'I think she'll be taking him out for lunch at the very least.

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'Later, something unusual for the Moorcroft enthusiasts.'

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-We have a phone line. We have two phone lines. Three phone lines!

-Oh, three phone lines!

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'While I'm in Derbyshire, I'm going to make the most of it by getting out into the countryside.'

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I've come back to Haddon Hall in the Peak District,

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but it's not the house I'm here to look at this time.

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Something really exciting has been happening to the management of the River Wye

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which meanders through the estate, which is what I'll show you today.

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I've got my day pass and I'm here to meet head river keeper Warren Slaney to do a spot of fly-fishing

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and also hear about what's been going on.

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'The Victorians were great fishing enthusiasts and gave this river a bit of a makeover.

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'In recent years, Warren has been undoing their work by bringing it back to nature

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'for the fly-fishermen of today.'

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So I guess fly selection is very, very important. You've got to select what the fish are biting for.

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-That's true. We've got two different flies.

-Mayfly?

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They've hatched in the air, and also some hawthorn flies.

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But the fish will be much happier about feeding on the mayfly because it's a bigger bite.

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So what we need is a big fly that matches the colour and size of the mayfly and here we are.

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-Either of those two flies.

-So these are dry flies.

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-They'll float on the surface of the water. Wet flies go under the water.

-They'll sit on top.

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-It's an unwritten rule with fishermen - freshwater fish, catch and release.

-Yeah.

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-I hope we catch one today. There's loads.

-The hot time is now, late afternoon, and it's humid.

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There's a few down there.

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'I can't wait, but I'd like Warren to show me how it's done first.'

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-Do they target this river for poaching at night-time?

-It can happen any time.

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It can happen at breakfast time, it can happen at midnight.

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-You got one!

-And through...

-He's got one.

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Do you want me to use the landing net?

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-That's it.

-Cracked it.

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-Go on.

-I'll take the opportunity to wet my hands when it comes in.

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-Otherwise, your hands are too dry.

-It can sit in my lap, this beautiful fish, as painted by Mr Faberge.

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Aren't they pretty?

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-There it is.

-Oh, nice. That's really good. It's not too deep, is it?

0:18:350:18:40

I'll make sure his teeth are OK.

0:18:400:18:43

-There he is.

-Wonderful, all the spots on the dorsal fin as well.

0:18:430:18:47

That's a Lathkill brown trout.

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-It's fat and happy on mayfly.

-Isn't that lovely?

0:18:490:18:53

-Gorgeous fish. There he goes.

-There he goes.

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-Back home.

-There he goes.

-In a state of shock.

-He doesn't know what's happened.

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-"What's happened? All I was doing was eating mayfly."

-All of a sudden, he's on some chap's lap.

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'This river is full of fish.

0:19:080:19:11

'It's my turn, but I have a feeling it may not be as easy as it looks.'

0:19:110:19:16

Will we have to fish on our knees cos this is a very narrow strip?

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-If they see us.

-So we'll crawl along on our knees.

-Yeah.

0:19:210:19:26

There, that's a nice fish. Let's creep up.

0:19:290:19:33

-It doesn't matter, we won't scare him.

-Are you sure?

0:19:350:19:38

Oh, good... Nearly.

0:19:400:19:42

-He's still there.

-He is still there, isn't he?

-Yeah.

0:19:420:19:46

These brown trout, they're the red ones that Izaak Walton's friend wrote about in 1670.

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The reddest and best trouts in England, according to Charles Cotton.

0:19:540:19:58

-The darker the water, the darker the trout sometimes?

-You do get black ones in peaty water in Wales.

0:19:580:20:05

-That's nice.

-That's nice, isn't it? Look at that fly move.

0:20:050:20:09

It looks natural when it lands then, doesn't it?

0:20:090:20:12

That's what'll deceive the fish.

0:20:120:20:14

-Oh, that's good.

-Talk me through some of the changes. What's been happening to the riverbank?

0:20:140:20:21

We took out all the weirs here, so the river level drops. It's a lot shallower.

0:20:210:20:26

It means the river's got more current, which grows more weed,

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more insects and a much better life for fish.

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It must be wonderful to see stock levels rising naturally.

0:20:330:20:36

-Yeah.

-They're just feeding off of what's here.

0:20:360:20:40

We used to be in complete control of the rivers. We could stock as many fish as we wanted.

0:20:400:20:46

But we didn't have as many fish as there is now.

0:20:460:20:49

By leaving nature to get on with it properly, the wildlife just becomes abundant.

0:20:490:20:54

-It's wonderful how nature works, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:20:540:20:58

Where is he now? I've lost him.

0:21:060:21:09

Come on, bite!

0:21:150:21:17

The longer this line gets, the more I'm going to catch the bank.

0:21:210:21:25

Shall I let that fly go...

0:21:300:21:31

Oh, sorry, Warren!

0:21:320:21:35

'Warren thinks it's time to try another spot. The fish aren't biting here.'

0:21:350:21:40

There's a mayfly going downstream.

0:21:400:21:42

-A fish just dropped in front there.

-Yeah.

-Can you see the fish?

0:21:420:21:47

Just coming over now.

0:21:470:21:50

Oh...

0:21:500:21:51

I scared him.

0:21:530:21:55

-Do you know who built this river?

-The Marquess of Granby.

0:21:550:21:59

-Back in the 1870s.

-Built in 1870.

0:21:590:22:02

-Purely just to fish in?

-Behind us there was a fish farm.

0:22:020:22:07

'The great thing about Warren is that he knows everything about this river.'

0:22:070:22:13

-Tell me about Mr Ogden.

-He influenced the way you fish.

-Badly?

0:22:130:22:17

-No, the style you're fishing.

-OK.

0:22:170:22:20

Little boys would come out on days like this and catch live mayfly,

0:22:200:22:24

put them into boxes and wait outside the pubs to sell them for a penny.

0:22:240:22:29

-That's quite enterprising.

-Sure.

0:22:290:22:32

Yeah, sure. So the rivers were being emptied by anglers.

0:22:320:22:36

And Mr Ogden found a way of taking straw from the fields

0:22:360:22:40

and trapping air in the middle to make an artificial floating fly.

0:22:400:22:44

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

-So he invented the fly!

-Our steward asked him to demonstrate his methods.

0:22:440:22:51

And James Ogden caught nine fish in front of a gallery of spectators,

0:22:510:22:56

the head keeper, the steward, and the next day the steward made it a dry fly only estate.

0:22:560:23:04

-Long may it continue.

-It's a good conservation measure.

0:23:040:23:08

-I guess this is a big part of your job, to make sure everyone does use a dry fly.

-Fishermen are very good.

0:23:080:23:14

-One out of a thousand will misbehave.

-use a maggot or something.

0:23:140:23:19

-You can clean up on maggots.

-But what would be the point?

0:23:190:23:23

-Yeah. It's not satisfying fishing, is it?

-No.

0:23:230:23:26

'There's no satisfaction here, so we're on the move once again.

0:23:300:23:34

'This is not my lucky day!'

0:23:430:23:46

You've got 20 years' experience which you've condensed into a few hours for me.

0:23:500:23:56

I've creamed all your knowledge off!

0:23:560:23:58

Oh, dear. Just got to put it to use.

0:23:590:24:02

-Yep.

-I'm not disappointed at all that I haven't caught one.

0:24:030:24:07

I've really enjoyed myself and learnt so much for next time. That's the main thing.

0:24:070:24:13

-That's a good cast. I'm going to make that my final cast.

-You've got to have one more!

0:24:130:24:19

-One more.

-What if it's a bad cast? We're allowed one more after that.

0:24:190:24:24

I've got to end on a good cast. OK?

0:24:240:24:27

-OK.

-That's good.

-Yeah. Leave it in there for half an hour.

0:24:290:24:33

Oh, please, bite!

0:24:340:24:36

Welcome back to our valuation day here in Ashbourne.

0:24:450:24:50

I'm still surrounded by people all hoping they're the lucky ones going to auction

0:24:500:24:56

to make a lot of money. If you want to take part in the show, just come to a valuation day.

0:24:560:25:02

You can find details on our BBC website. Just log on to:

0:25:020:25:06

And you will see all the information in front of you. Hopefully, you'll find us very close to you.

0:25:070:25:14

If you don't have a computer, check your local press. We would love to see you.

0:25:140:25:20

Get ready, Moorcroft fans. Michael's found something for you.

0:25:220:25:27

Ruth, thank you for coming in with this amazing vase.

0:25:270:25:31

Most people at home will have a good idea what it is,

0:25:310:25:35

but could you tell me what you know about it first?

0:25:350:25:39

I've had it since 1962. This chap who was building our house at the time

0:25:390:25:44

had it made for me for a housewarming gift.

0:25:440:25:47

-That's marvellous.

-He presented me with that, which was very modern then in this very modern house.

0:25:470:25:54

Now it sticks out like a sore thumb.

0:25:540:25:56

-So everyone's had time to shout Moorcroft at the television.

-Yes.

0:25:560:26:01

If we turn it over and confirm it, there we have the crossed mark. "Made in England".

0:26:010:26:08

And we've got Walter Moorcroft, William's son. His signature's on the base.

0:26:080:26:14

And, as you say, the date 1962.

0:26:140:26:17

-Yes.

-Was it a member of the Moorcroft family?

-No, he was a friend of theirs and he had it done.

0:26:170:26:23

-That's marvellous. I think, let's look at the things that go for it.

-Yes.

0:26:230:26:29

-It's this lovely flambe glaze.

-Yes.

0:26:290:26:32

And this wonderful large size. And it's in absolutely lovely condition,

0:26:320:26:38

apart from the odd fleck of white emulsion, which is almost a sign of provenance in private hands.

0:26:380:26:44

I think the only things that work against it

0:26:440:26:49

are actually the date and the fact that it's of '60s manufacture.

0:26:490:26:54

The large sums that are paid for Moorcroft, as we've seen over the years on Flog It,

0:26:540:27:00

-are for those pieces that are really pre-1920...

-Yes.

-1925.

0:27:000:27:05

And the rarer patterns. But it's nice that it's commissioned and nice that it's dated.

0:27:050:27:11

It's untested, really, with later Moorcroft to see how it goes,

0:27:110:27:15

but possibly in the region of about £500-£800.

0:27:150:27:19

Does that concur with what you were hoping for?

0:27:190:27:22

-I think if we put a discretionary bid for the auctioneer of about 750.

-750.

-I'd be happy with that.

0:27:220:27:29

We can do that. It's an untested market. If the reserve is 750,

0:27:290:27:34

-a broader estimate of £800-£1,200.

-Yes.

0:27:340:27:38

I think we'll see. We'll learn at the auction

0:27:380:27:43

-and find out what it's really worth.

-Yes.

-I hope you're proved right.

-Thank you very much.

0:27:430:27:48

That sale will be an education for us all.

0:27:500:27:54

What do you do if you inherit things you don't like? Bring them to us!

0:27:540:27:59

Adrian and Wendy, welcome.

0:27:590:28:02

Is this from your own home or things you've bought?

0:28:020:28:06

It was my mum's. She passed away and it's dropped down to me.

0:28:060:28:11

-So you inherited it.

-Yeah.

-Is it your sort of thing?

-No!

0:28:110:28:16

You're pretty definite about that.

0:28:160:28:19

-What about you, Adrian?

-I like it, but you don't, so...

-No.

0:28:190:28:23

When the wife doesn't like something, we don't get it in the house. That's why we have sheds.

0:28:230:28:30

Well, look...

0:28:300:28:32

The clock itself is a French mantel clock. It's gilt spelter, OK?

0:28:320:28:37

That's spelter, not bronze, which would be ormolu.

0:28:370:28:42

Because these clocks were popular at the time, 19th century,

0:28:420:28:46

they made them in various levels of quality. So at the top end would be the gilt bronze,

0:28:460:28:52

heavier, harder to produce, more expensive.

0:28:520:28:55

And this one is spelter, which can give the same sort of look as bronze when patinated and gilded,

0:28:550:29:01

as it is here, but it's a lot cheaper to produce and it's not quite as durable as bronze.

0:29:010:29:09

When this was being produced, it was a popular style of clock.

0:29:090:29:14

And because of that, a lot of them were produced.

0:29:140:29:18

The clock itself, because amongst this very showy case is a working clock,

0:29:180:29:24

you've got the dial at the front, which doesn't have any glass

0:29:240:29:29

and I don't think it ever did.

0:29:290:29:32

I don't think it had a glass front.

0:29:320:29:34

The aperture in the back, we can see the movement, which is a fairly basic French barrel movement.

0:29:340:29:41

It's job was to tell the time and to strike on the hour.

0:29:410:29:46

It does have a striker, a bell.

0:29:460:29:48

-Let's see if it's wound up at all.

-TING

0:29:480:29:51

-Yeah, it still works.

-You need to calibrate the hands and movement.

0:29:510:29:56

It struck once, but it's 11 o'clock. A good thing, really,

0:29:560:30:00

-or we'd be standing here for 11 gongs!

-Yeah.

-You have some issues here with condition.

0:30:000:30:06

-We've lost the huntsman's horn. That's come away.

-Yeah.

0:30:060:30:11

-You haven't got a huge glass dome at home?

-No, I think it got broke.

0:30:110:30:16

-Did it?

-Yeah.

-If it had been in perfect condition, without the losses and so on,

0:30:160:30:23

I would have said, as a big showy clock, it would have been worth £200-£300, something like that,

0:30:230:30:30

maybe £400 on a good day.

0:30:300:30:33

But because of the condition and you haven't got the glass dome,

0:30:330:30:37

which would have added £200 or £300 on top of the price,

0:30:370:30:41

I'm going to say it's worth between £100 and £150.

0:30:410:30:46

And we've got to think about a reserve figure as well.

0:30:460:30:51

-If it doesn't sell, do you want to cart it home again? Or let it find its level?

-Let it find its level.

0:30:510:30:57

-And then it's sitting on this table here. Is that in the loft as well?

-Yeah.

-Is it?

0:30:570:31:03

-You've got a big loft! Is this how you always remember them?

-Yeah.

-Did the clock sit on here?

0:31:030:31:09

Always kept on there.

0:31:090:31:11

I'm just going to move the clock carefully to one side.

0:31:110:31:15

There's quite an interesting... central panel here.

0:31:150:31:19

At first glance you think, "That's nice. It's ivory or bone."

0:31:190:31:23

Tortoiseshell inlay as well. But they're both faux tortoiseshell and faux ivory.

0:31:230:31:30

Not real ivory or tortoiseshell. It's a type of resin.

0:31:300:31:35

-This was made late 19th century.

-Yeah.

-That period.

0:31:350:31:38

Estimate-wise. I would think it's around that £100 mark.

0:31:380:31:44

It's a good, functional table and usable. Would you be happy with that as an estimate?

0:31:440:31:51

-See what it fetches.

-You remember them together, but let's put them in as separate lots.

0:31:510:31:58

-Yeah.

-Yes? I don't think they'll appeal to the same buyer.

0:31:580:32:02

'Not a huge valuation, but at least it will give them more space in the loft.

0:32:040:32:10

'Michael spotted some Orientalware he really likes.'

0:32:100:32:15

-Tessa, thank you for bringing in two wonderful Oriental pots.

-Are they wonderful?

-I think so.

0:32:150:32:22

-Do you not think they're wonderful?

-They're just Oriental pots.

0:32:220:32:27

You've cut me to the quick!

0:32:270:32:29

-Where did you get them from?

-That was my mother's.

0:32:290:32:33

-And that was 5p at a local village fete.

-5p?

0:32:330:32:37

I thought it looked like that one.

0:32:370:32:39

-So you were taken to the extent that you thought you'd risk 5p?

-Yes.

0:32:390:32:45

Well, let's start with your mother's pot first. Basically, we've got a vegetable terrine.

0:32:450:32:52

What's lovely is you've got all the decoration inside.

0:32:520:32:56

This is basically a class of porcelain that came out from Canton.

0:32:560:33:02

It started in about 1780. And the pieces that were made in 1780 were quite sparsely decorated.

0:33:020:33:10

You see much more white to them.

0:33:100:33:12

-And the palette is a little bit more vibrant.

-Yes.

-As you progress through the 19th century,

0:33:120:33:18

it gets a little bit paler, more fussy, more cluttered.

0:33:180:33:23

This piece, I would think, would date anywhere from about 1850 up to 1880 even.

0:33:230:33:29

You've got wonderful naturalistic scenes bordered by conjoined carp,

0:33:290:33:34

-which is a symbol, I think, of marital bliss.

-Right.

0:33:340:33:37

It is quite thickly potted. They tend to be chunky devils.

0:33:370:33:43

-Then you've got your 5p bargain.

-Yes.

0:33:430:33:46

Do you think that's older or later?

0:33:460:33:50

-I would think that was later.

-Older.

-Is it?

0:33:500:33:54

This piece would have come over in about 1750, 1760.

0:33:540:33:59

-And I paid 5p for it!

-You paid 5p. You did jolly well.

0:33:590:34:04

It's just beautifully and more vibrantly decorated.

0:34:040:34:08

It's a really super thing. For 5p!

0:34:080:34:11

The only downside is a couple of chips there.

0:34:110:34:14

This, I think, is slightly better condition.

0:34:140:34:19

It's so robust. This is a family piece and this from a jumble sale,

0:34:190:34:24

-why sell them now?

-Because my house is filled with things my children want rid of.

0:34:240:34:30

-They don't want them.

-Exactly.

0:34:300:34:34

This at auction, if it were earlier, might be £200-£300.

0:34:340:34:39

-As it is, probably £80-£120.

-Right.

0:34:390:34:42

This piece, because of the chips, £40-£60.

0:34:420:34:45

If we put the two together, that's £120-£180.

0:34:450:34:49

-With a fixed reserve of 100.

-Yes.

-And I think, really, they make a very appealing, attractive lot.

0:34:490:34:56

-If you're happy to do that...

-I am.

0:34:560:34:58

We'll pop them into the sale and see if the Chinese market is as buoyant as everybody says!

0:34:580:35:05

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:35:050:35:08

They are very decorative so they should find buyers.

0:35:080:35:12

Let's have a last glimpse at our items before they head off to the sale room.

0:35:120:35:18

It's Moorcroft and massive, but will it appeal to the collectors?

0:35:180:35:23

Two lots, but one valuation - a French clock and a little rosewood table. Neither has a reserve,

0:35:240:35:30

so they're going to go.

0:35:300:35:33

Finally, the Orientalware. The 19th-century terrine and the earlier porcelain bowl.

0:35:330:35:39

Before the sale, I caught up with Charles to get his reaction to the splendid Moorcroft vase.

0:35:460:35:52

-A cracking piece of Moorcroft. It belongs to Ruth. It says a lot.

-A great statement.

0:35:520:35:58

-Yes. Will we get £800-£1,200?

-We might do.

-Might do.

-We might do.

0:35:580:36:03

The market is so buoyant and upbeat for Moorcroft, it could go beyond £1,000, but I'm not sure.

0:36:030:36:10

That's why we love auctions! That's why you give estimates!

0:36:100:36:15

-Correct.

-The wider, the better!

-Exactly. We don't know.

0:36:150:36:19

Well, we have to wait to see. The Orientalware is up first.

0:36:190:36:23

-I've just been joined by Tessa in this packed saleroom. It is busy.

-Very busy.

0:36:260:36:31

-Now I want to know, 5p you paid for one of these.

-Yes.

-Because it looked like the other.

0:36:310:36:38

I thought it did, but I think it's better.

0:36:380:36:42

-You're right.

-There's something to start off a collection.

0:36:420:36:47

When you've been collecting for five or six years, you might sell those on to buy blue and white

0:36:470:36:53

-or something a little earlier, but it's a good start.

-Here we go.

0:36:530:36:58

A very fine Chinese porcelain dish together with a terrine and cover.

0:37:000:37:06

19th century. Where do we start? I am bid here, straight in,

0:37:060:37:11

at £75. 80. 90.

0:37:110:37:14

100. I'm out.

0:37:140:37:17

Do I see 110? At £100 now. Do I see 110? Come on.

0:37:170:37:22

At £100. I'll take 105 if it helps.

0:37:220:37:24

£100. Do I see 105?

0:37:240:37:27

£100. Sale.

0:37:270:37:29

He sold them. Just.

0:37:290:37:32

-That's a big improvement on 5p.

-Yes, it is!

0:37:320:37:36

It just goes to show it's worth picking up something if it catches your eye.

0:37:360:37:41

Now the clock and the table sales, but unfortunately owners Adrian and Wendy can't join us.

0:37:410:37:48

But we do have our valuer, Will. This is more of a decorative piece,

0:37:480:37:53

-rather than a scientific precious instrument.

-Exactly.

0:37:530:37:57

Clock collectors are fairly fussy about movement and maker. Bog standard barrel movement from France

0:37:570:38:03

and put into this spelter case, which was cheaper than bronze or gilt metal. A furnishing piece.

0:38:030:38:10

A couple of bits of damage.

0:38:100:38:13

-But it looks the part.

-Exactly.

0:38:130:38:16

Very, very nice spelter mantel clock. There we are. Delightful example.

0:38:170:38:22

-Spelter's a mixed metal, rubbish metal fused together.

-Exactly.

-Scraps, yeah.

0:38:220:38:28

Where do we start? I'm bid £60.

0:38:280:38:31

5. 70. 5. 80. 5.

0:38:310:38:34

90. 5. I've got 100.

0:38:340:38:36

105. Come on. One more.

0:38:360:38:38

105 and I'm out.

0:38:380:38:40

Do I see 110? Come on.

0:38:400:38:43

All out, no more. Sold.

0:38:430:38:46

That's a good price. £105.

0:38:460:38:49

Good start. Now the occasional table.

0:38:490:38:52

-It's quite nice quality.

-A nice table. Very useful.

0:38:520:38:56

I had a chat to Charles and said, "If you had to commission a cabinetmaker to make this,

0:38:560:39:02

"it would cost you £1,000!"

0:39:020:39:05

Even if he was making it out of Weetabix! Rosewood, inlaid, hand-done. Nice and tidy.

0:39:050:39:11

Useful bit of furniture. I reckon this is good value at £100.

0:39:110:39:16

Let's see if it does that.

0:39:160:39:18

Edwardian rosewood occasional table.

0:39:210:39:24

I'm bid, straight in here, only £50.

0:39:240:39:27

Great table.

0:39:270:39:30

I'll take 5 now. Surely 5.

0:39:300:39:32

50. I'll take 5 now.

0:39:320:39:34

5. 60. 5. Then I'll be out. One more and it's yours. I'm out.

0:39:340:39:39

£65. Do I see 70 now?

0:39:390:39:42

One more do I see? The gavel is falling. OK.

0:39:420:39:47

-Gone.

-£65.

-We'll get on the phone and let them know.

0:39:470:39:51

I think they'll be pleased it went.

0:39:510:39:53

Well, that was a total of £170.

0:39:540:39:57

Now get ready to hang onto your seats.

0:40:000:40:03

Going under the hammer right now is the biggest piece of Moorcroft we've seen. It belongs to Ruth.

0:40:030:40:10

-We've got a valuation of £800-£1,200.

-Yes.

-It's difficult.

0:40:100:40:14

On the day, I thought possibly more £500-£800.

0:40:140:40:19

But I didn't see that your reserve was completely out of the question.

0:40:190:40:23

-No, you had £750 as a reserve.

-Yes.

-OK, then.

0:40:230:40:27

-All we can do is see...

-Let the room decide.

-It's a whopper.

0:40:270:40:32

My next lot is a magnificent Moorcroft vase.

0:40:320:40:36

Autumnal leaves, flambe glaze. We have a phone line. Two!

0:40:360:40:41

-Three phone lines!

-Three phone lines!

-Oh!

-Three phone lines.

0:40:410:40:46

It's got to be sold.

0:40:460:40:48

-I am bid here in the room... on my book...

-Charles is excited!

0:40:480:40:53

Do I see 550? 600.

0:40:530:40:56

50. 700. 50. And I'm out.

0:40:560:40:59

750 in the room. Do I see £800?

0:40:590:41:02

800. 50. 900.

0:41:020:41:05

900, Miss White. Make a name for yourself.

0:41:060:41:10

950. £1,000, Miss White?

0:41:120:41:15

1,050. 1,100.

0:41:180:41:20

1,200. 1,300.

0:41:210:41:24

- Oh, my gosh. - 1,400! £1,500, Miss White?

0:41:240:41:30

Look at me. You've come so far.

0:41:300:41:33

At £1,400. 15 and it could be yours.

0:41:330:41:36

-1,500.

-We've teased it up. Marvellous.

0:41:360:41:40

1,550. 1,600?

0:41:400:41:43

1,650.

0:41:430:41:46

£1,700, Miss White?

0:41:460:41:48

1,750.

0:41:490:41:51

You've come so far. Thank you.

0:41:520:41:55

-1,750. 1,800.

-Another phone.

0:41:550:41:59

-1,850.

-Oh, Ruth! This is a magic moment.

0:41:590:42:03

1,900? ..1,950?

0:42:030:42:07

We've got it. £2,000?

0:42:070:42:11

2,000. 2,100?

0:42:110:42:14

Are you sure? All out. I'll take 2,050 if it helps you.

0:42:150:42:19

- I can't believe this. - At £2,000, fair warning.

0:42:190:42:23

Miss White, it's yours at £2,000. Well played.

0:42:230:42:27

Crack! £2,000! Well done, Ruth. Well done.

0:42:270:42:30

That is brilliant.

0:42:300:42:32

'And she's quids in - the commission drops to 10% when the sale is over £500.'

0:42:320:42:38

Moorcroft is so collectable and still making quality today.

0:42:380:42:43

-That's why it's always worth, when you get a design you haven't seen before, giving it a go.

-Yes.

0:42:430:42:49

-A lot of money.

-Half is going to Parkinson's Disease.

-That's good.

0:42:490:42:54

-The other half to the grandchildren.

-How lovely. How many?

-Four.

0:42:540:42:59

Grandmas are the best. I hope you enjoyed watching the show. Sadly, we've run out of time here,

0:42:590:43:05

but it's been a cracking day. Hope you enjoyed watching the show.

0:43:050:43:09

There's many more surprises to come. You don't know what will happen,

0:43:090:43:14

so join us again soon. But for now it's bye-bye.

0:43:140:43:18

-Well done, well done.

-Wonderful!

0:43:180:43:21

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2010

0:43:300:43:34

Email [email protected]

0:43:350:43:37

The team visit Ashbourne in Derbyshire. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by a team of antiques experts, led by Will Axon and Michael Baggott. Michael spots one of the largest pieces of Moorcroft he has ever seen and Paul takes time out to enjoy some dry fly fishing on the River Wye.


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