Cirencester Flog It!


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Cirencester

The crowds turn out for a valuation day at the Corn Hall in Cirencester. Finds include an early Barbie doll and a 41-piece Clarice Cliff dinner service.


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The buzz of the auction room, there's nothing like it.

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This is where dreams are made or hopes are shattered.

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One thing is for sure. There will never be a dull moment. Welcome to Flog It!

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Our venue today is the Corn Hall, right in the heart of Cirencester.

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We've got a massive queue already gathering.

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Some of them have been here since 8:30 this morning.

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The bells are ringing out. It is a Sunday morning,

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but we've got a Flog It faithful right here laden with bags and boxes.

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Hopefully, the best items will go off to auction and make a fortune.

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It is now 9:30. It's time to get the doors open and get this massive crowd inside.

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-Are you ready to go in?

-ALL: Yes!

-Come on, then, follow me.

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'Helping them discover exactly what they've got is our team of experts,

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'and today, it's headed up by Thomas Plant and Michael Baggott.'

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I'll leave that for my colleague, cos he's the toy man.

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'Thomas has an auction business which specialises in, amongst other things, toys.

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'But he won't be playing around when it comes to today's valuations.'

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If it was all polished up, it would be shiny-shiny glitzy-glitzy.

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-It's not Clarice Cliff, is it?

-'And Michael's interest in antiques began as a young child.

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'Today, he runs a business specialising in silver.

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'But there isn't much Michael doesn't know about antiques,

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'so our crowd are guaranteed a sterling valuation.

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'And coming up on today's programme, I take a walk in the wild side

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'with a pair of naturist gardeners.'

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He did this to calm the rebellious nature of his body.

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HE LAUGHS Read into that what you will!

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I think I understand.

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'And both our experts feel a little more than excited about some of their finds.'

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I think you've got a very rare early Barbie here.

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-It's got the Michael Baggott seal of approval all over it.

-It should walk out of the door.

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'And Thomas is up first after spotting these smart ceramics.'

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-So we have three generations here, don't we?

-We do. Tim, Claire, my daughter, granddaughter Libby.

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Is this a Deco service which was been within your family?

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The history of it is that my mother used to look after

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a lady called Yvonne Darwin,

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who was married to Robin Darwin,

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and he, in fact, was the great grandson of Charles Darwin.

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-Oh, right! OK.

-And my mother used to look after Yvonne Darwin

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as she got older and became ill,

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and before she died, she asked my mother if she would like this service as a present.

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-Did she use it?

-Yes, all the time.

-Really?

-Regularly.

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I remember going for Christmas dinner and she had these out.

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-Not every day.

-No, special occasions.

-Weekends.

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-High days and holidays.

-Well, OK.

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Birthday parties and Sunday lunches with the family. Isn't that sweet?

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-Did she know then what she was using?

-No.

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I think, for the cameras and everybody at home, let's reveal all.

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On the back here, we have "Designed by Billy Walters,

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"produced in the Bizarre range by Clarice Cliff."

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And we've got the date, 1934.

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Now, Billy Walters was the designer.

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Clarice Cliff probably had little or no input.

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So she would've had an association with Billy Walters

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but she wouldn't have gone in on the design with him on this.

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-Do you see what I mean?

-Yes.

-We see plates and other associated designers with Clarice Cliff,

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such as Dame Laura Knight and Frank Brangwyn.

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Those are two famous artists who have done associations with Clarice.

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I've seen those more often. I have to admit, I have never seen this service before, or this pattern.

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So it is quite interesting. Now, you said it was a whole dinner service. How whole is it?

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There are 12 of each plate,

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two serving dishes,

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two terrine dishes and the meat platter.

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-So it's 41 pieces altogether.

-41 pieces altogether.

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I think this could do quite well at auction.

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I mean, I certainly know that a plate has sold in 2006

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for £100, which is quite good.

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Now, we're not valuing every single bit at £100.

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Some things might be worth more than 100 and some things will be worth less than 100.

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I personally believe that, if you put it up for auction

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and you put the estimate at £2,000 to £3,000,

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I think you've got a good opportunity to sell it.

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-Really?

-Yeah.

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With regards to a reserve,

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-I think as it's been in your family, we should have a reserve.

-Yes, I'd like a reserve.

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And I think that should be fixed at the bottom estimate of £2,000.

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-I'm going to be so intrigued.

-So am I.

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'Gosh, what an immense dinner service with an equally huge price tag.

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'I think it's worth every penny, but will the bidders? We'll find out later on.

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'Flog It valuation days are always very busy,

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'and I can't help having a good nose around.'

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HE LAUGHS

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I don't think it's signed at all, is it?

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Oh, they're nice. Split cane fly rods.

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Fishing for antiques, that's what this is all about. Hello!

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-Hello.

-I love what you're wearing. Obviously, you're a couple. What's your name?

-Jim.

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-Jim? That's a really unusual name for a lady.

-I liked ginger cake when I was little and I couldn't say it,

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so I used to say Jimmy cake, so I've been stuck with Jimmy since I was two.

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Aww! What have you brought along?

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-This I bought in a charity shop for £5.

-£5, OK.

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-I think you got a good bargain there.

-Yeah. It's very pretty.

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-Very pretty.

-Cos you know what they say,

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one person's trash is somebody else's treasure.

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-Are you saying that's trash, then?

-No!

-THEY LAUGH

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No, seriously, it's a bit of fun.

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That's a bit of cranberry glass. That's Victorian.

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-And that would've come off a centrepiece, something big and fanciful.

-I wondered that.

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Obviously, it's got broken and it's been mounted at a later date

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-on this 1930s piece of cut glass.

-I see.

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But I kind of like the look of that. I think it's really nice. It's like a little spill vase.

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And if you put a rose in there, you see the reflection, so...

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-My sister wants it.

-You're buying it off her?

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I am, but if it makes a lot of money, I'm happy to let it go for charity.

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I think, on a good day, this could realise £30 to £50. OK?

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-If it reached £50, you've got to pay commission.

-That's fine.

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-But it's still better than a fiver, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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-Why don't I pay £50 and have it?

-No, we've got to put it into auction.

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You can't cut the auctioneer out now we're here.

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THEY LAUGH

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You can't... That's a different show.

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THEY LAUGH

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-You know!

-Ooh, she's tight!

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Yeah, exactly! Think of it all going to charity.

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She's frightened it goes up too high and she can't afford it.

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That's even better. It means you don't have to pay for it,

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-someone else has bought it and they may pay £80 for it.

-Yeah.

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And that's more money for charity.

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I'll see you at the auction. Hopefully, all of you. And you can be there with your paddle bidding.

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That's where we're going.

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'But first, we've still got room for one more item,

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'and Michael has spotted Ed with an intriguing little box.'

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-So, Ed, you're on an errand today.

-Yes.

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-You are here in proxy for your mother.

-Yeah.

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-She owns this little piece here.

-Yep.

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-So are you going to get into frightful trouble now?

-Hopefully not, no.

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Oh, dear! It's quite awkward! Let's hope not.

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I love boxes like this, shaped boxes,

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cos it took a lot of work, believe me, to make that box.

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A specialist did it and usually for a very good reason.

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You know what's in it already. Let's open it up and reveal

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-that fabulous pendant.

-Yeah.

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But being a bit of an anorak, what I also think is fabulous

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is the retailer's name on the top of the box.

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Henry Tessier. Tessier, one of the most important firms in the 19th century.

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So, this is your mother's. Do you know where she got it from?

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It's been passed from various generations. I'm not sure who owned it originally.

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-But it's just come down through the family.

-Yeah.

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Let's have a look. What we've got is the most fantastic cabochon,

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which basically just means a polished oval or round stone, rather than it being facetted.

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We've got this cabochon garnet with a little fly,

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but picked out in diamonds and with little ruby eyes, so there's a lot of work in this.

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If we flick it over, we've got probably a 15-carat gold mount to it

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and we've got this little glazed panel at the back,

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which would be for a loved one's lock of hair.

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Oh, right.

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What's interesting is, we've also got an engraved date,

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which is LL, 1st August 1882,

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12th October 1882.

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And that's a very odd dated inscription,

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cos it's the same year and it's different months.

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I don't know to what it pertains.

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My mum thinks, or what she's been told, is that it's a mourning brooch for a dead baby,

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which is why she doesn't like it so much.

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That was going to be my second thought.

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I don't want to say for definite,

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-because I'm not sure of the symbolism of garnet as a stone.

-OK.

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-But it would suggest a birth and death date.

-Yeah.

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Normally, though, you will have a D or a "Died"

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after one of the dates, and a B for born.

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Aside from that possibly gruesome explanation for it,

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it is a fairly stunning little pendant.

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So, have you got any idea as to the value of it?

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None at all. Not in the slightest.

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-You weren't given instructions by mother?

-No.

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Does she know you're going to flog it with us today?

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Yeah, she knows I'm here, but she doesn't know about selling it.

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You're on the knife edge. So we may see it at the auction, we may not.

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Well, if we do, I think we've got to put an estimate of £200 to £300 on it

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-and a fixed reserve of £200.

-OK.

-And it's really worth that all day long.

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A wonderful, wonderful pendant.

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So let's hope, when you get home and you haven't got this with you,

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you're not in too much trouble and I look forward to seeing you at the auction.

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-OK. Thank you very much.

-Or your mum. Thanks very much.

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'And that's where we're off to now.

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'Thankfully, Ed's mother decided to go ahead, so we will be selling the pendant.

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'We've also got the spectacularly rare Clarice Cliff dinner service.

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'And Jim's charity shop find, the cranberry glass vase and mirror.

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'It's a busy saleroom in Cirencester and things are selling well,

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'so hopefully we'll achieve some top prices for our owners.

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'We're starting with the interesting cranberry glass piece.

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'Hopefully, we'll improve on a fiver.'

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We're just about to sell that wonderful adapted bit of cranberry glass

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into this lovely little wall sconce with a pocket and a nice little mirror dating from the early 1900s.

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And all the money is going back to the charity.

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Lots of people find things in charity shops and go off and spend the money on a holiday

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-and don't really give it to the shop.

-I don't think this will be enough for a holiday, do you?

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-I don't know...

-SHE LAUGHS

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-Don't be pessimistic.

-THEY LAUGH

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-Your sister wanted to buy it.

-Yes, she's here.

-She's in the...

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-Right, OK.

-I wouldn't let them have it.

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Well, she might be bidding on it, you never know. Hopefully she is.

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That way, it'll put the price up a bit for someone else who wants to buy it.

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Anyway, good luck. It's going under the hammer now.

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1930s mirror there.

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Pretty little piece. Victorian taste.

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I can start you here on the book at £25.

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£25 I have here. 30. 5. 40. 5.

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50. The book's out at £50 now. 5 now. At £50.

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5. 60 if you like, madam. At £55.

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60 now. At 55, you all sure?

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Happy days. Happy days!

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I only paid a fiver for it.

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-Yes, I know! I wonder if your sister ended up buying it.

-I don't know.

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We've got to go and find out. Well done, anyway.

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'Alas, it turns out that Jim's sister missed out on it by just £5.

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'Still, it means a lot more money for charity.

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'Now it's time for the dinner service.'

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We've seen a lot of Clarice Cliff on the show before and 99 percent of the time, it hasn't let us down,

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but I've never seen so much Clarice Cliff in one lot, belonging to Claire and Tim.

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-Hi. Pleased to see you again.

-Hi.

-Now, this is a bit of a family piece, because it's yours

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-but, technically, now it's yours. You're inheriting this.

-Yep.

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Now we're selling it. £2,000 to £3,000 on this,

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and I know it's worth every single penny, because there's 41 pieces.

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Absolutely. It's amazing. 41 pieces, so averaging at about £60 a piece.

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-Yeah.

-I think that's what the cheapest piece of Clarice Cliff is worth.

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And for a big dinner service, all displayed out, it looks amazing in the saleroom.

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It absolutely is stunning. My only worry, I do have a slight doubt,

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is not many people use dinner services any more. There is an awful lot of it.

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Will it find a home? I know the value is spot on.

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It's going under the hammer now.

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Lot number 50, which is the Clarice Cliff dinner service.

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Designed by Billy Walters.

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I can start you on the book here. Commissions at £1,150.

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-Come on. We need a lot more.

-1,200 if you like.

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1,250. With me at 1,250. 1,300. And 50.

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1,400. And 50.

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At 1,450. With me at 1,450.

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1,500 now. At 1,450.

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-Not sold.

-Well, it's going home. I'm so sorry. We tried our hardest.

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The best thing you could do is hang onto it for a few more months,

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put it back into another sale. Give it a bit of space,

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otherwise people see the same thing all the time and it looks like the trade are trying to sell it.

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Maybe take it to a 20th century sale, have a chat with the auctioneer.

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-He might even decide to split them up into smaller lots.

-Yeah.

-Oh, well.

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-Anyway...

-Ever so sorry.

-That's all right.

-Sorry about that.

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'Well, today just wasn't the right day, but I'm sure it can achieve that price.

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'It just needs the right people to spot it. Now, will we do any better with the pendant?'

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Ed brought it along on behalf of his mum, he had to get permission to sell it and he's got it,

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but unfortunately, they can't be with us today.

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But Michael's here. A valuation of £200 to £300. Hopefully we'll get the top end.

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-Jewellery is selling well.

-It is. And most mourning jewellery,

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because this is more of a collector's piece than something you'd wear, is usually black enamel and serious.

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And in its original fitted case. It's just wonderful. It's a complete thing.

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-And at £200...

-You're confident.

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-Don't put me on the spot!

-It's got the Michael Baggott seal of approval all over it!

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-It should walk out of the door.

-Good luck. And good luck to Ed. It's going under the hammer now.

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The Victorian pendant. Has a diamond chip and ruby decorated fly

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upon the garnet loop.

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Start me 2.

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I can start you here, then, at 150 on the book. At 150.

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160 now. 160. 170.

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180. 190. 200. The book's out at 200. 220 now.

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220 on the phone if you like. 220. Thank you, madam.

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240 if you like. 240. 260 on the phone if you like. At 260. 280.

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This is good. It's going to get the top of your estimate.

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It deserves to. It's a really finely worked piece.

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340. 360. 380. 400.

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-Oh, fantastic.

-This is very good.

-440.

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At 440 in the room. 460. 480.

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-500.

-What do they say? Quality always sells.

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At 500.

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I wish Ed could've been here, that's all I can say.

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-He'd be doing cartwheels now!

-He would be!

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His mum must be really pleased. At least you can enjoy watching this later on.

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But well done, Michael. Unbelievable price, though.

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-If it's perfect and in a fitted case, it'll always do that little bit more.

-Yeah.

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And as Michael said, quality always counts.

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If you're going to invest in antiques, make sure the condition is perfect if you can.

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-No restorations and a good maker's name.

-Absolutely.

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Well, so far, so good. You've just seen three items go under the hammer.

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We are coming back later in the programme and hopefully there'll be one or two surprises.

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Bob, I think you've made my day today by bringing in this absolutely fantastic piece of jewellery.

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'Michael's dazzled by this diamond stunner.

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'But the auctioneer is a little more cautious.'

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It's got lots and lots of things going for it.

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-I know what you're going to say. Brooches aren't fashionable.

-They're not.

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'What will the bidders think, I wonder?'

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Before we go back to the valuation day, while we've been in the area,

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I had the opportunity to get some wonderful fresh air

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and explore the most beautiful garden. Take a look at this.

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This is the ancient hilltop town of Malmesbury in Wiltshire and it's not far from where I live.

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As you can see, it is rather a busy place, but today I've come here

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to show you an incredible town garden which is owned by a very special couple.

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So come with me and let's explore Abbey House Gardens.

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'Right in the middle of Malmesbury,

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'these extraordinary gardens boast 10,000 different species of plants and trees.

0:18:490:18:55

'But they're particularly well known for an impressive collection of tulips and 2,000 species of rose.

0:18:550:19:01

'And they were all planted by husband and wife owners Ian and Barbara.

0:19:010:19:05

'However, Abbey House Gardens are perhaps most famous

0:19:050:19:09

'for the unusual style Ian and Barbara like to indulge in when they're gardening.

0:19:090:19:13

'Quite often, they wear absolutely nothing, hence their nickname, the naked gardeners.

0:19:130:19:19

'Ian and Barbara work fully clothed when the gardens are open to the public,

0:19:190:19:23

'apart from on special "clothes optional" days,

0:19:230:19:26

'when the visitors are given the opportunity to strip off, too.'

0:19:260:19:30

I think you'll be pleased to hear it's not a "clothing optional" day today and I'm really relieved.

0:19:330:19:38

I'm going to head inside and find out what else makes this place so unique.

0:19:380:19:42

Just taking a first glance there, you can understand what I'm going on about.

0:19:420:19:47

-Barbara, Ian, hello! Good to see you! Caught you at work.

-Yep!

0:20:000:20:04

-You look fabulous. You look really healthy.

-So do you.

0:20:040:20:08

The gardens look great. It's late spring. I know this is one of the hardest times of the year for you.

0:20:080:20:13

Everything's growing. And after such a long, hard, cold, miserable, wet winter, we've been very glad

0:20:130:20:19

-to see the colour come in a rush.

-Everything was three of four weeks late and now it's catch-up time.

0:20:190:20:25

Early tulips have come up with mid-season tulips, blossom everywhere, all happening.

0:20:250:20:30

-How long have you had this place?

-In a few weeks, it'll be 16 years.

-Happy birthday.

0:20:300:20:35

-What was it like?

-Completely different. There was no garden here at all.

0:20:350:20:39

This area was formal and the lawns were kept cut, but just lawn with a little bit of perennial.

0:20:390:20:45

-Was this just...

-An exercise in moss.

0:20:450:20:48

Getting the heads off the daisies and dandelions and keeping the moss down.

0:20:480:20:53

What a backdrop over there. Look at that.

0:20:530:20:55

Through into the abbey. Tell me about the history of the abbey.

0:20:550:20:58

It started in the late 7th century. It began from a school

0:20:580:21:03

and a Celtic monk coming to the hill to be a hermit

0:21:030:21:06

and exchanging his knowledge for food.

0:21:060:21:09

So the school began and then that developed into a Benedictine monastery,

0:21:090:21:13

which was dissolved by Henry VIII about 1539

0:21:130:21:16

-and then a wealthy clothier bought the site and put up that Tudor house.

-It's a lovely house.

0:21:160:21:21

-So that's 1600s, as well.

-1542.

-Yeah, there abouts.

-Wow.

0:21:210:21:26

It's absolutely fabulous, it really is.

0:21:260:21:30

-What's this?

-Berberis.

-I've never seen that before, but it works really well with the box.

0:21:300:21:34

-A number of people think it's a purple box.

-I kind of thought that.

0:21:340:21:38

-THEY LAUGH

-But I didn't say it.

0:21:380:21:42

-When you put your hands around it to weed, you know it isn't, cos it scratches you to bits.

-Beautiful.

0:21:420:21:47

-How do you get those levels so perfect?

-With difficulty.

-Is it?

0:21:470:21:51

You need a good eye, really. Piece of string and some shears.

0:21:510:21:54

Yes, and shears.

0:21:540:21:57

I used a machine to do the tops, but the sides, I still cut with hand shears.

0:21:570:22:01

Machines have a tendency to drag it and rip it about.

0:22:010:22:05

-Gardening is hard work. Can we have a tour?

-Let's go.

0:22:050:22:08

-You could say this is the best office in the world, the best place to work.

-Definitely.

0:22:080:22:13

-It's a good stress buster.

-Oh, yes!

0:22:130:22:16

Beautiful, aren't they? Absolutely beautiful.

0:22:220:22:26

-So full.

-I like this one with the stripes on it.

0:22:260:22:29

A splash of Monet.

0:22:290:22:32

The herb garden looks fabulous, it really does.

0:22:410:22:44

And I love the deep raised beds. Obviously keeps the herbs drier, as well.

0:22:440:22:49

Absolutely. Most herbs come from the Mediterranean and they don't like getting their feet wet.

0:22:490:22:54

-And also... Walafrid Strabo was his name, wasn't it?

-Yep.

0:22:540:22:58

He was a monk in the 9th century and he wrote this poem,

0:22:580:23:01

"To grow your herbs well and good, you should grow them in raised beds with oaken sides."

0:23:010:23:06

-Really?

-So we have raised beds with oaken sides.

0:23:060:23:09

-The monks would be proud of the herbs here.

-I think they would.

0:23:090:23:12

-What herbs are you growing here?

-Things like ajuga reptans, which is the little bugle.

0:23:120:23:17

They're really good for lowering the blood pressure and stopping internal bleeding.

0:23:170:23:22

And then chives, which happen to be growing beside it.

0:23:220:23:26

Although we eat those for flavour, they're mildly antiseptic,

0:23:260:23:29

so they're quite good to help keep you healthy.

0:23:290:23:33

We've got Solomon's Seal in flower at the moment. You can make a poultice from that

0:23:330:23:37

-that's good for drawing out bruising.

-Isn't it lovely?

0:23:370:23:40

-It's so tranquil.

-It is. And the sound of the water.

0:23:400:23:44

The monks would've always had water nearby.

0:23:440:23:47

There's an energy in that water, as well. It keeps you going.

0:23:470:23:51

And it draws the birds, makes the atmosphere moist, it's lovely.

0:23:510:23:55

Oh, I do envy you. Where next?

0:23:550:23:59

-Shall we go down to the river garden?

-OK.

0:23:590:24:02

There's still daffodils.

0:24:130:24:16

All the time we're walking along, you're both working, aren't you?

0:24:160:24:19

You're thinking, "Tomorrow, I'm going to sort you out."

0:24:190:24:22

-That's right. That's got to change, that's got to move, get down here and sort that.

-Make a mental note.

0:24:220:24:27

-Were the fish ponds originally here? Did the monks have them?

-They did.

0:24:370:24:41

They had three, small, medium and large, and an eel trap that ran the water back to the river.

0:24:410:24:46

-Oh, gosh!

-This whole area was their supermarket.

0:24:460:24:50

They were even farming fresh-water oysters, cos we've found the shells.

0:24:500:24:53

Have you? Native oysters. So it was fish on Friday here.

0:24:530:24:57

Fish on Friday. The fish would've been lined or netted in the river,

0:24:570:25:01

thrown on here, taken up to a holding tank near the kitchen that was called the stew pond.

0:25:010:25:06

I've got to say, I love the rear elevation of the property, the house from here with that steep bank.

0:25:060:25:12

When I think how that was when we came here, it was completely overgrown.

0:25:120:25:15

I just feel that it's one of Ian's greatest achievements,

0:25:150:25:19

actually getting that planted up and so colourful at this time of year.

0:25:190:25:23

-Do you think that's one of the hardest things?

-It was, cos I lost the digger a couple of times!

0:25:230:25:29

-THEY LAUGH

-Isn't that lovely?

0:25:290:25:32

Absolutely beautiful. I think you've done a magnificent job, I really do.

0:25:320:25:36

-There's one more thing we've got to show you.

-OK. Come on, then.

0:25:360:25:40

-Right, are we here?

-This is what I wanted to show you.

0:25:530:25:56

Look at this lovely, smooth area of water.

0:25:560:25:58

There's a pool in the riverbed here.

0:25:580:26:01

-Where it changes colour?

-Yes.

-You can see it's a lot deeper.

0:26:010:26:05

That's right. It was known as St Aldhelm's Pool and it's been a place of baptism

0:26:050:26:09

until as recently as 1904, and the reason is that Aldhelm,

0:26:090:26:13

who was the first abbot of the Benedictine monastery,

0:26:130:26:16

used to bring himself down to this part of the river

0:26:160:26:19

-and immerse himself in the water night and day, year long.

-For a wash?

0:26:190:26:24

-And, apparently...

-No...

0:26:240:26:27

..according to the record, he did this to calm the rebellious nature of his body.

0:26:270:26:33

-HE LAUGHS Read into that what you will.

-I think I understand.

0:26:330:26:38

-But, interestingly...

-Get rid of all those naughty thoughts.

-That's it.

0:26:380:26:42

-Cool yourself down.

-That's it.

-How wonderful!

0:26:420:26:45

It is wonderful, and I think it's wonderful that people followed suit

0:26:450:26:50

and came to immerse themselves in the water in just the same spot.

0:26:500:26:53

Thank you both so much. It's been delightful. The weather's been perfect.

0:26:530:26:57

This is just a haven for wildlife, but not only that, it's inspiration for everybody.

0:26:570:27:02

If you come here, you can take a bit home and be creative at home

0:27:020:27:05

-and hopefully follow in your footsteps.

-Thank you. We'd like to think so.

-Wonderful.

0:27:050:27:09

-Now for a cold bath. Come on, let's get a cup of tea.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:090:27:14

'Away from the peace and quiet of the garden,

0:27:220:27:25

'we're holding our valuation day at the Corn Hall in Cirencester. And it's a very busy day.'

0:27:250:27:31

We're prepared for almost anything.

0:27:310:27:33

Pretend you're enjoying yourself.

0:27:330:27:36

-Thank you very much.

-That's OK.

-You've made my day.

-Oh! Thanks for coming in.

0:27:360:27:40

-We wouldn't have a show without all these people.

-Thank you.

0:27:400:27:43

Three, two, one.

0:27:430:27:45

'Toy expert Thomas is thrilled to have come across a rare doll, brought in by Susan.'

0:27:490:27:55

Mattel. What a toy name to conjure with.

0:27:550:27:58

And Barbie. The most iconic doll of the post-war era, isn't it?

0:27:580:28:06

Fascinating. Tell me, how did you come by this almost mint Barbie?

0:28:060:28:11

It was a present to me in 1963 from my auntie

0:28:110:28:15

and her next-door neighbour brought it back from Canada.

0:28:150:28:20

They weren't in this country much, I don't think, then.

0:28:210:28:25

-No.

-Nobody else had one that I know of,

0:28:250:28:28

so that's why it's still in the box.

0:28:280:28:31

-Were you a dolly person?

-Yes, but the original baby dolls.

0:28:310:28:35

-Yeah?

-You know, like, the bigger dolls.

0:28:350:28:39

-Oh, really? You liked the larger dolls, which looked like babies with round faces?

-Yes.

0:28:390:28:44

-With porcelain or celluloid heads by Pedigree?

-Yes.

-British dolls by Pedigree.

-Yes.

-Absolutely.

0:28:440:28:49

-And this turned up and it was slightly alien to you, was it?

-Yes.

0:28:490:28:53

-Especially with the wigs.

-You didn't like that?

-No, not really.

0:28:530:28:58

I suppose, if they weren't in the country

0:28:580:29:00

-and none of your friends had them, you couldn't have a Barbie tea party.

-No.

0:29:000:29:05

-Nobody really knew what you were talking about.

-No.

-No.

0:29:050:29:09

-It would've had a cellophane cover to it.

-Yes.

-Which has gone, unfortunately.

0:29:090:29:14

But for the... How can you put it nicely? ..anoraks

0:29:140:29:19

who collect Barbies, they'd like it all mint.

0:29:190:29:22

But, as it is, you've got Barbie here

0:29:220:29:25

within some sort of very risque swimming suit, really.

0:29:250:29:29

I don't think you could go on the beach like that in the early 1960s.

0:29:290:29:33

Early 60s, 1962 this was made, '63 you were given it,

0:29:330:29:38

you wouldn't be seen dead... It was for film stars to wear that kind of costume.

0:29:380:29:42

So what you've got here is a very risque and sexy Barbie

0:29:420:29:46

with the wigs, which I've never seen before.

0:29:460:29:49

-Oh.

-I think it's quite impressive.

0:29:490:29:52

Have you any thoughts or ideas of value?

0:29:520:29:56

Not really. I know she must have some worth,

0:29:560:29:59

but I wouldn't know what worth, really.

0:29:590:30:02

I wouldn't be surprised if it made £150.

0:30:020:30:06

-I really wouldn't.

-Really?

-Honestly.

0:30:060:30:09

-However, in a general sale, I would suggest we put it in at £80 to £120.

-Yes.

0:30:090:30:14

-We fix the reserve at £80.

-Mm-hm.

0:30:140:30:17

-Cos I believe it's worth it.

-Yep.

0:30:170:30:19

And I would imagine that the phone lines will be red hot for the auction house

0:30:190:30:25

wanting to know all about this. I think you've got a very rare, early Barbie here.

0:30:250:30:29

-Thank you for coming.

-Thank you very much.

0:30:290:30:31

'That Barbie might well evoke the glamour of a film star,

0:30:310:30:34

'but Michael has spotted Bob with something any A-lister would be proud to sport.'

0:30:340:30:39

Bob, I think you've made my day today by bringing in this absolutely fantastic piece of jewellery.

0:30:390:30:45

But before I tell you anything about it, can you tell me, where does it come from?

0:30:450:30:50

Well, it belonged to my mother-in-law,

0:30:500:30:53

and she was widowed quite early and she travelled a lot

0:30:530:30:57

and she liked to wear nice jewellery.

0:30:570:31:01

So would this be something that she would probably wear on quite a regular basis?

0:31:010:31:06

-Oh, yes, she would.

-Wonderful. Something like this was designed to be worn.

0:31:060:31:11

If we look at it closely, we've got this fantastic brooch,

0:31:110:31:15

made in about 1895, 1900,

0:31:150:31:19

turn of the last century.

0:31:190:31:21

What we call fin de siecle jewellery.

0:31:210:31:24

It's very fine, it's very light.

0:31:240:31:27

It's diamond-set. There's an elegance about it.

0:31:270:31:31

The fantastic thing about so much of this jewellery

0:31:310:31:34

is that it's affordable, because it's small stones, it's enamel work.

0:31:340:31:40

When you move up a level, as you do with your brooch,

0:31:400:31:43

-you start to get larger diamonds being used.

-I see.

0:31:430:31:47

And that's really where the value lies today, in that and its wearability.

0:31:470:31:51

We've got a lovely white-gold setting

0:31:510:31:55

and we've got a central brilliant-cut drop

0:31:550:31:59

that probably weighs just over a carat.

0:31:590:32:02

-Really?

-And we've got four similarly sized stones here

0:32:020:32:08

that between them are maybe 2, 2.5 carats.

0:32:080:32:12

So you've got a lot of carat weight in this.

0:32:120:32:14

It's a stunning thing. Why now have you decided to part with it?

0:32:140:32:19

Well, my wife did used to wear it and she inherited it from her mum.

0:32:190:32:24

Unfortunately, my wife is now in a nursing home.

0:32:240:32:27

-Oh, dear.

-And, erm, I know that a few years ago, when we discussed the jewellery that she inherited,

0:32:270:32:35

that she felt that it probably wouldn't be worn

0:32:350:32:40

and, at some point, she would like to sell it on.

0:32:400:32:43

I mean, this is a valuable brooch.

0:32:430:32:45

I think we should put it into auction with an estimate of £2,000 to £2,500.

0:32:450:32:52

-Oh, really? That's quite good.

-And we must protect it with a fixed reserve of £2,000.

0:32:520:32:58

-OK.

-And we'll instruct the auctioneer on those lines.

0:32:580:33:01

And I think, on the day, because a piece of jewellery isn't just worth the intrinsic parts of it,

0:33:010:33:07

but how wearable and attractive it is,

0:33:070:33:10

I could see two Cirencester ladies

0:33:100:33:13

becoming quite embattled about buying that brooch.

0:33:130:33:16

So let's put it into the auction and I think it could have a sparkling result for us at the end of the day.

0:33:160:33:22

-Excellent.

-Thank you so much for bringing this in, Bob.

-Not at all.

0:33:220:33:26

'What a stylish brooch! Now Thomas is rounding off his day

0:33:260:33:29

'with a beautiful but simple chalice belonging to Linda.'

0:33:290:33:34

Linda, thanks for coming. Tell me about your cup.

0:33:340:33:37

-Well, it's a silver cup. I believe it's quite old.

-Mm-hm.

0:33:370:33:42

It was given to me as a gift from somebody who knows that I like small silver.

0:33:420:33:48

-But, for me, it's a bit too big.

-It's not really a piece of small silver, is it?

0:33:480:33:52

-No, not as small as I usually collect.

-What do you collect?

0:33:520:33:55

I like spoons, all sorts of different spoons.

0:33:550:33:59

And I like little salt and little mustard pots.

0:33:590:34:03

What's your earliest piece of silver?

0:34:030:34:06

I think I've got a spoon and it's about 1715.

0:34:060:34:11

That's not bad, is it? Quite interesting.

0:34:110:34:13

-This is 18th century.

-Yes.

0:34:130:34:16

It is 1771.

0:34:160:34:18

-Oh, right.

-And it's by a man called Emik Romer.

0:34:180:34:22

-Emik Romer.

-Is he British?

-Oh, yeah, British.

0:34:220:34:26

He's quite a prolific maker of good-quality items.

0:34:260:34:29

Normally, it's candlesticks and epergnes,

0:34:290:34:32

but this is a sort of chalice or a footed cup.

0:34:320:34:36

And it's very, very plain, which is actually so appealing.

0:34:360:34:40

-Yes, I like plain things.

-It hasn't been got at.

-No.

0:34:400:34:44

Of course, what was the risk of happening with this type of silver within the 19th century,

0:34:440:34:49

this then would've been all decorated and repoussed with floral design.

0:34:490:34:54

Somebody's restrained themselves.

0:34:540:34:57

When Emik Romer was making it,

0:34:570:34:59

this sort of slight gadrooning around here

0:34:590:35:03

-was the only style of decoration to this.

-Right.

0:35:030:35:06

So it's rather fun. And you've got these quite good marks on the base here.

0:35:060:35:10

-Yes, they're quite big.

-They're quite big and quite fine and as you know from collecting silver,

0:35:100:35:15

they look quite fresh, so that's brilliant.

0:35:150:35:18

Because it's by Emik Romer and it's 1771,

0:35:180:35:21

-you've got to think that the value is going to be higher than a usual chalice from this date.

-Right.

0:35:210:35:27

So I would put this in at auction between £300 and £500.

0:35:270:35:31

-Oh, right.

-I'd fix the reserve at £300.

0:35:310:35:34

How does that grab you?

0:35:340:35:36

-That was a nice friend, wasn't it?

-It was a nice friend, wasn't it! A very nice friend!

0:35:360:35:41

'So that completes our selection of antiques to take off to the auction room.

0:35:430:35:47

'And we're spanning the ages. There's that 20th century icon, Barbie.

0:35:470:35:52

'The Belle Epoque brooch.

0:35:520:35:55

'And the 18th century silver cup.

0:35:550:35:58

'As with all auctions, there's a buyer's and seller's commission,

0:36:010:36:05

'and here it's 15 percent of the sale price, plus VAT.

0:36:050:36:09

'Things are hotting up in the saleroom. In a quieter moment,

0:36:090:36:12

'I had a chat with auctioneer Philip Allwood about Bob's brooch.'

0:36:120:36:16

This could be the jewel in Flog It's crown. It's absolutely stunning, isn't it?

0:36:190:36:24

-Smart thing.

-Yeah, lovely brooch. Belongs to Robert.

0:36:240:36:28

We've got £2,000 to £2,500, possibly could get £3,000, could it?

0:36:280:36:33

It's a very nice looking piece. It's very good quality.

0:36:330:36:39

The setting's nice. It's very typically that Belle Epoque style of the 1900, 1920s period.

0:36:390:36:47

-It's got lots and lots of things going for it.

-I know what you're going to say.

0:36:470:36:53

-Brooches aren't fashionable.

-They're just not fashionable. You can't get away from it.

0:36:530:36:57

-Maybe that's because not many people have a brooch like this.

-True.

0:36:570:37:01

More fashionable would be

0:37:010:37:04

a pair of ear studs, a solitaire ring,

0:37:040:37:07

another pair of ear studs for everyday use

0:37:070:37:09

and it would destroy the thing, of course.

0:37:090:37:13

-It would be a dreadful shame, it was made to look like this for a reason.

-It's got integrity.

0:37:130:37:18

It's very organic looking. But I guess, to maximise the value, that's what the trade would do.

0:37:180:37:24

-And they'd turn it into something that would be used.

-Saleable.

-Yeah.

0:37:240:37:28

That's the shame of it. As to the value,

0:37:280:37:31

I think £2,000 to £3,000 is enough for it in today's market.

0:37:310:37:35

I hope it'll get there. We'll do our very best with it

0:37:350:37:39

and if any brooch should make that, this should.

0:37:390:37:42

But...you're selling something people don't want to buy.

0:37:420:37:46

Yeah. I can see you're not sure about this one.

0:37:460:37:48

So there's no telephone bids at the moment, as we speak?

0:37:480:37:53

-That would be telling, wouldn't it?

-OK. You've got to watch to find out.

0:37:530:37:58

'First, Susan is going to find out whether she'll have to say goodbye to her childhood gift.'

0:38:010:38:06

Now, will there be tears from Susan? We're just about to find out.

0:38:060:38:11

We're talking about that wonderful Barbie doll from Canada, which was quite rare at the time.

0:38:110:38:15

-You've had this ever since you were... How old?

-I was nine.

-Nine.

0:38:150:38:21

-And it's still boxed!

-Yes.

-And the wigs are wonderful! I've never seen these wigs before.

0:38:210:38:26

Thomas is a Barbie doll specialist. You are, though, let's face it!

0:38:260:38:30

You specialise in lots of things like this. Collector's things.

0:38:300:38:34

We have a saleroom which sells toys, so I see lots of things coming up in the Barbie doll world.

0:38:340:38:40

But I must admit, I'm like Paul, I've never seen the three wigs in there, in the set and boxed,

0:38:400:38:45

so I'm a little bit excited.

0:38:450:38:48

But I don't want to come over like I'm excited about selling dolls.

0:38:480:38:52

THEY LAUGH

0:38:520:38:54

Lot number 145

0:38:560:38:58

is the new fashion queen Barbie. 50 to get on.

0:38:580:39:03

£50. At £30 a bid only. At £30.

0:39:030:39:07

At 5. 40. 5. 50. 5.

0:39:070:39:11

60. 5. 70. 5.

0:39:110:39:14

80. 5 if you like. At 80 here. At £80.

0:39:140:39:17

Are you all sure now, then? Lady's bid at £80.

0:39:170:39:21

Are you all done?

0:39:210:39:23

-On estimate. Well done.

-Good.

0:39:230:39:25

-At least someone will appreciate it.

-Oh, yeah.

0:39:250:39:29

-I'm pleased.

-It's been a long time.

-Yeah.

0:39:290:39:34

'Thomas got the valuation spot on.

0:39:340:39:36

'But will he do just as well for Linda?'

0:39:360:39:39

-Why are you selling this?

-Well, I collect small Georgian silver,

0:39:410:39:45

-but this is a bit large for my collection.

-Yeah.

0:39:450:39:48

-Hey, silver's selling well today.

-Oh, yes.

-The trade are here. And, as you know, silver prices are up

0:39:480:39:54

-so it's a good time to sell.

-Absolutely, great time to sell.

0:39:540:39:57

Lot number 28 we're onto now, which is the George III silver goblet

0:39:580:40:03

by Emik Romer. 2 get on. Must be 200.

0:40:030:40:06

At 200. Thank you. At 200.

0:40:060:40:09

I'll take 210 if you like now. 210. 220.

0:40:090:40:11

230. 240. 250.

0:40:110:40:15

At 250. 260 now. At 250.

0:40:150:40:18

260. 270.

0:40:180:40:20

-280. 290.

-Oh, that's better.

-300.

0:40:200:40:23

At 300 here. And 20 if you like now.

0:40:230:40:25

At 300. On my right at £300. 320.

0:40:250:40:28

-340. 360.

-Good!

-380.

0:40:280:40:32

At 380. In front of me at 380. 400 now. 400.

0:40:320:40:36

-Fantastic.

-Oh, excellent.

-420.

0:40:360:40:39

440 anywhere?

0:40:390:40:41

At 420.

0:40:410:40:44

-Yes!

-Brilliant!

-Good man, Philip!

0:40:440:40:47

He worked that really well, the auctioneer. £420.

0:40:470:40:50

Ebbed and flowed, ebbed and flowed, sticking in places.

0:40:500:40:53

-I was worried it wasn't going to sell.

-So was I. It was bobbling around there, wasn't it? Wow!

0:40:530:40:58

-That's very good.

-That'll get you a good spoon.

-Yes.

0:40:580:41:02

'I hope she manages to find that spoon,

0:41:030:41:06

'and I'm also hoping there's someone in there right now

0:41:060:41:09

'who's just as keen to get their hands on a wonderful diamond brooch.'

0:41:090:41:13

It sparkled at the valuation day. What will happen in the auction? We're just about to find out.

0:41:140:41:19

I've been joined by Bob. The brooch is going under the hammer.

0:41:190:41:22

£2,500 at the top end of the estimate is what we would love to get,

0:41:220:41:27

but it's got to get over £2,000 to sell.

0:41:270:41:29

I think it's the biggest diamond-set piece we've had on Flog It

0:41:290:41:34

and it actually breaks up, not that anyone would break it up,

0:41:340:41:37

at £2,000 for the constituent parts of it, if you just took the stones out.

0:41:370:41:41

We talked about that just before the sale with the auctioneer.

0:41:410:41:44

If the trade are really serious about this, they will break it up.

0:41:440:41:47

But then I said to Philip, nobody will ever have a brooch like this again.

0:41:470:41:51

Maybe this will be the new trend-setter. Maybe it should be kept intact.

0:41:510:41:55

I hope so, because people appreciate antique jewellery now

0:41:550:41:58

and it's still eminently wearable, even if you wanted to turn it into a pendant.

0:41:580:42:03

-That would look nice.

-Absolutely.

-Let's find out what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:42:030:42:08

The diamond brooch in the Belle Epoque taste.

0:42:090:42:13

Super quality brooch there. Where for that? 1,000 to get on.

0:42:130:42:17

1,000 bid. At 1,000.

0:42:170:42:20

And 50 if you like. And 50. 1,100. And 50.

0:42:200:42:24

1,200. And 50. 1,300. And 50.

0:42:240:42:28

1,400. And 50.

0:42:280:42:30

1,500. And 50.

0:42:300:42:32

1,600. And 50.

0:42:320:42:35

1,700. And 50.

0:42:350:42:37

1,800. And 50.

0:42:370:42:40

1,900. And 50.

0:42:400:42:44

2,000.

0:42:440:42:46

2,100. 2,200.

0:42:460:42:49

At 2,200 on my left now. 2,200. 2,300 now.

0:42:490:42:53

It's on my left. 2,300.

0:42:530:42:55

2,400 if you like, sir.

0:42:550:42:57

At 2,300. The lady's bid at 2,300.

0:42:570:42:59

2,400 now. At £2,300. You sure now at 2,300?

0:42:590:43:04

Yes! Well, Bob, £2,300!

0:43:060:43:11

-Ooh!

-A lady bidding. Maybe she will keep it intact as a brooch.

0:43:110:43:15

-Brilliant. That's good. I'm really pleased about that.

-It deserved to make every penny.

0:43:150:43:20

-Well done. Thank you so much for bringing such a wonderful item in.

-Well done.

-Thank you very much.

0:43:200:43:25

'If you think you've got something special hiding away at home like that,

0:43:250:43:30

'bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:43:300:43:33

'You can find our more at bbc.co.uk/flogit

0:43:330:43:38

'We look forward to seeing you.'

0:43:380:43:41

I hope you've enjoyed the show. So, until the next time, from Cirencester, it's cheerio.

0:43:410:43:46

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:480:43:52

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:520:43:56

.

0:43:560:43:56

The crowds turn out for a valuation day at the Corn Hall in Cirencester. Finds include an early Barbie doll, a 41-piece Clarice Cliff dinner service and a fantastic diamond brooch. Paul Martin takes time out for a walk on the wild side with the Naked Gardeners.