Truro Flog It!


Truro

Truro's cathedral provides the backdrop for valuation day. A Ruskin bowl and an 18th-century silver milk jug are among the items valued by David Barby and David Fletcher.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Truro. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Welcome to Flog It!

0:00:030:00:04

the show that turns unwanted antiques into cash.

0:00:040:00:05

And today, it's the turn of the good people of beautiful Cornwall.

0:00:050:00:08

Truro is the most southerly city in the UK and we're lucky enough to be holding our valuation day

0:00:330:00:38

in the cathedral, Cornwall's most spectacular building.

0:00:380:00:43

And just look at all the people who've turned out.

0:00:430:00:45

I always like to get out there nice and early to get a first glimpse of what people have brought along

0:00:450:00:50

and I'm never alone. Our team of experts are there to make sure we don't miss a thing.

0:00:500:00:55

These have not been used for years.

0:00:550:00:58

Today, they're headed up by those Flog It! stalwarts David Fletcher and David Barby.

0:00:580:01:03

Both are very experienced auctioneers and valuers, so our crowd are in safe hands.

0:01:030:01:08

-What did you think? 100 quid?

-A little bit more, up in three figures, yes.

0:01:080:01:13

Coming up on the programme, we make plenty of interesting discoveries.

0:01:130:01:17

Any child would have been delighted to have owned this.

0:01:170:01:21

But they aren't always everybody's cup of tea.

0:01:230:01:25

I think they're absolutely awful, awful. And this one, the same.

0:01:250:01:29

-Do you like amethyst?

-I've not reached that age yet.

0:01:290:01:33

-It's an age thing, is it?

-For me it is!

0:01:330:01:35

I think you'll have to agree, our venue today is absolutely stunning.

0:01:370:01:42

It really is. It's an architectural delight.

0:01:420:01:44

There's such a feel-good factor

0:01:440:01:45

inside Truro City Cathedral.

0:01:450:01:47

But not only that, there's an air of anticipation and excitement, because any one of these people

0:01:470:01:51

could have something in their bag that's worth a small fortune and we're going to find out.

0:01:510:01:56

It doesn't take David Barby long to spot these quirky porcelain figures brought in by Susan.

0:02:000:02:07

These are delightful collectors' items.

0:02:070:02:10

Have they been pride of place at home?

0:02:100:02:12

Pride of place in a shoebox.

0:02:120:02:14

In a shoebox! Why in a shoebox?

0:02:140:02:16

-Downsizing, nowhere to display them any more.

-How did you get them?

0:02:160:02:21

They were given to me by my neighbour a long time ago, because she knew I liked little things.

0:02:210:02:28

-We used to help her out and she popped round with something small for Sue's collection.

-How lovely.

0:02:280:02:32

Yes, she was very, very sweet.

0:02:320:02:35

These are Royal Worcester porcelain and they were produced

0:02:350:02:39

towards the end of the 19th, beginning of the 20th century.

0:02:390:02:42

They're candle snuffers.

0:02:420:02:44

-Yes.

-You put out candles with these delightful little objects.

0:02:440:02:47

Now they've become collectible.

0:02:470:02:49

Colourations are very good and do affect the value of these pieces.

0:02:490:02:54

What I like is you've got the puce tartan shawl around this gentleman,

0:02:540:02:59

and then you've got the floral decorated nightcap, which is rather nice.

0:02:590:03:03

People collect these models, depending on the colouration.

0:03:030:03:07

Particularly Mr Caudle, because his shawl varies from one model to another.

0:03:070:03:11

The most expensive one that has been sold is £360 and that was for a gentlemen with a pink nightcap.

0:03:120:03:19

He's only got a bordered one. Mrs Caudle always looks as miserable as ever.

0:03:190:03:25

She does, doesn't she?

0:03:250:03:27

I'm hoping if she's not kept in a dark shoebox, she might cheer up a bit.

0:03:270:03:32

That could be the case. But they're rather nice. I'd think if these go up for auction,

0:03:320:03:36

we're looking at around about £140 to £160, that sort of range.

0:03:360:03:41

The other little object you brought along I found fascinating.

0:03:410:03:45

You've never liked that, have you?

0:03:450:03:47

-I like the fact that it's small but it's not my colours.

-It's not your colours.

0:03:470:03:52

I say you've never liked it because you've never polished up the silver around the edge.

0:03:520:03:56

No. I didn't realise it was silver. In my defence, I didn't realise it was silver.

0:03:560:04:01

There are the marks of the silver here.

0:04:010:04:03

It's a Chester hallmark and the date for that is 1897.

0:04:030:04:07

This little object, what would you use it for?

0:04:070:04:10

-It's got a silver rim to stop the chipping.

-Right.

0:04:100:04:15

You put something in there.

0:04:150:04:18

Yes.

0:04:180:04:19

This could be a gentleman's piece and just imagine of an evening,

0:04:190:04:24

they'd have their pipes and smoked away and may have had cheese or something to eat.

0:04:240:04:30

Little toothpicks for cleaning their teeth.

0:04:300:04:33

Right.

0:04:330:04:36

-That's my theory.

-It's not a feminine thing, is it?

0:04:360:04:38

I don't think so.

0:04:380:04:40

It's quite a butch, masculine piece.

0:04:400:04:42

Yes.

0:04:420:04:44

As regards value, not a large amount, £15 to £20 at the most.

0:04:440:04:48

-We may well get the auctioneer to put the whole lot together.

-Really?

0:04:480:04:54

If he puts them together,

0:04:540:04:56

I'd like to see an estimate in the region of about £150 to £170.

0:04:560:05:03

You'd need to reserve it at roundabout...£140.

0:05:030:05:09

-Is that acceptable?

-Yes, that's fine.

0:05:090:05:12

I think they're lovely collectible items and I only hope that someone in that saleroom is like-minded.

0:05:120:05:17

Yes.

0:05:170:05:19

Well, they certainly won't appeal to everyone but let's hope

0:05:190:05:20

David's enthusiasm isn't snuffed out at the auction room.

0:05:200:05:25

David Fletcher's found a much prettier prospect, an attractive brooch, belonging to Sandra.

0:05:250:05:29

Thank you for bringing this brooch along to us today.

0:05:290:05:33

-What's its history?

-It was a gift from my uncle to my aunt.

0:05:330:05:36

They're both now deceased.

0:05:360:05:38

-How long ago did your aunt die?

-Six years ago.

0:05:380:05:42

It must have been owned by an ancestor of your uncle or he'd have bought it for your aunt.

0:05:420:05:47

-I think he'd have bought it, yes.

-It would certainly predate both of their lifetimes.

0:05:470:05:52

-Right.

-In as much as it would have been made in the late 19th century.

0:05:520:05:56

-Right.

-Do you know what the stone is?

-I believe it to be amethyst.

0:05:560:05:59

It's an amethyst, you're right. Do you like amethysts?

0:05:590:06:03

I do but I haven't reached that age yet.

0:06:030:06:05

-It's an age thing, is it?

-For me it is!

-When do you start wearing amethysts?

0:06:050:06:11

When you're are about 70 or 80.

0:06:110:06:15

-I've just bought my girlfriend an amethyst brooch.

-Sorry!

-I shall have to take it back.

0:06:150:06:21

I love it. I know it's not everyone's taste a brooch like this

0:06:240:06:28

but it speaks so much of its time. The Victorians liked jewellery like this

0:06:280:06:33

and it's the sort of jewellery which people buy today either to dress up or to dress down.

0:06:330:06:38

You could wear it if you're going out for the evening for dinner

0:06:380:06:41

-and equally you could wear it on a T-shirt with a pair of jeans.

-Yes.

0:06:410:06:45

The appeal is enduring.

0:06:450:06:47

The amethyst itself is large and it's rather conservatively

0:06:470:06:52

but nicely cut so it reflects the light well.

0:06:520:06:54

It's quite a good colour.

0:06:540:06:57

Possibly a bit too light for some people.

0:06:570:06:59

I think a slightly darker shade would be more widely acceptable.

0:06:590:07:04

It's beautifully mounted in this gold filigree setting.

0:07:040:07:08

And around it's a band of seed pearls.

0:07:080:07:11

Do you have anything in mind for the money?

0:07:110:07:13

My French holiday with my husband.

0:07:130:07:16

A holiday in France, OK. Jolly good.

0:07:160:07:19

-It's not going to pay for the holiday.

-No.

0:07:190:07:22

It'll buy you dinner or some sort of souvenir.

0:07:220:07:25

-That would do.

-Good.

0:07:250:07:26

I'd have expected it to make between £80 to £120.

0:07:260:07:29

Right.

0:07:290:07:31

A good old Flog It! estimate.

0:07:310:07:32

I'd suggest a reserve of £75.

0:07:320:07:35

-Yes, that would be lovely.

-Is that all right by you?

0:07:350:07:39

-Yes, that's fine.

-So we'll go ahead on that basis and I'll look forward to seeing you at the sale.

0:07:390:07:42

-OK, thank you very much.

-See you there.

0:07:420:07:45

So would be au revoir for the brooch?

0:07:450:07:47

We'll find out later. There are still plenty more things to see.

0:07:470:07:52

Hello, what's your name?

0:07:520:07:54

-My name is Anne.

-What have you brought along today?

0:07:540:07:56

We've brought...

0:07:560:07:59

This has given to me, left to be by my aunt.

0:07:590:08:03

-This is nice.

-She's written...

0:08:030:08:05

-Postcards, 1926.

-Yes.

0:08:050:08:08

Where do you live in Cornwall?

0:08:080:08:10

I live in Four Lanes, Redruth.

0:08:100:08:12

I know. Right in the centre of Cornwall.

0:08:120:08:15

Yes, a lovely part. Lovely part.

0:08:150:08:18

-Who's the family, do you know?

-No, I don't know who these are,

0:08:180:08:21

I've left it just as she did it.

0:08:210:08:23

-Do you watch Flog It! regularly?

-Regularly.

0:08:230:08:25

You see how much photograph albums fetch, don't you?

0:08:250:08:28

This is sort of lost social history and civic pride. All these buildings that don't exist any more.

0:08:280:08:34

It's hard to put a value on these but we find, in general, some of these albums fetch £200 to £300,

0:08:340:08:41

some fetch £400 to £600, it depends how many there are.

0:08:410:08:44

If there are 200 to 200, you'll easily get a couple of hundred pounds.

0:08:440:08:46

Good luck with these.

0:08:460:08:48

Thank you.

0:08:480:08:50

It's always fascinating, there might just be one postcard that could be an awful lot of money.

0:08:500:08:55

Anne and Jack are showing David Barby a beautiful Ruskin bowl to value.

0:08:560:09:01

So, it's Anne

0:09:010:09:03

-with an E. No way.

-No, thank you.

0:09:030:09:07

No E. Ann. And this is Jack.

0:09:070:09:09

Jack, that's me, yes.

0:09:090:09:11

Who brought this into the marriage?

0:09:110:09:13

-I did.

-You did.

0:09:130:09:15

-From my parents.

-From your parents.

-Yeah.

0:09:150:09:18

-How long have they had it?

-They were given it when they walked around the factory in 1930.

0:09:180:09:24

So it's never been bought, it was given.

0:09:240:09:27

-Do you admire it?

-I love it.

-Why?

0:09:270:09:30

Love it. The colouration.

0:09:300:09:33

It's like a bird's egg really, isn't it?

0:09:330:09:35

Well, that's true. It's very nice.

0:09:350:09:38

I always love these glazes.

0:09:380:09:40

Of course, Howson Taylor's factory, which was called Ruskin because he was a devote of Ruskin, John Ruskin.

0:09:400:09:48

He called the factory in honour of John Ruskin, the Ruskin Factory.

0:09:480:09:53

-I see, yeah.

-He specialised in a Chinese glazes.

0:09:530:09:56

This isn't the top range.

0:09:560:10:00

No, I realise that.

0:10:000:10:02

-Do you know why, Jack?

-No idea.

0:10:020:10:04

The actual glazes that make the money are the flambe glazes.

0:10:040:10:10

When you look at these red tones, you can almost see flickering lights and flames.

0:10:100:10:14

This is one of his experimental ranges, where he used crystalline glazes but I like the shade.

0:10:140:10:23

It's very much part and parcel of the Art Deco period.

0:10:230:10:28

Why are you selling this?

0:10:280:10:30

Well, we've got so many children, none of them want any money.

0:10:300:10:35

They want us to enjoy ourselves.

0:10:350:10:38

I've looked at it for...

0:10:380:10:41

77 years.

0:10:410:10:44

So I've really enjoyed it.

0:10:440:10:46

It's beautiful and I'd love it to go to somebody who can really appreciate a thing of beauty.

0:10:460:10:51

I think that's a very good attitude. Now let's talk about money.

0:10:510:10:55

As I said, it's not top of the range.

0:10:550:10:57

-No.

-Top of the range, £800 to £1,000, if not more.

0:10:570:11:01

If it borders on £100, £150, I shall be delighted.

0:11:010:11:07

-I think we're looking £60 to £80 on this type of Ruskin.

-Yes.

0:11:070:11:13

At that sort of level, you might say to yourself, "What can I do with that money?"

0:11:130:11:16

-What would you do with it?

-Sequence dancing, a holiday most likely.

0:11:160:11:21

-A holiday.

-So you're both sequence dancers.

-We are. Yes.

0:11:210:11:25

I was absolutely fascinated just before Christmas, I went cruising.

0:11:250:11:27

Oh, right.

0:11:270:11:29

On the cruise, there was sequence dancing and to see all these people go backwards and forwards...

0:11:290:11:35

-Oh, yes.

-At the same moment, the same beat of the music, it was incredible.

0:11:350:11:40

That's lovely.

0:11:400:11:41

Beautiful. That's what we do.

0:11:410:11:43

This will buy some refreshments in between.

0:11:430:11:44

That's free normally.

0:11:440:11:48

Jack, thank you very much for bringing Ann along.

0:11:480:11:52

And the vase as well. You're both coming to the auction, are you?

0:11:520:11:55

-Yes, please.

-I shall look forward to seeing you there and let's hope we can get over that £100 barrier.

0:11:550:12:00

Yes, that would be wonderful.

0:12:000:12:03

-Thank you very much.

-More than I thought.

0:12:030:12:04

So, now we have got three lots ready to go under the hammer.

0:12:050:12:08

Mr and Mrs Caudle, the Royal Worcester candle snuffers,

0:12:100:12:14

along with what David thinks might be a toothpick holder.

0:12:140:12:16

Sandra is hoping to enter a purple patch with the sale of her amethyst brooch.

0:12:190:12:24

And will Ann and Jack's Ruskin bowl dance away at the auction?

0:12:240:12:27

For the sale, we've travelled north to Lostwithiel, the home of Jeffreys Auctions.

0:12:300:12:34

Partner Ian Morris will be leading the proceedings.

0:12:340:12:36

His saleroom charges 15% commission, plus VAT,

0:12:360:12:41

to the sellers and buyers.

0:12:410:12:43

Sandra's first in the hot seat.

0:12:430:12:46

A wonderful little brooch up for grabs, £80 to £120. Put on by our expert David.

0:12:460:12:51

I know the money is going towards a French holiday.

0:12:510:12:54

You thought this is a brooch more suitable for an older person.

0:12:540:12:58

-Yes.

-I thought this would suit any age.

0:12:580:13:00

You can dress it up, you can dress it down.

0:13:000:13:02

It's a lovely brooch.

0:13:020:13:04

It's just not me.

0:13:040:13:07

-No, I understand.

-It's definitely somebody's in this room because there are lots of lady, aren't they?

0:13:070:13:12

It's packed. Let's find out what they think. Here we go.

0:13:120:13:14

Late 19th century brooch. Pretty little brooch. Can I say £80?

0:13:170:13:20

£50 away.

0:13:200:13:22

£40, I'm bid. I'll take 5.

0:13:220:13:26

-£40 I'm bid. 45, 50...

-Getting there.

0:13:260:13:30

-60, 65, at 65, at 65, 70 now.

-Come on, where are the ladies?

0:13:300:13:35

70, we're done. 65!

0:13:350:13:39

Didn't sell it.

0:13:390:13:41

Close.

0:13:410:13:43

No, it's too precious to me to give away.

0:13:450:13:50

I don't blame you, always protect things with a reserve.

0:13:500:13:53

Make sure you stick a fixed reserve on.

0:13:530:13:56

Sandra gets to keep her amethyst brooch but will we be able to sell

0:13:580:14:02

our next lot, those candle snuffers and that tiny silver-rimmed tanker?

0:14:020:14:07

Next up, we've got some quality, a great name, Royal Worcester, and hopefully it'll fly away.

0:14:070:14:11

It belongs to Susan and it's the husband and wife, the miniatures.

0:14:110:14:14

£150 to £170, a tight estimate.

0:14:140:14:19

I hope so. It's Mr and Mrs Caudle.

0:14:190:14:21

There are recognisable characters.

0:14:210:14:25

And they've been kept in a shoebox, haven't they? Why in a shoebox?

0:14:250:14:29

Because I had to downsize and I no longer had my china cupboard.

0:14:290:14:35

You're packing things away into boxes.

0:14:350:14:37

Have you moved now?

0:14:370:14:39

-Yes, I've moved now.

-You're enjoying the new space?

0:14:390:14:41

-Very much so.

-The neighbours lovely?

0:14:410:14:43

-Yes.

-Good. Hopefully we can find a new home for Mr and Mrs Caudle,

0:14:430:14:46

right here and right now because they're going under the hammer.

0:14:460:14:49

Two Royal Worcester candle snuffers, husband and wife. Dalton at Lambeth.

0:14:510:14:55

A miniature silver-rimmed, willow pattern tankard. Can I take 150 away.

0:14:550:14:58

£100 away?

0:14:580:15:00

£80 I'm bid. At £80 I'm bid.

0:15:000:15:02

I'll take 90.

0:15:020:15:04

90, 100, 110, 120?

0:15:040:15:07

120, 130, 140? 140, 150?

0:15:070:15:12

140 here.

0:15:120:15:14

145, 150, 155?

0:15:140:15:18

155, 160, 165.

0:15:180:15:22

165? At 165.

0:15:220:15:25

Come on! A bit more!

0:15:250:15:27

At 165.

0:15:280:15:29

Yes! 165, that's brilliant.

0:15:300:15:33

A very good result.

0:15:330:15:34

-Very pleased.

-Was that halfway between my estimate?

0:15:340:15:37

You were spot-on, weren't you?

0:15:370:15:38

All I want to know is how did he know that? How did you know that?

0:15:380:15:42

They are recognisable, according for that sort of money.

0:15:420:15:45

We had that additional item, didn't we?

0:15:450:15:49

-Hopefully that will help towards doing the house up and bits and pieces.

-The garden.

0:15:490:15:54

Are you a keen gardener?

0:15:540:15:55

No. Not at all.

0:15:550:15:58

So, Mr and Mrs Caudle and the tiny tankard have escaped their shoebox for good.

0:15:580:16:02

But will Ann and Jack be saying goodbye to their Ruskin bowl?

0:16:020:16:06

Next up, that fabulous Ruskin bowl, a great name.

0:16:060:16:09

Studio pottery, it belongs to Ann and Jack and hopefully

0:16:090:16:12

they can get their dancing shoes on after this.

0:16:120:16:14

That's where the money is going, isn't it? Towards the dancing.

0:16:140:16:18

Tell us about that.

0:16:180:16:19

We go twice a week.

0:16:190:16:21

Keeps you fit, doesn't it?

0:16:210:16:23

-Very fit.

-How long have you been doing it for?

0:16:230:16:26

-Since 1991.

-'91 we started.

0:16:260:16:28

You must be pretty good then.

0:16:280:16:30

-Yes, thank you.

-Bless.

0:16:300:16:33

-We love it.

-OK, hopefully we get the top end.

0:16:330:16:36

Ruskin is a great name, a wonderful collectible and we should be getting £80, shouldn't we, for this?

0:16:360:16:41

We should. It's the thing I advise people strongly to collect this.

0:16:410:16:45

The line, the colour.

0:16:450:16:48

Let's find out what happens, shall we?

0:16:480:16:49

-Here we go.

-Ruskin model blue and brown glazed circular bowl.

0:16:510:16:54

A nice Ruskin bowl.

0:16:540:16:57

Can I say £50 to start me? £30?

0:16:570:17:00

At £30. 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60,

0:17:000:17:06

£60, the bid's to my left.

0:17:060:17:08

In the middle. £70, 75? Yes, £75.

0:17:080:17:12

80, 85, 90,

0:17:120:17:15

at £85 in a middle. 90 now? Are we all done?

0:17:150:17:20

At £85, spot on.

0:17:200:17:24

Yet again. David is on form today.

0:17:240:17:26

£85. Very, very good.

0:17:260:17:29

That will keep you dancing for a few years.

0:17:290:17:32

David Barby walks out of the sale room with a good set of results

0:17:340:17:37

and his luck seems set to continue later in the programme.

0:17:370:17:40

This man is on fire!

0:17:400:17:43

Right now though, I'm off to shed some light on some old-time magic.

0:17:440:17:47

There was once a form of entertainment that for

0:17:560:17:58

over 200 years ignited the imagination of generations.

0:17:580:18:02

The magic lantern show enthralled and mesmerised its audiences

0:18:020:18:06

by allowing them a glimpse into an extraordinary fantasy world.

0:18:060:18:10

And the wonderful thing is, that tradition is being kept alive.

0:18:120:18:15

David and Eunice Aylesbury have been collecting lanterns and slides

0:18:170:18:21

for more than 30 years and regularly put on shows.

0:18:210:18:25

I've come to see them and have a private viewing.

0:18:250:18:27

David and Eunice, I don't know what to look at first.

0:18:280:18:31

Where do you find all this stuff from?

0:18:310:18:35

When we started collecting, we found lanterns first of all.

0:18:350:18:40

And then with the lantern would come a box of slides.

0:18:400:18:42

They came from all sorts of places.

0:18:420:18:45

We found lanterns in churches, boot sales as well in those days.

0:18:450:18:49

And all the slides seem to be around the same time

0:18:490:18:53

so consequently, our collections pretty well late Victorian.

0:18:530:18:56

It's all about 1880 to 1900.

0:18:560:19:01

Some of the early ones, they're all hand-painted, aren't they?

0:19:010:19:03

The early ones are hand-painted, yes.

0:19:030:19:05

Hand-painted, early slide,

0:19:080:19:10

showing Roman races.

0:19:100:19:12

Beautiful. I guess in their heyday, they would have employed the best sort of miniature portrait artists.

0:19:120:19:18

They would have done in the early days but when they

0:19:180:19:21

started to mass produce slides, that was a different matter.

0:19:210:19:25

These are wonderful educational tools.

0:19:250:19:26

It was used as an educational tool and for social reform.

0:19:260:19:31

We think we have a problem today with alcohol, it was horrendous then.

0:19:310:19:35

It was so cheap, let's face it.

0:19:350:19:37

That was down to the Georgians, every sort of third shop out of seven was a gin palace or a bar.

0:19:370:19:44

We have a typical little set here.

0:19:440:19:46

We have one here where we see that chap is spending all of his time

0:19:460:19:50

in the pub.

0:19:500:19:52

The obvious effect of that is

0:19:520:19:55

the workhouse. But he goes along to a temperance meeting and he's inspired.

0:19:550:20:00

Learns the error of his ways.

0:20:000:20:02

And he signs up -

0:20:020:20:03

sign the pledge tonight.

0:20:030:20:06

You can imagine that, big on the wall.

0:20:060:20:09

These shows were remarkable but the lantern men needed new ideas to keep the audiences excited.

0:20:110:20:17

The public wanted action and the next development in the slides gave them exactly that.

0:20:170:20:23

These are rack-work slides.

0:20:230:20:27

You have a background scene printed on the glass and as I turn

0:20:270:20:30

the handle, so the sails of the windmill turn.

0:20:300:20:33

Oh, yes, I see it.

0:20:330:20:35

The wind changes and you can make them turn the other way.

0:20:350:20:38

-That's it.

-This one is like a kaleidoscope of colour.

0:20:410:20:44

Yes, this is what we call a chromotope.

0:20:440:20:48

There are many variations of these.

0:20:480:20:50

They came in roughly again about 1850.

0:20:500:20:53

They were the highlight of many Victorian shows and they have counter-rotating glasses.

0:20:550:21:00

They called them indoor fireworks.

0:21:000:21:01

What's this? You've got two boxes here.

0:21:070:21:10

Yes, this one links to shadow theatre.

0:21:100:21:13

Two little copper figures and they go into the projector upside down.

0:21:130:21:18

And operate them here.

0:21:180:21:20

If you hold the little bit and you grab that one.

0:21:200:21:24

OK. We can make them box.

0:21:240:21:26

Have a punch-up.

0:21:260:21:28

And this is the favourite when we work in schools.

0:21:300:21:32

This is the one the children like best.

0:21:320:21:35

Do you have any favourite items you'd like to point out?

0:21:350:21:38

One which is a favourite with audiences and was in Victorian times, was this one.

0:21:380:21:44

This is arguably the most famous lantern slide ever produced.

0:21:440:21:47

-Is it really?

-It's called the man swallowing rats.

0:21:470:21:52

It shows an old man asleep in bed. You explain, Eunice.

0:21:520:21:56

There are two movements here. The lever will make the man's mouth open and close as if he's snoring.

0:21:560:22:03

And on this side here, the mouse will creep up across the counterpane and straight into his mouth.

0:22:030:22:10

And then he chews it up.

0:22:100:22:12

That's when your audience explodes with laughter.

0:22:120:22:16

Well, you hope.

0:22:160:22:18

I've been in an awful lot of auction rooms in my time but I've never seen at the quality you've got here.

0:22:180:22:23

This is very good.

0:22:230:22:24

Do you have to recondition your lanterns?

0:22:260:22:29

Not necessarily. One can get brass relacquered

0:22:290:22:33

but my personal feeling is if it's in reasonable condition, leave it alone.

0:22:330:22:37

This lantern opens up at the back here.

0:22:370:22:40

Lift this one across.

0:22:400:22:43

And this is the oil lantern for it.

0:22:430:22:46

If you hold on to that, yeah, I'll lift it up here.

0:22:460:22:50

They're your burners.

0:22:520:22:54

Underneath here, we have three parallel wicks

0:22:540:22:58

and when they're lit, and adjusted, they come up to a point.

0:22:580:23:02

It's a point source of light, which you need for projection.

0:23:020:23:05

It goes into the back of the lantern like so.

0:23:050:23:09

And having lit it, one can put the chimney on and extend it to get a good draught up through it.

0:23:090:23:14

Everything is so well thought of!

0:23:140:23:18

There we are and we have an oil-burning lantern.

0:23:180:23:21

-How crude is that and yet it can make the most wonderful projection on the wall.

-That's it.

0:23:210:23:25

Thank you so much for showing me around, especially

0:23:290:23:32

for showing me how a magic lantern works because I never knew.

0:23:320:23:34

And thank goodness you've got this collection.

0:23:340:23:36

Just before I go, though, I've got a couple of pence in my pocket, I have to pay you.

0:23:360:23:41

We'll put the lights out and put the screen up and have a quick picture show. Shall we do that?

0:23:410:23:46

OK.

0:23:460:23:48

We're holding our valuation day in Truro's stunning cathedral in Cornwall.

0:24:390:24:43

It's been a busy day and there's still a crowded room.

0:24:430:24:46

David Fletcher's imagination is well and truly captured by a magical garden he spotted in the crowd.

0:24:460:24:51

Isn't this wonderful?

0:24:510:24:53

Fantasy is so much more fun than the real thing, isn't it?

0:24:530:24:56

Yes, it is.

0:24:560:24:59

This is a real fantasy garden.

0:24:590:25:00

Any child would have been delighted to have owned this

0:25:000:25:06

and to have wandered in their imagination through this garden, under these trees, shaken hands

0:25:060:25:12

perhaps with some of the people, even joined these little children here climbing this flagpole.

0:25:120:25:18

Amazing.

0:25:180:25:20

What can you tell me about it?

0:25:200:25:22

How did you come to own it?

0:25:220:25:23

Well, it was my grandmother's and my mother had it

0:25:230:25:28

and then my mother handed it on to me.

0:25:280:25:31

So it goes back

0:25:310:25:34

donkey's years in the family.

0:25:340:25:35

It does, it's possible that my grandmother had it

0:25:350:25:38

when she was young, which would have been about 1870.

0:25:380:25:43

I must say, I'm at a bit of a loss as to how to date it.

0:25:430:25:46

So often these lead models like this are late 19th century

0:25:460:25:53

but I think this is a bit earlier than that. I say that for two or three reasons really.

0:25:530:25:58

Firstly, the nature of the decoration of this fencing

0:25:580:26:03

looks to me very much in the manner of

0:26:030:26:06

architects and designers like Pugin and the costume looks mid-Victorian rather than late Victorian.

0:26:060:26:14

-There's something of Dickens about it really, isn't there?

-Yes.

0:26:140:26:18

I'm inclined to say mid-19th century.

0:26:180:26:22

The key to it really lies in us being able to ascertain who the manufacturer was.

0:26:220:26:30

If we did a bit of research,

0:26:300:26:32

and we asked the auctioneer to do that, we'll be able to find out

0:26:320:26:35

who made this little set because this piece is marked.

0:26:350:26:41

I can't read what it says underneath.

0:26:420:26:44

I'm pretty say certain it's in German.

0:26:440:26:46

-That would make sense. I think it's of German manufacture.

-Right.

0:26:480:26:52

Why are you selling it after all these years?

0:26:520:26:56

Well, because it stays in its box and I haven't got anywhere to display it

0:26:560:27:01

and I brought it in because I really didn't know what it was.

0:27:010:27:05

-Have you got grandchildren?

-Yes but they aren't the sort

0:27:050:27:09

who would want to play with it.

0:27:090:27:12

So it's time now to think about what it might make.

0:27:120:27:15

I've not seen anything like this in all my years.

0:27:150:27:20

I'd like to suggest an estimate of £60 to £100.

0:27:200:27:24

Right.

0:27:240:27:26

And a reserve just below the bottom estimate of £50.

0:27:260:27:30

-Right, yes.

-OK? And I look forward to seeing you at the sale and we hope that it does better than that.

0:27:300:27:37

-Thank you very much, yes, lovely.

-Thank you. Jolly good.

0:27:370:27:39

Have you brought anything in today?

0:27:440:27:46

We did but Mr Barby didn't think they were worth more than £200 so we're keeping them.

0:27:460:27:50

Oh, Mr Barby, isn't he a meanie?

0:27:500:27:54

I hope he's got some better news for Lynn who's keen to offload her items.

0:27:540:27:59

Lynn, this is quite an extraordinary mixture.

0:27:590:28:02

Why have you brought them along? What's the reason?

0:28:020:28:04

These were my great grandmother's

0:28:040:28:08

and they've never really been out on display or anything like that.

0:28:080:28:11

-Why?

-Because I don't like them.

-You don't like them!

0:28:110:28:15

I think they're absolutely awful, awful. And this one the same really.

0:28:150:28:19

-It's just not to my taste. We've got an old cottage.

-Right, right.

0:28:190:28:24

I've tried with these but they

0:28:240:28:25

don't look right. It's not such an endearing subject, I don't think.

0:28:250:28:31

-What, these little...

-These cherubs.

0:28:310:28:33

I've been to several homes recently

0:28:330:28:36

where the ladies of the household have decorated rooms with sort of fairy

0:28:360:28:41

or children subjects, so these would be quite acceptable to them.

0:28:410:28:46

Actually, we call these petits - little children.

0:28:460:28:50

-Yes.

-Here you have a selection with musical instruments.

0:28:500:28:55

Here, you have children with an adopted dolphin here.

0:28:550:28:59

Who painted them and where did they come from?

0:28:590:29:01

There was one particular company, Minton's,

0:29:010:29:04

that had a factory at Kensington Gore and there was a gentleman there called Coleman, who often

0:29:040:29:11

did this type of decoration.

0:29:110:29:14

Now, these are plaques and at one time, they might have been mounted.

0:29:140:29:19

Don't go yuck! In velvet mounts all the way around

0:29:190:29:25

and then hung on the wall.

0:29:250:29:26

Because otherwise, they would have no purpose. How would you

0:29:260:29:29

attach them to the wall? So, we've established you don't like these.

0:29:290:29:32

-Not really, no.

-Are you a modern girl?

-Not really, no, I'm not.

0:29:320:29:35

What sort of decorative items do you put in your home?

0:29:350:29:37

-Lots of Victorian.

-Staffordshire figures and things?

0:29:370:29:41

Yes, I've got lots of Copeland Spode china, that kind of thing.

0:29:410:29:46

I can understand why you've brought this piece along, which is Paul pottery.

0:29:460:29:49

It's far too modern.

0:29:490:29:50

-It very jazzy, isn't it?

-Very, very.

0:29:500:29:53

Paul pottery of this nature are very much in vogue.

0:29:530:29:57

-Yes.

-Oranges and turquoise and washed-our whites, and I prefer that to these.

0:29:570:30:04

I think I do as well.

0:30:040:30:06

So we've got to sell these, the two contrasts together.

0:30:060:30:09

I think, when they go through to auction,

0:30:090:30:12

the auction house will say, right, we'll sell these as a pair and we'll sell that separately.

0:30:120:30:19

-OK.

-The two plaques,

0:30:190:30:22

I think will sell for something in the region

0:30:220:30:25

of maybe £70 to £120 that sort of range.

0:30:250:30:30

-Yeah.

-The Paul pottery I think will sell for £20 to £40.

0:30:300:30:35

-Right.

-Would that be agreeable?

0:30:350:30:37

-It would, yes.

-No regrets?

0:30:370:30:39

No, not at all.

0:30:390:30:41

-Family history going.

-That's all right, I'll have more space in the cupboard.

0:30:410:30:44

I hope for Lynn's sake, someone at the sale likes them rather more than she does.

0:30:440:30:50

So many different things to see.

0:30:520:30:54

You'd be surprised what turns up at our valuation days and I can

0:30:540:30:57

just dip along here and find all sorts of curios. What's your name?

0:30:570:31:02

-Michael.

-Mike, hello. Can I have a look at these?

0:31:020:31:04

They do say you can tell a man's profession by what cane he'd carry and the way he'd walk with it.

0:31:040:31:10

Especially the silver-ended canes, the rather fanciful ones.

0:31:100:31:14

Doctors and lawyers would have such a walking cane.

0:31:140:31:17

Isn't that nice? A rural, country one, a dog lover.

0:31:170:31:20

It's a nice bit of yew wood. He's a boxer dog.

0:31:200:31:24

That's Victorian and worth around £60 to £100 on the right day.

0:31:250:31:30

What's this one?

0:31:300:31:32

I thought that was ivory for a minute but it's resin.

0:31:400:31:42

It's a resin head so

0:31:420:31:45

not a great deal of value on that one.

0:31:450:31:48

Nevertheless, it's a good old, sturdy stick, isn't it?

0:31:480:31:51

I'd put a value of £40 to £50.

0:31:510:31:55

What's this one?

0:31:550:31:57

This is unusual, isn't it?

0:31:570:31:58

That to me looks north African.

0:32:000:32:03

Sort of late 19th century.

0:32:030:32:05

I was thinking that.

0:32:050:32:07

With all that wirework.

0:32:070:32:09

It's not a club or a mace, I don't think.

0:32:090:32:12

It's more ceremonial,

0:32:120:32:15

a fashion statement.

0:32:150:32:17

Nevertheless, it does make a nice walking cane, doesn't it?

0:32:170:32:20

-Do you collect canes?

-I do, yes.

0:32:200:32:22

-How many have you got?

-About 30.

0:32:220:32:24

Wow. How do you display 30?

0:32:240:32:26

What to do with them?

0:32:260:32:28

They're in a walking-stick stand, which my wife hates because she has to dust them.

0:32:280:32:33

She said take them along to Flog It!

0:32:330:32:35

I saw a wonderful way of displaying walking canes and it's a good tip because if you've got half-a-dozen

0:32:350:32:42

and don't know what to do with them, they don't look very nice like that.

0:32:420:32:45

On the wall that way, mounted on brackets like say a Victorian whip rack,

0:32:450:32:49

on the wall one above the other, they look beautiful.

0:32:490:32:52

It's a silhouette of art then going on. You can pick them

0:32:520:32:56

-off and muse with them.

-A good idea.

0:32:560:32:59

That's lovely.

0:32:590:33:00

Maybe if James takes my advice, his wife might be more than happy to have them around the house.

0:33:000:33:07

David's next item has transported him back to a more glamorous era.

0:33:070:33:10

In the 18th century, if you had a cup of tea, you did it in style.

0:33:110:33:16

-Yes.

-You didn't go and pour boiling water into your mug, splash a bit of milk in afterwards,

0:33:160:33:21

you brought the milk in in a jug like this.

0:33:210:33:24

This is a beautiful thing.

0:33:240:33:26

It's in the neo-classical style, which means that it's in the manner

0:33:260:33:31

of the classical period, the period of ancient Rome and ancient Greece.

0:33:310:33:36

It's basically in the form of a Roman or a Greek vase.

0:33:360:33:41

-The material of course is silver. How long have you owned it?

-For about 30, 32 years.

0:33:410:33:49

You don't use it?

0:33:490:33:51

-No.

-You're fed up with cleaning up.

0:33:510:33:54

I don't clean it because it's in a box.

0:33:540:33:56

-Right.

-It's hidden away.

-It's hidden away.

-Nobody is appreciating it.

0:33:560:34:01

-You've decided to sell it.

-Yes.

0:34:010:34:04

Good for you. Let's have a little look at the hallmarks.

0:34:040:34:07

The hallmarks are your guarantee of quality.

0:34:070:34:11

There are four of them. The first is the lion standing on all fours.

0:34:110:34:14

That's the sterling mark that tells us that it's silver.

0:34:140:34:17

The second is the leopard's head, which tells us it was assayed in London.

0:34:170:34:23

In this instance the leopard's head is crowned which means it was assayed before 1821.

0:34:230:34:27

The third mark is the data letter, a little B,

0:34:270:34:31

which tells us it was assayed in 1777.

0:34:310:34:35

I think it's the oldest thing I've seen here today.

0:34:350:34:37

The fourth mark are the initials of the maker.

0:34:370:34:41

The gauge itself isn't particularly heavy.

0:34:410:34:44

It weighs about three and a half ounces, which for a silver jug of this period is relatively light.

0:34:440:34:52

The quality of workmanship is very good.

0:34:520:34:54

You can still see the hammer marks used by the silversmith when he was actually making this.

0:34:540:35:01

I'd just mention things like this stiff-leaf decoration

0:35:010:35:06

on the cap of the handle.

0:35:060:35:09

This is called a scroll handle of course.

0:35:090:35:11

-I think this will make between £100 and £150.

-Yes.

0:35:110:35:16

Georgian silver milk jugs of this type aren't scarce but they're collectible.

0:35:160:35:23

So, let's assume it makes £100.

0:35:230:35:26

-Yes.

-What would you do with the money then?

0:35:260:35:28

Probably buy a nice pair of earrings or something like that.

0:35:280:35:30

OK, so you'll roll it over. In ten years' time, when Flog It!

0:35:300:35:33

-next comes to Truro, bring those back to us and we'll sell those for you.

-OK, thank you very much.

0:35:330:35:38

Thank you.

0:35:380:35:39

That concludes our search for items to take off to auction

0:35:390:35:45

so alas we have to take leave of this fantastic building. It's been such a privilege

0:35:450:35:47

to hold our event here.

0:35:470:35:51

We're in Lostwithiel for the sale and here's what we're selling.

0:35:510:35:55

The intriguing model garden, that three generations of Margaret family have played with.

0:35:550:36:01

The Minton plates and Paul bowl, which are being sold as two separate lots.

0:36:010:36:07

And lastly, the 18th century silver milk jug brought in by Rosalind.

0:36:070:36:13

It's a packed saleroom, in fact there's barely any space to move.

0:36:130:36:17

Surely out of all these people,

0:36:170:36:20

someone is going to want those Victorian plates rather more than Lynn.

0:36:200:36:24

I've been joined by the owner Lynn, who is looking fabulous and daughter, Emma.

0:36:240:36:28

-So you're supporting Mum today.

-I'm supporting her today.

0:36:280:36:31

Sounds like trouble. Sounds like a pub lunches as well.

0:36:310:36:34

-I should hope so.

-Pasties and a pint?

0:36:340:36:36

A little bit nicer than that.

0:36:360:36:39

OK, look. The auctioneer has decided to split the two lots.

0:36:390:36:42

We've got the two plates with the cherubs on, valued at £70 - £90, going under the hammer first.

0:36:420:36:47

Later in the sale, we'll get you back

0:36:470:36:50

because we're going to sell the Paul pottery. At £20 to £40.

0:36:500:36:54

Which should fly through that.

0:36:540:36:56

-Happy?

-One hopes.

0:36:560:36:59

Well, I put the three together because the Paul pottery might push the other ones into a sale.

0:36:590:37:03

I know, but Ian was quite confident they would sell.

0:37:030:37:06

-Really?

-He said not everybody's cup of tea but at £70, they should sell.

0:37:060:37:10

-I'd be amazed if they do.

-So will I!

0:37:100:37:12

They don't do nothing for me.

0:37:120:37:13

-You don't like them, do you?

-I don't.

0:37:130:37:16

-You could inherit them, Emma.

-No, I'd rather not!

0:37:160:37:19

Good luck. It's going under the hammer now.

0:37:210:37:24

A pair of late 19th century attractive enamel wall plaques.

0:37:260:37:30

£80 away? £50 away? £30 to start.

0:37:300:37:35

£30, at £30.

0:37:350:37:37

At £30, and I'm bid five more. 35, £40, 45. At £45 I'm bid.

0:37:370:37:43

45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, at 65,

0:37:430:37:49

at 65, 65. Are we all done?

0:37:490:37:53

At 65 are we all done? I'm going to sell. At 65.

0:37:530:37:58

Yes, hammer's gone down.

0:37:580:37:59

£65 just. It was close, wasn't it?

0:37:590:38:02

That's good. They aren't going home, they aren't going on your wall.

0:38:020:38:06

-Well done.

-Delighted.

-I'll see you later on for the Paul pottery.

0:38:060:38:10

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

0:38:100:38:13

Thanks to the auctioneer's discretion, the plates away but it was close.

0:38:130:38:16

Will Lynn's mid 20th century bowl fare any better?

0:38:160:38:20

We'll find out shortly.

0:38:200:38:21

First, we're going to see if the sun is shining on that miniature garden.

0:38:210:38:25

This next lot will please you keen gardeners.

0:38:250:38:29

It's that little model gardens set which belongs to Margaret.

0:38:290:38:33

I bet you've had hours of fun playing with this.

0:38:330:38:35

-Yes, I have.

-It's just...

-Not for long time though.

0:38:350:38:39

Divine, it really is.

0:38:390:38:40

We've got a valuation of around £60 to £100.

0:38:400:38:45

We've done a little bit more research on this and the auctioneer has come back.

0:38:450:38:47

You know what he said because to rang you up, didn't he?

0:38:470:38:49

It's quite a rare set.

0:38:490:38:52

He's hoping for £800 to £900.

0:38:520:38:55

That's what he said, didn't he?

0:38:550:38:57

Fingers crossed.

0:38:570:38:59

-You'll get caught out again.

-Fingers crossed.

0:38:590:39:02

-Public humiliation again.

-I'm pulling David's legs really.

0:39:020:39:06

We did a bit of research, we couldn't find anything else.

0:39:090:39:11

-It's continental.

-I knew it was continental.

-I know, I know.

0:39:110:39:17

It's put a smile on our faces. Hopefully,

0:39:170:39:20

it'll go for a little bit more than the top end. Good on you for hanging on to it and enjoy it.

0:39:200:39:24

The condition is very good as well. Here we go.

0:39:240:39:26

The lead garden figures including palms, railings, bandstands.

0:39:280:39:33

Can I say £50 away?

0:39:330:39:35

£30 I've got. At £30.

0:39:350:39:38

35, £40, 45, £50, 55, £60, 65.

0:39:380:39:43

Your bid, sir at £65.

0:39:430:39:45

£70. 75, £80 then.

0:39:450:39:48

At 75, the bid is in the middle.

0:39:480:39:51

At £75, at 75.

0:39:510:39:54

Good valuation.

0:39:540:39:57

£75, spot on.

0:39:570:39:59

-What are you going to do with your money?

-Well, I don't really know.

0:39:590:40:02

I think probably put it towards a trip somewhere, yeah.

0:40:020:40:06

Margaret and David must be pleased with that result.

0:40:060:40:08

Now let's see if Lynn gets to say goodbye to that bowl.

0:40:080:40:13

It's good to see both back again.

0:40:130:40:15

Let's hope we come round this up with the Paul pottery at £100 or even more.

0:40:150:40:19

We're looking at £20 to £40, that's the guideline.

0:40:190:40:22

Fingers crossed, here we go.

0:40:220:40:23

It's a Paul pottery bowl,

0:40:250:40:27

black and white painted decoration on orange ground. Can I say £30 away?

0:40:270:40:31

£20 I've got. At £20, 22, 25, 28, at £28, the bid's with me.

0:40:310:40:36

At £28, £28, £30, 32, 35, at £32, the bid is with me.

0:40:360:40:42

At £32, we're done at £32.

0:40:420:40:47

Yes, well done. Mid estimate again.

0:40:470:40:50

This man is on fire!

0:40:500:40:52

Not quite the £100. A few pound short.

0:40:530:40:55

You've got £97 in total.

0:40:550:40:58

You don't have to take anything home.

0:40:580:41:00

-No, lovely.

-You've got a bit of money to spend.

0:41:000:41:03

-Thank you very much to both of you.

-Thank you.

0:41:030:41:06

There's one last thing to sell and that's the beautiful silver milk jug but will the bidders lap it up?

0:41:060:41:11

We're running along smoothly now

0:41:110:41:14

which brings us to possibly one of the oldest things in the sale from the 18th century.

0:41:140:41:17

It's hallmarked 1777.

0:41:170:41:19

It's that wonderful silver jug brought into our valuation day by

0:41:190:41:21

Rosalind who's standing next to me. Hello.

0:41:210:41:24

I think I might be the oldest one here.

0:41:240:41:27

No, you're not.

0:41:270:41:29

-No, you're not. Lovely item, what do you think?

-I think it's great.

0:41:290:41:34

Rosalind, I must confess that after you left I'd another look at it and there's a spot of damage

0:41:340:41:39

on the handle which has been soldered and I think that might put the eagle-eyed person off.

0:41:390:41:45

I hope not but I'm a little bit concerned.

0:41:450:41:47

-OK.

-Fingers crossed and it's a good time to sell precious metals.

0:41:470:41:51

The silver market is up. Things are going well today.

0:41:510:41:53

So, fingers crossed. We're going to find out.

0:41:530:41:55

Silver cream jug by Thomas Sheppard.

0:41:570:41:59

1777 dated. London hallmark.

0:41:590:42:03

Can I say £100 away?

0:42:030:42:06

£50 to start me. £50 I'm bid.

0:42:060:42:08

60, 70, 80, 90,

0:42:080:42:11

100, 110, 120, 130.

0:42:110:42:15

At 120, 130, 140, 150,

0:42:150:42:19

160, 170, 160 here.

0:42:190:42:23

At £160 I'm bid.

0:42:230:42:27

170, 180, is it 180? 180.

0:42:270:42:32

190, at £190 there.

0:42:320:42:35

We're done at £190.

0:42:350:42:37

The hammer has gone down. £190.

0:42:380:42:41

Quality always sells. It really does.

0:42:410:42:45

And you bought it along.

0:42:450:42:48

Of course I did.

0:42:480:42:49

A bit of quality here.

0:42:490:42:52

Brilliant result there for Rosalind.

0:42:520:42:54

If you think you've got any quality items at home and fancy making a bit of money,

0:42:560:42:59

bring them along to one of our valuation days.

0:42:590:43:03

You can find out where they'll be by going to:

0:43:030:43:07

Then click F for Flog It! and follow the links to find a list of towns we're coming too soon.

0:43:080:43:14

That's it, that brings us to the end of another show, another day in the auction room.

0:43:150:43:19

A day on the road with Flog It!

0:43:190:43:21

It's been really special for me because I've come back home to Cornwall.

0:43:210:43:24

I'm seeing my mum tonight and having some of her cooking.

0:43:240:43:26

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show.

0:43:260:43:28

Until the next time, from Lostwithiel, cheerio.

0:43:280:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:310:43:34

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:340:43:38

Truro's cathedral provides a majestic backdrop for valuation day. A Ruskin bowl and an 18th-century silver milk jug are among the items valued by experts David Barby and David Fletcher. Paul Martin takes the chance to explore the entertaining and decorative world of magic lanterns.