Todmorden Flog It!


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Todmorden

At Todmorden Town Hall in Yorkshire, the Flog It! team discover a variety of curious items, including a hoard of advertising memorabilia and an unusual piece of wood.


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Today we're in the busy market town of Todmorden in Yorkshire.

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Not only is it market day, but it's also a valuation day.

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Welcome to Flog It!.

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Overlooked by the Pennines and located between three beautiful valleys,

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the town of Todmorden is in Yorkshire, right on the border with Lancashire.

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And I'm hoping for a jolly good turnout of local people

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for today's Flog It!.

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The market doesn't look that busy.

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Why's that? Well, there's another special event going on,

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and it's right here in this magnificent venue, the Town Hall.

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Look at this! Hundreds of people queuing to see Flog It!.

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They want the answer to the question "what's it worth?", and we're going to tell them.

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We've got a great team of experts to value all the items

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everyone has brought along, and leading the crew today

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we've got Flog It! favourites Adam Partridge and Catherine Southon.

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Adam runs his own auction house, and is used to valuing all sorts of antiques.

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Looks like a German mark on it,

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maybe the Sitzendorf factory. That's quite nice, isn't it?

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Catherine is an antiques consultant with an eye for maritime items,

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and always has a cheery word for our visitors.

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-£50 or £60 then.

-Right.

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-I wonder what it might be worth.

-It might be worth millions now!

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-Nice!

-THEY LAUGH

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You never can guess what we're going to unpack and discover

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at our valuation days, and for me, that's the fun of it all!

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So let's get down to business, shall we?

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Coming up on today's show...

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find out why Adam is looking a bit sheepish.

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Right. Have you any idea what it might be worth?

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Catherine looks into a bit of advertising history.

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..a can of dog shampoo.

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A bit quirky, and you've... Whoops! Sorry!

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'And a bit of wood turns out to be a valuable and dangerous antique.'

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And that seriously would do an awful lot of damage.

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'With items of every shape and size coming through the doors,

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'it's going to be a mixed lot making it to the valuation tables.

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'So let's look at that rather modern item with Adam,

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'brought in by Catherine.'

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-Are you from Todmorden?

-No, I'm from Burnley.

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-So you're Lancashire, not Yorkshire.

-Yes.

-I'm getting the grip of this.

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I had my passport stamped at the border.

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-It's really close, Todmorden. It's a border town.

-Yes.

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-It is. Now, you've brought a sheep.

-No. He's a ram.

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-He's a ram. How did you get him?

-Car-boot.

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-Car-boot.

-Yeah.

-OK. Tell us a bit more.

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He was bought as a joke for my daughter.

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Right.

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Since she was little, she's collected sheep.

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-Your daughter collects sheep?

-Yes.

-How old's your daughter?

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She's 16.

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So you've got... How many sheep has she got, roughly?

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She's got about 250, of varying sizes,

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from tiny little ones up to huge humungous things.

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We're not allowed to eat lamb in our house.

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-That's how bad she is into her sheep.

-Right.

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He was laid on the stall... laid down...

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-Ahh!

-..like that.

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-Like a dead ram.

-Like a dead ram.

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So I picked him up. The girl asked... I said, "How much is it?"

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She said, "50p." Gave her the 50p.

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I thought that would be a good joke for her.

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Put it in my bag, got back to the car with my husband,

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and he said, "It's Steiff."

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So if she'd have laid it that way round...

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Yes. She'd have probably got a lot more for him.

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-But he was my bargain of the day!

-You presented it to your daughter,

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-who collected sheep, and she was delighted.

-And she hates him.

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-Why?

-She hates him with vengeance.

-What's the matter with him?

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-Because he's a ram and not a sheep.

-Ahh!

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Well, for 100 years now, Steiff has been the leading name

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and the most famous name in teddy bears, and consequently later years

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in all sorts of stuffed toys and novelties.

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This one isn't of great age, but it's got that great Steiff pedigree.

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And it's very nicely made. Lovely quality.

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You've not dropped on fortunes, but certainly on a profit.

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Yeah. And we always watch this programme,

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so it's, like, you learn so much!

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So you can tell me what it's worth.

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-I don't know.

-Come on. Let's have a prediction off you.

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-£20.

-£20. Good idea. Good.

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-I was going to say put 20 to 40.

-Yeah.

-Do you reckon?

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-Yeah.

-No reserve?

-No reserve, no.

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-Let him go?

-Let him go, yeah.

-If he's cost you 50p...

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-50p's nothing.

-Are you going to keep the...

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I know it's not a lot of money, but are you going to keep it?

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It's going to more sheep. Yes, it's got to go to more sheep.

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Excellent. Well, thanks for bringing him.

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Oh, you're welcome!

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More and more people... Where does the queue end?

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-That looks heavy! Are you all right?

-It is, yes.

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'And it's not only people coming in. I'm like Dr Dolittle today,

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'with Flog It! attracting all the animals in town.

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'Back in the hall, Catherine's with Sonia and her son Matthew,

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'and some advertising memories.'

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Sonia, welcome to Flog It!. And gorgeous little Matthew, as well.

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Thank you for coming and bringing something out of the ordinary.

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I always like to see something a little bit unusual,

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and you've certainly delivered today with this lovely collection

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of advertising memorabilia. Tell me about it. Where did you get it from?

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My father worked in Odhams during the '30s and '40s,

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and also in Fleet Street during that sort of time.

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-So Odhams were...printers.

-Printers.

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-It was based in Watford.

-Some of these are shop stands,

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posters, all things that would have been used

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to decorate the shops, advertise the products.

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And they really epitomise, to me, the 1930s.

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-Yes.

-Especially this wonderful lady here,

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who looks so glamorous - she's got this wonderful hat,

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and this lovely red lipstick. Very 1930s.

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And she's holding a can of dog shampoo.

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-Yes.

-It's wonderful!

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And underneath, "Perfection is true of all Cooper Dog Remedies".

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This is another one of my favourites here,

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because it's really futuristic - this fantastic picture of a rocket

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zooming out, and it's beautifully, beautifully drawn.

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"You can 'rocket' your hosiery sales with Ballito heavenly nylons".

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I mean, just... It's a wonderful image there,

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and not something you would associate with your pair of tights.

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No, not really. Not rockets.

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It seems sad to sell something like this,

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which was part of your father's life.

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I've kept some pieces that I particularly like,

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particularly want to keep, so this is what's left over, really.

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Well, I think you should probably put them at auction

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-with an estimate of £80 to £120.

-Right. OK.

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But I can really see these taking off, actually.

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I think people will really get excited about them.

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So with that in mind, I want to put a fixed reserve on

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-of, I think, £80...

-OK, that's fine.

-..so they don't sell below that.

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-Are you happy with that?

-I think they're worth...

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Or do you want to pitch it lower and just get rid of them?

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-I think 80 is fine.

-80.

-They're probably worth 80.

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I think they are. So if they don't go for £80,

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I think you should probably keep them,

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-and pass them on to your lovely son.

-Yes, who's ignoring everyone.

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Thank you very much for bringing them along,

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because I've really enjoyed looking at them,

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and I'm sure they will at the auction, as well.

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We can't always hang on to all our inherited items,

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but a reserve protects their value.

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'Lots of people from Tod are waiting in the queue

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'for a valuation, but it seems Alan's elegant timepiece

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'has particularly caught Adam's eye.'

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I can see you've brought a very nice-looking chronometer.

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-Are you a collector of watches?

-I've had a short collection,

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and I bought a book on watches,

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and on the front cover was an illustration of this watch.

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And I went to a watch fair at Liverpool

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-about five or six years ago...

-Oh, not that long!

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I managed to find one,

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so I was delighted to find what I was looking for.

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So this is something you'd always wanted to get,

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cos you'd seen it on the front cover of your book,

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and it's the kind of, er, high point of a collection.

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-Exactly.

-And you managed to find it.

-I did.

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-Tell us about the watch.

-Well, it's known as a chronometer.

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It does many things - day, month, year, even phases of the moon.

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-Yes.

-This little implement I use...

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There are tiny little buttons round the side

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for altering the dials.

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Right. So this is your way of getting to these little buttons

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-to alter what the dials say.

-Exactly.

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And you can see it's French because of the fact

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that the months and the days of the week are in French.

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Well, as you can see, time is passing by.

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We've opened it up. It's a fairly standard movement.

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-It is, yes.

-Sometimes you see these with jewels set in, as well,

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jewelled movements. But for something that does quite a lot,

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it's a fairly standard movement.

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French case. A base-metal case - gunmetal case, of course,

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not a silver case.

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So in some ways it's quite a cheap object really,

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in terms of its construction and movement,

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-but very elaborate, beautiful dial.

-Beautiful dial, yes.

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-Isn't it?

-I don't like things that have been damaged,

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-and the dial is perfect on this one.

-This is often the problem

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with the pocket-watch and chronometer market.

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The enamel dials here... I'm getting used to this!

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Can I keep it for future ones? A little pointer.

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The enamel dials get cracked and chipped,

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and this has come out really unscathed altogether.

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-Crisp.

-Very crisp. That's right.

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And the gilding on there's very crisp, as well.

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And it's working. I like the fact it's got the moon phases, as well,

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hasn't it? So, you bought it only about five years ago.

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-About five years ago, yes.

-From a specialist watch fair?

-Yes.

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-Right.

-Yes.

-Probably cost a bit?

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Er, I think it was, er, 340.

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340. Did you manage to get that down a bit?

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-He was asking 375.

-So you had a bit of a deal on it.

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Yes.

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Well, I don't think that's a bad price for a watch market,

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but I think, to get interest on it,

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you're going to have to pitch it a bit lower for auction.

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-Is that something you're prepared to do?

-That's fine, Adam.

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I thought you might have an adverse reaction to that.

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No. It's just recycling things, and I'll probably buy another antique.

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Well, I would say 200 to 300 would be a sensible estimate

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to get people interested in it, and it would be lovely

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-to get your money back, or a small profit would be ideal.

-It would.

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-Fix a reserve, then. 200 is what I'd suggest.

-Right.

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You stand to lose a bit, but you're quite a cool customer, aren't you?

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-It'll be good on the day.

-It will be good on the day.

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And we know what you're going to do with the money,

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-so thanks for coming.

-Thank you.

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Right! We're halfway through a day,

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and we're about to put our first valuations to the test.

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This is where it gets exciting, because you never know what's going to happen.

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That's the beauty of an auction room. Fingers crossed, we've got one or two surprises.

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And here's a recap of what's going under the hammer.

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Catherine's unwanted Steiff ram surely has to attract bidders,

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as it has no reserve. Will there be any nostalgia fans

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bidding on Sonia's advertising material?

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And Alan paid £340 for his chronometer.

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Will he make his money back?

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Well, to find out, all of our items are being sold

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at Calder Valley Auctioneers, not far from Todmorden,

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in some beautiful countryside,

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and the commission here is 15% plus VAT.

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The Steiff ram is up next, and owner Catherine and daughter Hannah

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are after funds for some real sheep, rather than the toy variety.

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This is a lovely Steiff ram. I know you're into sheep.

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-You've got a little smallholding.

-It's not me. It's her that's into sheep.

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Ah! So Mum bought this for you. This is great,

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because it only cost 50 pence, so it is classic recycling again.

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-It doesn't get greener than antiques...

-No.

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..because they keep going around and around.

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-So, what's the money going towards?

-More sheep.

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-More sheep.

-You didn't want a ram because all yours are ewes.

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-Yes.

-Can't throw a ram in amongst all those ewes.

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-You can't.

-Mayhem.

-It would be, wouldn't it?

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Good luck. Let's find out what the bidders think. It's going under the hammer right now.

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Large Steiff soft-toy ram in cream and beige.

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Right. There it's being shown.

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It's got the yellow label and the ear stud. 391 is the lot.

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What am I starting at? 30?

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Owe me at £20. £20. 20 I'm bid. And five anywhere?

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-At 20.

-There you are!

-Any further bids?

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-At £20. 25.

-Let's have another one.

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30, sir. 30. 35.

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-40.

-Come on, Flossie.

-45.

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-This is nice.

-This is good.

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At 50 in that corner. Anybody else now?

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-At £50. Selling for £50...

-50 quid!

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First and last time in the corner...

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-It's yours.

-Yes!

-That's fabulous.

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As Adam just said, 50 pence becomes £50.

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It is all out there! You've just got to get there early,

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to the charity shops and car-boots and little fairs to pick up these bargains. Well spotted, Mum.

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-Yes.

-Well spotted.

-Two real sheep for that.

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-Yes.

-Hopefully, yeah!

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-Thanks for coming.

-Yeah. Thank you.

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Two sheep on the shopping list! Now I've heard it all.

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Time for a more conventional antique now - Alan's French chronometer.

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Everybody's on the edge of their seats right now,

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because it's not an exact science at auction. Anything can happen,

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and it can go wrong, but thankfully we've got Adam with us.

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We've got £200 to £300 on this, and I think you should get your money back.

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I would hope so. I'm not sure it's going to make much more.

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£300, fingers crossed. Let's get the top end.

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It's a lovely lot, and it's going under the hammer right now.

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Lot 310, the French chronograph.

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What am I bid for this? A couple of hundred?

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150? I'm opening this at £100.

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£100. At £100. 110. 120.

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At £120.

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At 120. 130. 140. At 140.

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-150. 160.

-He's got a commission.

-Are we quite finished at 160?

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Any further bids? At £160.

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At £160...

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Passed on it.

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I said it's not an exact science and things can go wrong.

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It just depends on the day. You've got to have the buyers here.

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-Nobody fancied a chronometer.

-No.

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-OK. There's another day.

-I did have my concerns,

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but it's better than Alan being disappointed.

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I'll have to learn to tell the time. THEY LAUGH

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-Thanks a lot, Alan.

-OK.

-Thanks for coming.

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What a shame that didn't sell!

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But hopefully Alan will recoup his investment at a later date.

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Sonia and son Matthew have come along

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to see their advertising collection go up for sale.

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We got a classic 80 to 120 on this.

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Yes, I know. It is a bit of a cliche estimate,

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but these are lovely, and in their own right,

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each item is a little work of art, really.

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-Why are you selling?

-Um, they were my father's,

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and they've just been stuck away in a drawer,

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and I had nowhere to put them. I've taken the bits I like out

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and I've got them framed, but I've got nowhere else for them.

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-Makes sense, doesn't it?

-Perhaps someone else can appreciate them.

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Look, he's hiding his face. Look!

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PAUL LAUGHS

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You're going to miss all the action! Which is just about to start now.

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Here it is. It's going under the hammer.

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And then 480 is the collection of advertising memorabilia.

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1930s up to '60s.

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-And I've got a phone bid...

-Oh, yes!

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The collectors are here and on the phone.

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So I'm going to open this at...

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£80. At £80 I'm bid. At £80. At 80.

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I've 90. At £90. At 90. Do I have 100?

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I have £90. At £90.

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At 100 in the room. 110.

0:16:560:16:58

110. 120.

0:17:010:17:02

130 on the phone. At 130. Anybody else, now, for this lot?

0:17:060:17:10

£130. It's going for £130.

0:17:100:17:16

A few people were keen on that. 130, top end and a bit over.

0:17:160:17:19

-Yeah, that's great.

-Happy?

0:17:190:17:21

Yes, I am. I wasn't sure whether they were going to sell or not.

0:17:210:17:24

I think I know who's going to get the money,

0:17:240:17:28

-after commission's paid.

-Yes. We're going out to LEGOLAND.

0:17:280:17:31

I've got another, older boy, so that's where we'll be going.

0:17:310:17:34

-Yeah? Oh, well.

-There you go.

0:17:340:17:37

-Thank you.

-He's happy.

-Yeah.

0:17:370:17:40

At 40. 45.

0:17:520:17:54

While I've been filming up here, I took the opportunity

0:17:540:17:57

to go and explore the most magnificent house,

0:17:570:17:59

which is a real treasure. Take a look at this.

0:17:590:18:02

I've popped over the border from Yorkshire to Lancashire

0:18:060:18:09

to a place called Padiham, to show you a true architectural delight.

0:18:090:18:13

And that's all down to one family, who lived here for 400 years.

0:18:130:18:17

And believe me, it's quite a house. Welcome to Gawthorpe Hall.

0:18:170:18:21

The original structure, hiding underneath the house we see now, was square.

0:18:300:18:35

It was built way back in the 14th century

0:18:350:18:38

as a peel tower, and used as a lookout.

0:18:380:18:40

The tower and land were inherited by a wealthy man

0:18:400:18:44

called Sir Richard Shuttleworth back in 1596,

0:18:440:18:48

and he set about the radical transformation

0:18:480:18:51

of the original medieval tower into this impressive Elizabethan mansion.

0:18:510:18:55

Sadly, he didn't live to see the build begin.

0:18:550:18:58

Shuttleworth is believed to have enlisted the help

0:19:060:19:09

of an influential architect called Robert Smythson,

0:19:090:19:12

the man behind other great country houses -

0:19:120:19:14

Here at Gawthorpe, it's likely he made the most

0:19:160:19:19

of locally sourced materials. The wood in the panelling

0:19:190:19:22

almost certainly came from the nearby Mitton Wood,

0:19:220:19:25

and much of the stone from a nearby quarry.

0:19:250:19:27

The original Gawthorpe Hall took about five years to build,

0:19:280:19:33

and it's as immaculate on the outside as it is on the inside,

0:19:330:19:36

and that's down to the generations of Shuttleworths who lived here.

0:19:360:19:40

What you've got to remember about these big ancestral piles is,

0:19:430:19:46

they don't always look like they would have done originally.

0:19:460:19:50

That's because each later generation would have liked to have updated the property while they lived here,

0:19:500:19:55

and, of course, add their mark.

0:19:550:19:58

All through the life of this magnificent house,

0:19:580:20:02

marks have been left to remember the family who owned it.

0:20:020:20:05

These carved figures are of the original Sir Richard Shuttleworth,

0:20:070:20:11

who commissioned the house, and his wife.

0:20:110:20:13

And there are family monograms all over the place.

0:20:130:20:17

By 1850, the house was in need of repair and general updating,

0:20:200:20:24

so its then owner, Sir James Kay-Shuttleworth,

0:20:240:20:27

commissioned another illustrious architect

0:20:270:20:29

to transform this house back to its former Elizabethan glory.

0:20:290:20:33

And such a well-to-do family could only call upon the best.

0:20:330:20:37

The architect he commissioned was also responsible

0:20:370:20:40

for designing the Houses of Parliament.

0:20:400:20:43

Sir Charles Barry was one of the best practitioners

0:20:440:20:47

of the Victorian fashion for designing in a more historic style.

0:20:470:20:51

His most famous work was arguably the Palace of Westminster in London.

0:20:510:20:56

Barry used some very clever and quirky design innovations

0:20:570:21:01

here at Gawthorpe. Take, for instance, this magnificent fireplace.

0:21:010:21:04

Normally there should be a chimney breast above it with a flue,

0:21:040:21:08

so it would draw the smoke off the fire so it doesn't fill the room.

0:21:080:21:11

But look - he's put this wonderful great big window up there.

0:21:110:21:15

What he's cleverly done is angled the flue

0:21:150:21:18

so it runs underneath the window and then up parallel with it,

0:21:180:21:22

so it still does the same practical job of drawing the smoke out the room.

0:21:220:21:26

But he's introduced badly needed extra light

0:21:260:21:30

into this room, because it is rather dark,

0:21:300:21:32

due to the wonderful Elizabethan oak panelling.

0:21:320:21:35

What I find so fascinating about this house is,

0:21:390:21:42

obviously it's a place of historical interest,

0:21:420:21:45

but it feels like a family home, not a museum.

0:21:450:21:48

And that's down to the family who have loved it and cared for it,

0:21:480:21:52

and over the years they've added their innovations,

0:21:520:21:55

but kept true to the original Elizabethan design.

0:21:550:21:59

And to tell you the truth, it's the first time, today,

0:21:590:22:02

I've ever heard of it, so I feel like I've discovered a bit of our hidden heritage.

0:22:020:22:06

Gawthorpe ticks all the boxes for me. It's well worth the visit.

0:22:060:22:09

The Victorian town hall in Todmorden

0:22:170:22:19

is proving to be a good venue for Flog It!,

0:22:190:22:22

with lots of visitors.

0:22:220:22:25

Adam's over at the tables with a bit of bronze brought in by Barbara.

0:22:250:22:29

This is a handsome beast here, isn't it?

0:22:290:22:31

-He surely is.

-He surely is!

0:22:310:22:33

Where did you get him from, Barbara?

0:22:330:22:35

Well, he's my husband's grandmother's.

0:22:350:22:37

We're not quite sure how she got him.

0:22:370:22:40

She was given it, and she died at 96, 20 years ago.

0:22:400:22:44

-We live on a farm up above Todmorden.

-That explains a lot,

0:22:440:22:48

because farmers tend to love their bronzes and figures of animals,

0:22:480:22:52

-don't they?

-Yes. It's beautiful.

0:22:520:22:54

But we've had it for a long time, and I think it's time for it to...

0:22:540:22:59

-Find a new home.

-Find a new home, yeah.

0:22:590:23:01

Time for it to "moove" on. I can't believe I said that!

0:23:010:23:04

OK. So, he's magnificent.

0:23:040:23:07

You can tell... He's a good large size.

0:23:070:23:10

-He's a big, heavy lump, isn't he?

-Very heavy.

0:23:100:23:12

And, um, nicely modelled, really, isn't he?

0:23:120:23:15

-He is.

-Quite nice detail.

-The detail is tremendous.

0:23:150:23:19

The detail is very good. I think he's late-19th, turn of the century,

0:23:190:23:23

that sort of period. About where it was produced, I'm sure it's European.

0:23:230:23:28

-Yes.

-Something tells me Spanish about it.

0:23:280:23:30

-This bit here has this sort of...

-It has got a Spanish feel.

0:23:300:23:34

-You want it to be English.

-You do, and you want it to be signed

0:23:340:23:37

so that I can give you a really good, chunky price on it.

0:23:370:23:41

What expectations do you have? Have you got a figure in mind?

0:23:410:23:44

Well, I was hoping for around 500,

0:23:440:23:46

because of the weight and the intricate workmanship in it.

0:23:460:23:50

You'd like to think he should be worth that.

0:23:500:23:53

Would you be devastated if it made £200?

0:23:530:23:56

I'm not disappointed. It's worth what somebody's going to pay for it.

0:23:560:24:01

-This is the thing.

-Yeah.

0:24:010:24:03

So what would you suggest as a reserve?

0:24:030:24:05

I'm a straight-talking chap. You won't get any bull from me.

0:24:050:24:09

Oh, yes. Very good! SHE LAUGHS

0:24:090:24:11

-What price do you want for it?

-I was hoping 500.

0:24:110:24:14

You were saying 200. So shall we put a...

0:24:140:24:18

-Can we put a 250 reserve?

-Yes. We'll do that.

-Compromise?

0:24:180:24:22

-Life is full of compromise!

-It is, isn't it?

0:24:220:24:25

You're clearly a very reasonable lady.

0:24:250:24:27

I try to be. I don't know if my husband would agree with you!

0:24:270:24:31

I don't know.

0:24:310:24:32

-OK. Let's go for a 250 reserve.

-Fine.

-Estimate 250, 350.

0:24:320:24:36

Let's just hope there's two or three people wanting it

0:24:360:24:39

-and that it might go up.

-He's in a good area,

0:24:390:24:42

because there's agricultural interest round here.

0:24:420:24:44

There's a lot of hill farmers around.

0:24:440:24:46

What are farmers like when they get stuck in at an auction?

0:24:460:24:49

-They never know when to stop!

-Exactly!

-We always go too high.

0:24:490:24:53

So what we need is two farmers to go for that, and we'll get a huge price.

0:24:530:24:57

-There we go.

-Let's hope. Thanks.

0:24:570:25:00

Let's hope the bidders do get carried away, like Barbara suggested.

0:25:020:25:06

Now, I've spotted a bit of wood with a rather unusual purpose.

0:25:070:25:11

Right, Stewart and Eleanor, what have we got here?

0:25:110:25:15

I guess this is Dad's, isn't it? It wouldn't be yours.

0:25:150:25:18

-Tell me, what do you know about it?

-Er, not a lot, really.

0:25:180:25:22

It was given to my parents about 30 years ago

0:25:220:25:25

by an old sailor, and they've just had it on the wall.

0:25:250:25:29

About ten years ago, when my dad died,

0:25:290:25:31

we had it decorated. It went into the garage,

0:25:310:25:33

and it's been there ever since. My mum died last year.

0:25:330:25:36

We were clearing the garage, and that's on one of the shelves.

0:25:360:25:39

What's really nice is, this came from an old sailor,

0:25:390:25:42

so it's got great provenance. He brought this back from his travels.

0:25:420:25:46

-Do you know what this is?

-I haven't got a clue.

0:25:460:25:48

If I did this - bash, bash - have you got a clue now?

0:25:480:25:52

-Some sort of club.

-Yes. It's a Fijian gunstock war club.

0:25:520:25:57

I don't know what wood this is, but it's incredibly hard,

0:25:570:26:00

close-grained, dense wood.

0:26:000:26:02

And it's meant to do a lot of damage, as well.

0:26:020:26:05

With the weight, I would have expected so.

0:26:050:26:08

-Now I know it's a club, yeah!

-It's known as a gunstock war club.

0:26:080:26:12

You can see why. It looks like a gunstock.

0:26:120:26:15

You see this wonderful geometric carving on the handle?

0:26:150:26:17

That's known as cross-hatching, and it's virtually what you see

0:26:170:26:21

on the stock, on the handle of a gun.

0:26:210:26:23

-Right.

-It's just to give you extra grip.

0:26:230:26:26

And you do need a lot of grip. That's to be held with two hands.

0:26:260:26:29

And that, seriously, would do an awful lot of damage.

0:26:290:26:33

-Just about!

-Yeah.

0:26:330:26:37

You see this section here? That's been broken.

0:26:370:26:40

Maybe this actually terminated in a point at one stage,

0:26:400:26:43

like an arrowhead. Maybe just a sort of spear, as well.

0:26:430:26:47

-Now, that's obviously...

-The damaging bit.

0:26:470:26:50

We thought originally that it was a plough, a hand-plough,

0:26:500:26:53

-with it being that shape.

-Understandably.

0:26:530:26:56

That would be for tilling. No, it's not.

0:26:560:26:59

-That's a war club.

-I take it it's not ceremonial.

-No.

0:26:590:27:02

-It's probably been used?

-If this was ceremonial,

0:27:020:27:05

most of the handle would be decorated with geometric pattern.

0:27:050:27:08

-Right.

-Yeah.

0:27:080:27:10

So that's what it is. That's what's been in your garage

0:27:100:27:13

all of this time.

0:27:130:27:15

-Amazing.

-It's incredible, isn't it?

0:27:150:27:18

-It really is. This is 18th century.

-As old as that?

0:27:180:27:21

-Yes, it is. Yeah. Sort of circa 1790.

-Gosh!

0:27:210:27:24

-At the very latest, early 1900s.

-Fantastic.

0:27:240:27:28

And it's got that lovely patina to go with it.

0:27:280:27:31

The wood, over the years, gets tighter and tighter,

0:27:310:27:34

and holds the dirt and the grime and the wax,

0:27:340:27:36

and that's what you call patina. Any idea of value?

0:27:360:27:40

-Absolutely none at all.

-What would you be happy with?

0:27:400:27:43

-What would he take?

-Anything.

0:27:430:27:45

Would he? Is he going to treat you to something with the money?

0:27:450:27:49

-I hope so.

-Are you a student at the moment?

0:27:490:27:52

-Yes.

-Studying, yeah? OK.

0:27:520:27:54

-Well, the money will come in handy.

-I hope so.

0:27:540:27:57

Would you be happy with £300?

0:27:570:27:59

-Definitely, yes.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

0:27:590:28:02

-I'd be more than happy with £300.

-Would you?

-Yeah!

0:28:020:28:05

-Will you be extra-happy at five?

-Just about, yes!

-Right.

0:28:050:28:09

I think to tempt these bidders in, we've got to show them that it's not a trade loss.

0:28:090:28:13

It's not done the rounds. It's from a private source,

0:28:130:28:16

-and you're prepared to let this go at £300 to £500.

-Right. OK.

0:28:160:28:20

-That's fantastic.

-That's auction psychology for you,

0:28:200:28:23

because you know what happens, don't you? It really is a tricky business.

0:28:230:28:27

We'll put a fixed reserve on at £300,

0:28:270:28:29

so if it doesn't go for over £300, it goes home with you.

0:28:290:28:33

This is where it gets exciting,

0:28:330:28:35

because you don't know what will happen at auction.

0:28:350:28:38

We're about to find out. Whatever you do, don't go away.

0:28:380:28:41

You two could be going home with a lot of money.

0:28:410:28:44

Not a bad prospect for something found hidden in a garage!

0:28:460:28:49

But now it's Catherine's turn.

0:28:490:28:52

She's found a retro-looking piece of pottery belonging to Cynthia.

0:28:520:28:56

-Cynthia, welcome to Flog It!.

-Thank you.

0:28:580:29:00

Thank you for bringing along this posy-holder.

0:29:000:29:03

As you look at it, it just looks like a rather ordinary posy-holder.

0:29:030:29:07

But as you turn it over, we're faced with the wonderful name of Dresser,

0:29:070:29:13

namely Christopher Dresser. Tell me about this.

0:29:130:29:16

Where did you get this from?

0:29:160:29:17

It came in a box of oddments from a relative of mine,

0:29:170:29:21

because she knew that I collected green glass,

0:29:210:29:24

and primarily green things, and so it came with a lot of bits and pieces,

0:29:240:29:29

and I must admit when I first saw it, I thought it was rather tacky,

0:29:290:29:32

because I thought it was something modern

0:29:320:29:35

-that we used to have in the '60s.

-It does look modern.

0:29:350:29:38

And then I had a book of Miller's Collectables.

0:29:380:29:41

It was illustrated in the book, and a passage about Christopher Dresser.

0:29:410:29:46

So then it took on an entirely different meaning.

0:29:460:29:49

-So then you quite liked it.

-Yeah.

-Well, I don't blame you.

0:29:490:29:52

I mean, you hit the nail on the head.

0:29:520:29:54

When you look at it, it does look quite modern,

0:29:540:29:57

and you probably would think more sort of '40s, '50s.

0:29:570:30:00

-But actually it dates from the late 19th century.

-Does it?

0:30:000:30:03

-1880s, 1890s.

-Really?

0:30:030:30:06

-So it is quite a bit older than one would think.

-Yes!

0:30:060:30:09

To look at it, you wouldn't think it is a piece of Christopher Dresser,

0:30:090:30:13

because it hasn't got his characteristics about it.

0:30:130:30:15

When you think of Dresser, you think of, really, metalwork,

0:30:150:30:19

and very iconic design, quite stylised and very stylish.

0:30:190:30:23

-Really, this doesn't say Dresser.

-It doesn't give you the wow factor.

0:30:230:30:27

It doesn't, and it's not until you turn it over

0:30:270:30:31

and you see that name on the bottom. But it is a lovely piece of pottery,

0:30:310:30:35

and I'm so glad that you didn't chuck it out,

0:30:350:30:38

which was probably one of your first thoughts.

0:30:380:30:41

-Do you have any idea on value?

-Not present value.

0:30:410:30:45

-Right.

-But I have had it valued previously,

0:30:450:30:48

-about ten to 12 years ago.

-Mm-hm?

-£40.

0:30:480:30:52

£40. Right. I would say it's gone up a little bit since then,

0:30:520:30:55

and I'd be happy to put a pre-sale estimate on of £60 to £80,

0:30:550:30:59

-with a 50 reserve. How does that sound to you?

-That sounds fine.

0:30:590:31:03

-Would you be happy to sell at that?

-Very happy, yes.

0:31:030:31:06

This town hall has been a marvellous venue for Flog It! today,

0:31:070:31:11

and now it's time to say a fond farewell to Todmorden.

0:31:110:31:14

We're making our way to the auction rooms, so let's...

0:31:140:31:17

And put everything under the hammer!

0:31:170:31:20

We're selling Barbara's bronze bull.

0:31:210:31:24

Will it appeal to any farmers at the auction?

0:31:240:31:26

Cynthia's green Christopher Dresser posy-holder,

0:31:260:31:30

and Stewart and Eleanor's wooden gunstock war club.

0:31:300:31:34

That's the one to watch!

0:31:340:31:37

At the auction, we've got a bull to sell now -

0:31:400:31:44

not livestock, but Barbara's bronze.

0:31:440:31:47

We've got a reserve of £250, but let's hope we get that top end of 400.

0:31:470:31:51

-Why are you selling this?

-Well, we've had it...

0:31:510:31:55

-It's a great thing to look at.

-I know.

0:31:550:31:58

We've had it in the family over 60-odd years,

0:31:580:32:00

and it sits in one of the lounges and just sits in front of the fire,

0:32:000:32:04

so the idea is that we'll sell it, perhaps put it into premium bonds.

0:32:040:32:08

Oh, really? Have a dabble with the premium bonds!

0:32:080:32:11

-The government can use it. They're in a terrible state!

-They are!

0:32:110:32:15

-Do you do the Lottery as well?

-Yes.

-Have you ever won a tenner?

0:32:150:32:18

Oh, yes. We've won some tens and we've won some 55s.

0:32:180:32:21

Have you? But right now, let's find out, shall we?

0:32:210:32:24

We digressed a bit. But let's get back to business. This is Flog It!

0:32:240:32:28

and we've got the bronze bull going under the hammer. Let's find out what the locals think.

0:32:280:32:33

Lot 350 is the 19th-century European bronze model of a bull

0:32:340:32:38

with saddle. Here it is. Lot 350. What am I bid for this?

0:32:380:32:42

A couple of hundred, may I say?

0:32:420:32:44

150. 150. Starting at 150.

0:32:450:32:48

150. Advance in tens. 160. 170. At £170.

0:32:480:32:53

Any advance on £170? At 170. 180. Thank you. 180.

0:32:530:32:57

-Come on, come on!

-190.

0:32:570:32:59

200. And ten.

0:32:590:33:01

£210. Any further bids at £210?

0:33:010:33:05

We're just short of reserve.

0:33:050:33:07

At £210. Anybody else, now,

0:33:070:33:09

at £210...

0:33:090:33:11

-HE BANGS HAMMER

-Unsold.

0:33:120:33:15

Couldn't find a buyer. I'm really sorry.

0:33:150:33:17

-It's fine. It can go home.

-Auctions can be a lottery too.

0:33:170:33:20

Yes, exactly. You never know what's going to happen.

0:33:200:33:23

I had had a few second thoughts, because we've had it for so long.

0:33:230:33:27

-Well over 60 years.

-Maybe it's meant to stay at home.

0:33:270:33:31

-I like the look of it.

-I think it's meant to stay on the farm.

0:33:310:33:34

-It's been there so long.

-That's where the bull belongs.

0:33:340:33:37

-It does.

-Thank you for bringing it in.

-That's OK.

0:33:370:33:40

Well, the bronze bull is heading out to pasture for now.

0:33:400:33:44

Let's hope Cynthia has more luck with her Christopher Dresser posy-holder.

0:33:440:33:48

Cynthia, good luck! That's all I can say.

0:33:480:33:50

Here's the posy-holder. Fingers crossed.

0:33:500:33:53

Hope you'll get the £60. What do you think?

0:33:530:33:56

-I don't know!

-Oh, dear, we're all worried now!

0:33:560:33:58

Let's find out what the bidders think. It's going under the hammer right now.

0:33:580:34:02

Lot 588 is this rather nice little 19th century posy-holder

0:34:020:34:08

by Christopher Dresser. It's well signed on the bottom.

0:34:080:34:11

Greeny runny glaze. Let's open this at, let's say, 40.

0:34:110:34:15

30, then. £30. £30. An affordable piece of Christopher Dresser here.

0:34:150:34:19

-£30 I have. Thank you. £30.

-Come on!

0:34:190:34:22

This is such a good name.

0:34:230:34:26

At £45. 50, do I see? I have 45.

0:34:260:34:29

And 50. 50, thank you. £50.

0:34:290:34:32

At 50. Any further bids at £50?

0:34:320:34:35

Are we all done at £50? 55, sir.

0:34:360:34:40

-55.

-He thinks, "55. A bit more."

0:34:400:34:44

Then, at 55, signed by Christopher Dresser,

0:34:440:34:46

at £55. Are you all done?

0:34:460:34:50

Are there any further bids?

0:34:500:34:52

55, then.

0:34:520:34:54

Yes! The hammer's gone down. We just did it, didn't we?

0:34:540:34:57

Had a reserve of 50.

0:34:570:34:59

-Just!

-Oh, that was nail-biting, wasn't it?

0:34:590:35:02

-It was!

-We don't want to be doing that too often.

0:35:020:35:05

Not really!

0:35:050:35:07

That just goes to show Catherine's valuation was pretty accurate,

0:35:070:35:11

but now I'm under pressure, as the gunstock war club is up for auction.

0:35:110:35:15

So you could be going to Barcelona for that photography trip!

0:35:150:35:18

So what's this all about, then, the trip?

0:35:180:35:21

It's for my graphics course. It's photography.

0:35:210:35:24

We're going to go and do some work over there,

0:35:240:35:26

and try and get a bit more in my portfolio.

0:35:260:35:29

Ooh! Because we were saying students haemorrhage money,

0:35:290:35:32

don't they, Dad? Eh? I just hope we get the top end

0:35:320:35:35

of the estimate. Whatever happens, that's still £500.

0:35:350:35:38

But you never know. We could be in for a real surprise.

0:35:380:35:41

We see it happen in auction rooms all the time.

0:35:410:35:44

-I just hope it happens now.

-Fingers crossed!

0:35:440:35:46

Fingers crossed, please! Don't go away. Watch this.

0:35:460:35:49

This is going under the hammer now. Let's see what it does.

0:35:490:35:53

Lot 417,

0:35:530:35:55

the hardwood tribal gunstock war club

0:35:550:35:58

with carved handle there.

0:35:580:36:02

Good-looking piece. Nice patina, lovely carving.

0:36:020:36:05

Lot 417.

0:36:050:36:07

What am I bid on this? £300?

0:36:070:36:09

250? 200 I have. Thank you. £200.

0:36:110:36:14

-Gosh, he's starting low, Eleanor.

-225. 250. 250.

0:36:140:36:19

275? 250. 275 in the room.

0:36:190:36:22

£300. At £300. £300.

0:36:220:36:24

-£300. I have 325. Do I see 325? 325.

-We've got a phone bid.

0:36:240:36:28

There's somebody on the phone.

0:36:280:36:31

350. 375 on the phone. At 400 in the room. £400.

0:36:310:36:36

Stewart, it's starting to get exciting.

0:36:370:36:40

450 in the room. 450.

0:36:400:36:42

475 on the phone. £500 in the room.

0:36:440:36:47

£500.

0:36:470:36:49

-Top end now.

-525 on the phone.

0:36:500:36:52

550, sir. 550.

0:36:520:36:55

575. At £600 in the room.

0:36:570:36:59

At £600.

0:36:590:37:01

-This is good.

-625 on the phone.

0:37:030:37:06

650 in the room.

0:37:060:37:08

-Barcelona, here we come.

-Barcelona, here we come!

0:37:080:37:11

675 on the phone.

0:37:120:37:14

I've 675 on the phone.

0:37:140:37:17

Any further bids? At 675, then...

0:37:170:37:20

-Yes! The hammer's gone down.

-Well done!

-£675.

0:37:210:37:24

-We're happy with that, aren't we? Well over the top end.

-Sure!

0:37:240:37:28

And to think this was in the garage!

0:37:280:37:31

Yes. And only two weeks before the valuation,

0:37:310:37:35

-the garage got broken into.

-What did they steal?

0:37:350:37:37

They went through everything, left that, and took a mountain bike!

0:37:370:37:41

SHE LAUGHS So thanks very much!

0:37:410:37:44

-It's enough for a new mountain bike!

-It's enough for a new mountain bike,

0:37:440:37:48

-and the air fare to Barcelona.

-Definitely.

-Yeah?

0:37:480:37:51

-Great!

-Congratulations, both of you. Thank you for bringing that in.

0:37:510:37:55

You've made my day and everybody else's here, as well.

0:37:550:37:58

I hope you've enjoyed watching the show.

0:37:580:38:00

Do join us again for many more surprises, but for now,

0:38:000:38:03

from the Calder Valley, it's goodbye from all of us.

0:38:030:38:06

Todmorden Town Hall in Yorkshire is today's venue for Flog It! and it hosts a variety of curious items.

Adam Partridge finds a fluffy and modern item that might prove to be a bargain when it goes under the hammer and Catherine Southon discovers a hoard of advertising memorabilia. Presenter Paul Martin spots an unusual piece of wood that was found in a garage and also finds time to explore a fascinating country pile with an impressive architectural heritage, Gawthorpe Hall.