Richmond Flog It!


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Richmond

Paul Martin and the Flog It! team head to Richmond in Yorkshire. Experts James Lewis and Adam Partridge value an assortment of items including an exquisite tea pot.


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We have arrived! Today "Flog It!" is in Richmond, Yorkshire,

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and hopefully the locals will be making their way to the Market Hall

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laden with unwanted antiques and collectibles.

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Yes, "Flog It!" is in town!

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The picturesque town of Richmond is situated on the banks

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of the River Swale, and is steeped in history.

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High above the town is the breathtaking Richmond Castle,

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which was built in the reign of William the Conqueror.

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Its construction is of stone rather than wood,

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which was incredibly unusual for its time.

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In fact, it's thought to be the first stone-built castle in England.

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Back down at ground level, I hope this huge crowd gathering here

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have got some unusual antiques for our experts to value.

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And they've all come to ask that all-important question, which is...

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THEY ALL SHOUT What is it worth?

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And when you know, what will you do?

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-THEY ALL SHOUT Flog it!

-That's right!

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It's now 9:30. Let's get the doors open

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and get this massive crowd inside. Ready to go in?

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THEY ALL SHOUT Yes!

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The hundreds of people that are streaming into the Market Hall

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will all have their items valued by our team of experts,

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who are led today by James Lewis, who's attracted to a bit of metal.

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Surprisingly, under that soft exterior

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beats the heart of a heavy-metal fan.

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All the plate's come off, hasn't it?

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Imagine what it would have been like!

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He's joined on the tables by Adam Partridge,

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whose musical tastes are a bit different.

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Those are quite nice things to own,

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but don't let anyone catch you framing them!

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He used to be a professional violin player.

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Everyone knows now!

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We've got a great show for you today.

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James makes an interesting discovery...

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This is gruesome, isn't it?

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When you stab somebody,

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it's easier to draw the blade out again.

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That's why they're made.

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..while Adam is predicting great things.

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I think we'll sell it, and I'm going to be bullish

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and say it should be worth the four figures that you're hoping for.

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And I tread the boards in one of the most intact Georgian theatres in the world.

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Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?

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Here I am!

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As you can see, we've got a full house, which means lots of antiques.

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We really do have our work cut out, so let's get on with it.

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Adam Partridge is at the tables. Let's take a closer look at what he's found.

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-Janet and David... David and Janet.

-Yes!

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Hello. Welcome to "Flog It!". Thanks for coming along.

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This piece needs no introduction.

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I'm sure everybody knows what that is.

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It's the very distinctive shape and design of the Moorcroft Pottery.

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How have you come to own this one?

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I bought it in a little antique place

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within a big department store in Newcastle

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-about 25, 26 years ago.

-OK!

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I just passed by. The colours caught my eye.

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-I thought, "That's pretty."

-Do you remember how much it was 25 years ago?

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-£6.

-It's probably 50 quid now.

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-Yeah?

-Maybe.

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-Yes.

-Getting on for £50 now. So, why are you selling it?

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-It doesn't take up much room.

-Not at all.

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We didn't know for ten years that it was Moorcroft

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-or anything important.

-Or the significance of...

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But as soon as I found out the significance of it,

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I thought, "Somebody's going to drop it and break it,"

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-and I nearly did, once or twice.

-Oh, really?

-Yeah.

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-So it's had a couple of lives...

-When we first got it,

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I used to let my kids fill it with water and paint with it.

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-So it could easily have not survived.

-I don't know how -

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Any idea what it's worth now?

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I'd like to think it was over £100.

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I agree. I agree.

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I'd say an estimate of 100, 150 would be about right,

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would be a realistic guide. I'd like to think it'd make 150,

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-because, of course, small is beautiful.

-Yes.

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-THEY LAUGH

-I'm not tall myself.

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In collector's terms, also, the smaller the piece of furniture,

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the miniature vases,

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make often much more than their great big counterparts.

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So, um, a reserve of 100 - would that sound...

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Excellent. Yes. Fine.

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And Moorcroft, it doesn't really need... It sells itself.

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-Anyone can sell Moorcroft. Have you done any auctioneering?

-No.

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If you were to start, that would be a good thing to try on,

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-because there'd be hands everywhere.

-That would be nice.

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It's the leaf-and-berry pattern, by the way,

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which dates to the late 1930s,

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and that "Potter to HM the Queen" confirms that date.

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-Yes.

-That confirms what you knew.

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It would be a little bit more if it was under a flambe glaze.

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It would be maybe 200 or 300. I hope it goes to a new home,

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-and goes very well.

-I hope so.

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Would you reinvest in antiques?

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I've often wanted to go down to the pottery that does it now.

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-To the Moorcroft potteries?

-Yeah.

-It's quite near me,

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-so let me know if you're coming. I'll take you out to tea.

-Thanks!

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Well, that's an invite that would be hard to refuse.

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I love having a rummage, because you never know what you might find!

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Some pot lids. Oh, look at these!

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-Do you collect pot lids?

-I do, yes.

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-How many have you got?

-About 85.

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85? You're bonkers about pot lids, then.

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I was bonkers, but I've been going now for about 15 years.

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-We're downsizing a bit, so...

-They've got to go.

-Some of them.

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Why are you downsizing? I'm just being nosy, but -

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We've redecorated throughout because we're retired,

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and we want to make things easier. Everything came off the wall.

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I had them on every wall of the lounge.

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-So now the walls are bare.

-Yes!

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-What's going back on them?

-Not a lot.

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Not a lot at all.

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Good luck. I know there's plenty of collectors

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that will want this kind of thing.

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We've seen them do really well on the show before,

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and it's nice that that's just a set of four rather than your 80 at once!

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It's amazing how well made everyday items have become collectible

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and valuable! The solid-silver cutlery set Sue has brought in

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is another classic example of that.

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Sue, were you born with one of these in your mouth?

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No, not at all!

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-No?

-No. It's quite funny, actually.

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I got them when I bought my first house,

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and a friend of my father's said, "Would this help Sue out?"

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because I got the house but nothing to put in it.

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So, your first-ever home, and there you are with solid silver.

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-Can't be bad.

-I know! Probably worth more than the house.

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Let's have a look. These are a pattern

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that's known as Old English pattern. It's just a rounded end,

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very, very plain, with a down-swept terminal to the end.

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In the 17th century, you'd have a dog-nose, then a trefid

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that's split into three, then a Hanoverian pattern,

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and then this Old English pattern really came into fashion

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around 1750, 1760.

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This example was made a hundred years later...

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..in 1896, 1897.

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We've got the anchor, we've got the lion,

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and we've got the date letter -

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the lion meaning it's Sterling-standard silver,

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the anchor which means it was assayed in Birmingham,

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-and the date letter for 1886/7.

-Right.

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Then we've got "E & Co Ltd" - Elkington & Co.

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Elkington & Co, one of the most famous silversmiths of all time,

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-makers for the Queen in the 19th century.

-Oh!

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Very good quality. We've got five teaspoons.

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They're worth about £2 each.

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-Really?

-That's all.

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-£2 or £3 each.

-I'm really disappointed!

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So let's forget the teaspoons. This is where the real value is.

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Dessert forks like that, a set of six...

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The tines aren't quite level.

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When you're looking at forks, the tines should be level at the top.

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-These have had a bit of wear.

-Chased some peas round.

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-They have.

-Exactly.

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A set of six of those are going to be worth £60 to £100.

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-Excellent.

-A set of six dessert spoons

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will be worth about the same. £60 to £100.

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We've got 60, we've got 60,

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we've got 20. £140, lower end.

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-So if we put 150 to 200 on them...

-Lovely.

-Is that all right for you?

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Very nice. And what do you think... Because of the make,

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will they be melted down,

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or are they likely to be bought to be used?

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They will be probably melted down.

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Right. OK. It's a shame, isn't it?

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I hate to think of them going down that road.

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But then again, you know, they're early,

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-but...

-Not that special.

-They're not that special.

-No.

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Like I always say, antiques are the ultimate recyclables,

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and although it's sad for Sue to think they'll be melted down,

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at least they'll go on to make something else.

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'I've been investing in a bit of precious metal myself.'

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I've got a flashy silver pen now, and it shows up on my photograph.

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-HE LAUGHS

-Thank you.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-That's come in quite useful.

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We've got all different-size valuation tables on "Flog It!",

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but sometimes people bring their own in,

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although this beautiful little table is gracefully hiding its real use.

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We're not often lucky enough to see furniture,

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especially not such a nice object as this.

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-How did it come to be yours?

-It was my grandmother's.

-Right.

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And on my father's death ten years ago, it passed to me.

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-You've always known this piece.

-Since I was a toddler.

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That's lovely, isn't it? And what's made you decide to sell it now?

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I think living in a modern house.

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It takes up quite a bit of room in our house.

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-It's a bit incongruous with the rest of the furniture.

-Yeah.

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Yes, we've loved it, but perhaps it is time to pass it on,

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let somebody else perhaps appreciate it as well.

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Some people watching will be thinking, it's only half my size.

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"What's he talking about, it's too big?"

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-I know what you mean. It's not the most practical thing.

-No.

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Very decorative, and it's in satinwood.

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-Satinwood, yes.

-I would date that to the William IV period,

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1835 or thereabouts.

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This carving on the columns is typical of the William IV period.

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And this is an elaborate teapoy, tea caddy, on a stand.

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Oh, there we are.

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And it's a beautiful satinwood interior,

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and it's in really, really lovely condition.

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-Beautiful smooth wood, isn't it?

-It really is.

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And these lift out, and they're wonderfully made,

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mahogany and then satinwood.

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Just lovely things in their own right, aren't they?

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-They are.

-These are the original bowls,

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because there's no give there. They're well fitted.

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And it's an object of real quality.

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You see the thickness of the brass hinges,

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and this Bramah patent lock - things that was put on furniture

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of high quality. It's a dual-lock mecha-...

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-I don't suppose you've got keys.

-We have no key, no.

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It's a complicated lock, but it's a sign of great quality,

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and, of course, tea was a valuable commodity in the 19th century.

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-Keep the servants out!

-That's right! Lock the servants out,

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and keep your green and black tea separate.

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Tea isn't such a valuable commodity nowadays.

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It's a bag of dust in a mug now, isn't it?

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But the teapoy is still quite a commercial piece of furniture.

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You told me you wanted £1,000, really.

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-Is that right?

-It was in my head.

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-Yeah. So we're going to go with a reserve of £800.

-Yes.

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-Is that happy with you?

-I'm happy with that.

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If we put an estimate of 800 to 1,200,

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when we go to the auction, the auctioneer might say,

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"You're quoting us ten-years-ago prices,"

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but I think we'll sell it. We'll be all right.

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I'm going to be bullish and say it really should be worth the four figures you're hoping for.

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If it doesn't make £800, it's not worth you selling it.

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-No. No.

-So it's a good test of the market here.

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And we're going to find out exactly what the market thinks, as we're about to up the tempo!

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We've been working flat out. Let's put those valuations to the test

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in the auction room. Catch you there.

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Going under the hammer with Graham's stunning teapoy are Dave and Janet's miniature Moorcroft vase,

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which they're afraid they might break if they keep it,

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and Sue's silver cutlery, which was a very welcome housewarming present.

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Today we're the guests of Thomas Watson Auctioneers in the heart of Darlington.

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Now, I've been to hundreds of auctions in my time,

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and there's always a guaranteed surprise.

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Today I'm pretty sure we'll have one or two. Keep watching,

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because someone's going home with a lot of money. I don't know who,

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but you've heard our experts. Let's catch up with today's auctioneer, and see what he's got to say.

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Commission is standard in all salerooms,

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but the amount can vary, so check the auction catalogue

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to see what it will cost you to buy and sell.

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Here at Thomas Watson Auctioneers, you pay a buyer's premium,

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which is commission at 15 percent plus VAT.

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'Auctioneer Peter Robinson has a different idea

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'about how much the teapoy could sell for -

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'but is it higher or lower?'

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-It's in the satinwood.

-It is, which is super.

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-I mean, look at the workmanship.

-Look at the grain!

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-Look at that figuring!

-The caddies, original bowls,

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the carving to the base... It's got all the credentials.

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My worry is the market that we have today.

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Ironically, if it was just the box, just the caddy top,

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it probably would be better received,

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because boxes are selling like wildfire.

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It's a funny piece of furniture to have in a room, a teapoy.

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It is. It has no usefulness to it at all.

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It's purely ornamental. If you've got somewhere a corner

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that you want a pretty piece of furniture, it's ideal,

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but, at the end of the day, it's people bidding.

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The fitted interior is wonderful. When you look at that,

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you can see it's definitely worth £1,000.

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Absolutely. There's a lot for your money.

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To ask a cabinet-maker to make this today,

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he would want probably £5,000 minimum,

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so it should sell, but we are governed by the marketplace

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and what people will buy.

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Well, the good thing about this is, you can't pick any faults.

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There's nothing wrong with it. Collectors are a picky bunch,

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but they'll appreciate the quality here,

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and we'll get this one away. Fingers crossed!

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Everyone agrees that it's a very classy piece,

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and we'll find out very soon whether the bidders agree.

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But first up is the Moorcroft vase.

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Why are you selling it?

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Because we're downsizing, going to sell the house.

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-I know it's small -

-They all say that, don't they?

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Yeah. Remember the lady with the thimble?

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Yeah, or a little picture, a miniature.

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-"Oh, I'm downsizing."

-Every little helps.

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When you pick it up and dust it, I keep thinking,

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"I'm going to break this. I'm going to break this."

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-We've had it for 25 years.

-Yeah.

-Well, good luck, is all I can say.

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Moorcroft is big business. They're still making it today.

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-Yes.

-Collectors all over the world are buying.

-They love it.

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Let's hope they're here today. OK? Good luck, everyone. Here we go.

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Nice little piece of Moorcroft,

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and I'll have £50 to start me. At £50 for it.

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At £50. 60, second row. 70 in the left.

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80, 90.

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100? £90 on my left now.

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-£90 for the lot now. It's at 100 now. 100 I'm bid.

-Good.

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Everywhere you go.

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130. £120 I'm bid now.

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£120. Are you all finished? £130, then, bid.

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It's always a sure thing with the Moorcroft.

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It's on my left. At £130 bid. Being sold now to my left at £130.

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-That's good, isn't it? £130.

-It is.

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-That's fine.

-Decent profit.

-That's what it's all about.

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Thanks for coming. I hope you find a new receptacle for your paintbrush.

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I don't want the grandchildren to get a hold of it!

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Not surprisingly, the Moorcroft collectors have put their money where their mouths are.

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But will the silver spoons have their fans, as well?

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Now, these were really kind of a housewarming present, weren't they?

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They were, yes, for my first house,

0:16:030:16:05

and I didn't have any furniture,

0:16:050:16:08

but a friend of my father's thought these might come in helpful!

0:16:080:16:11

-THEY LAUGH

-A collection of silver!

0:16:110:16:13

Well, you've got to start somewhere. And you obviously used them.

0:16:130:16:17

-No.

-Oh, you didn't?

-No. No, we haven't,

0:16:170:16:21

and it's not straightforward dishwasher stuff.

0:16:210:16:23

No, but you could just wash them under a bit of warm, soapy water.

0:16:230:16:27

-Yes.

-It's not that hard work, is it, really?

0:16:270:16:30

We don't all have servants to do it for us, Paul.

0:16:300:16:33

I do it myself. Look, it's a great time to sell silver, anyway,

0:16:330:16:37

so let's see what the bidders think. Here we go.

0:16:370:16:40

The collection of cutlery. £100 bid for the cutlery.

0:16:400:16:44

At £100. At £100.

0:16:440:16:45

Come on. Where are all the hands?

0:16:450:16:48

130, 140, 150, 160, 170.

0:16:480:16:51

175? 180.

0:16:510:16:54

190? 180 with me, the bid.

0:16:540:16:56

At £180. 190, then, on my right now.

0:16:560:16:59

At £190. Selling on my right at £190.

0:16:590:17:03

-All finished now at 190 for the lot?

-HE BANGS HAMMER

0:17:030:17:05

-Hammer's gone down. That was good.

-Brilliant.

-£190.

-Brilliant.

0:17:050:17:09

So, are you going to buy something for the house?

0:17:090:17:11

Er, possibly use it for spending money on holiday.

0:17:110:17:14

-We're going to Northern Cyprus.

-Oh, lovely!

-Northern Cyprus!

0:17:140:17:17

-So, lots of ice creams.

-Baklava!

-Yes!

0:17:170:17:20

That's a great result for Sue, and a spot-on estimate for James.

0:17:200:17:24

Next up is the teapoy that everybody has fallen in love with.

0:17:240:17:27

I really hope it reaches its full potential!

0:17:270:17:30

Your grandmother really looked after this.

0:17:300:17:32

-She did.

-The condition! There's not one stain or chip on this.

0:17:320:17:36

-You've looked after it, as well.

-We have.

0:17:360:17:38

This is wonderful. I know you fell in love with this, as well.

0:17:380:17:42

It's got the quality of Gillow's about the workmanship.

0:17:420:17:45

It's just splendid. If it doesn't sell, it's a travesty.

0:17:450:17:48

Had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:17:480:17:50

He said it's not a popular piece of kit.

0:17:500:17:53

If it was a tea caddy, people would want to own it,

0:17:530:17:55

but as a teapoy, it's a free-standing piece of furniture.

0:17:550:17:58

-What do you do with it?

-But you could say that with lots of things.

0:17:580:18:02

-Course you could.

-It should make four figures,

0:18:020:18:04

but it's an uncertain market these days.

0:18:040:18:06

We're putting it to the test. That's what this is all about.

0:18:060:18:10

Let's find out what the bidders think.

0:18:100:18:13

At £600.

0:18:130:18:15

At £600. At £600 with the teapoy.

0:18:150:18:18

650, can I say?

0:18:180:18:20

-At £600.

-Not exactly flying away, is it?

0:18:200:18:24

650. 80. 700.

0:18:240:18:25

At £700. At £700.

0:18:250:18:28

720? At £700. No further bidding?

0:18:280:18:32

-Looks like it's going home.

-At £700, short of the reserve.

0:18:320:18:35

At £700. All finished, then, at £700.

0:18:350:18:39

Sorry. Unsold.

0:18:390:18:41

-Unsold.

-It's going home.

-I'm not too disappointed.

0:18:410:18:44

-No. You've got a lovely spot for it at home.

-Absolutely.

0:18:440:18:47

-Enjoy looking at it, as well...

-Yeah.

0:18:470:18:49

..just musing over the little hinges and the dovetails.

0:18:490:18:53

-It's, um...

-No.

-Well, thank you anyway.

0:18:530:18:55

It's a luxury item, and it's a joy to behold and have.

0:18:550:18:59

Well, Adam did say that if it didn't sell at the reserve of £800,

0:18:590:19:03

Graham should take it home, and I for one would be ecstatic

0:19:030:19:05

to have it in my house.

0:19:050:19:08

If you want to sell furniture, bring it along to one of our valuation days.

0:19:080:19:12

You can pick up details on our BBC website. Just log on to...

0:19:120:19:15

All the information will be there, and hopefully we'll be near a town

0:19:170:19:21

very close to you soon, so come and join us.

0:19:210:19:24

While I've been in Richmond, I had a look at a local treasure

0:19:280:19:31

just down the road from the Market Hall.

0:19:310:19:34

I've come to the centre of Richmond to visit a building

0:19:370:19:40

that holds a very important place in history

0:19:400:19:42

and in the hearts of all the local people here.

0:19:420:19:44

And it's this very building - the Georgian Theatre Royal.

0:19:440:19:48

OK, it looks unassuming on this road right here

0:19:480:19:51

with these cars going by, but it is a Grade I listed building,

0:19:510:19:55

and it also has a very important claim to fame.

0:19:550:19:58

It's the oldest and most complete Georgian playhouse in Britain,

0:19:580:20:02

and that's a fact. All the good stuff is on the inside,

0:20:020:20:05

so without further ado, let's go in and view the piece de resistance.

0:20:050:20:09

In the early 1700s, there weren't any theatres in Britain,

0:20:120:20:15

as it was illegal to act for money.

0:20:150:20:17

However, plays were performed by travelling companies of actors,

0:20:170:20:21

who found ways around the law. From the 1760s,

0:20:210:20:25

royal patents were granted to a few leading provincial theatres.

0:20:250:20:28

But the biggest change came in 1788

0:20:280:20:31

with the passing of the Theatre Licensing Act,

0:20:310:20:34

which allowed companies of actors to apply for licences

0:20:340:20:37

to put on classical plays for 60 days at any one time.

0:20:370:20:41

It was shortly after the Theatre Licensing Act

0:20:430:20:46

that a remarkable Yorkshireman called Samuel Butler

0:20:460:20:49

signed a 21-year lease with the Richmond Corporation.

0:20:490:20:52

And on 2nd September, in 1788,

0:20:520:20:55

this remarkable, unique little theatre was opened to the public.

0:20:550:20:59

And isn't it just marvellous?

0:20:590:21:02

It really is!

0:21:020:21:04

It's so tiny, though, but it's just fabulous!

0:21:040:21:08

When it first opened, this venue was simply named the Theatre.

0:21:080:21:12

And Butler's company of actors played not only here

0:21:120:21:15

but at seven other theatres that the entrepreneurial Butler had established across Yorkshire.

0:21:150:21:21

Sadly, in 1830, the lease on this building was never renewed.

0:21:210:21:25

The theatre and the Butler company parted ways.

0:21:250:21:28

Over the following centuries, a few odd performances were played out

0:21:280:21:32

on this very stage. But in general, the theatre was put to different uses.

0:21:320:21:37

It became a wine vault. During the Second World War,

0:21:370:21:40

it was a storage depot, and believe it or not,

0:21:400:21:42

it was even an auction room.

0:21:420:21:44

But thankfully the core, the fabric of this very building

0:21:440:21:47

was never altered greatly. That's why it's become so important

0:21:470:21:51

to theatre historians all over the world -

0:21:510:21:53

it's the best surviving example of a Georgian playhouse in Britain,

0:21:530:21:58

and it's an absolute architectural delight.

0:21:580:22:01

The dilapidated theatre has been firstly restored in the 1950s,

0:22:020:22:06

and then again in 2003. On both occasions,

0:22:060:22:09

restoration was undertaken carefully and sympathetically,

0:22:090:22:13

so that the theatre appears much the same as it would have been

0:22:130:22:17

when the Butler company were performing all those years ago.

0:22:170:22:21

It's known as the Courtyard Theatre,

0:22:230:22:25

because it mimics the space you'd find behind a public house,

0:22:250:22:29

which is where the touring troupes of actors would have played

0:22:290:22:32

before theatres were even built, and this theme carries on to the ceiling.

0:22:320:22:36

If you look up there, you can see fluffy white clouds

0:22:360:22:39

blowing along in the breeze, mimicking the open-air space

0:22:390:22:42

that the plays were watched in.

0:22:420:22:44

The stage itself is typical of the period,

0:22:450:22:48

and is known as a proscenium arch, acting as a window to the action.

0:22:480:22:54

The stage is raked, and it's a foot higher at the back

0:22:540:22:57

than at the front, in order to give the audience a better view.

0:22:570:23:00

Today, the Georgian Theatre Royal can seat up to 214 people,

0:23:010:23:06

but back in the Georgian era, 400 eager audience members would have squeezed in.

0:23:060:23:12

You can imagine how lots more people were jammed in this small space together.

0:23:120:23:16

But which were the good seats and which were the bad?

0:23:160:23:20

Up here is called the gallery, and these are the cheap seats,

0:23:200:23:24

used by the young and the dissolute. To watch performance here

0:23:240:23:28

back in the Georgian period would have cost you one shilling.

0:23:280:23:32

-BANGING

-Did you hear that?

0:23:320:23:33

Don't worry - that was me.

0:23:330:23:35

This gallery has a unique Georgian feature.

0:23:350:23:38

It's known as the kicking board,

0:23:380:23:40

and that's exactly what you do to it.

0:23:400:23:42

The Georgian patrons would have used this to show signs of disapproval

0:23:440:23:48

if the act wasn't working out properly.

0:23:480:23:50

I've been told it's still used today,

0:23:500:23:52

but only as a sign of approval, to encourage an encore.

0:23:520:23:57

-HE KICKS BOARD

-Yeah! More, please! More!

0:23:570:24:00

I say, who's that talented chap down there?

0:24:000:24:03

This whole area is known as the pit.

0:24:030:24:06

It's more expensive than the gallery.

0:24:060:24:08

Theatregoers would pay two shillings to watch a performance here

0:24:080:24:11

when the Butler company was in town.

0:24:110:24:13

I would have preferred to have sat here, in one of these seats.

0:24:130:24:17

They're considered to be the best in the house.

0:24:170:24:19

To sit in one of these boxes would have cost you three shillings per person.

0:24:190:24:23

In fact, this is the royal box. It's the best seat in the house.

0:24:230:24:28

Why? Because it has a direct eye line

0:24:280:24:30

with the actors onstage right in front of you.

0:24:300:24:33

And up here is another example of a typical Georgian feature.

0:24:330:24:37

This is called the Juliet box. It's not for the audience to sit in

0:24:370:24:40

and watch the plays. It's for the actors to use for balcony scenes.

0:24:400:24:44

Of course, it's named after the most famous heroine of all -

0:24:440:24:47

Juliet, from Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet.

0:24:470:24:50

Romeo, Romeo, wherefore art thou Romeo?

0:24:500:24:55

Here I am!

0:24:550:24:56

'So, that's how the Georgians would have watched theatre,

0:24:560:24:59

'but I'm interested in seeing what went on behind the scenes.

0:24:590:25:03

'I'm going to tread in the actors' footsteps, as I head down

0:25:030:25:06

'through the dressing room to the very guts of the theatre.'

0:25:060:25:09

I'm underneath the stage right now. There it is, look -

0:25:100:25:13

there above me. This whole area is known as the machine room.

0:25:130:25:17

And these are the footlights, or the floats, as they were called

0:25:170:25:20

back in the Georgian period.

0:25:200:25:22

Now, these candles would have been alight in troughs of water,

0:25:220:25:26

and this whole trough would have been winched up

0:25:260:25:29

by this winch here, going up to the stage

0:25:290:25:31

to project light back onto the actor's faces so you could see them.

0:25:310:25:35

They were in water because, if the candles fell over,

0:25:350:25:37

it would put the flame out and the whole place wouldn't catch on fire.

0:25:370:25:41

Perhaps one of the most exciting parts of the theatre

0:25:420:25:46

is operated from right down here, and that's the trapdoors.

0:25:460:25:50

Now, this enables items and actors to spring up out of nowhere

0:25:500:25:54

onto the stage. There were originally three trapdoors here,

0:25:540:25:58

but now there's only one, and this is a reconstruction.

0:25:580:26:01

Sadly, it doesn't work, either, so I've got to take the long way back up.

0:26:010:26:06

The Georgian Theatre Royal holds such a prestigious place

0:26:080:26:13

in the history of theatre in Britain

0:26:130:26:15

that many of our country's finest actors feel it's a status symbol

0:26:150:26:19

to have played here. Timothy West, Judi Dench,

0:26:190:26:22

and plenty of other legendary actors have graced the stage here.

0:26:220:26:25

And I have to say, yours truly is very proud

0:26:250:26:28

to have been able to visit this fascinating piece of theatre history.

0:26:280:26:32

There are still plenty of Yorkshire folk coming to the Market Hall

0:26:420:26:46

with their antiques and collectibles, hoping to flog it.

0:26:460:26:49

Welcome back to our valuation day in the heart of Richmond.

0:26:510:26:54

As you can see, it's still a full house.

0:26:540:26:56

Let's catch up with our experts and see what else they've spotted.

0:26:560:27:00

James has set his sights on this pair of Derby figurines,

0:27:010:27:04

brought in by Harry.

0:27:040:27:06

I have to say, I was not expecting to travel

0:27:060:27:09

all the way up to Richmond in North Yorkshire

0:27:090:27:11

to find two things that were made

0:27:110:27:14

about five miles from myself in Derbyshire.

0:27:140:27:16

-Isn't it a small world?

-Yeah, isn't it just?

-Yeah!

0:27:160:27:19

The initial Derby factory, right back in the 18th century,

0:27:190:27:22

started making figures around 1750,

0:27:220:27:25

and if you turned up an early Derby figure,

0:27:250:27:28

you would see three little patch marks

0:27:280:27:30

that would indicate... Those are the little pads

0:27:300:27:33

to stop the figure sticking to the bottom of the kiln.

0:27:330:27:36

Today, with the new factory, Royal Crown Derby is a lot easier.

0:27:360:27:40

Turn a figure over - there we are, a great big mark

0:27:400:27:43

that says "Royal Crown Derby, English Bone China".

0:27:430:27:46

Then we have "XLIX".

0:27:460:27:48

So that's the Roman figure - "XL", 40, "IX", nine.

0:27:480:27:53

49. The first Roman numeral was put on in 1938.

0:27:530:27:57

-Oh, right.

-So we add 49 to 1938,

0:27:570:28:00

we get 1987.

0:28:000:28:02

-That's when this figure was made.

-Oh!

0:28:020:28:05

We've got this canted square base

0:28:050:28:07

with a Greek-key decoration around that base,

0:28:070:28:10

and that's harking back to an earlier period,

0:28:100:28:13

because these figures, allegorical of water,

0:28:130:28:15

allegorical of air, are inspired from figures

0:28:150:28:18

that were dug up in Herculaneum, Pompeii, Vesuvius.

0:28:180:28:22

So these are very much a modern figure,

0:28:220:28:26

but with a very traditional past.

0:28:260:28:28

So, tell me - why have you got them, how long have you had them,

0:28:280:28:32

and what are they doing here at "Flog It!" today?

0:28:320:28:35

Well, what I'm trying to do is, I'm trying to sell them

0:28:360:28:40

-for the grandchildren.

-OK.

0:28:400:28:42

-Cos my wife's died, and...

-Oh, OK.

0:28:420:28:44

And, um, I'm hoping to split the money.

0:28:440:28:47

I've got a grandson and a granddaughter.

0:28:470:28:50

-OK.

-And I'm going to give them half and half.

0:28:500:28:53

Lovely. The thing about these is, because they're modern,

0:28:530:28:56

and this one's had a, um...

0:28:560:28:59

been through the wars a bit...

0:28:590:29:01

-It wasn't me!

-Are you sure?

0:29:010:29:03

HE LAUGHS No, no.

0:29:030:29:05

If I'd have fixed that, you'd have noticed.

0:29:050:29:08

I would've used a lot of glue.

0:29:080:29:10

-Is it your job to do the dusting?

-No. I mustn't touch it.

-Really?

0:29:100:29:14

-No.

-What, in case you break them? You might have had two broken ones.

0:29:140:29:18

-I'm too clumsy, really.

-Oh, well...

0:29:180:29:20

Hopefully the auctioneers won't be clumsy, and hopefully they'll do a good job for us.

0:29:200:29:25

So I think, auction estimate, £50 to £70.

0:29:250:29:29

Almost all the value is in that one, and I'm sure they'll sell.

0:29:290:29:33

-Fingers crossed on the day.

-I hope so.

0:29:330:29:35

'Everyone's got their fingers crossed today,

0:29:350:29:38

'hoping they've unearthed a treasure that could be worth a fortune.

0:29:380:29:41

'There's still a lot to get through, so we're all working very hard -

0:29:410:29:45

'well, perhaps not everyone.

0:29:450:29:47

'Adam has found a magnificent bronze statue, brought in by Diane.'

0:29:470:29:50

Thank you very much for coming along.

0:29:500:29:52

-And do you have a name for this?

-We call her Ruth,

0:29:520:29:56

because she was my mother's. My mother was called Ruth.

0:29:560:29:59

She's a lady gleaning in the fields, so we call her Ruth

0:29:590:30:02

-after Ruth and Naomi.

-Appropriate on more levels than one!

0:30:020:30:06

-So, this was your mother's?

-It was, yes.

0:30:060:30:09

-Do you know how she came to own it?

-My grandmother bought it for her,

0:30:090:30:12

-possibly in the late '30s, early '40s.

-Right.

0:30:120:30:15

-Because of the Ruth...

-Because of the Ruth connection.

0:30:150:30:18

Excellent. How has she ended up on a table here in Richmond in 2010?

0:30:180:30:24

-She's a big girl.

-She is a big girl.

-She's a heavy girl.

0:30:240:30:27

-She's very big and heavy.

-I have nowhere to display her now

0:30:270:30:30

-to her advantage.

-Have you moved house?

-Yes.

0:30:300:30:33

-Gone into somewhere small.

-That's often the problem.

0:30:330:30:36

And she does take up a lot of space

0:30:360:30:38

because she needs room around her to be shown properly.

0:30:380:30:41

She's got the mark here of Fournier.

0:30:410:30:44

That's the French sculptor, Paul Fournier,

0:30:440:30:47

and it'll date her to the end of the 19th century,

0:30:470:30:49

-late 19th or turn of the century.

-Right.

0:30:490:30:52

She's mounted on this big rouge-marble base here,

0:30:520:30:55

which has had a few...nibbles, would be a kind way of putting it.

0:30:550:30:59

-It was like that when we got it.

-It doesn't really detract.

0:30:590:31:02

A lot of them have lost the base altogether,

0:31:020:31:04

and she'd still work as a figure without the base.

0:31:040:31:07

-She's incredibly heavy, but rather nicely modelled.

-Yeah.

0:31:070:31:11

We can't sell her for ANY price.

0:31:110:31:13

I would suggest that she'd make £300 to £500 at auction...

0:31:130:31:16

-Right.

-..and that you should put a reserve of £300 on her.

0:31:160:31:20

-OK.

-Otherwise she's probably not worth selling.

0:31:200:31:23

No. I'd rather keep her than just give her away for nothing.

0:31:230:31:26

And then you'd have to find a new home for her,

0:31:260:31:29

or you could try her again, or something else.

0:31:290:31:32

-Does that sound in line with your expectations?

-Yes.

0:31:320:31:34

I'd like to see her making 500 or 600,

0:31:340:31:36

because she's so big and so decorative, she must be worth that.

0:31:360:31:41

I bet Ruth turns some heads when she gets to the auction room.

0:31:410:31:44

Now I've found Carol with an item that has a secret.

0:31:440:31:47

This piece of furniture is the right height for an arm rest.

0:31:490:31:52

-It certainly is, isn't it, Carol?

-It is.

-At the end of a long day!

0:31:520:31:55

If you put this on the floor, it would make a wonderful footstool

0:31:550:32:00

-with a cushion on it. Have you ever done that?

-I haven't.

0:32:000:32:03

-So what have you done with this?

-It's just been sitting there in the dining room, doing nothing.

0:32:030:32:08

Or you could chill your champagne in it.

0:32:080:32:10

-That's a very good thought!

-You never thought of that!

0:32:100:32:13

I had not thought of that, no. Brilliant idea!

0:32:130:32:17

It's got a multiple of uses.

0:32:170:32:19

-Now, people will be wondering, "What does he mean?"

-Exactly.

0:32:190:32:23

-"What does he mean?"

-Exactly. It's late Victorian,

0:32:230:32:26

circa 1880. It's made of Spanish Cuban mahogany.

0:32:260:32:29

It would have been owned by a wealthy family in its day.

0:32:290:32:32

-Really?

-Are you ready?

0:32:330:32:36

-Here we go!

-HE LAUGHS

0:32:360:32:38

-SHE LAUGHS

-It's a little tiny baby bath!

0:32:380:32:42

-Isn't that cute?

-That's right.

0:32:420:32:44

That is so cute. This is probably made by Doulton.

0:32:440:32:47

Oh!

0:32:470:32:49

The frame's made by a cabinet-maker. It's just incredible!

0:32:490:32:53

-Do you know how much this is worth?

-I haven't a clue.

0:32:530:32:55

Well, sadly, only around £60 to £80,

0:32:550:32:59

and I think it's a shame to put it into auction for that sort of money.

0:32:590:33:03

Yes. I agree. It was just a novelty thing

0:33:030:33:05

-I thought would be of interest.

-Yeah.

0:33:050:33:07

You're better off using it as a footstool.

0:33:070:33:10

-I think that's a good idea.

-It's quite solid.

-Mm-hm.

0:33:100:33:12

Or fill it here full of ice, and a bottle of champagne -

0:33:120:33:16

-Put champagne in it!

-And there you go.

-Oh, right!

0:33:160:33:19

There's your cellarette.

0:33:190:33:22

I love to find a piece of furniture with a multitude of uses.

0:33:220:33:26

Our last item is a group of military items

0:33:260:33:29

that David has brought along.

0:33:290:33:31

-You've got a real assortment here.

-Right. Yeah.

0:33:310:33:34

-Tell me what you know.

-Sam Brownes are for officers.

0:33:340:33:37

Swords and swagger sticks are for officers,

0:33:370:33:40

and binoculars are for officers. And I was a trumpet major,

0:33:400:33:43

which is a staff sergeant in the army.

0:33:430:33:45

Trumpet major? Is that the person that...

0:33:450:33:48

-Yes. I play at all military funerals...

-Oh, do you?

0:33:480:33:51

-..of the regiment.

-How incredible!

-Hard work,

0:33:510:33:54

but that's my job. Been there for 23 years.

0:33:540:33:57

So these are bits you've picked up over the years?

0:33:570:34:00

A few bits of military things.

0:34:000:34:02

-OK. Shall we start with the Sam Browne?

-Right.

0:34:020:34:05

Um, this would originally have had a three-pegged badge

0:34:050:34:08

-with the emblem of the regiment on it.

-Absolutely.

0:34:080:34:11

-Correct. Yeah.

-So we can say that this is 1935

0:34:110:34:15

-to 1950, something like that, in period.

-Yes.

0:34:150:34:17

-Maybe a bit later.

-They still use it in dress parades.

0:34:170:34:20

Oh, they do. All officers get issued with them.

0:34:200:34:23

-Financially they're not worth a lot of money.

-No.

0:34:230:34:26

We still see a lot of them. Let's move on to the sword.

0:34:260:34:29

-Matches nicely, doesn't it, with the leather scabbard.

-It does, yes.

0:34:290:34:33

-Let's take that out.

-Yep.

0:34:330:34:35

And we have a single, straight, pointed blade.

0:34:350:34:38

-Ah, this is gruesome, isn't it?

-It is gruesome, yes.

0:34:380:34:41

The idea of the fuller down the centre there,

0:34:410:34:44

the fullered blade, so that when you stab somebody,

0:34:440:34:47

it's easier to draw the blade out again.

0:34:470:34:50

That's why they're made. And it's a sharp point, as well,

0:34:500:34:54

-so you can go in quite a long way.

-Oh! Moving on very quickly...

0:34:540:34:58

And then we've got a... what's known as a basket hilt.

0:34:580:35:02

-Yes, it is.

-Pierced basket hilt...

-Yes.

0:35:020:35:04

..and a shagreen grip, wire-bound shagreen grip.

0:35:040:35:08

This is made from shark skin. This is chrome.

0:35:080:35:11

-We've got the George V cipher there.

-Yes.

0:35:110:35:13

So this would date to about 1920 to 1930, something around there.

0:35:130:35:17

-Yeah.

-OK.

0:35:170:35:19

-We have a pair of binoculars, again Second World War period.

-Yeah.

0:35:190:35:23

-1943, I think.

-Are they dated somewhere?

0:35:230:35:25

-Yes, they are.

-Oh, there we are.

0:35:250:35:27

Kershaw, maker, 1943.

0:35:270:35:30

Typical army officer's binoculars, aren't they?

0:35:300:35:34

-Yep.

-You see chaps standing out the top of the tanks with these...

0:35:340:35:38

-That's right.

-..in the war films. Finally we've got the swagger stick.

0:35:380:35:41

On the end there we've got the regimental motto...

0:35:410:35:44

-Oh, the Royal Corps of Signals!

-Yes.

0:35:440:35:47

-And in the centre we've got Mercury.

-Yes.

0:35:470:35:50

And that's a figure of Mercury after a bronze sculptor

0:35:500:35:54

called Giambologna, Italian, and Mercury stands

0:35:540:35:57

wearing a winged helmet, and little wings on his feet, as well.

0:35:570:36:02

-And he was the messenger god, which is why the Royal Corps of Signals use Mercury.

-Yeah.

0:36:020:36:07

We've got a hallmark for London, 1927,

0:36:070:36:11

and there we have a Malacca shaft.

0:36:110:36:14

It was seen to be the best material to use as the shaft of a cane.

0:36:140:36:18

OK. When it comes to values, we've probably got £10 or £15 there,

0:36:180:36:22

the Sam Brownes. I think the sword is £60 to £100.

0:36:220:36:26

-Right.

-I think the swagger stick is probably £30 to £50.

0:36:260:36:31

-Right.

-So we're up to about £100 there,

0:36:310:36:34

-and there's another ten there.

-Right.

-So I would say 100 to 150.

0:36:340:36:38

-I think that's a good idea.

-And what would be your minimum?

0:36:380:36:41

I would say 125.

0:36:410:36:44

-125. OK.

-Would that be all right?

-That's fine.

0:36:440:36:46

Because the reserve has to be around the bottom end of the estimate,

0:36:460:36:50

we'll up the estimate slightly and we'll put 120 to 180 on them.

0:36:500:36:54

-All right?

-I'll be very happy with that.

-Fantastic.

0:36:540:36:57

It's time to take our last three items to the auction room,

0:36:570:37:01

but first, a quick recap. Leading the charge with his military items

0:37:010:37:04

is David, followed by Harry, who wants to give the money from the sale of his Derby figures

0:37:040:37:09

to his grandchildren. And finally Angela

0:37:090:37:12

and her French bronze statue, that her mother named Ruth.

0:37:120:37:15

Thomas Watson's salerooms are buzzing with buyers and sellers.

0:37:170:37:20

First up we've got Harry with the Derby figurines.

0:37:200:37:24

After the valuation day, he had a chat to the auctioneer,

0:37:270:37:31

and changed the "no reserve" to a £40 reserve.

0:37:310:37:34

We've got some Royal Crown Derby, two figurines, Air and Water.

0:37:350:37:38

They belong to Harry, and all the money is going to the grandchildren.

0:37:380:37:42

-How many have you got?

-Only two.

-What are their names?

0:37:420:37:45

Scott and Katie.

0:37:450:37:47

OK. And I know initially James put a value of around - what?

0:37:470:37:50

-£40 to £60?

-50, 70. Yeah.

0:37:500:37:53

No reserve, and I know you've had a chat to the auctioneer.

0:37:530:37:56

A bit wise! These auctioneers like things with no reserve.

0:37:560:38:00

-Ken told me to reserve them.

-Did he?

0:38:000:38:03

-Let's hope we get top money for this, shall we?

-I hope so.

0:38:030:38:06

Fingers crossed!

0:38:060:38:08

Royal Crown Derby bone-china figures,

0:38:080:38:10

at £40.

0:38:100:38:13

At £40, the two of them. At 50, can I say? £50.

0:38:130:38:18

£60. 70 now. At £60.

0:38:180:38:20

-That's good!

-That's good.

0:38:200:38:22

All they're worth, at £60? Royal Crown Derby.

0:38:220:38:25

At £60. They're being sold at £60.

0:38:250:38:28

-All finished now, then, at £60?

-HE BANGS HAMMER

0:38:280:38:31

Well done. Thank you so much for coming in, Harry.

0:38:310:38:35

-And thanks for your help.

-Pleasure.

-Oh, that's all right.

0:38:350:38:39

'Right in the middle of the estimate! Well done, James.

0:38:390:38:42

'Harry's gone home happy. Will Angela be just as happy

0:38:420:38:46

'when her bronze statue, nicknamed Ruth, goes under the hammer?'

0:38:460:38:49

Coming up next we've got that wonderful bronze. It's titled Ruth,

0:38:490:38:53

-and it made the front page of the catalogue!

-It did.

0:38:530:38:56

-Who have you brought along with you?

-My granddaughter, Emma.

-Hello.

0:38:560:39:00

Gosh, you're tall, aren't you?

0:39:000:39:02

What do you think this is going to go for today, Adam?

0:39:020:39:05

Well, having spoken just before, I'm hoping it doesn't sell!

0:39:050:39:09

Oh, why? What's happening? I've missed out on something.

0:39:090:39:14

Angela's got in trouble with her granddaughter

0:39:140:39:16

for offering it without checking with her first.

0:39:160:39:19

-Oh!

-She had her eyes on it.

-This is the inheritance!

0:39:190:39:22

Granny's selling all the inheritance, yes.

0:39:220:39:24

-Naughty Granny!

-What are you doing, Granny?

0:39:240:39:28

Never mind. We'll see. She might not sell.

0:39:280:39:30

It's quite unusual that we're all hoping that it doesn't sell!

0:39:310:39:35

The auctioneer has done us really proud.

0:39:350:39:37

It's made all the trade press. It's on the front page,

0:39:370:39:40

and I think it should do quite well. I really do.

0:39:400:39:44

-I have a suspicion myself.

-Oh, dear, oh, dear.

0:39:440:39:47

The French bronze, the style of Ruth.

0:39:480:39:52

Open the bidding at £200.

0:39:520:39:54

-At £200 for the bronze.

-Not gone past it. OK.

0:39:540:39:58

At £200. At £200, at £200. 220.

0:39:580:40:02

250. 280. 300. 320.

0:40:020:40:04

-Gone.

-Gone!

0:40:040:40:06

380. 400. At £400, being sold now.

0:40:060:40:10

At £400. Have we all finished?

0:40:100:40:13

-The bronze, at £400. All done?

-HE BANGS HAMMER

0:40:130:40:17

-That was short and sweet. You were bang-on there.

-Gone.

0:40:170:40:20

Yeah. £400.

0:40:200:40:22

-Oh, dear!

-I feel like I'm in trouble.

0:40:220:40:25

-I didn't want to say! Yes.

-I feel like I've been really naughty.

0:40:250:40:28

-And would the money come in useful?

-THEY LAUGH

0:40:280:40:32

What will you do with the money, Granny?

0:40:320:40:34

We have two special birthdays in the family this year,

0:40:340:40:37

-so it'll come in handy.

-And neither of them are yours.

0:40:370:40:40

I'm sure Granny's got lots of other lovely things

0:40:400:40:42

-that you'll inherit one day.

-Yes, I think so.

0:40:420:40:47

That's a bittersweet result for Angela and her granddaughter,

0:40:470:40:51

but I'm sure the £400 will make up for it.

0:40:510:40:54

Luckily, David is happy to sell his collection of military items,

0:40:540:40:58

so let's get them under the hammer.

0:40:580:41:01

Next up, a collection of militaria belonging to David.

0:41:010:41:04

-You can stand at ease now.

-Thank you very much.

0:41:040:41:07

-You look very smart.

-Thank you. For the occasion.

0:41:070:41:09

-What regiment is this?

-The Royal Tank Regiment.

-OK.

0:41:090:41:12

-You were in the services for how many years now?

-23 years.

0:41:120:41:15

And are you donating some of the money to the regiment?

0:41:150:41:18

I'm donating half the proceeds to the regiment benevolent fund.

0:41:180:41:22

OK. I think your items are the only items of militaria here.

0:41:220:41:27

-Yeah.

-But we do have the power of the internet,

0:41:270:41:29

-so hopefully...

-Makes a huge difference.

0:41:290:41:32

There's no excuses for an auctioneer any more.

0:41:320:41:35

We can't say, "It was the wrong day. No-one was here."

0:41:350:41:38

One of the big "Flog It!" excuses out the window!

0:41:380:41:40

-It's out of your hands.

-It is, yeah.

-The auctioneer's hands.

0:41:400:41:44

So, fingers crossed.

0:41:440:41:46

Collection of military items here,

0:41:460:41:48

and opening at £100.

0:41:480:41:50

At £100. 110, can I say, for the collection?

0:41:500:41:54

110 bid now. £110. £120, can I have?

0:41:540:41:58

At £110. 120.

0:41:580:41:59

-In the room.

-120. 130.

0:41:590:42:01

140.

0:42:010:42:03

150.

0:42:030:42:04

160. 170 with me. 180.

0:42:040:42:07

190.

0:42:070:42:09

200. 210.

0:42:090:42:11

-220. 230.

-This is good.

-It is good, yeah!

0:42:130:42:16

220 beside me, the bid. At £220, being sold there.

0:42:160:42:20

You finished, sir? Bidding? 230.

0:42:200:42:23

-240.

-That's very good.

0:42:230:42:25

250.

0:42:250:42:27

Nice lot.

0:42:270:42:29

No? Shakes his head. 240, then. The bid's beside the rostrum.

0:42:290:42:32

-At £240.

-£240!

0:42:320:42:35

-£240.

-That's the excitement of the auction room.

0:42:350:42:37

-Isn't that great?

-It is. Wonderful. I think so.

-£240.

0:42:370:42:41

Well, it is exciting when it goes THAT way,

0:42:410:42:43

when it does well. It's not so fun when it struggles.

0:42:430:42:47

-That's a lot of money, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

0:42:470:42:49

Half's going to the benevolent fund, anyway.

0:42:490:42:52

-And the other half you're keeping.

-Probably give it to my family.

0:42:520:42:56

-Good.

-Well done.

-Good to catch up with you.

0:42:560:42:59

-You still look so fit and so smart!

-Thank you very much, Paul.

0:42:590:43:02

That's being in the services for you.

0:43:020:43:04

As you can see, I've always kept fit.

0:43:040:43:06

'I'm saying nothing, James! But that's a good result

0:43:060:43:09

'on our military items.'

0:43:090:43:11

It's all over for our owners,

0:43:110:43:13

and that concludes another "Flog It!" auction.

0:43:130:43:15

What a wonderful day we've had here! A few highs and a few lows,

0:43:150:43:19

but that's what auctions are all about - a roller-coaster ride of emotions.

0:43:190:43:23

I hope you've enjoyed the show. Join us again soon for many more,

0:43:230:43:26

but for now, it's cheerio.

0:43:260:43:27

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:270:43:31

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:310:43:35

.

0:43:350:43:36

Paul Martin and the Flog It! team head to Richmond in Yorkshire. James Lewis and Adam Partridge are the experts on hand ready to value an assortment of items, including an exquisite tea pot and a statuesque bronze figure. Paul Martin also takes a look around the town's Georgian theatre, one of the most intact of its kind in the world.