Cardigan Flog It!


Cardigan

Flog It visits Rhosygilwen Mansion just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion.


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Transcript


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I'm here enjoying the magnificent Teifi Valley in

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glorious Pembrokeshire, near the borders of Ceredigion and Carmarthen.

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Today, Flog It comes to you from beautiful, magnificent West Wales.

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Flog It comes from Rhos-y-gilwen Mansion, a beautiful historic house that's recently put itself on the map

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as one of South Wales' most exciting music and arts venues.

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Its newly opened Oak Hall incorporates

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state of the art technology so it has something for everyone.

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And what a turn-out we've got! Thank you so much for turning up today.

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All of these people have one thing in common which is they all want to sell

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their antiques and they're all going to ask that one important question later on to our experts which is.

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ALL: What's it worth?

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Exactly, and when you've found out and if you're happy with the valuation, what are you going to do?

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-ALL: Flog it!

-Let's get on with the show.

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And providing those antique valuations are our

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faithful team of experts, headed up by the enthusiastic Mr Charlie Ross.

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Oh, gosh, isn't that great!

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Life in the Suffolk Regiment Recruits Physical Training.

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You wouldn't get me doing that or indeed Paul doing that.

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I don't think he'd be any good at jumping over a vault!

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How does he know?

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And the astute Christina Trevanion,

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who caught the auctioneering bug as a ten year old watching a family friend on the rostrum.

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I like that. You've got some great car boot sales around here.

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I'm going to have to come down here more often. And what have we got here?

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Don't tell me...

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-it came from a car boot sale?

-No.

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Oh, fantastic!

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Later in the show Charlie discovers a very scratchy problem.

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Frankly, it looks as if they've had a Brillo pad at it.

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-Any ideas he said looking at you!

-Not me, not guilty.

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And we get some lovely surprises.

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Ooh, that was a surprise!

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350.

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Charlie is first at the table with Julia.

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Let's find out where her three jugs come from.

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Julia, there's really quite a story isn't there behind these three jugs. How did you get them?

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-I bought them at a car boot sale when I...

-There we go!

-Yes, sorry.

-Where?

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In Exmouth in Devon, so they've travelled a long way and I've brought them home.

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And what did you know about them when you arrived?

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All I knew was that they were Welsh china and that was about it, really.

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-How did you know that?

-Well, mainly because of the back stamp on the...

-On the bottom?

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-..on the small jug there.

-Yes, yes.

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-How long ago did you buy them?

-A couple of years.

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And you recognised them then, or did you recognise them being Welsh when you got them home?

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I recognised the back stamp....

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And also this colour I recognise

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-from other pieces of Llanelli china.

-What a clever girl.

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-And what did you pay?

-Not very much.

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No, come on, I want more accuracy than that.

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£3 each.

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-Nine quid the lot?

-Yeah.

-Well, you know one of them is damaged?

-Yes, but that's all right for £9!

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I know. I was only pulling your leg!

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They are fantastic.

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Now they were made from a period from 1847 to 1850,

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only a three year period with that back-stamp of Cymru, Swansea.

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-Does that make them worth more?

-Well, of course it does, even more than nine quid!

-Oh, great.

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They've got a typically Welsh decoration there, haven't they,

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a bit like some of the gaudy Welsh decorations?

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-They're not particularly pretty.

-I don't like them at all, to be perfectly honest with you and

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when I saw them across the room to begin with I thought they were Staffordshire,

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but of course if they were, I think they would be worth...

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And the middle one has got a crack...

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I think they'd probably be worth £30 to £50 the lot on a good day with the wind behind you.

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-Right.

-But because of what they are,

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I'm going to stick my neck out and say I think we'll go with £200 to £300.

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-Right.

-Reserve 200, a little bit of discretion just in case he gets very

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close, because you would rather sell them that not, wouldn't you?

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-At the right price!

-Well, of course it will be the right price.

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-Lovely.

-Fingers crossed.

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'That's a wonderful story. Rare Welsh pottery finding its way home all the way from Devon.'

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-How are you being looked after today?

-Very well.

-Are you having a good time?

-Yes.

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Have you had good news or bad news?

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We haven't had any news. No news?

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-No news.

-No, not yet.

-Fingers crossed for good news, that's all I can say.

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'The good news is that the sun has come out so I've popped out to enjoy

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'it with Hilary and Michael, who have a rather interesting sketch to flog.'

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My day just gets better. Not only am I having a marvellous time in the Oak Hall and

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found some fabulous things to take off to auction, but the sun has come out so I've came outside.

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I've persuaded Michael and Hilary to join me, and their wonderful

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Conte crayon study by Augustus John, so how good is that!

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A Welshman, born in Tenby in 1878 which is just down the coastline isn't it, Tenby?

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-Indeed it is.

-It doesn't get much better.

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-Local interest, that's what it's all about and one of my favourite artists as well.

-Mine too.

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-Do you know, in the 1920s he was considered to be England's leading portrait artist?

-He was, was he?

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Yeah, he even paints Dylan Thomas.

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-Really?

-Yeah! So, tell me the story.

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You own an Augustus John.

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LAUGHTER

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Well, I just saw it at auction and liked it so I thought I would buy it

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and I was very lucky, I did manage to get it.

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It's been sitting in the lounge ever since, staring down at me.

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He did many pencil sketches and crayon sketches.

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It's quite loose, it's a study and I don't think it got any further than a study.

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I think this is an experimental doodle, really.

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Signed "John", which is wonderful. He'd just sign things bang in the middle "John".

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Literally there. It was never in the corner.

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It was always sort of right on the image. Why are you wanting to sell?

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Originally I just wanted it valued but I thought well,

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if it's a worth a few bob, I might sell that and buy something else.

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-OK.

-I just sort of...

-Trade upwards?

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Well, trade up or trade sideways, just a general rollover.

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I don't collect anything particular,

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just what is catching my eye at the time and it may very well be her time to go.

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-How much did you pay for this one?

-200.

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-I think you got this at a very good price.

-Oh, right.

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A very good price, and that was how many years ago? Five years ago?

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-About four or five years ago.

-Five years ago.

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-There's some interesting provenance on the back.

-Yes, there is.

-Can I just take this again.

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Now here, look, this is from the collection of Admiral Caspar John,

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-the artist's son.

-Another John?

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Yeah, and this was given to him in the mid 1930s, so that's nice, isn't it?

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Well, I think with the provenance, with the renewed interest,

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-I think if you put this into auction, you should double your money.

-That would be nice.

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And if you're willing to give it a go, we'll put it in with a valuation

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of £300 with a fixed reserve, so it won't sell for anything under 300.

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-That would be fine.

-So you're still in profit, but hopefully it will go up to the £400 mark.

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That would be nice! Jolly good. Let's hope so.

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'Fingers crossed it does the business.

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'Next, Margaret with some reminders of the '60s and '70s that have caught Christina's eye.'

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You're really taking us back to the Swinging '60s here.

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It feels like I've got Austin Powers sitting on my table.

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You've got the most wonderful collection of handbags. Where has it all come from?

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Well, most of them I acquired in a

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trunk from my late husband.

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It was given to him to dispose of.

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Right. Have you ever used them?

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This one I have, yes, sorry, this one I have and I used it at

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-quite a grand ball in Brighton.

-Ooh, fantastic!

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Maybe I'm glad to get rid of the memory because I insulted...

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Who was not a peer of the realm at the time,

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but I did call him a stuffed shirt, so he got my husband nearly sacked.

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OK. Let's have a chat about this one.

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This has got the most wonderful label inside it.

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It says "Saks Fifth Avenue"

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which is one of the most luxurious stores in New York and

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it's fantastic, I love it, and to have come from such a luxury place, it's the most wonderful product.

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You can imagine somebody going to New York, picking this up as a souvenir of their wonderfully

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glamorous trip to New York and tripping back down Fifth Avenue and this one here, this one is Italian

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and I think this is quite 1960s-1970s,

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very clean lines here and there's use of this new material.

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It's quite Perspexy, and just real glam, isn't it?

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It oozes glamour with a nice original strap to it as well

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and with this one as well it's nice that you've got the original chain.

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This is enamelled in cream as is the bag as is the clip here, or the frame, and it's great

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that they are in really good condition because to a costume

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collector that's very important, and handbags are a wonderful thing to collect.

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They don't take up too much space and also, if you're very careful, you can use them as well.

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I could use this happily today and it wouldn't look out of place, it's fantastic!

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So, Margaret, why are you selling your collection? What has prompted you to bring them here today?

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Where I store them in the box room, my chimney is giving trouble and it's

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getting damp so the condition might deteriorate and that is the reason.

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They are getting back in vogue but they're not going to be valuable

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because people who are collecting handbags are collecting them because

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they're still affordable. But I think at auction if we were to put these forward to auction,

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we would be looking at putting them probably as one lot.

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It would be best to sell them all together and I think we're probably looking somewhere

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in the region of maybe £30 to £50 for the group, something like that.

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-How do you feel about that?

-I'd like £30 in my pocket.

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-OK, all right.

-Then I could give it maybe to charity or something.

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-OK, well that's a nice idea.

-My sons would have dumped then, anyhow.

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Well, hopefully two people will like them as much as we do and they'll go for more.

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-That will be fine by me.

-Excellent! Thanks so much for coming in today.

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Thank you, and I really enjoyed today. It was fun!

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-Oh, good.

-Good luck.

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Well, we have been working flat out and it's time to put those valuations to the test so while we make our way

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over to Peter Francis Auction Rooms in Carmarthen, we're going to leave

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you with a quick reminder of all the items going under the hammer. Take a look at these.

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Bought at a car boot sale in Devon,

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Julia's three Swansea jugs are now back on home territory.

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Let's hope Hilary and Michael's little sketch is by Augustus John.

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If it is, then it's as good as sold.

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Finally, Christina's find,

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a selection of vintage handbags.

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They're a little bit of a departure for Flog It so it will be interesting to see how we do.

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It doesn't get much better than this.

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The magnificent, stunning Welsh countryside on a sunny, fresh morning.

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We're here in the historic town of Carmarthen to put our valuations to

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the test and they're going to be going under the hammer in that building over there on the

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banks of the River Tywi, Peter Francis Auctioneers.

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This is where they either sink or swim.

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We have two auctioneers on the rostrum today. Nigel Hodson...

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Selling I am there 30 now.

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..and Geoff Thomas.

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In the room at 80. 130.

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'Nigel is starting us off

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'with the sale of Margaret's collection of handbags.'

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Your handbags are just about to go under the hammer.

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There are eight of them, 1920s right up to 1970s.

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-Did you have a favourite amongst them?

-The favourite I kept!

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-A-ha, ha!

-And she's using!

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Wise! Have you got it here today?

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-No, no.

-A nice little lot, though, a mixed lot hopefully we'll get around

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40, 50, £60, you just don't know, do you?

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Yes, and vintage textiles of course are really coming back into fashion

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-so let's really hope that we get some fashionistas here today that want them.

-Something for the ladies!

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-Absolutely!

-Here we go, this is it.

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Assorted handbags and evening bags.

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Handbags and glad rags, here we go.

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Some in the Mary Quant style, the black and white,

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very well-recognisable black and white chequered bag there.

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A little bit of interest with me 30, 40.

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-At £40.

-Ooh, brilliant!

-Bid with me on the book at 40.

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Here to be sold. 40.

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May I say 50 on the bags there? At 40 with me, 50 a lady's bid.

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I have 60 on the book. 70 do you want?

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At £60, on the book at £60.

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Five if it helps you, it goes at 60, will be sold. Five do you want? £60.

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Margaret, that's fabulous! £60!

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-That's great!

-Hey, well done!

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-Fantastic!

-That was a tough call.

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A hard thing to put a price on.

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Yes, it is, it really is, but there we go.

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-You've got to be happy with that, surely?

-Extremely happy, yes.

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Excellent. I'm pleased.

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Double the reserve. Good result!

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'Next it's Hilary and Michael's little sketch which

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'appears to have some provenance, but the big question is, is it right?'

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It's my turn to be the expert and I've been waiting for this moment,

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ever since I met Hilary and Michael back at the valuation day on that lovely sunny day.

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The weather has really done us proud here in Wales.

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You can't beat it. Beautiful countryside and lovely weather.

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Augustus John, local boy, Tenby, you got this in a sale room five years ago.

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-Roughly.

-And how much did you pay for it again?

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-£200.

-Let's hope we can double that £200.

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-That would be nice.

-I had a chat to the auctioneer yesterday.

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-He agrees with me, the image is not brilliant is it, let's face it.

-No.

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It's a study, it's a rough sketch.

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He's slightly dubious it might be a forgery,

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but in my opinion if you're going to forge something, you're going to do a half-decent job, aren't you?

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What you're looking at here is something that's interesting,

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something that's been owned by the family and it's a rough, rough study

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by Augustus John but it's still worth buying into at the lower end of the market.

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Let's just hope the bidders here fall in love with it like you did five years ago, and we've

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got a bit of competition because this Augustus John is worth £300 to £400 of anybody's money if it's right.

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The Augustus John female reclining nude.

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There's been some developments on this

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picture since it was catalogued and since it was entered in the sale.

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Some doubts have been expressed as to

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whether it is by Augustus John irrespective of the fact that there

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is some suggested provenance

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and unfortunately I am going to have to say in the manner

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of Augustus John and really leave it to you to make up your own mind

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and what may I say. In your hands, what is it worth?

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What do you say, £500 for it?

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£500 for it?

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£300 then to put me in.

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£300 for it. £200 to start me, then.

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All quiet. £200.

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-No opening bid? £100 for it.

-He won't get an opening bid.

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No? Well, I'm not surprised and I'm sorry to have to do that

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at that stage but we will pass it by and perhaps the thing to do would be

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to make some further enquiries

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as to see whether we could get a cast-iron attribution.

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-You paid a lot of money for it.

-That's life.

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I'm sorry. Going back on the wall.

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-Oh, definitely!

-Yeah, back on the wall.

-I like her, I don't care!

-Good, good!

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'Well, the bidders didn't seem convinced today but I think Hilary is quite pleased to be taking it home.

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'Nigel's colleague, auctioneer Geoff Thomas, is now on the rostrum to sell

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'the three Swansea jugs that Charlie spotted.'

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Julia, that's what I call a good day's shopping,

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buying Welsh jugs in Devon, down in the West Country for £3 each.

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They're going in the sale today with a value of some £200 to £300.

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-Since the valuation day you put that valuation on, you've dropped the reserve down to £100.

-Yeah.

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-You just want to let them go.

-Yep, let them go.

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You brought them at the right place, at the right time.

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-Let's hope so.

-I hope so as well.

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The condition is there, the buyers are here.

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-Yep.

-Let's find out what they think. Here we go.

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We have a graduate set of three Swansea pottery jugs.

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Got 360. What about these? Start me, what will you give me £100 away.

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£100. £80.

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£50, £50 only £50 bid at £50.

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At £50 I've got 50. 60 is it now?

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At 50, 60, 70, at £70 bid.

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At £70, £80 now is it?

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As at £70. Are you all done then?

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£80 in the centre. At £80 I'm bid.

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At £80 bid. £90 is it now?

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At £80 bid, £90 is it. At £80 are you all done then,

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they'll go then, are you all done at £80.

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Oh, he's let them go at £80.

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-That's fine.

-Are you happy?

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Well, I'm not unhappy!

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It's been a good day. Well, at least this one has gone.

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Hey, it's still a great return on what you paid for them.

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-Oh, of course, yeah.

-And that's what it's all about.

0:17:470:17:50

Recycling antiques. It doesn't get greener and it doesn't get better.

0:17:500:17:53

'Not only that, they're back home in Wales.

0:17:530:17:58

'Time now for me to leave the auction behind and explore a little local history.'

0:17:580:18:03

Cardigan is a delightful little town in the far west of Wales, lying on the River Teifi.

0:18:100:18:16

There's been a settlement here for the past 900 years

0:18:180:18:23

during which time it has of course had its ups and downs.

0:18:230:18:27

It once boasted the most splendid medieval castle

0:18:270:18:31

but all that remains now is this outer stone wall,

0:18:310:18:35

seemingly held up by these rather ugly rolled steel joists

0:18:350:18:39

stopping it from caving over into the road.

0:18:390:18:42

But it remains remarkable for being the first castle to be built in stone by a Welsh prince.

0:18:420:18:47

Therein lies a tale.

0:18:470:18:49

The Prince was Lord Rhys ap Gruffydd.

0:18:520:18:55

He's still thought of by many as the greatest Welshman who ever lived

0:18:550:18:58

for his part in defending Wales from Anglo-Norman invaders.

0:18:580:19:02

By the time we join the story, he had cut a deal with King Henry II.

0:19:080:19:12

His new stone castle was to be one of the main administrative centres for South Wales.

0:19:120:19:16

His son, who had been held captive at Henry's court at Aquitaine in France was to be released

0:19:160:19:21

and returned to him so by the time the castle was completed in 1176, Rhys had a great deal to celebrate.

0:19:210:19:27

He through the most incredible housewarming party, possibly

0:19:270:19:30

borrowing the idea brought back from France by his son at the Court of Aquitaine.

0:19:300:19:35

At the party, he set up a contest between poets and bards and another between various classes of musicians.

0:19:360:19:43

He honoured the victors by seating them at his table and bestowing them with gifts.

0:19:430:19:48

The occasion as generally accepted as the first national Eisteddfod.

0:19:480:19:52

An event which still happens annually and is the lynch-pin of Welsh culture.

0:19:560:20:01

So this castle is central to Welsh history and culture.

0:20:170:20:21

It's just such a shame that it was largely destroyed by Oliver Cromwell's army

0:20:210:20:26

during the Civil War. But in 1808 it had a second, more delicate, flowering...

0:20:260:20:30

in the form of Castle Green House, an elegant Georgian villa built inside the walls of the old castle.

0:20:320:20:38

It survived well until the mid 20th century when it became derelict.

0:20:380:20:44

The hole has been a blight on the town for years but there is new hope.

0:20:470:20:51

The local Cadwgan Building Preservation Trust has come up with a restoration plan.

0:20:510:20:56

It is now submitting a Heritage Lottery Bid and is striving to match the amount themselves.

0:20:560:21:00

'Jan Tucker from the Trust is going to tell me more.'

0:21:070:21:10

So how did Castle Green House get to be in this state in the first place?

0:21:100:21:14

Well, the Woods Family bought it in 1940 and came here. I don't think...

0:21:140:21:19

They had lost quite a bit of money before they came here

0:21:190:21:22

and just generally it has gone down and down, and down.

0:21:220:21:25

When was it last lived in, then?

0:21:250:21:27

The house, probably about the '80s, 1980. We don't know what happened to the father.

0:21:270:21:33

The mother and Miss Wood lived here then for quite a while and they were

0:21:330:21:36

burning the floorboards, the panelling, everything to keep warm.

0:21:360:21:41

Mrs Wood actually died in the bedroom up there and Barbara Woods

0:21:430:21:46

never went back there again and just slept downstairs the whole time.

0:21:460:21:50

-She just lived here on her own with 20 cats, I think.

-Really?

-Yes.

0:21:500:21:55

And what did she do for money, then?

0:21:550:21:58

-Just sort of begged and borrowed?

-People in the town were looking after her.

0:21:580:22:02

One gentleman was very, very good to her and eventually he brought a caravan in here for her to live in.

0:22:020:22:07

'The council bought the property from Barbara in 2003 and she was able to escape the caravan and

0:22:070:22:13

'end her years living comfortably in a local residential home.'

0:22:130:22:18

So obviously the scaffolding is up now. Can we go in?

0:22:180:22:22

-No, I'm sorry.

-There are no staircases I bet, the floorboards still.

0:22:220:22:26

The staircase is in a very bad state. In actual fact a bit of it has fallen off

0:22:260:22:31

because it's open to the sky up above and also they've been in and found a lot of asbestos

0:22:310:22:36

-in there, so I'm sorry, Paul, we won't be able to go in.

-Oh, dear!

0:22:360:22:40

-And I've found that you've got some endangered species living in there.

-We have, we have.

0:22:400:22:44

Some very rare bats in the cellar.

0:22:440:22:47

We have, we have. Greater Horseshoe bats, Lesser Horseshoe bats.

0:22:470:22:50

I hope they're paying their rent, contributing towards the maintenance!

0:22:500:22:54

It would be nice if they did because we're only looking for about £4 million.

0:22:540:22:58

Are you? Is that the project budget?

0:22:580:22:59

Well, we've got £4.5 million from the Heritage Lottery Fund.

0:22:590:23:03

-Right, OK.

-But we have to match-fund that and so we have to raise this money somehow,

0:23:030:23:09

the Trust have to do this so we've had quite a lot of events to date,

0:23:090:23:14

but we've got a long way to go.

0:23:140:23:16

'The exciting plans for the new site include a circular performance space to be known as the Eisteddfod Garden

0:23:160:23:23

'and a brand new restaurant overlooking the river.

0:23:230:23:26

'Weddings and events for all ages will be held at the castle

0:23:260:23:30

'so once more it will be back in its rightful place

0:23:300:23:33

'at the heart of the community.'

0:23:330:23:35

-What about the house, inside?

-The house is going to be an interpretation centre telling the

0:23:350:23:39

story of the culture and heritage of Wales and we're going to be doing master classes here.

0:23:390:23:45

Anything to do with the Eisteddfod and that can be anything from jam-making

0:23:450:23:50

to playing the harp, to singing...

0:23:500:23:52

Exactly what was happening here in 1176, possibly.

0:23:520:23:56

-Sounds really exciting and keeping all this traditions alive.

-Yes.

0:23:560:24:00

-And hopefully we'll be back here with Flog It for a valuation day.

-Thank you.

0:24:000:24:03

'At Rhos-y-gilwen Mansion the team is still in full swing.

0:24:160:24:19

'Christina is very impressed by a pair of plates belonging to Rosalind.'

0:24:230:24:29

-So Rosalind, I saw you in the queue with these.

-Yes.

-And I fished you out of the queue.

-You did.

0:24:290:24:33

Because I got very excited when I first saw them.

0:24:330:24:36

These pair of plates here as well, you've got two, this pair.

0:24:360:24:39

Have they been in your family for a long time?

0:24:390:24:41

-Well, they've only been in our family for about 30 years.

-Right.

0:24:410:24:46

They did belong to the family of my aunt's husband so they're

0:24:460:24:53

not directly associated with my family,

0:24:530:24:56

so they're not of great sentimental value.

0:24:560:25:00

-And where do you keep them now?

-Well, actually my sister in law had them.

0:25:000:25:03

-I think they were just in a cupboard or somewhere.

-In a cupboard?

0:25:030:25:07

-So you don't have fruit in them?

-Nothing.

0:25:070:25:09

OK. Well, I'll tell you why I got quite excited about them

0:25:090:25:13

is that these really do represent a fantastic period in English pottery, they really do.

0:25:130:25:20

They are English, well I think they are English, tin-glazed earthenware.

0:25:200:25:25

This is the pre-cursor to porcelain, this is the pre-cursor really to pottery.

0:25:250:25:29

It's really the earliest form of pottery that you can get.

0:25:290:25:32

I think it dates to about the mid 18th century,

0:25:320:25:36

so we're looking at about maybe 1740 to 1760, so they're 250 years old.

0:25:360:25:40

That's pretty fantastic, isn't it?

0:25:400:25:42

The style

0:25:420:25:44

was originally started in Delft.

0:25:440:25:46

Now the Delft workers originally saw all sorts of things coming in from China, being imported in,

0:25:460:25:51

all these wonderfully big chargers with these polychrome...

0:25:510:25:55

When I say polychrome I mean a lot of different coloured patterns...

0:25:550:25:59

..coming in from the east and they tried to replicate them.

0:25:590:26:02

They couldn't replicate them in porcelain so they developed this

0:26:020:26:05

tin-glazed earthenware which is all we had available to us at the time.

0:26:050:26:09

We didn't know the sort of magic recipe of porcelain so we couldn't develop that, sadly,

0:26:090:26:14

-and then they decorated them in these wonderful patterns.

-It is nice.

0:26:140:26:18

It's lovely, isn't it, with these... we've got three colours here.

0:26:180:26:21

We've got this wonderful russet colour and then the olive green and the blue as well,

0:26:210:26:26

so it really is, it's just magic within this ogee border here, obviously hand-painted.

0:26:260:26:31

-Yes.

-I think they're fabulous, I really do.

0:26:310:26:34

I think this damage isn't going to affect the value hugely.

0:26:340:26:40

It is lovely to have a pair, even though one is damaged. It's great to have a matching pair.

0:26:400:26:44

-Do you like them?

-I do like them but we're not using them.

0:26:440:26:47

We don't have them displayed and the main thing is that they haven't come directly in the family

0:26:470:26:53

because we don't sell anything that's sentimental.

0:26:530:26:55

They're about the only thing we've got!

0:26:550:26:57

OK, all right. I think at auction if we were to offer them,

0:26:570:27:01

we'd probably pop them in at maybe £300 to £500 and see how we got on.

0:27:010:27:06

-Really!

-What do you think?

0:27:060:27:07

I think that is fantastic!

0:27:070:27:10

That is absolutely fantastic!

0:27:100:27:12

Wonderful! Well, I think we'll try them at £300 to £500 with a reserve of £280 and see how we get on.

0:27:120:27:18

Fingers crossed they'll do well.

0:27:180:27:20

-Wonderful! Wonderful!

-Thanks so much for bringing them in.

-Thank you very much, that's great!

0:27:200:27:27

Ooh, that was a surprise!

0:27:270:27:31

'I'm not surprised Christina picked them out. They're stunning!'

0:27:310:27:35

FIDDLER PLAYS MUSIC

0:27:350:27:39

Join in, everyone.

0:27:390:27:40

Yes, well done!

0:27:520:27:56

It's marvellous to be here in Wales, it really is!

0:27:560:28:00

Now Kath, with a charming Art Deco piece.

0:28:000:28:03

Well, Kath, what made you bring this in today?

0:28:030:28:06

Well, it was an item that we nearly didn't bring in and we just remembered I'd got

0:28:060:28:10

it in a box in my wardrobe and we put it in the bag to bring along, just to see what it was about.

0:28:100:28:14

And it's always been in your wardrobe?

0:28:140:28:16

It has been since I've had it, yeah.

0:28:160:28:18

So, how did you get it? Did you buy it, or...?

0:28:180:28:20

No, I had it from my grandparents because I used to collect frogs and there is a little frog on it.

0:28:200:28:24

-So you used to collect frogs?

-Yeah.

0:28:240:28:26

Because it had a frog on it, they gave it to me, so it came on...

0:28:260:28:29

-Did you like it or you just took it on sufferance?

-No, I do like it, I do like it, yes.

0:28:290:28:34

Have you any idea where it was made?

0:28:340:28:38

-Well, I think Germany.

-Yes.

0:28:380:28:39

-And that would fit in.

-What would give you a clue?

0:28:390:28:42

-The "WMF".

-WMF", exactly,

0:28:420:28:46

yeah, there is it as clear as anything, "WMF".

0:28:460:28:50

-Do you know what WMF stands for?

-I should do, but no.

0:28:500:28:53

Wurttemberg. That's the name of the place. Metallen.

0:28:530:28:56

Metal. Fabriken which is, made. so it was made in the Wurttemberg factory.

0:28:560:29:02

Date, any idea how old it might be?

0:29:020:29:04

None at all, no idea.

0:29:040:29:06

-It's about 1930.

-Right.

0:29:060:29:08

It's really quite

0:29:080:29:10

Art Deco in its look, which I like.

0:29:100:29:14

-Do you know what it might have been, or what it is I should say?

-No. I just wondered whether it was

0:29:140:29:20

maybe a bon-bon dish or something to put trinkets in, I don't know.

0:29:200:29:24

-Yeah, I think it's quite possibly a visiting card tray.

-Oh, right, OK.

0:29:240:29:31

The real problem, it would have had a great patternation when it came out of the Wurttenberg factory.

0:29:310:29:38

Somebody has been very naughty with this

0:29:380:29:42

and frankly, it looks as if they've had a Brillo pad at it.

0:29:420:29:47

Any ideas, he said, looking at you?

0:29:470:29:50

It's not me, I'm not guilty, so no, I don't know.

0:29:500:29:53

To a certain extent the patternation of something

0:29:530:29:56

like this is very important but somebody will find that charming.

0:29:560:29:59

Now if you collect frogs, why are you selling it?

0:29:590:30:02

Well, I haven't really got anywhere to put it as it is, and I don't collect so many now.

0:30:020:30:06

And it's been in a box for such a long time that I thought maybe it's time to go.

0:30:060:30:10

-Time to de-clutter?

-Time to de-clutter.

-Time to introduce it to Flog It!

-That's right.

0:30:100:30:15

Value, any ideas?

0:30:150:30:17

Absolutely none at all.

0:30:170:30:19

I'm going to plump for £50 to £80.

0:30:190:30:22

-OK.

-With a little bit of discretion on the 50. Perhaps a fixed reserve of £40.

-That sounds good.

0:30:220:30:28

But with a saleroom estimate of £50 to £80.

0:30:280:30:32

-OK.

-Making it absolutely clear, so thank you very much for rescuing it and bringing

0:30:320:30:37

-it along today and I think we might get a pleasant surprise.

-Brilliant!

0:30:370:30:42

'Shame about the damage, but it still may catch someone's eye.

0:30:420:30:47

'Finally, Christina wins the prize for the largest find of the day.'

0:30:500:30:55

So, Linda, when I saw you in the queue this morning,

0:30:550:30:58

-you came in with a bag containing a very small sample of this.

-Yes.

0:30:580:31:03

-And then you brought in another bag and then you brought in another bag.

-Yes.

0:31:030:31:09

So this is a tiny sample, really, of the quite extensive dinner service that you've brought in to us today.

0:31:090:31:16

140 pieces, yes.

0:31:160:31:18

That's a big dinner service!

0:31:180:31:20

-It is!

-And tell me about it. Where has it come from?

0:31:200:31:23

It originally was a friend of the family who was a lovely old gentleman

0:31:230:31:27

who collected things for years and years and years

0:31:270:31:30

to the point where he had things in boxes in his flat, and he didn't even know what he had any more.

0:31:300:31:35

The flat was broken into once so he decided to clear things,

0:31:350:31:40

but he wanted his things to only go to people who would love them,

0:31:400:31:44

so that was when he sold it to my dad and stepmother

0:31:440:31:48

and that would have been back in the '50s.

0:31:480:31:51

OK. Tell me, the gentleman that it belonged to in the first instance, that was...

0:31:510:31:57

Where was he based? Was he based in France or in the UK, or?

0:31:570:32:00

No, he was based in Chicago.

0:32:000:32:02

He was based in Chicago in America?

0:32:020:32:05

-Yes.

-Right, so this dinner service which is a Limoges dinner service, made in France.

0:32:050:32:09

Yes.

0:32:090:32:12

-Early 20th century has gone from France.

-Correct.

-To America.

-Yes.

0:32:120:32:16

And now we're in Cardigan.

0:32:160:32:18

-Yes.

-This is probably the best-travelled dinner service I've ever seen in my life!

0:32:180:32:22

It's wonderful!

0:32:220:32:24

I see from the pattern, which is a nice shamrock pattern,

0:32:240:32:27

which would indicate it might have some sort of Irish connotations,

0:32:270:32:30

might it have been over to Ireland as well?

0:32:300:32:33

Not to my knowledge.

0:32:330:32:35

Not to your knowledge? OK. I notice that you've got a little bit of damage here.

0:32:350:32:39

We've got a hairline crack

0:32:390:32:41

just inside that sauce boat there

0:32:410:32:44

and we've also got a crack inside the cup, there.

0:32:440:32:49

-Where has it been kept? Have you had it out on display, or?

-Not...

0:32:490:32:54

Now in a lovely old stone cottage and there just is no room for it.

0:32:540:32:58

-It's been in the loft for the last eight years and it should not be in a loft.

-No, indeed.

0:32:580:33:02

It should be loved and cracks, yes. Let's put it this way.

0:33:020:33:06

If we were as old as this china, we'd be showing a few cracks, too.

0:33:060:33:10

I think you might be right! I would, definitely.

0:33:100:33:13

Right. I think at auction we still have to be quite conservative,

0:33:130:33:18

-purely because they are pretty tricky to sell.

-Right.

0:33:180:33:21

I think what we'll do is we'll pop an estimate of maybe £100 to £200 and see how we get on.

0:33:210:33:28

-I know that you'll be disappointed if you don't get more than £100 for it.

-Yes.

0:33:280:33:32

So I would suggest that we pop a firm reserve of £100 on it

0:33:320:33:37

and hopefully we'll find it a nice new home.

0:33:370:33:40

I certainly hope so!

0:33:400:33:41

And what are we going to put the money towards?

0:33:410:33:44

Well, when one has a 200 year-old stone cottage, there's always something!

0:33:440:33:48

Well, that's it, we've now found our last lots and I tell you,

0:33:550:33:58

there'll be one or two surprises amongst them when we get to the auction room.

0:33:580:34:01

And here is what we are taking.

0:34:010:34:03

Rosalind's lovely tin-glazed plates.

0:34:030:34:06

They're unloved at home but they won't be in the auction room,

0:34:060:34:10

followed by the 1930s WMF visiting card tray, owned by Kath, which has definitely seen better days.

0:34:100:34:17

And finally the extensive and much travelled Limoges dinner service with its charming pattern.

0:34:170:34:22

'Before the auction starts, let's hear what Nigel Hodson thinks about those tin-glazed plates.'

0:34:370:34:42

We've got two tin-glazed earthenware plates.

0:34:420:34:46

A nice soft glaze to this but lots of damage.

0:34:460:34:49

They belong to Rosalind and they've been in the family for 30 years and we've put £300 to £500 on them.

0:34:490:34:54

The good part about these is that one is absolutely perfect

0:34:540:34:56

as far as one would expect with this sort of plate.

0:34:560:34:59

-You always get the fritting round the edges because of the glaze.

-That's quite nice.

0:34:590:35:03

It is, it's part of the constitution of the glaze and that's not an issue.

0:35:030:35:07

That one has got rather a large bite out of it and one or two other problems.

0:35:070:35:11

-So it's buy one, get one free.

-As you say, yes, quite right.

0:35:110:35:14

A while ago these would have made rather more than they do now but

0:35:140:35:17

the sort of estimate that you've got, they've got a fighting chance

0:35:170:35:20

because that is a nice plate and stand something in front of that and you won't see to much of a problem.

0:35:200:35:25

If you were dressing it and it's nice to have that symmetry of the two identical ones.

0:35:250:35:29

A pair of those on a delft rack they would still look very nice.

0:35:290:35:33

I think we've got a good chance with those.

0:35:330:35:35

I'm so pleased you said that because...

0:35:350:35:37

-English rather than Dutch?

-English.

0:35:370:35:39

-I think English rather than Dutch.

-I love this kind of thing, and it's period... It's a proper antique.

0:35:390:35:44

Yep, absolutely, no question at all.

0:35:440:35:46

'They're up first with auctioneer, Geoff Thomas.'

0:35:460:35:50

OK, so far, so good.

0:35:500:35:52

It's getting exciting here, the tension is really building.

0:35:520:35:55

Rosalind has just joined me and Christina.

0:35:550:35:57

We've got a real antique going under the hammer, proper lot,

0:35:570:36:00

a pair of 18th century tin-glazed earthenware plates. A lovely, lovely lot. One is badly damaged, OK...

0:36:000:36:06

-I think...

-Buy one, get one free!

-Yeah.

0:36:060:36:08

-I've had a chat to the auctioneer. He agreed with the valuation.

-Good.

0:36:080:36:11

-I just think, you know, in times gone by these were £600-£700 each.

-Yes, there we are.

-Yep, absolutely.

0:36:110:36:17

-Hey, nice lot, though!

-And there's two, two.

0:36:170:36:19

-And the condition of the other one is very, very good.

-Yes.

0:36:190:36:21

Chipping around the edges doesn't put the collectors off. It's meant to be, it's soft paste?

0:36:210:36:26

If you consider the age of them, you've got to figure there's a little bit of damage, haven't you,

0:36:260:36:31

-but no, fingers crossed, they'll do really well.

-I'm excited about this.

-Fingers crossed.

0:36:310:36:35

Let's find out exactly what the bidders think and what it's worth.

0:36:350:36:39

We have a pair of 18th century English Delft earthenware plates.

0:36:410:36:45

What about these, what should I ask you. Say I want £300.

0:36:450:36:47

Three, two, two, one, one only, one on the back.

0:36:470:36:51

I can see 140 with me, 160, 180...

0:36:510:36:55

-Come on, come on!

-200, 220, 240, 250, 260. At 260.

0:36:550:37:02

-£260.

-I have the bidding at 260.

0:37:020:37:05

At 260, 260 bid.

0:37:050:37:09

At 260, 70 is it now?

0:37:090:37:10

280 I've got on the net.

0:37:100:37:12

At 300, £300 I'm bid.

0:37:120:37:15

At 300, at £300. In the room now at 300, out on the net at 300.

0:37:150:37:20

Are you all done then, it will go then, at £300.

0:37:200:37:25

-Brilliant!

-All right, lovely.

-£300.

0:37:250:37:28

-That's a good result.

-Yes, we're all pleased with that.

0:37:280:37:32

-It sold to someone in the room as well.

-Oh, that's good.

0:37:320:37:35

I gather all the money is going towards a big family get-together?

0:37:350:37:38

-Well, actually it's a few family get-togethers.

-A few!

0:37:380:37:42

Because we're quite economical as a family!

0:37:420:37:45

I wish I had one like that! I'm really pleased for you, Rosalind. That's fantastic.

0:37:450:37:51

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you, thank you.

0:37:510:37:54

-Thanks very much.

-Great lot, an absolutely great lot.

0:37:540:37:57

If you've got anything like that, we would love to see it.

0:37:570:37:59

Bring it along to one of our valuation dates and you can pick up the details on our website.

0:37:590:38:03

Just log onto bbc.co.uk/flogit follow the links and hopefully

0:38:030:38:07

all the information will be there.

0:38:070:38:10

If you don't have a computer check the details in your local press

0:38:100:38:13

because we're coming to an area very near you, soon so watch out, we want to see you.

0:38:130:38:18

'Nigel Hodson is back on the rostrum with Kath, our Art Deco visiting card tray.'

0:38:180:38:24

Kath, I love this little card tray, big fan of this.

0:38:240:38:26

-I like the little frog, I think it's sweet and I think you love that frog as well.

-Yeah, it's lovely.

0:38:260:38:31

WMF, we've seen a lot on the show before, made in Germany.

0:38:310:38:34

It's quality. Fingers crossed we get the top end of the £80.

0:38:340:38:37

-I hope so.

-Happy with Charlie's valuation?

0:38:370:38:39

-Very happy.

-I'm just slightly worried about the condition.

0:38:390:38:42

Someone has really taken a scouring brush to it or something, which is not easy to...

0:38:420:38:46

-It's lost its brilliantness,

-It has.

0:38:460:38:47

You'll never be able to get that back, so I guess that's why you have got £50 to £80.

0:38:470:38:52

Exactly. I think otherwise it would be £100-£150.

0:38:520:38:55

-I bet everybody loves frogs and they put a smile on your face don't they?

-Yep, yep.

0:38:550:39:00

And if you're smiling when you buy something, you generally pay

0:39:000:39:03

a little bit more for it, so let's hope this lot are smiling here today.

0:39:030:39:06

Here we go.

0:39:060:39:08

It's the little electro-plated

0:39:080:39:11

carte de visite tray and this is marked "WMF"

0:39:110:39:15

so German, WMF,

0:39:150:39:18

good quality German silver plate.

0:39:180:39:21

What do I say for that? What do I say? £100 for it?

0:39:210:39:23

£100 for it. Little WMF dish there.

0:39:230:39:26

-Come on!

-50 to go, then, put me in.

0:39:260:39:29

There it is, 30 only. 40 may I say?

0:39:290:39:31

At 30. May I say 40 on the WMF.

0:39:310:39:33

At 30, at 30 only, may I say 40 now, 40 on the front row.

0:39:330:39:38

At 40, at 40 on the front row, at 40. May I say 50 now?

0:39:380:39:41

-It's the lady's bid in the room.

-Cor, it's struggling, isn't it!

0:39:410:39:44

-What about 45?

-All quiet online. 50 is in the centre.

0:39:440:39:47

-Phew!

-We've got it, we've got it.

0:39:470:39:49

60 for you, madam? Not expensive. 60. At 60 the lady on the front.

0:39:490:39:53

At 60. May I say 70 sir? 70 I'm bid.

0:39:530:39:56

At 70, 80 is it now? No?

0:39:560:39:57

At £70 the gentleman's bid, against you on the front madam, at 70.

0:39:570:40:02

Is there 80 anywhere? All quiet online, it goes for 70.

0:40:020:40:05

-70, £70.

-The hammer is gong down. Yes!

0:40:050:40:07

Because it's lost its brilliance, I think that is bang on... £70.

0:40:070:40:12

-That's good.

-Well, done.

-Thank you.

-There is commission to pay here.

0:40:120:40:17

-It is 17.5% OK.

-That's fine.

0:40:170:40:20

On items under £150. They've got a sliding scale here.

0:40:200:40:24

If it's over £150 but under £3,000, it's 15%. If it's over £3,000 it's 10%.

0:40:240:40:30

'Well, I reckon that was a reasonable result, given the damage, and I think

0:40:300:40:34

-'I recognise one of the bidders!'

-50 is it?

0:40:340:40:36

At 1,100 bid. Are you all done, then?

0:40:360:40:40

Geoff Thomas is with us again hoping to sell Linda's enormous Limoges dinner service.

0:40:400:40:46

Well, I've just been joined by Linda and Christina here and a 140-piece dinner service

0:40:480:40:52

which is well-travelled. It has certainly collected its air miles.

0:40:520:40:55

-It certainly has!

-Wow! Linda said to me earlier she was rather hoping for a nought on the end,

0:40:550:41:00

like £1,000 to £2,000 because there's an awful lot of this but...

0:41:000:41:04

I wish I was at the valuation day seeing your face when you said £100 to £200.

0:41:040:41:09

It was a bit of a shock, wasn't it?

0:41:090:41:11

Well, it's sad. I don't want to cry because I know what it is but I also appreciate

0:41:110:41:17

the times we're in now and the fact that it can't go in a dishwasher...

0:41:170:41:22

-No.

-And we don't entertain that way any more.

0:41:220:41:25

-I was quite clear about it at the time I think, wasn't I, but...

-It's that beautiful gilt edging.

0:41:250:41:30

Is it a come and buy me or is it only really worth £100 to £200?

0:41:300:41:34

It just is a bit difficult to find

0:41:340:41:35

somebody that wants such a comprehensive dinner service for best.

0:41:350:41:39

I mean hopefully, really hopefully, it will make more for you,

0:41:390:41:42

I really do hope it does, but no, it is here to sell, so, fingers crossed.

0:41:420:41:46

It was those big Christmas dinners we used to foray.

0:41:460:41:49

All those meals, all those wonderful times.

0:41:490:41:52

Are you a good cook?

0:41:520:41:53

A good entertainer, I'll bet!

0:41:530:41:55

My husband is a qualified chef. I don't do kitchen now!

0:41:550:41:58

-I don't blame you!

-I'll have to find one like that.

0:41:580:42:02

I'll lend him out! Well, let's hope somebody here is a good cook

0:42:020:42:05

and they want a big dinner service because it's going under the hammer,

0:42:050:42:09

right here, right now. Here we go.

0:42:090:42:10

Porcelain coffee, tea and dinner service, 140 pieces.

0:42:100:42:17

I have interest here. I can start the bidding at 200.

0:42:170:42:21

-Yes!

-250. 300.

0:42:210:42:23

350. At 350 I'm bid, at 350, 350...

0:42:230:42:29

-Absolutely brilliant!

-At 350 bid, at 350, at 350 bid, at 350.

0:42:290:42:35

380, 380, 400.

0:42:350:42:39

At 400 with me, at 400 bid, at 400, at 400. 420.

0:42:390:42:44

At 420 bid, online now at 420.

0:42:440:42:48

440, 400, at 440, 60.

0:42:480:42:51

Bidding online at 460. At 460 bid, at 460. 80 do I hear?

0:42:510:42:56

At 460. Are you all done, then and it goes then at £460.

0:42:560:43:00

-Yeah!

-Well, done.

0:43:020:43:03

Fabulous, Linda. I'm ever so pleased.

0:43:030:43:05

That was well-travelled, wasn't it...

0:43:050:43:07

-that was certainly well-travelled.

-That's brilliant! I'm sorry for being so gloomy!

0:43:070:43:12

That's all right. Say I told you so!

0:43:120:43:15

Every cloud has a silver lining, doesn't it?

0:43:150:43:18

-Brilliant!

-Wonderful! Thank you.

-Thank you for keeping us entertained.

0:43:180:43:21

If you've got anything like that, we'd love to see it.

0:43:210:43:23

Bring it along to one of our valuation days. We've run out of time in Carmarthen.

0:43:230:43:27

I hope you've enjoyed the show. See you again soon for plenty more surprises!

0:43:270:43:31

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:440:43:47

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:470:43:50

Flog It visits Rhosygilwen Mansion just outside Cardigan in the west of Wales. Presenter Paul Martin is joined by experts Charlie Ross and Christina Trevanion. The finds include 16th-century plates and handbags from the 1960s, all to be auctioned in Carnarvon. Paul takes time out to find out what is happening at Cardigan Castle.


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