Bangor Flog It!


Bangor

Joining Paul Martin in the university city of Bangor are experts Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge. Among the items they value are a novelty hat and a microscope.


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Transcript


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'Today, we're heading over the majestic mountains and verdant valleys of North Wales

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'and it doesn't get much better than this. Welcome to Flog It!'

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'Our journey's led us to Bangor, which grew up on the site of a monastery

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'dating back to the early 6th century.

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'It may be one of the smallest cities in Britain,

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'but its population almost doubles in term time, when the students are back at university.

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'Today, though, Flog It has taken over the campus.'

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The university plays an important role in the history and the identity of this marvellous city.

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It was built in 1884 with funding by local quarrymen

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who volunteered wages to provide a better form of higher education.

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Today, we're at the university's Pritchard Jones' Hall

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where this massive crowd of people are all eager for knowledge

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-and the answer to one very important question, which is...

-ALL: What's it worth?

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'Taking an academic interest in our items today are our experts, Adam Partridge and Mark Stacey.

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'Mark, back in his home county of Wales, has an interest in Art Nouveau.

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'After years in the business, he knows how to get the women on side.'

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-You're far too young to have been on the Titanic.

-You really are a charmer, aren't you?

-I try to be.

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Good make, isn't it?

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'And auctioneer Adam is always hungry to find a valuation day treasure.'

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-They're nice.

-HE LAUGHS

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'Coming up in today's programme, we take a hat off to our experts.'

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I think that's dead cute. And it serves a purpose for me

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-because now I'm getting on a bit, I've got one of these bald spots.

-Oh!

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'And I dust off an old family heirloom.'

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Do you know something? I'm so pleased you haven't cleaned it,

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because I think the collectors will absolutely love this.

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'And we visit an architectural gem, a little bit of the Italian Riviera

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'tucked away in North Wales.'

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Just look at that there! Hey, bella, bella, mama, mama!

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'With all that coming up, we better get on! First up, it looks like Alan and Barbara

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-'want Adam to turn over a new leaf.'

-You've brought in this lovely book.

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It caught my eye straight away for a number of reasons. Firstly, cos it's The Illustrated Book of Poultry,

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which is a well-known volume, so I pretty much know what it's worth. Good start.

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Secondly, it's about poultry, and I'm interested in poultry cos I keep chickens.

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Thirdly, it's got an auctioneer's lot number on it. An old-fashioned one.

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Look at that. Boardman and Oliver of Sudbury.

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-In Suffolk.

-Are you a Suffolk man?

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-I'm Suffolk born and bred.

-Are you?

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And how did you come to own this book? Did you buy it from... That's an old lot number.

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It must be from the 1950s.

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My parents purchased a shop in Sudbury and behind the shop,

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there was about half an acre and there was some big sheds out the back,

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so we decided that we'd utilise the sheds with chickens.

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Right. Who had the book, then?

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Well, the chap that was selling the property,

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we were talking about it and he said, "I've got just the book for you."

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Ah, right! So you were an enthusiastic young man,

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thinking, "I want to keep chickens" and he said, "Here you go, son!"

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Yes, and when I looked into it,

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the husbandry within wasn't current to the day then.

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It has been well used in the past, though.

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Look at that. The spine's coming off, so they were obviously well used.

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There's a loose plate there, isn't there?

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Mr John Douglas's black-breasted red gamecock, The Earl.

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-Crystal Palace, 1870, so that helps us date it.

-Yes.

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And you've got chapters to cover absolutely everything. Houses, accommodation,

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selection, eggs and incubation, all the way down to showing, judging, buying, selling.

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-And then you've got all the different...

-All the different breeds.

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-Do you remember some of the breeds you had?

-Rhode Island Red and White Leghorns.

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-Hamburgs. They are Bantams, aren't they, Hamburgs?

-Yes.

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I used to have some Hamburg Bantams, but the fox got them. Anyway, back to the book.

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-Why are you selling it?

-I want it to go to somebody who's going to appreciate it.

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-Right. Where does it live at home?

-In the cupboard.

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-So you don't really ever use it.

-No.

-You don't look at it.

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-No.

-A good copy of this is worth a few hundred pounds.

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-But this is a bit of a poor example.

-I can understand that.

-A bit sad.

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I'd be tempted to go with our favourite quote, and you watch Flog It, don't you?

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-Oh, yes.

-So you know what I'm talking about. What's our favourite quote?

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-50.

-I was going to say 80 to 120.

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-Yes.

-80 to 120.

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And it must make 50 quid whatever happens,

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so I would put a reserve of 50 quid on it, just to cover it. Is that all right?

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-Yeah.

-You'd be disappointed if it went for 20 quid, wouldn't you?

-Yeah.

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It might have got thrown out, that's the danger, if we kept it at home.

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So you've rescued it and it's going to go to someone who's hopefully enthusiastic about poultry.

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Anything raised will go to lifeboats, anyway.

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Oh, good! I often don't ask people what they're going to do with the money when it's only £50, £80,

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but for the lifeboats, that helps.

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-Oh, yeah.

-I hope it sells well at the sale.

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'We'd better not count our chickens, Adam.

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'Next up, Amanda has brought in some interesting plaster casts to show Mark.'

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Tell me, where on earth did you get these from?

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My father was given them by a dear old friend of his

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and, many years after, my father gave them to me.

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And do you know why he was given them?

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He was just a very good friend. My father helped him out quite a bit

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cos he was getting old and he needed help. Other than that... That's the main reason.

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-And did your father treasure them?

-Erm, not really.

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-Tucked away in a cupboard or something?

-Yes, quite.

-They are a difficult thing to house.

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-I think they're beautiful, but you do need a typical country house interior.

-Yes.

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And quite a large country house.

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These, really, come from a bygone era.

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If you transport yourself back to the 18th century,

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when gentlemen of certain rank,

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rich gentlemen, started the Grand Tour,

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so they toured Italy in search of Renaissance art pieces

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and classical pieces of art,

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they shipped back thousands and thousands of treasures from the Grand Tour

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which furnished that typical country-house look.

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-It showed that you were a learned person if you had wonderful objects in your home.

-Yes.

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The early ones, the 18th century one, are often made of carved agate, carved cameos,

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and done in specialist shops and of the highest quality

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and can be worth thousands of pounds for each cameo.

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These ones are a plaster copy, if you like.

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But they have got some age. They're 19th century. But they're towards the mid-19th century.

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-The frames are contemporary to them, I think. Slight bit of damage on one of the frames.

-Yes.

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But that's chipped plaster, which could be touched up and gilded and you wouldn't notice it so much.

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-In terms of value, I would be looking at £50 a case.

-Right.

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-So £200 to £300.

-Yes.

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I'm hoping that if we put a sensible estimate like that,

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we'll get two or three interior design dealers interested, as well as collectors

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-and it might even push above that. Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

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-Yes, I would.

-And you've obviously had them a fair while, as we've discussed.

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What's the reason for selling them now?

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They don't go with our cottage

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and we've asked our boys whether they'd like them and they don't,

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so we might as well sell them and have a nice meal out.

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-Kids don't want old things, old fuddy-duddy things now, do they?

-No.

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-They want a new Xbox or Wii game or something.

-Yes.

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-Well, that's lovely. It's great to have met you.

-Likewise.

-And I look forward to the auction.

-Thank you.

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'We always expect the unexpected at the valuation day.' Are you ready for this?

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'And the next item, brought in by Irene and John, is no exception.'

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This is lovely. I can already see it's an Attaboy, isn't it?

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-It is.

-Which is a type of hat make.

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So, let's have a look at it. Let's get that lid off there. This is a salesman's sample, I think.

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-I see.

-And the salesman would've taken it out, it's small enough to carry around.

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"Believe it or not, this miniature Attaboy is half the size of an ordinary Attaboy hat."

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So you've got an idea of what it'll make. Isn't that cute?

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And it's got the Attaboy label in there.

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-What a cute little thing.

-It is lovely, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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These were introduced in the 30s. Attaboy, I believe, started in 1930.

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You said the 30s, didn't you?

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I think they carried on quite a while after that. It was popular.

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The Attaboy trilby hat was quite well known.

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I think that's dead cute. And, also, it serves a purpose for me, because now I'm getting on a bit,

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-I've got one of these bald spots.

-Oh!

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That would cover it just nicely.

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-How did you get to own it, then?

-A gentleman gave us this, didn't he?

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-One of the neighbours.

-And how did he own it?

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-Well, he had a gentleman's shop, didn't he?

-Like an outfitter's?

-Yes.

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So he may have got that as a sample or as a shop display article.

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It's just my kind of thing, really.

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So, what's brought you to sell it? Where does it live at home?

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In the loft with lots of other things, like everyone else.

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-You put it in the loft, forget about it.

-That's it.

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-Yeah, you just don't think of looking at it. And yet it is cute, really.

-It's lovely.

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You've got the box and everything and it's made...

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-That's still the same tissue, I think.

-I think it's excellent.

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-So you're selling it because it's in the loft?

-Yes. We're getting rid of lot of things.

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-That'll free up a load of room!

-I know, this is it.

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-THEY LAUGH

-Erm, it's not worth a lot.

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I know. We know that.

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-Great fun, though, isn't it?

-I know! It's a novelty thing.

-It's a curiosity.

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It's the story that you can tell.

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-So I think it'll make £20 to £40.

-There you are.

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-Quite surprising.

-Fingers crossed.

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SHE LAUGHS

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-I think we should put a reserve on it, though, of 20 quid. You don't want it to go for less.

-No.

-No.

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We'll take it home and look at it again.

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So let's put £20 bottom limit.

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-Yes.

-And then, hopefully, two people will fall in love with it

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and it'll find a new head.

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-THEY LAUGH

-A small one!

-Thanks for coming. I really enjoyed that.

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'We're heading up the coast to the seaside town of Colwyn Bay to sell our items.

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'But before the sale gets underway, here's a quick reminder of all the items going under the hammer.

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'We're hoping Adam and Barbara's bird book flies at the auction.

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'Amanda's cameos certainly have the look.

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'And Irene and John have big hopes for their small hat.'

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And now for my favourite part of the show, because anything can happen!

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It's auction time! And as you know, it's not an exact science.

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This is where we're putting our valuations to the test today,

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so don't go away, because there'll be one or two very big surprises.

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At 420. 440. 460.

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'First up, it's the unusual book.'

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This next lot is a wonderful lot if you keep chickens.

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It's an illustrated book by Lewis Wright and it belongs to Alan and Barbara,

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-who did keep chickens but not any more.

-A long while ago.

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-Lovely book, great illustrations.

-Isn't it lovely?

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There's a little bit of damage to the spine, but you can forgive it.

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A good copy is worth a few hundred pounds, I think we've pitched it right.

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-You're in the money. It's got to make £100.

-Anything less than 60 would be a "paltry" amount.

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The Illustrated Book Of Poultry by L Wright.

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Green leather cloth. Lovely book. 50 coloured plates. Bid me £50.

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50. 30 I'm bid.

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At 30. 5. 40.

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50. 5.

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60. 5. 70.

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-70 bid.

-Come on.

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At 70. Is there 5? £70 only.

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Everybody done? 70... 72.

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-75.

-72! Someone's a meany!

-75.

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At £75.

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Everybody done? 85.

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85. 90. 90 bid. £90.

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5 again. At £90.

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100. 100 bid.

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Yes! That's what I wanted.

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£100 only. Everybody done now?

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100 on my right. 105. Back again, in the room.

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£105.

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110. 110 bid.

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-120 tops!

-£110. Final call.

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115. 115.

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Against you at 115.

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120. 120 bid. Online.

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120 online. Brilliant!

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-Great!

-Well done. I'd have been disappointed if it went for £50.

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Well done, you. Well done.

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'Right at the top of the estimate. That's a good result. Next up, it's Amanda and Mark

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'with four cases of plaster cast cameos.'

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I absolutely love this next lot, these wonderful cameos belonging to Amanda.

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They're all beautifully cased in glass. I can see them on the wall in any fine room.

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-I just think they're wonderful.

-They're very you, Paul. They're very interior design,

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because you can picture them in an 18th century room.

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They do have the look. There's some lovely hotels around here and they'd look really good

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-in a drawing room or in the bar of a hotel.

-Yeah, keep talking them up.

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Oh, I will! You've got to buy them!

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Anyway, let's find out what North Wales thinks. They're going under the hammer now.

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Four framed hanging cases,

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each containing approximately 22 classical cameos, varying shapes.

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I'm on the book at 160.

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Oh, well, we're straight in. Yes!

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-240.

-Oh, that's all right.

-That's good, isn't it?

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240. 260. 240 bid. Is there 60?

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At 240. 240. Is there 60?

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240.

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250, OK.

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260. 260 against you.

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260. Are you coming in? At 260. Bid's with me at the moment.

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At 270. 270.

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-280. 280 bid.

-Would be nice to get up to 300, wouldn't it?

-Yeah.

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Back with me. 280. 280 bid.

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Final call. 280.

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Are you coming back? Final call at £280.

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Yes! Hammer's gone down. £280.

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That was short and sweet. You could say it was a cameo performance.

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THEY LAUGH Oh, Paul.

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-Hey, that's a good result, isn't it?

-It is. More than we expected.

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I bet they end up in a restaurant or a hotel. I really do. They were lovely.

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'Another brilliant result. Well done, experts.

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'Now it's Irene and John with their unusual display piece.'

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Well, the great thing about Flog It is we get the chance to go out and about all over the UK

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and come across the most wonderful things, and in nine years of Flog It,

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I've never seen anything like this. And that's the beauty of it. We're always surprised at valuations days.

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-Good to see you. I love this little... It's almost like a tailor's advert.

-Yeah, it is.

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-A little hat.

-It's the sort of thing, if I saw it at a fair, I'd buy it.

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-You'd have to.

-Yeah.

-And you wouldn't really want to sell it for £30 or £50.

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-I don't know if it's worth hundreds, though, is it?

-No. Let's hope it goes to a good family.

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-It'd be nice to see it make 50 quid, wouldn't it?

-Yep. Who knows?

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You never know what's going to happen in the auction.

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Hats off to you two for bringing it in.

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Let's find out what the bidders think.

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Now, I know that my opinion counts for nothing,

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but I think this is one of the most delightful lots in today's sale.

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It's the cardboard-boxed Attaboy velvet trilby hat.

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It won't fit any of us here. I don't think it really matters.

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Original labels to the box and to the hat.

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It's a real little gem.

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£100.

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You wait. We won't be far away when we finish.

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50. 40 I'm bid. At 40.

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40 bid. 40. A real little beaut.

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At 40. 40 I'm bid.

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50. £50.

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-60.

-60.

-£60.

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And again now. Is there 70? At 60.

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65. 70 with me.

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£70. 5 again now.

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At £70. A delightful little lot.

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75. 80. 80 bid.

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-At 80.

-That's good!

-It's great, that, isn't it?

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£80 only. With me now against you.

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-At £80 on the book.

-Come on.

-£80.

-That's good.

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Great! I'm surprised.

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I didn't think we'd get that. I thought we were going home with it.

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-80.

-£80. The hammer's gone down.

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-That was in museum condition.

-Yeah.

-It really was.

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Pristine. Well done, you two!

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'Well, that's our first items, and we'll be back here later on in the programme.

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'But first, I'm going to visit somewhere very special.'

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Today, I've nipped off to the Mediterranean

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to take a little walk around this wonderful Italian village.

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Well, no, I'm only joking, but I am actually walking through an Italian-style piazza

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surrounded by Italianate architecture. Just look at that!

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Hey, bella, bella, mama, mama!

0:18:460:18:48

They're not Italian. That's given me away.

0:18:480:18:50

I haven't left North Wales. I'm here in the magical village of Portmeirion

0:18:500:18:55

and all this is only possible because of the realisation of a dream by one very special man.

0:18:550:19:00

Clough Williams-Ellis.

0:19:000:19:02

42 years ago, I discovered this place of wilderness,

0:19:060:19:10

just the old, deserted mansion and stables and one cottage.

0:19:100:19:15

And now all this

0:19:150:19:17

has given pleasure to countless people,

0:19:170:19:20

but much more to myself.

0:19:200:19:22

Indeed, it has been my love affair with life.

0:19:220:19:26

I wanted to show that you could develop even a very beautiful place

0:19:280:19:35

without defining it.

0:19:350:19:37

In fact, that if you did it with sufficient loving care,

0:19:370:19:40

you might even enhance what God had given you.

0:19:400:19:44

Clough Williams-Ellis was born in North Wales in 1883

0:19:460:19:50

and his childhood dream of becoming an architect was quickly achieved

0:19:500:19:53

when, in 1903, after only three months of formal training, he set up a practice.

0:19:530:19:58

Clough became a successful, jobbing architect

0:19:580:20:01

with many projects on the go.

0:20:010:20:03

But the village of Portmeirion here was arguably his most successful and important work.

0:20:030:20:09

It must have been an extremely difficult job choosing the right location to build Portmeirion.

0:20:200:20:25

You see, the architecture has to sit in harmony

0:20:250:20:28

peacefully with the natural surrounding landscape.

0:20:280:20:31

And look at that lovely high cliff with the natural woodland behind it.

0:20:310:20:34

And you do have this marvellous estuary. Look at this, we're right in the mouth of the estuary.

0:20:340:20:39

And it's wonderfully tidal, as well. This is paradise!

0:20:390:20:43

And Clough got off to a great start, as well, because there were some existing buildings to start on.

0:20:430:20:49

Clough may have been a visionary, but he was also a very practical man

0:20:550:20:58

and he realised he needed funds from tourism to finance this incredible building project.

0:20:580:21:03

So when work started on Portmeirion in 1925,

0:21:030:21:07

he converted this old house that was built on the shoreline here into this magnificent hotel.

0:21:070:21:12

'The hotel opened on 2nd April 1926

0:21:190:21:23

'and from then on, it was packed out every summer.

0:21:230:21:27

'During the winters at Portmeirion, Clough spent the profit the hotel made on extending the village.'

0:21:270:21:32

And, I must say, what a marvellous job he has done of this place.

0:21:410:21:45

It puts a smile on your face wherever you go, whatever corner you turn.

0:21:450:21:49

Granted, Portmeirion does have a strong Mediterranean feel,

0:21:490:21:53

but in reality, there's lots of different styles of architecture going on all around you.

0:21:530:21:58

Clough called this his architectural mongrel.

0:21:580:22:00

I call it an architectural delight, because, well, I just want to embrace and hug all these buildings

0:22:000:22:05

cos they look so cute. But the attention to detail is superb.

0:22:050:22:09

In the second phase of the building work, after the war in the 1950s,

0:22:270:22:31

Clough concentrated on a more formal, Georgian style, which is evident in that big building there.

0:22:310:22:36

Look at it peering down on us, the pink and white one.

0:22:360:22:39

Now, that has strong architectural form and detail,

0:22:390:22:43

a wonderful symmetry about it. It's known as unicorn.

0:22:430:22:46

I think Clough appreciated a practical joke, because here at Portmeirion,

0:22:550:22:59

all is not what it seems. Well, some of the time, anyway.

0:22:590:23:02

Take this house, for instance. Cliff House, here we go, look.

0:23:020:23:05

A wonderful gentleman's residence with this lovely old sweeping wartime canopy over the door.

0:23:050:23:11

Real windows here. Ooh, someone might come to the door now.

0:23:110:23:15

And on this side, look, one, two, three painted windows, painted onto the stonework,

0:23:150:23:21

even down to the net curtains with this lovely lace pattern on it.

0:23:210:23:24

It's these quirky little things that make this place so magical.

0:23:240:23:29

This building is called the Gatehouse.

0:23:400:23:43

Clough used some very skilful design techniques on this one.

0:23:430:23:46

Let me point out a couple. For a start, the windows. Take a look at them.

0:23:460:23:50

They look strangely small, so out of proportion, but they're designed to be small

0:23:500:23:54

to make this building look a lot bigger and more important and impressive.

0:23:540:23:59

Also, looks quite old, doesn't it?

0:23:590:24:01

It's aged well over the years, weathered with all the elements.

0:24:010:24:04

Well, that's because Clough had this painted with four different shades of pink

0:24:040:24:09

to look like early plasterwork. At the bottom, it's darker, and as it rises upwards,

0:24:090:24:13

where it hits the sun, it graduates out into this sort of faint-looking colour.

0:24:130:24:17

That is just simply genius.

0:24:170:24:21

'Portmeirion also made a name for itself as a home for fallen buildings,

0:24:270:24:30

'as Clough rescued salvage from other sites and incorporated them into the village.

0:24:300:24:35

'As word got out, people flocked to donate things.

0:24:350:24:38

'For example, numerous mermaids were featured around the village,

0:24:380:24:42

'which came from the Seaman's Mission in Liverpool.

0:24:420:24:46

'The Buddha came from the film set of The Inn Of The Sixth Happiness, which starred Ingrid Bergman

0:24:460:24:51

'and was filmed locally. The Bristol Colonnade came from Arnos Court in Bristol,

0:24:510:24:56

'which was bombed during the Second World War. It now stands proudly overlooking the piazza.

0:24:560:25:01

'As the Bristol Colonnade shows,

0:25:010:25:03

'Clough wasn't afraid of incorporating larger salvage finds.'

0:25:030:25:07

Now, before I leave Portmeirion, there's one final view I just cannot resist

0:25:260:25:30

and it's up there, that bell tower.

0:25:300:25:33

'The bell tower, also called the Campanile, was built in 1928.

0:25:350:25:39

'It had always been an integral part of Clough's early plans and model for the village.

0:25:390:25:44

'It was also one of the few buildings which Clough prepared a complete half-inch drawing of,

0:25:440:25:50

'which he actually stuck to.'

0:25:500:25:52

Gosh, just look at that view from up here.

0:26:000:26:03

That was definitely well worth the long climb.

0:26:030:26:05

But there must have been times during Clough Williams-Ellis' life

0:26:050:26:09

where he thought this place, Portmeirion, would've never been completed.

0:26:090:26:13

This was a lot of hard work, so he was obviously a very determined chap.

0:26:130:26:17

The building work was finally finished in 1973

0:26:170:26:20

and five years later, at the grand old age of 95,

0:26:200:26:23

Clough peacefully passed away here in Portmeirion,

0:26:230:26:27

possibly a very happy man, knowing that his dream had become a reality.

0:26:270:26:32

'Our valuation day's inside the Great Hall at Bangor University.

0:26:480:26:52

'It's a familiar spot to thousands of students. Talking of familiar, it looks like Valerie and Gary

0:26:520:26:57

'have brought in one of our old Flog It favourites. Good old Clarice Cliff.'

0:26:570:27:02

-Hello, Valerie. Hello, Gary. How are you doing?

-Not too bad, thank you.

0:27:020:27:06

-Well, you've brought a Flog It favourite on.

-Yes.

-A piece of Clarice Cliff.

0:27:060:27:10

-Very true.

-A rather nice biscuit barrel.

0:27:100:27:13

-Are you a collector of Clarice Cliff?

-We'd like to be.

-But not these days.

0:27:130:27:18

-Too expensive, isn't it?

-Yes, it is these days.

0:27:180:27:21

-Where did you get it from?

-Well, some time in '74, '75

0:27:210:27:27

we went into a car boot and we saw this on the table.

0:27:270:27:32

And, as it happened, we knew the people that were selling it.

0:27:320:27:36

And I said, "How much?"

0:27:360:27:38

and he said, "Well, to you, 50p" and she said, "No, 30p."

0:27:380:27:43

-You didn't.

-Yes.

0:27:430:27:45

30 pence you paid for this? Good lord. Mind you, in those early days of car boots,

0:27:450:27:49

you really could get a bargain. People just went mad and took everything,

0:27:490:27:53

cleared Auntie's house out and didn't know what they were selling.

0:27:530:27:56

-Correct, yeah.

-Well, good on you. You spotted a really nice shaped piece.

0:27:560:28:01

In some ways, I love and loathe Clarice Cliff,

0:28:010:28:03

but I do like unusual shapes.

0:28:030:28:06

The pattern is rather boring on this one, cos it's the crocus pattern,

0:28:060:28:10

but the shape is rather nice.

0:28:100:28:13

This shape was known as the bonjour shape, because of these loops,

0:28:130:28:17

and it's got that rather fresh look about it.

0:28:170:28:21

This is the original handle, of course.

0:28:210:28:24

And underneath, we've got the usual Clarice Cliff mark.

0:28:240:28:27

So we're looking at maybe the 1935 period.

0:28:270:28:31

So a nice period to be in.

0:28:310:28:33

-There is a small chip.

-Yes.

-Very small chip on the corner, which I have to point out to you.

-Uh-huh.

0:28:330:28:39

Now, how much do you think it's worth? Cos I have a feeling you've done some research.

0:28:390:28:44

-We thought £300 to £400.

-Oh!

-But I don't know.

0:28:440:28:48

-HE LAUGHS Well, I think you should stop thinking now.

-All right.

0:28:480:28:54

THEY LAUGH Several of these have come up recently in more exciting patterns.

0:28:540:28:59

-Ah.

-And the more exciting patterns have been making £300, £350, £400, as much as £500 or £600.

0:28:590:29:06

But I think, because this is the crocus pattern,

0:29:060:29:10

we've got to think a little bit less than that.

0:29:100:29:13

I mean, ideally, I would say around £200 to £300.

0:29:130:29:16

And then you might find that it pushes up towards £300.

0:29:160:29:20

But if you put it in at £300 to £400,

0:29:200:29:22

it might not encourage the bidders underneath.

0:29:220:29:25

-Would you be happy with that?

-Er, yes.

-I think we would, wouldn't we?

0:29:250:29:29

-We'll put a reserve of £200, because we don't want it selling below that.

-No.

0:29:290:29:34

Valerie, you knocked it down from a grand total of 50p to 30p.

0:29:340:29:40

You've had it all these years. Why, oh, why are you selling it now?

0:29:400:29:43

Erm, to help raise some money, really.

0:29:430:29:46

-Towards?

-Towards buying a new car.

-A new car?

0:29:460:29:50

So you're hoping to turn a biscuit barrel into a car.

0:29:500:29:54

-Well, part of a car.

-THEY LAUGH

0:29:540:29:57

-Thank you so much for bringing it in.

-Thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:29:570:30:01

'Next, it's Adam, who's found something a bit special, brought along by Patricia.'

0:30:050:30:11

-Can you tell me where you got it from?

-It was my mother's.

-Right.

0:30:110:30:14

I never saw her wearing it. I found it when I was emptying her jewellery boxes after she died.

0:30:140:30:20

So you wouldn't have necessarily recognised it at all.

0:30:200:30:23

I didn't even know what metal it was. I thought it was just chrome.

0:30:230:30:26

Well, it's stamped here, 18-carat white gold and platinum. So it's quite nice.

0:30:260:30:32

I think a lot of people will think, "What a lovely brooch, why is she selling it?"

0:30:320:30:36

Tell us why you're selling it.

0:30:360:30:38

Well, when I found out it was quite valuable, I was frightened to wear it in case I lost it

0:30:380:30:43

-and my daughter was the same. I offered it to her and she said, "Oh, no, I might lose it."

-It's a shame.

0:30:430:30:48

They're there to be worn, really.

0:30:480:30:51

So, what do you think it's worth?

0:30:510:30:54

-I don't know. You're the expert.

-Well, yeah, so they say.

0:30:540:30:57

Thanks for reminding me.

0:30:570:30:59

It's Art Deco period, by the way. 1930s, that sort of thing. 20s, 30s.

0:30:590:31:04

If the stones were bigger, it'd be worth quite a lot, but it's quite a small thing.

0:31:040:31:08

I think it's worth about £200.

0:31:080:31:11

-Still something you want to sell?

-Yes, I think so.

0:31:110:31:13

-Excellent. Well, I would say if we put an estimate of £150 to £250.

-Uh-huh.

0:31:130:31:18

Reserve at £150. But no less at all. Just a fixed reserve of £150.

0:31:180:31:23

-Does that sound all right?

-Sounds good.

-I don't want you disappointed.

0:31:230:31:27

But I've enjoyed this, and hopefully the bidders will enjoy this Art Deco brooch when we go to auction.

0:31:270:31:33

-Thanks for bringing it.

-Thank you.

0:31:330:31:36

'What a stylish brooch.

0:31:360:31:38

'And they say Michelle Obama's made them popular again.

0:31:380:31:41

'Well, we'll just have to wait and see.

0:31:410:31:43

'Now it's my turn and, as you know, I can't resist the unusual.'

0:31:430:31:47

This is absolutely marvellous and it belongs to Christine.

0:31:470:31:50

Where are you? Oh, there you are!

0:31:500:31:52

What a lovely Cuban mahogany carrying case. Isn't that splendid?

0:31:520:31:57

It just goes to show the quality of this microscope. I'll just put it down.

0:31:570:32:01

-Tell me, how did you come by this?

-We've just had it in the family, really.

0:32:010:32:05

My granddad had it. I remember playing with it when I was little.

0:32:050:32:09

You haven't played with it for a long time. I can see that, cos it's covered in dust and cobwebs.

0:32:090:32:14

And I'm so pleased you haven't cleaned it today

0:32:140:32:17

because I think the collectors will absolutely love this.

0:32:170:32:20

-Dust and all?

-Yes! That's what you're buying into, the forgotten history.

0:32:200:32:24

It's been lying around somewhere. It's not been through the trade, if you know what I mean by that.

0:32:240:32:29

It's not gone from auction room to dealer, from dealer to dealer, and then back to the auction room.

0:32:290:32:34

It's fresh to the market. We see a lot of microscopes.

0:32:340:32:38

I've not seen one as nice as this for a long time.

0:32:380:32:41

-Sadly, I can't find a maker's name anywhere on this.

-No, I couldn't.

0:32:410:32:45

I've had a really good look. It's possibly by Dollond of London,

0:32:450:32:51

if I stick my neck out and have a guess at something.

0:32:510:32:54

And it's of the Regency period, it's around 1815, 1820.

0:32:550:32:59

Look of the quality of these columns. They're like proper Roman capitals,

0:32:590:33:05

fashioned and turned in rosewood. The lenses, the optics, are very, very good.

0:33:050:33:10

Here you've got a mirrored convex glass,

0:33:100:33:12

which reflects the light back up.

0:33:120:33:15

The only damage I can see to it is the rack and pinion focussing

0:33:150:33:20

is slightly worn. And you see those teeth in there?

0:33:200:33:24

-Yeah.

-Is that you when you were a young girl playing with it?

-Probably.

0:33:240:33:28

You've stuck your hair brush in there and given it a whack, haven't you?

0:33:280:33:32

But as I said earlier, the lens is very good. The optics, that's what it's all about.

0:33:320:33:37

They're not damaged, they're not scratched. And, of course, a whole case of slides

0:33:370:33:42

in a fitted bottom drawer to go back in the cabinet. So, it's all here. It's all here.

0:33:420:33:48

This, in its day, would've been very expensive.

0:33:480:33:51

It would've been owned by an academic, a botanist or a chemist, using it to earn their living.

0:33:510:33:56

-Have you any idea of value?

-No, none at all.

0:33:560:34:00

If we could find a maker's name, I know it would put the value up.

0:34:000:34:04

At the moment, I'm inclined to think it's in the region of £300 to £500.

0:34:040:34:09

-Oh, right.

-I'd love to be so wrong and so far out on this.

0:34:090:34:13

Because it's a proper statement piece.

0:34:130:34:16

It looks great cased, it looks great out of the case.

0:34:160:34:20

And I think the collectors will love this.

0:34:200:34:23

-Would you like to put it into auction with a value of £300 to £500?

-Yeah.

-And fingers crossed,

0:34:230:34:28

my gut feeling is it'll do a little bit more.

0:34:280:34:30

-Happy with that?

-Yep.

0:34:300:34:33

-Fixed reserve at £300?

-Yeah.

0:34:330:34:35

OK.

0:34:350:34:37

'So, that's it, and we're selling our items at Colwyn Bay.

0:34:390:34:44

'Here's a reminder of the three things we're taking.

0:34:440:34:47

'Of course, there's Christine's quality microscope.

0:34:490:34:52

'It'll be joined by Valerie and Gary's Clarice Cliff biscuit barrel

0:34:530:34:57

'and Patricia's Art Deco brooch.'

0:34:570:35:00

First up, biscuit barrel, OK?

0:35:040:35:07

£200 to £300 put on by Mark. We're going to find out exactly what the bidders think

0:35:070:35:11

right now up here in North Wales because it's going under the hammer.

0:35:110:35:15

The Clarice Cliff is a crocus lidded biscuit barrel

0:35:170:35:19

with basket-woven handle. Not perfect...

0:35:190:35:23

There we go. He had to say that, really.

0:35:230:35:27

210 bid me. 200.

0:35:270:35:29

-Finger crossed.

-200.

0:35:290:35:32

180. I have 160 on the book.

0:35:350:35:37

At 160. 160 bid.

0:35:370:35:39

180 if you like. At 160.

0:35:390:35:42

160. Is there 80? At 160.

0:35:420:35:45

180. 180 bid. 180. 180. Is there 200?

0:35:450:35:49

At 180. 2 I'll take.

0:35:490:35:51

We've got a £200 fixed reserve. We're one bid away.

0:35:510:35:55

£180. Everybody done? At £180.

0:35:550:36:00

It can be sold on condition, that's all. 180 is in the room.

0:36:000:36:03

-Everybody done? £180.

-Do you want to take it?

0:36:030:36:06

To be sold on condition, that's all. 180 in the room.

0:36:060:36:09

Final call at 180. 180.

0:36:090:36:12

We have sold it. He's used a bit of discretion. I think that was wise,

0:36:120:36:16

-because of that chip. Are you happy?

-Yes, fair enough.

0:36:160:36:21

For the sake of £20, yes, exactly. That's a good result.

0:36:210:36:25

-I think so.

-A very good result for a bit of damaged Clarice Cliff. You see, Clarice hasn't let us down!

0:36:250:36:30

It's never failed us! If you've got anything like that at home and you want to sell it,

0:36:300:36:34

bring it along to one of our valuation days, that's where it all starts.

0:36:340:36:38

You can pick up details from your local press to venues we're coming to close to you

0:36:380:36:42

or you can log on to bbc.co.uk/flogit

0:36:420:36:46

and follow the links.

0:36:460:36:48

'That was just under the reserve and our auctioneer used his discretion

0:36:540:36:58

'on a nod from Gary and sold it anyway.

0:36:580:37:01

'Next, it's Patricia's brooch.'

0:37:010:37:04

-This is the nervy part of it, Patricia.

-Yes.

0:37:040:37:07

It's all down to the bidders in the room. And it's very quiet.

0:37:080:37:12

A very nice quality 18-carat white-gold bar brooch

0:37:140:37:18

with a round-cut diamond and two tiny flanking diamonds.

0:37:180:37:23

£200.

0:37:230:37:25

That's quality. 150.

0:37:260:37:29

100 I'm bid. £100.

0:37:290:37:31

100 bid. 120. 120 bid. Is there 40?

0:37:310:37:35

-140. 140 bid. 140.

-He's got a bid on the book, hasn't he?

0:37:350:37:40

The white gold and diamond brooch. At 140. Where's 60?

0:37:400:37:43

£140. Everybody done?

0:37:430:37:46

-Are we selling? I think we're selling.

-Yeah.

0:37:460:37:50

-Did we have discretion on this?

-150.

0:37:500:37:52

140. 50 if you like. I don't mind. Split with you. 150 if you wish.

0:37:520:37:58

-I don't know if we're selling or not.

-Nor do I.

0:37:580:38:00

At £140. We have to leave that there at 140.

0:38:000:38:04

He didn't sell. We had £140.

0:38:040:38:08

We were about £3 or £4 short of the discretion.

0:38:080:38:11

-You were a bit worried about it, anyway.

-I'll take it home and wear it.

-Will you? Bless you!

0:38:110:38:16

I think it suits you, because I can see you love things like that.

0:38:160:38:20

I shall have a safety chain fitted.

0:38:200:38:22

-Yeah.

-That makes sense.

-Cos I'd hate to lose it.

0:38:220:38:26

-It was close, though.

-It's definitely worth that, really.

0:38:260:38:29

Jewellery's such a subjective thing.

0:38:290:38:32

-No, I shall take it home and enjoy it.

-Excellent.

0:38:320:38:35

-And you carry that really well. You can wear a brooch really well.

-Thank you.

0:38:350:38:39

'What a shame the Michelle Obama effect hasn't hit North Wales yet. Give it time.

0:38:390:38:44

'But I think Patricia was relieved to hold onto it rather than let it go too cheaply.

0:38:440:38:48

'Next, it's my turn. Let's hope I have more luck.

0:38:500:38:53

'Before the sale, I had a quick chat to auctioneer David Rogers Jones about the microscope.'

0:38:530:38:58

This has got to be my favourite lot in the sale.

0:38:590:39:02

Christine owns this and I nearly pounced on her when I saw it.

0:39:020:39:05

It came in the most wonderful, gorgeous Cuban mahogany case, as well.

0:39:050:39:09

I couldn't find a maker's name on it.

0:39:090:39:11

We looked as well, Paul. Obviously, the first thing we were anxious to find was a name

0:39:110:39:16

and we can't find one, which is the downside.

0:39:160:39:19

But to come in a Cuban mahogany case and the rosewood on the base,

0:39:190:39:23

it's nearly all brass, it smacks of quality, it really does.

0:39:230:39:27

I've pitched it at £300 to £500, but I'm hoping it could be worth an awful lot more.

0:39:270:39:33

-It's beautiful, isn't it?

-It is.

0:39:330:39:36

-Christine is not going to be keen to sell at much less than the reserve.

-I know.

0:39:360:39:41

-I had this battle with her.

-She's a reluctant seller.

0:39:410:39:44

Yes. But I've said to her, let's start it at £300 and hopefully it'll get £400 to £500.

0:39:440:39:49

Well, scientific is selling well. If only we had a make.

0:39:490:39:52

But, as you say, they'll be some knowing guy who's going to be...

0:39:520:39:56

And I'm sure this has had a lot of interest. Surely people have mused over this

0:39:560:40:01

and have thought, "Gosh, I want to own something like that."

0:40:010:40:04

-We have had condition report requests from abroad.

-Good.

0:40:040:40:07

So that all bodes well, doesn't it?

0:40:070:40:11

Absolutely fabulous microscope. I fell in love playing with this at the valuation day, didn't I?

0:40:110:40:16

I know we talked about £300 to £500 and hopefully, you never know,

0:40:160:40:20

with two academics battling it out, it could easily do £800 to £1,200.

0:40:200:40:23

That's what I'd like in my dreams,

0:40:230:40:27

because I think something like that is worth it.

0:40:270:40:30

But without a maker's name, we don't know. But I bet there's somebody out there that does know.

0:40:300:40:35

And they'll have a value. Hopefully, there's two people that know here to push the price up.

0:40:350:40:39

But we've got a fixed reserve of £400 now, because I know you weren't happy with £300, so you've upped it.

0:40:390:40:45

-Yeah.

-Which is fair enough, because I always said we wanted £400 to £500

0:40:450:40:49

but you need to start at £300 to get that. So let's see what the bidders think, shall we? Here we go.

0:40:490:40:54

A very, very nice early microscope on a rosewood base

0:40:560:40:59

with rosewood columns

0:40:590:41:02

and a small quantity of glass slides

0:41:020:41:05

and in a very, very nice pyramidal box. Bid me 400.

0:41:050:41:10

300.

0:41:120:41:14

200 I'm bid. At 200. £200.

0:41:160:41:19

250 anybody? At 220. 250. 280.

0:41:190:41:24

280 my bid on the book. 300 I'm bid. 20 my bid on the book.

0:41:240:41:29

-Ooh.

-Getting there.

0:41:290:41:31

320. 40.

0:41:310:41:33

340. 340 bid.

0:41:330:41:35

At 340. Everybody done now?

0:41:350:41:37

-At 340.

-It's petering out, isn't it?

-Mm.

0:41:370:41:41

At 360. Is there 80? 380. 380 bid.

0:41:410:41:45

Come on, come on, come on.

0:41:450:41:47

380. 400. 400 bid.

0:41:470:41:50

At 400. Final call.

0:41:500:41:53

-£400.

-We're selling.

0:41:530:41:56

£400. 410.

0:41:560:41:59

Every penny counts. At 410. 20 if you like.

0:41:590:42:03

420. 420 bid.

0:42:030:42:05

420. Everybody done now?

0:42:050:42:08

At £420. Is that for the final time?

0:42:080:42:12

420. All done?

0:42:120:42:15

430.

0:42:150:42:17

430. Skin of your teeth.

0:42:170:42:19

430. Well, every penny helps, doesn't it?

0:42:190:42:23

At 430. 430 bid. 430.

0:42:230:42:27

At £430.

0:42:270:42:30

-440.

-440.

0:42:300:42:31

Come on, come on.

0:42:320:42:34

Hammer's up at £440.

0:42:340:42:37

Well, it's gone. That's good. That was mid-estimate. That was OK.

0:42:400:42:43

-Unbelievable, that.

-Good, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

0:42:430:42:46

Thank you so much for bringing such a wonderful thing in. It was a real delight to see such quality.

0:42:470:42:52

If you've got anything like that, we'd love to see you. Bring it to a valuation day.

0:42:520:42:56

Everybody done?

0:43:040:43:06

Well, that's it. The auction has just ended.

0:43:060:43:09

One minute, this room is full of bidders, it was jam packed, and the next,

0:43:090:43:12

well, everybody has just scarpered. I think it's time to take a well-earned rest and put my feet up,

0:43:120:43:18

because, boy, what a day that was! It was a rollercoaster ride of emotions.

0:43:180:43:22

But that's the beauty of auctions. You never know what's going to happen.

0:43:220:43:26

I hope you've enjoyed today's show. I loved being in North Wales.

0:43:260:43:29

So until the next time, it's cheerio. Ohh.

0:43:290:43:33

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:350:43:39

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:390:43:43

.

0:43:430:43:43

Joining Paul Martin in the university city of Bangor are experts Mark Stacey and Adam Partridge. Among the items they value are a novelty hat and a microscope.

Paul also visits a wonderful architectural gem - Portmerion. The village was the inspiration and life's work of Sir Clough Williams-Ellis. He bought the site in 1925 and spent the next 50 years building the village, lovingly mixing architectural styles to prove that they could all live comfortably side-by-side. Clough was also a master of recycling and salvaged many unwanted buildings and design features to add to his creation.


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