Pottery Lottery Flog It!


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Pottery Lottery

Paul Martin showcases ten of his favourite pottery items from the series. Among the treasures is an aquarium-themed green vase and, of course, some Clarice Cliff.


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Hello and welcome to Syon House, nestling on the River Thames, a few miles from Central London,

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and to this special series of Flog It! Ten of the Best.

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This estate is a living landscape that's simply teeming with history

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from Prehistoric Times right up to the present day.

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It was the site of an abbey, housing Britain's only Bridgettine Order.

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But all that came to an abrupt end in 1539

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when Henry VIII ordered its suppression,

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transferring it to royal occupation.

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But it's the antiques and artefacts that really bring the colourful past to life.

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Every room you walk in there's a real sense of history,

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from the classical marble columns to the stone statues,

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the furniture by Thomas Chippendale, oil paintings,

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wall mounts that date back to the 1500s.

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It is just quite amazing,

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a real sense of connection to the past.

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Well, Flog It! wouldn't be Flog It!

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without a lottery of pottery that comes bursting through our doors.

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Over the years, I've seen it all, from Majolica to Moorcroft,

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Clarice Cliff and my old favourite, Troika from Cornwall.

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All of these clay treasures are a tribute to their time in production.

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And of course, we've seen them make their owners a cracking fortune at auction.

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So be prepared to be fired up

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as we look back through the Flog It! archives at my top-prized pottery items.

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I hope you enjoy them.

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First, let me take you to Basingstoke, where, in 2008,

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James Lewis was bowled over by Christine's Roman pottery.

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You've brought in something that's probably the oldest thing in the room. Well done!

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Tell me all about that.

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Well, it's just a family friend, as usual, gave it to us,

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and we've kept it around in a box really.

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-Now and again, I get it out and have a feel, because it's so old.

-Yes.

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And to imagine the people before you who'd used it is fantastic.

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-And where did your friend find it?

-I don't know.

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-I haven't any idea at all.

-Really?

-No.

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It's just something that's cropped up.

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Well, what we're looking at there is a wonderful piece of Roman pottery.

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Known as Samian ware for this very shiny red glaze,

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and this is the sort of pottery that was made throughout the Roman Empire

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in the second, third and fourth century AD.

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Something that I find really interesting is this mark across the centre of the dish.

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"Priscuse". Strange really.

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I wonder why they've put that across the centre of the bowl.

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It reminds me of a Roman oil lamp that I brought back from Turkey.

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I got so excited, brought it home,

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and it had across the back "taklit".

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I thought, "I wonder what that is. I wonder if it's a Roman site!"

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I looked it up in my Turkish book and it said "Turkish word for fake".

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I thought, "Oh, no!" I was so excited!

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But I'm just hoping that this isn't!

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I'm confident now that this is a really good early piece.

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And this damage, all this surface damage here is exactly what you'd expect to see.

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And these sort of chips that you get out of the glaze

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are typical of the sorts of damage you find

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when something's been in the ground a long time.

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I am totally convinced that that's right.

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Value... Roman stuff doesn't make a lot of money.

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It should make so much more than it does.

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I think it's greatly undervalued.

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I think we ought to put an estimate of £60 to £100 on it.

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Let's protect it with a reserve of 50.

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If it doesn't make that, you might as well put your soap in it!

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If it's not worth £50, it's not worth selling.

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We'll see if that pottery made history at auction a little later.

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Now it's over to Barrow-In-Furness,

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where, in 2009, Bob and Melissa brought in a marvellous-looking

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Parian-ware heirloom for me to value.

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-Bob, Melissa, do you know what you've got here?

-It's a lion.

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It's a naked lady riding a lion! It's a bit of Parian ware.

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-Yes.

-It's a Victorian invention.

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This was made at the Minton factory

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and it was modelled by a guy called John Bell.

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The reason it's called Parian is because

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it's named after the pure, fine, white marble

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that came from the island of Paros in Greece.

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That's where it's quarried.

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But this isn't white marble. This is a hard-paste porcelain.

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This dates to round about 1860, 1870.

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That's about the time my great, great grandfather moved to Haughton.

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-Has this been in your family a long time?

-I remember it when I was a child of about four,

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late '50s, early '60s, and it was on my grandparents' dresser.

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-With two ladies, as well.

-Really?

-Which have disappeared. I think my dad sold them.

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-Parian figures, as well?

-I think so.

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And it is actually beautiful. And it's a good decorative height, not too small, not too big.

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It'll go anywhere in the house, and that's what it was designed for back in the 1860s.

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And it was a way of introducing the naked female figure into the household.

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-She does look very cold.

-She does look very cold, doesn't she?

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I can sit here and comfortably say we've seen a lot of Parian ware on the show before

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and it varies from 150

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all the way to six or £700.

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Let's give this a fair chance.

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I'll stick my neck out and say two to 300.

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-OK? Can we put a reserve on this at £170?

-OK.

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It'll protect it and make sure it sells nothing under 170.

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-Otherwise, it means the buyers weren't there on the day.

-Right.

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Keep it and put it in another auction on another day.

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If I kept it and it was on the mantelpiece, something would happen.

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It would get broken with four children about.

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I'm very clumsy.

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Well, I think she's beautiful. And it's so beautifully modelled,

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it's going to find a new home.

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It is realistic, isn't it? Very.

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Absolutely gorgeous.

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Now, I'm taking you back to 2003 to Bristol,

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where Peter had some unwanted pottery items to show James Braxton.

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Have you known these bits for a long time?

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-50 years.

-50 years.

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And who bought them originally?

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Well, that I don't know for this one

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because I think my mother had it before I was born.

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This one I had when I was a little kid.

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I remember eating marmalade out of it.

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-It looks as though it's suffered a bit as a result!

-A little bit. It's not too bad.

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-I think, regrettably, somebody's whacked the top off this one.

-I think so.

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That's going to hold it back.

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-Now, Clarice Cliff, highly entrepreneurial lady.

-Yes.

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Did amazing things. Revolutionised pottery.

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After the First World War, everything's a bit grim,

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she suddenly came upon this idea

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of producing highly decorative household ware

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that was affordable.

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She went, in fact, to the Paris Exhibition of 1925

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and really fell in love, absorbed all the influences which were on show,

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Cubism, Art Deco,

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and launched the Bizarre range as a result in 1928.

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-Now we have Bizarre. This one's apple-tree pattern.

-Yes.

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There are the apples. It's a lovely conical sugar caster.

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-But it's suffered. Somebody's given it a fair old bash.

-Yes, I think so.

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But in spite of that, it doesn't really seem to put people off too much.

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Turning to the preserve pot,

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a lovely sort of apple, tomato shape. Squat little fellow.

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Here we've got Bizarre Fantasque.

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-It's very nice. But as you say, it's a bit chipped.

-Yes.

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We've got to bear in mind the fact that they're damaged,

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-and I'm going to say to you two, three hundred pounds.

-Oh!

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-Would you be delighted?

-Yes.

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-If we put two to three hundred, we'll have people flocking from all over.

-Yes.

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-But I think we should protect it. £200 reserve?

-Yes.

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It just wouldn't be Flog It! without Clarice Cliff.

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I'll let you know how those charming pieces faired

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when they went to auction in a minute.

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I'm taking you to Llandudno now, where, in 2005,

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David Barby thought he'd netted a real treasure

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with Kate's aquarium design green vase.

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Kate, my interest is in 19th and early 20th century ceramics

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and this is a lovely, lovely example.

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And I'm just trying to consider why on earth you want to sell it.

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It belongs to my mother. She inherited it from a friend.

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-I think she likes it, but declutterising...

-Really?

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I think she's decided it's time to go.

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That's a common reason why people want to sell objects.

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-Declutter.

-And they're always in my age group, which is quite worrying!

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Why I like 20th century ceramics

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is because there were so many innovations coming in with pottery.

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The different techniques, whether it was flambe or lustre,

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or whether it was copying Chinese or Japanese glazes,

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it all spans that period

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of the late 19th coming into the 20th century.

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It coincides with an art movement that we call Arts and Crafts,

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Art Nouveau,

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and this is all part and parcel of that movement.

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This piece here is a lovely English piece.

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This comes from the Pilkington Royal Lancastrian factory.

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Dated after 1913, because the mark has changed.

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So from having a "P" on the bottom with a "B",

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which was the early mark for Pilkington's,

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it changes to a rose for Royal Lancastrian.

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The mark, you can see it's the rose that replaced the P and the B,

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and if you look carefully, I'm just going to turn it round,

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-can you see that lustre initial interlinked monogram?

-Yes.

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So we've got the R and the J, Richard Joyce, who specialised in fish,

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and this wonderful, almost encased or encapsulated, aquarium

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with all these glazes and lustre finishes.

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It's absolutely exquisite,

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particularly with this rim all the way around here.

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Although Pilkington's was set up at the end of the 19th century to produce tiles,

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a brilliant chemist by the name of William Burton

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introduced these lustre glazes.

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Hence this wonderful subject that we have in front of us.

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This is a beautiful piece. If it goes up for auction,

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it should realise something in the region of,

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dare I say, 250 to 350.

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Maybe tucking on to about 400. That sort of price range.

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I think we've got to box clever on the reserve...

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-OK.

-..and not appear to be too avaricious.

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I'd be inclined to put the reserve round about 200.

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-That sounds good.

-Marvellous! I hope somebody loves it as much as I do.

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But before I reveal whether that vase made waves when it went to auction,

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let me just give you a quick recap.

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Bob and Melissa's Minton ornament made a big impression on me

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and I was convinced it would make a mint at auction.

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James thought Peter's Clarice Cliff sugar bowl and pepper shaker were divine,

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but did they score high when they went under the hammer?

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David Barby couldn't believe Kate wanted to offload her exquisite fish-themed green vase,

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and with an estimate of £250 to £350,

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he was convinced it would hook a buyer.

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And James Lewis thought Christine's Roman relic

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would unearth a great price when it went up for sale.

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That's the first under the hammer, but, sadly, James couldn't join Christine and I that day.

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It's unbelievable really, Roman pottery and artefacts,

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200 to 400 years Anno Domini

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-and they're worth an awful lot less than antiques that are only 100 years old.

-I know.

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-Can you imagine the people that have handled it?

-And the stories it could tell!

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If only this little saucer could speak!

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This is the Anglo-Roman bowl.

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Start me at £60. £60 bid.

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Thank you. And five. 65.

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70. At £65. Any more? At £65, are you all done?

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£65 with you, sir. 70 down here.

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And five. 80? And five. 90.

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And five? 100.

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-And ten?

-Look at this!

-120. 130.

-This is more like it!

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£120 seated. 130 at the back. 140.

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They love it!

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£130 with you, sir. £130.

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Is there any more? Last time, then.

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-Good! Wow!

-£130!

-Lovely.

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-Isn't that incredible?

-It is, actually.

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A solid result for Christine.

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Now to Somerset to see if Peter's Clarice Cliff pieces

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would deliver the business.

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The auctioneer told me earlier that he's very optimistic

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that this is going to do not just three, not just four,

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but maybe five to six hundred.

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-Really?

-Yes. So we're going to find out in a few seconds.

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So don't go away, don't put the kettle on. Here we go.

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We've got some Clarice Cliff. We've got the apple design sugar sifter,

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which has been restored or repaired,

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and a jam pot.

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There we are. Two items there.

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Considerable interest here.

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-Considerable interest!

-£500. 550. £600.

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650. 700.

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750. 800. 850.

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£900 with me. 950?

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950. 1,000? 1,100?

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1,100? 1,200 with me. 1,300 now?

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£1,300?

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£1,300? All done with me at £1,250, then.

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£1,250!

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-Jesus Christ!

-THEY LAUGH

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£1,250.

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If it pours down with rain tomorrow, what will you go out and spend money on?

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Put it in the bank!

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Good old Clarice Cliff! £1,250.

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What a fantastic result.

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Now to Kendal, where I joined Bob and Melissa

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to see if their lion Parian ware would be a roaring success

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when it went up for sale.

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I hope I don't let you both down, do you know that?

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I think we have to put our fingers together. Let's cross our fingers. Mel's already done it.

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I have commission bids, so I'm going to have to start this one

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and go at £320.

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-Yes! Straight in at the top end.

-Fantastic.

-With me at 320.

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340 anywhere? At £320 now, with the commission at 320.

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Straight in at £320, Mel! What's the money going towards?

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-Recarpeting my dad's house.

-He's doing his house up, is he?

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Are you going to get any money? What would you like to do?

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-I'd like to go to London.

-You'd like to go to London, would you?

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Do you really want to go? You get stuck in traffic!

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-I want to go sightseeing.

-Daddy will take you one day.

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-At least it's not going shopping!

-Not shopping!

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Let's hope with that £320,

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Bob managed to give his daughter a great time in London.

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Now I'm taking you to Colwyn Bay

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to see whether Kate's vase made any bidders green with envy.

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We're looking at, what, £250 for this, hopefully £300?

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-That would be wonderful.

-That would be swimming along nicely! Let's hope we get 400.

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There are other pieces that are quite interesting.

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If the collectors are here, they'll push up the price. It's the collectors that are buying.

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There's some heavy prices already achieved in this room.

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-I'm keeping my fingers crossed.

-How exciting!

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That's come from our very own Mr B, he's optimistic. It's under the hammer now.

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Huge interest, as would be expected. It has to start at 480.

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Straight in!

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At 480? At 480?

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500.

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520. 550.

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At £550. At 550. 580.

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600.

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-Do you need a seat?

-625.

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650.

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680.

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-Oh, my God!

-700.

-It really is that special.

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I'm jumping to £840. 840's on the book.

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-You're shaking, aren't you?

-Yes.

-880.

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880. 900.

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-£900.

-I'm shaking now!

-925.

-Crikey, I've gone cold all over!

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975.

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£975.

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£1,000.

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And 25. We should be going 50s now. 50.

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1,100 I'd like. £1,100.

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What is so special about this?

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-At £1,150.

-Why didn't you pick up on that in your valuation?

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£1,200. Have you all done for the final call?

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1,200 on the telephone.

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The hammer's gone down. That is a sold sound.

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That is £1,200.

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Staggering. Absolutely unbelievable. Another brilliant Flog It! moment.

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Kate, come on, speak, say something!

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-You were shaking like a leaf.

-Absolutely shaking.

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That is incredible.

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There was nothing fishy about that vase. It smashed through David Barby's estimate.

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The art of pottery making has changed over the years,

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with new technology invented to remove all the hassles of production,

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things like the potter's wheel, electronically-controlled kilns that are fan assisted.

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But it's still no mean feat to make a prize-winning piece,

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as I found out on a visit to the Moorcroft factory back in 2008,

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when I decided to get my hands dirty.

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To find out more about Moorcroft, I've come to the heart of the British pottery industry.

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This area is so synonymous with the trade that it's referred to as the Potteries.

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You may know it as Stoke-On-Trent.

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Today, Staffordshire boasts some 350 potteries.

0:20:170:20:20

Renowned names like Clarice Cliff, Royal Doulton

0:20:200:20:23

and, of course, Moorcroft with its exquisitely vibrant style,

0:20:230:20:26

were all born and based here, producing everything from the little egg cup

0:20:260:20:30

to the most expensive, highly sought-after bowls and vases.

0:20:300:20:34

They may be all the rage with the collectors, but the industry has been around for centuries.

0:20:340:20:40

Pottery was established in the West Midlands in the early 1700s.

0:20:400:20:44

But it wasn't until 1897 that the world was introduced to a style legend.

0:20:440:20:50

Moorcroft caught the attention of a local pot manufacturer,

0:20:500:20:53

James Macintyre & Company,

0:20:530:20:55

and that moment marked the official birth of an artistic genius.

0:20:550:21:00

William had already gained an enviable reputation as a gifted painter,

0:21:000:21:04

even though he was just a recent graduate.

0:21:040:21:06

He started working for Macintyre's as a lead designer.

0:21:060:21:10

With his vibrant, colourful designs, inspired by nature, he soon captured a market.

0:21:100:21:15

He even boldly placed his signature on the bottom of every pot.

0:21:150:21:20

He was a visionary designer, and revolutionary in his approach to ceramic art.

0:21:200:21:25

Demand for William's work soon exceeded any other designer in the firm.

0:21:250:21:30

In 1912, aided by money from Liberty of London,

0:21:300:21:33

Moorcroft left Macintyre's,

0:21:330:21:35

taking with him 12 members of staff, to start up his own factory.

0:21:350:21:39

They marched the 500 metres from the old premises to Moorcroft's new factory,

0:21:390:21:44

taking with them sketches, designs, pot moulds and tools.

0:21:440:21:47

A new age of ceramics had dawned and the iconic Moorcroft was born.

0:21:470:21:52

Today, Moorcroft is a much loved worldwide brand.

0:21:520:21:56

Its delicate but intricate detail delights thousands upon thousands

0:21:560:22:00

and it's been a bit of a regular for us on Flog It!.

0:22:000:22:03

How about 150, 250?

0:22:030:22:05

-Yes!

-Definitely!

0:22:050:22:07

-They're not worth that.

-BOTH: Oh.

0:22:070:22:09

-They're worth three to 500.

-You are kidding?

0:22:090:22:12

It doesn't often disappoint us when it comes to selling on at auction.

0:22:120:22:16

2,050.

0:22:160:22:17

That is a great Flog It! moment. £2,050!

0:22:170:22:23

To find out why it's so sought after, I've come to the Moorcroft Visitor Centre

0:22:240:22:28

to meet MD Elise Adams

0:22:280:22:31

and take a look at their stunning collection.

0:22:310:22:34

What an incredible room.

0:22:360:22:38

Moorcroft is vying for my attention everywhere! I'm surrounded!

0:22:380:22:43

-What's this room called?

-This is the Moorcroft Museum,

0:22:430:22:45

it's part of the Moorcroft Heritage Visitor Centre in Burslem.

0:22:450:22:49

-Wow. How long have you been here?

-I've been at Moorcroft for 12 years and slowly worked my way up.

0:22:490:22:55

Every day is a new day, and that's the nice thing about living art pottery.

0:22:550:23:00

-We've got a few that you've pulled out.

-I have.

0:23:000:23:03

I've started with some early pieces.

0:23:030:23:05

This is where William started out at Macintyre's,

0:23:050:23:08

a local firm that was founded back in the 1830s.

0:23:080:23:11

He started with pieces like this. This is Aurelian ware.

0:23:110:23:14

It's flat to the touch, not like the Moorcroft that we then come to know,

0:23:140:23:18

-which have the raised...

-Tube linings.

0:23:180:23:21

-Where did he get his inspiration from?

-From his environment around him.

0:23:210:23:25

A lot of British flowers, forget-me-nots and daisies, things he would see day to day.

0:23:250:23:30

And these pieces lead on to other pieces that come forward.

0:23:300:23:34

He was very clever at this stage,

0:23:340:23:36

because he was signing his wares, although he worked for Macintyre.

0:23:360:23:40

-Yes, he was.

-How did he get away with that?

0:23:400:23:43

He was a very canny businessman. Macintyre's don't seem to have objected, from what we know.

0:23:430:23:48

Pieces like this, as I said, it's a Macintyre piece, it's got their stamp on it,

0:23:480:23:54

but quite clearly in green is William's signature.

0:23:540:23:57

He's branding his own name there,

0:23:570:23:59

he's setting himself up for when he goes it alone and sets up his own factory.

0:23:590:24:03

So people know these pieces as Moorcroft when, in fact, they're actually Macintyre.

0:24:030:24:07

-What's distinctive about this piece?

-This is the first range that William designed

0:24:070:24:12

when he moved to this new factory in 1913.

0:24:120:24:15

This follows the following year, in 1914. It's called Persian ware.

0:24:150:24:18

The shape was inspired by Middle Eastern culture.

0:24:180:24:22

William starts to work with Liberty and Co in London

0:24:220:24:25

and they start buying pieces of Macintyre ware,

0:24:250:24:28

and he starts designing specific ranges exclusively for them,

0:24:280:24:32

such as this powder blue ware, which they used in their tearooms.

0:24:320:24:36

-Flambe.

-Wonderful! From blue to red.

0:24:360:24:39

This was his technique, wasn't it? His little invention.

0:24:390:24:43

This was something that he held close to his heart.

0:24:430:24:45

He took the recipe with him to his deathbed

0:24:450:24:48

and only passed it on to his son, Walter, on his deathbed in 1945.

0:24:480:24:52

He didn't let anyone else fire or load the kilns. He was very protective over it.

0:24:520:24:57

-What period are we looking at?

-We're coming forward a little bit to more contemporary pieces,

0:24:570:25:02

pieces by Walter, who takes over the factory in 1945.

0:25:020:25:06

But as you can see, we start to get away from what Moorcroft's all about here.

0:25:060:25:11

There's very little tube lining,

0:25:110:25:14

which exactly the opposite to what William had advised.

0:25:140:25:17

Let's talk about the new designers. Do they have to have a good archive knowledge of previous designs?

0:25:170:25:22

They do. They're all very aware of pieces that have gone before.

0:25:220:25:26

They have access to the museum. You often find them in here looking at old shapes and designs,

0:25:260:25:30

but they're careful to always be moving forward.

0:25:300:25:33

But the process of Moorcroft has changed very little.

0:25:330:25:37

It's still tube-lined by hand, painted by hand, dipped by hand and so on.

0:25:370:25:42

So from that point of view, in 112 years, very little's changed.

0:25:420:25:46

I think that's great, to see some animals.

0:25:460:25:48

It's by Kerry Goodwin, one of the newest members of the design studio.

0:25:480:25:52

She works here on our factory and is here today.

0:25:520:25:55

-If you would like to come and meet her...

-I'd love to.

0:25:550:25:59

-..we can see how this piece is made.

-That'll be interesting.

0:25:590:26:03

The first stage of the process is mould making.

0:26:030:26:06

The craftsman hand-makes each mould with plaster of Paris.

0:26:060:26:09

Next, the piece is cast.

0:26:160:26:18

The mould is filled with liquid clay and then emptied,

0:26:180:26:22

leaving a wet shell.

0:26:220:26:23

When the clay has dried, the mould is removed, revealing the shape.

0:26:230:26:27

The vase is then placed in a damp room overnight to harden.

0:26:270:26:31

The dried vase needs to be smoothed. It's mounted on a lathe

0:26:320:26:36

and any seams removed by hand.

0:26:360:26:38

That's precision work.

0:26:380:26:40

Excess flakes of clay are removed with a sponge dipped in water,

0:26:400:26:45

and those familiar stamps are then pressed into the base.

0:26:450:26:49

The pattern is inked onto a clear sheet of paper

0:26:490:26:52

with a special ink mixed at the factory.

0:26:520:26:54

Then the wet design is pressed onto the pot,

0:26:540:26:57

with the tube liners to follow.

0:26:570:27:00

Once the pattern has been pressed onto the pot,

0:27:010:27:04

the famous Moorcroft tube lining can begin.

0:27:040:27:08

They follow the pattern precisely, laying it onto the pot.

0:27:090:27:12

It's a good job my work is being overseen

0:27:120:27:15

by the designer who created this piece, Kerry Goodwin.

0:27:150:27:18

My hands are so thick and clumsy, I'm worried I might break off what's already been done!

0:27:190:27:25

That's hard. That's very difficult.

0:27:250:27:27

-It's not going. It's not running.

-You're doing quite well.

0:27:270:27:32

Come the final glaze, that'll be very vibrant, like this.

0:27:320:27:35

Yes, the glaze is the main part,

0:27:350:27:38

because the colour soaks into the pot itself.

0:27:380:27:41

Once you put the glaze on, it turns into precious jewels.

0:27:410:27:44

All the colours come through, all the reds and the greens.

0:27:440:27:48

And then the whole thing just comes to life.

0:27:480:27:50

-Do you want to finish this?

-I think it'd take me two days, not three hours!

0:27:500:27:54

-Can you finish it off for me?

-Yes, I'll finish it off

0:27:540:27:57

-and send it through the kiln.

-Thank you!

0:27:570:28:00

Thanks, everybody. They've shown me Moorcroft's secrets.

0:28:000:28:03

It's well and truly alive and kicking!

0:28:030:28:06

But first, let me take you to Coventry.

0:28:130:28:16

In 2002, Alistair wet David Barby's lips

0:28:180:28:22

with his pristine condition 1930s Shelley's tea service.

0:28:220:28:26

I'm looking at this tea service, um, and it doesn't look as though it's ever been used.

0:28:290:28:35

I don't believe that is has. Not in my lifetime anyway.

0:28:350:28:38

-Does it belong to you?

-No, it belonged to my mother.

0:28:380:28:41

-It was something that she was given by her mother when she was in her early teens.

-Right.

0:28:410:28:46

I believe that she put it away in her bottom drawer for when she got married.

0:28:460:28:50

She may have used it once or twice, but the idea was that she would put it away for best

0:28:500:28:55

and, as far as I know, it's not been used, apart from the condiment set, with any kind of regularity.

0:28:550:29:00

-So, your mother must be aged, what, 85 to 90?

-She's 85.

0:29:000:29:04

Same generation as my mother. We have a "Sunday best" room.

0:29:040:29:07

I didn't dare go in that room!

0:29:070:29:09

-So, this is your Sunday best china?

-It would be.

0:29:090:29:12

-Do you know how I can tell it's Sunday best?

-No.

-We have this unusual piece here,

0:29:120:29:16

-the one with the pierced bottom.

-Yes?

0:29:160:29:19

And this was made for cress.

0:29:190:29:22

And you have the little shallow bowl which would catch drips of water.

0:29:220:29:27

You don't get them together very often, so that's nice to be part and parcel of this service.

0:29:270:29:32

The other thing to look at is, you've got not only a Sunday best,

0:29:320:29:35

but you've got a breakfast service, as well.

0:29:350:29:38

-So we have these extra-large cups and saucers.

-Yes.

0:29:380:29:41

This is a very attractive service. The pattern is called Melody.

0:29:410:29:45

It dates from about 1932, 1934.

0:29:450:29:49

It's not in its extreme Shelley design, but a Cubist pattern with angular-shaped handles.

0:29:490:29:54

This is a very accommodating middle-class pattern.

0:29:540:29:58

But the beauty is that you've got so many components to this service.

0:29:580:30:02

-The only thing that I can see is, there's a bit of damage on the condiment set.

-Yes.

0:30:020:30:06

-Was this used elsewhere?

-It was used fairly regularly during my childhood.

0:30:060:30:12

That was the one piece that she did want to get some use out of.

0:30:120:30:16

Well, it's very nice to handle. I would estimate, if this came up for auction,

0:30:160:30:21

that we should get between three and £400, if not more.

0:30:210:30:25

But I would want to accommodate with a reserve in the region of about £280.

0:30:250:30:30

-That's fine.

-That sort of price. Would you be happy with that?

-Yes.

0:30:300:30:34

-I'm sure the auctioneers will be happy to sell that.

-I look forward to the auction.

-Good!

0:30:340:30:39

Stay tuned to see how it did when it went up for auction.

0:30:390:30:43

But first, here are three memorable pottery items

0:30:440:30:47

that I just have to show you again.

0:30:470:30:50

Here's one I didn't make earlier,

0:30:510:30:53

a fabulous example of Moorcroft design,

0:30:530:30:55

which was spotted in Nantwich back in 2009.

0:30:550:31:00

Has it been cherished by you?

0:31:000:31:02

I've got to be honest, when I first inherited it, we used it as an umbrella stand.

0:31:020:31:06

You are joking?

0:31:060:31:08

It made owner Alan a whopping £960.

0:31:080:31:11

David Barby thought this unusual 18th century heirloom of Bob and Peggy's

0:31:110:31:15

would drum up a great price in Melksham.

0:31:150:31:18

To all intents and purposes, it's a working miniature longcase clock.

0:31:180:31:23

And it didn't disappoint,

0:31:230:31:25

making £800.

0:31:250:31:28

And Anthony got to savour some serious success

0:31:280:31:31

when his Majolica strawberry bowl went under the hammer in Norwich back in 2003.

0:31:310:31:36

At £950, that was definitely a fruitful result.

0:31:360:31:41

I'm taking you to Milton Keynes now where we join Nigel Smith,

0:31:430:31:48

who was simply lusting after Andrew's Lancastrian lustre vase.

0:31:480:31:51

Andrew, you've brought quite an interesting little pot here, something I particularly like.

0:31:510:31:56

-Tell me what you know about it.

-I know it's my great-grandmother's

0:31:560:32:00

and it's passed down from my granny, then to my mum.

0:32:000:32:03

It's stayed with my mum, but I've loved it every time I've gone home.

0:32:030:32:08

-You've inherited it?

-Yes.

0:32:080:32:10

Is it something you particularly like?

0:32:100:32:12

Oh, yes! Yes, I do.

0:32:120:32:14

But I've got little children, so I'm always petrified they'll break it,

0:32:140:32:18

so I thought, "Well, I could do something with the money."

0:32:180:32:23

-What would you do with the money?

-I'd like to send my parents on a cruise, as it's theirs.

0:32:230:32:28

That's a nice idea, but you'll probably have to put a bit to it!

0:32:280:32:32

I'll put some money towards it, as well!

0:32:320:32:36

Not unless it's really valuable, a Ming or whatever!

0:32:360:32:39

It is quite well marked on the underside.

0:32:390:32:41

If we turn it over, it's got a date code in Roman numerals.

0:32:410:32:46

-XII, so 1912.

-Oh, right.

0:32:460:32:50

This is made by the Lancastrian Art and Tile Pottery.

0:32:500:32:53

-That's her maiden name, Lancaster.

-Is it?

-Yes!

0:32:530:32:56

-So, do your family come from that part of the world?

-Yes, Formby.

-Right.

0:32:560:33:02

There's an artist's monogram. It's badly worn.

0:33:020:33:04

Again, in lustre. It's a sort of wheel mark.

0:33:040:33:07

If we look there, we can see that it's a cipher for Gordon Forsyth.

0:33:070:33:13

The downside to this is the fact that it's misfired.

0:33:130:33:17

If we turn it round, it's pale on one side and towards the bottom.

0:33:170:33:21

I thought it had faded!

0:33:210:33:23

-It doesn't actually fade.

-Oh, right.

-This is a firing fault.

0:33:230:33:29

But it's beautifully decorated, with rampant lions all the way round

0:33:290:33:33

and then these scrolly leaves,

0:33:330:33:35

and then this lovely border, this sort of, er,

0:33:350:33:38

lappet border going all the way round.

0:33:380:33:41

It's a beautiful thing. The market is strong for this type of pottery.

0:33:410:33:46

That's good.

0:33:460:33:47

-Have you got an inkling about its value?

-I have no idea at all.

0:33:470:33:51

-Very cautiously, we could estimate two to £300.

-Oh, gosh!

0:33:510:33:55

-You'd be happy with that, would you?

-Definitely.

0:33:550:33:57

I think it'll make that and more. It should make more.

0:33:570:34:01

-Your parents might have a cruise!

-Yes.

-A small one.

0:34:010:34:05

Let's hope it doesn't misfire at auction.

0:34:060:34:09

Next, I'm heading to Northampton,

0:34:090:34:13

where, in 2004, James Lewis hunted down a real find

0:34:130:34:17

in Janet and Alan's Beswick figurines.

0:34:170:34:20

We see a lot of Beswick on the Flog It! show,

0:34:210:34:24

but I haven't seen a collection this good for a while.

0:34:240:34:27

-What can you tell me about it?

-Originally, they were my father's.

0:34:270:34:31

-Dad was a Grafton Hunt supporter.

-Ah, OK.

0:34:310:34:34

And so he was very much into all this sort of thing.

0:34:340:34:37

-Do you follow the hunt?

-We don't.

0:34:370:34:40

-No.

-No, nor me.

0:34:400:34:43

It's a good set. And we've got some good figures there, as well.

0:34:430:34:48

Some are rarer than others. Also, we've got different backstamps.

0:34:480:34:52

We've got the post-war backstamp on all of them,

0:34:520:34:54

but this one is different to this.

0:34:540:34:57

If you turn her over,

0:34:570:34:59

-this mark is a more modern mark.

-Right.

-OK?

0:34:590:35:04

So she's slightly more recent.

0:35:040:35:06

And looking at him, he's got a tiny chip to his ear.

0:35:060:35:09

So they're not perfect as a set and they're made in different dates,

0:35:090:35:14

but they're still a good set.

0:35:140:35:16

Now, when it comes to the children on horseback,

0:35:160:35:20

there's one pony and rider that's incredibly rare.

0:35:200:35:24

I can't remember which one it is.

0:35:240:35:27

I think it might be that one.

0:35:270:35:31

Before the auction, we need to do some research and confirm it for you.

0:35:310:35:35

But as a whole, there's quite a lot of value there.

0:35:350:35:38

Have you ever thought about value?

0:35:380:35:40

Well, having visited the Doulton factory...

0:35:400:35:44

Oh, OK!

0:35:440:35:45

..we did see some actually being made, some figures,

0:35:450:35:50

and we've also got a few books, and friends with books...

0:35:500:35:54

-OK.

-..so we think, possibly,

0:35:540:35:57

-we're talking about £100 for the big ones.

-Those two.

0:35:570:36:02

-This is our estimate.

-That one's more modern, though.

0:36:020:36:07

-And he's got a chip to his ear.

-Yes.

-That does make a difference.

0:36:070:36:11

But they are good figures. I think if you average it out,

0:36:110:36:15

I reckon you're going to get three to £500 for them.

0:36:150:36:20

Something like that.

0:36:200:36:21

-On that basis, are you happy to go ahead?

-Yes.

0:36:210:36:24

-Yes, we'll go ahead with that.

-Yes?

-Fine.

0:36:240:36:27

But did they deliver a good price? We'll find out in just a minute.

0:36:280:36:33

First, let me refresh your memory with a quick summary.

0:36:330:36:36

David was humming with excitement for Alistair's Shelley "Melody" tea service in Coventry.

0:36:370:36:42

But did the bidders agree?

0:36:420:36:45

Janet and Alan's Beswick hunting set made a big impression on James.

0:36:450:36:49

He was convinced that they'd snare a good price when they went under the hammer.

0:36:490:36:54

Andrew was terrified his kids would break his beautiful Lancastrian heirloom.

0:36:540:36:59

Was it a smash in the sale room?

0:36:590:37:02

Let's find out, as it goes under the hammer first in Woburn, with Charlie Ross.

0:37:030:37:08

This is the first auction room you've been to,

0:37:080:37:12

you're selling something, hopefully, and you're going to buy something if you get lucky.

0:37:120:37:16

I know. I'm nervous, though. It's going to be good.

0:37:160:37:19

-That's half the fun, though!

-Yes.

-Hopefully, it will start a love affair in antiques.

0:37:190:37:24

-This is your lot now.

-Right.

0:37:240:37:26

I can start at £100 exactly. Ten I will take. 20.

0:37:260:37:31

130. 140. 150.

0:37:310:37:34

160. 170. Your bid.

0:37:340:37:36

170, back of the room. 180. 190.

0:37:360:37:40

-200. 210?

-This is good.

-20. 30.

0:37:400:37:43

240. 250. 260.

0:37:430:37:46

270. 280. No?

0:37:460:37:50

270. At £270. 280 behind you.

0:37:500:37:54

290, sir? 300, madam? I'll take 20. 340.

0:37:540:37:59

360. 380. 400.

0:37:590:38:03

420. 440.

0:38:030:38:05

460. 480.

0:38:050:38:07

500. 520.

0:38:070:38:09

540. No. 520.

0:38:090:38:12

The gentleman's bid, then. £520.

0:38:120:38:16

He's all at sea now!

0:38:160:38:19

I can buy more stuff now!

0:38:190:38:22

-How brilliant was that?

-That's excellent! That's nearly double the estimate.

0:38:230:38:28

Back to the drawing board for me!

0:38:280:38:30

Well, yes! Gosh, that was really amazing.

0:38:300:38:33

I can't believe it's gone for so much.

0:38:330:38:35

A good result. Andrew looked extremely pleased.

0:38:350:38:40

Time for tea now, as we head off to Wolverhampton

0:38:410:38:44

to find out how that wonderful Shelley set went down with the bidders.

0:38:440:38:48

Alistair, you look really smart. Turned out well for the auction.

0:38:480:38:51

I've never been on TV before, so...!

0:38:510:38:54

The set is now complete because you found the little toast rack.

0:38:540:38:58

-Let's hope it increases the value.

-I'm hoping.

-You can have breakfast with it now.

0:38:580:39:02

-There's just one little chip on one of the condiments.

-Yes.

0:39:020:39:06

-Because they've been using it.

-That was my fault.

-Antiques are supposed to be used!

0:39:060:39:10

There we go. Super set.

0:39:130:39:15

280. In the room at 280. 290.

0:39:150:39:18

300. 310.

0:39:180:39:21

320. 330.

0:39:210:39:23

-340.

-Excellent.

-This is good.

0:39:230:39:26

360. 370.

0:39:260:39:28

380. 390.

0:39:280:39:30

400.

0:39:300:39:33

And 20, sir? 420.

0:39:330:39:36

-440. 460.

-It's top money for this, isn't it?

-Very good.

0:39:360:39:41

540. 560. 580. 600.

0:39:410:39:46

-620.

-620!

0:39:460:39:49

-660. 680. 700.

-That's unbelievable.

0:39:490:39:52

-And 20.

-There's two keen buyers bidding against each other.

0:39:520:39:56

-This is what we want.

-They're actually bidding against each other.

0:39:560:39:59

-800!

-They're going to fight for it.

0:39:590:40:01

£860.

0:40:010:40:03

-That went bonkers!

-All done at 860.

0:40:030:40:06

-860!

-Gosh! Wow!

0:40:060:40:10

THEY LAUGH

0:40:100:40:12

It's done at 900.

0:40:120:40:14

-900?

-Congratulations.

-I'm absolutely staggered!

0:40:140:40:19

-Get on the phone to your mother!

-That is fantastic!

0:40:190:40:22

-It is.

-That's amazing.

-That's a world record for a bit of Shelley.

0:40:220:40:26

Would you have sold it had it not been for Flog It!?

0:40:260:40:29

-Possibly not, no.

-Brilliant.

-There you go.

0:40:290:40:32

And it caused a real stir, delivering a fantastic triple estimate result.

0:40:320:40:38

Back to Woburn now to 2004.

0:40:380:40:41

Let's see how Janet and Alan's hunting set got on.

0:40:410:40:45

James's valuation ended with a reserve of 300.

0:40:470:40:50

Since then, you've had a chat with Charlie. You wanted 800.

0:40:500:40:53

Charlie's talked you into 600. We've gone up, down, up, down.

0:40:530:40:57

-Are you happy with that?

-BOTH: Yes.

0:40:570:40:59

You're adamant they'll do well, aren't you?

0:40:590:41:02

-Absolutely.

-Oh, yes.

-I think they're going to do well.

0:41:020:41:05

-James?

-They're going to fly. The market is so buoyant for them.

0:41:050:41:08

What will they do, James? He hates me doing this!

0:41:080:41:12

OK, let's say... I'll say 1,100.

0:41:120:41:15

-I agree.

-Do you really?

-Yes.

-OK, well, that's not fixed!

0:41:150:41:19

-Well done.

-We hope so!

0:41:190:41:22

I'll get punched in t'face if they don't sell!

0:41:220:41:25

-HE MIMICS FANFARE

-I can start here at £600.

0:41:270:41:31

I'll take 20. 620.

0:41:310:41:33

-There we go.

-640. 660. 680. 700.

0:41:330:41:38

20. 740. 760. 780.

0:41:380:41:41

800. 20.

0:41:410:41:43

840. 850. 860.

0:41:430:41:47

880. Your bid. 900.

0:41:470:41:50

-20. 940.

-Tally-ho!

0:41:500:41:53

I'll come to you at the back in a minute! 960. Have a rest!

0:41:530:41:56

980? No. Now 980!

0:41:560:41:59

-980.

-Please get the 1,100!

-1,000. And 50. 1,100.

0:41:590:42:04

And 50. 1,200.

0:42:040:42:07

1,150. The middle of the room, 1,200. Fresh bidding.

0:42:080:42:12

1,250. You're both out now. 1,200.

0:42:120:42:16

All done, then, at 1,200...

0:42:160:42:21

-Brilliant, Janet!

-That's wonderful!

-£1,200!

0:42:210:42:25

-I can't believe that!

-Wonderful.

-They are so collectable.

0:42:250:42:28

I don't understand it, I don't like them, but there you go!

0:42:280:42:32

-You don't have to, do you?

-£1,200! No, I don't have to!

0:42:320:42:35

-James, you were right.

-So were you!

-Yes!

0:42:350:42:38

Thank you!

0:42:380:42:40

-It's wonderful.

-Now, there's a holiday, isn't there?

0:42:400:42:43

-There is. Where are you off to?

-BOTH: South Africa.

0:42:430:42:46

-Have you been before?

-No.

-Trip of a lifetime.

-Absolutely.

0:42:460:42:49

Fantastic! That's what Flog It! is all about!

0:42:490:42:52

Get rid of the stuff you don't like and go on a trip!

0:42:520:42:55

-Thank you very much. Enjoy it.

-BOTH: Thank you.

0:42:550:42:58

-My daughter's crying like anything.

-Where is she?

-Over there!

-Oh, yes!

0:42:580:43:03

That was an incredible result!

0:43:070:43:09

It certainly brought tears to Janet and Alan's daughter's eyes.

0:43:090:43:14

Well, that's all the glorious glazes we have time for today, sadly.

0:43:200:43:24

I hope you've enjoyed the show

0:43:240:43:25

and I hope you join me again for another trip through the archives.

0:43:250:43:29

Until then, it's goodbye from Syon House.

0:43:290:43:32

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:320:43:36

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:360:43:40

Paul Martin showcases ten of his favourite pottery items from the series. Among these clay treasures is a stunning aquarium-themed green vase, and of course it wouldn't be Flog It! without some Clarice Cliff.

Also, Paul visits the Moorcroft factory in Stoke-on-Trent and finds out just how hard it is to create a prize-winning piece.