Philip Serrell v David Harper: Auction Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Philip Serrell v David Harper: Auction

Antiques challenge. Going head-to-head at an antiques auction in order to raise money for a charity of their choice are experts Phil Serrell and David Harper.


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We have all seen them on TV, but how will the country's

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favourite antiques experts fare when they're challenged to make a profit with their own cash?

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Watch out.

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Who's going to make the biggest profit of all? Me.

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From car-boot sales to auction houses, our experts will recreate some of their real-life deals

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-as they go head-to-head and try to make the most money for their chosen charities.

-Come on, Knowles.

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The competition is really hot.

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The challenge to our experts is clear.

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Dealers, put your money where your mouth is.

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Today's antiques explorers are the cunning Philip "the Fox" Serrell, and devilish David Harper.

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Philip is truly the seasoned professional,

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with his own auction house in the heart of Worcestershire.

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At £220, is there any more?

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And years of sharing his knowledge on Flog It.

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This business isn't just about selling it,

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it's about buying something and placing it with the right person.

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David is the expert dealer of our pair, with 20 years in the antiques trade under his belt.

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It's a buzz. You are, effectively, a treasure hunter.

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On screen, he's often seen unearthing treasures on Bargain Hunt.

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60? Yes?

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So, we have the experts, they have the contacts, the knowledge, and a fierce determination to win.

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It's time for us to find out the aim of today's game.

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You're sauntering in there, Philip the Fox.

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-Good to see you.

-Devilish David Harper. How are you, all right?

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I'm very well. We've got two envelopes.

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-Exchange time.

-I give you that one, and you open yours first.

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This is like the Oscars, isn't it? And the winner is...

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"David and Philip, your challenge today is to spend

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up "to £1,000..." - I don't like this bit - "..of your own money on antiques.

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-"You must then resell your purchases with the aim of making as much profit as possible."

-No?

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-"The winner is the presenter who makes the most cash."

-I like a challenge.

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Let's have a look.

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"Today, you must buy all your antiques from an auction." Your territory.

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-But YOU'RE the dealer.

-But YOU'RE the auctioneer.

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You're the dealer!

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-Best of luck.

-You too, matey.

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Have a good one.

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Yes, Philip and David each have to spend up to £1,000

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of their own money buying antiques to sell on later for a profit.

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Today's shopping site is Bigwood fine art auctioneers in Stratford-upon-Avon.

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And our two antiques gladiators have drawn up their plans of attack.

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My strategy for buying here today in auction is the same as my strategy I use on any other auction buying day.

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You've got to buy for the right price.

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If it's going over bottom estimate, leave it and wait for the next item,

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especially the ones that don't get a bid.

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My strategy today is to try and beat the devilish David Harper.

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I'm going to try to buy quirky bits, small bits, but interesting bits.

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Good quality items, and I know he's into his furniture.

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So, dealer David is hoping to clean-up by snapping up bargains that other people don't spot.

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Auctioneer Philip, on the other hand, is aiming to buy small, quirky lots.

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This is a 1970s, I would think, silver goblet gilt by Stuart Devlin.

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He was an Australian designer.

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Actually, I think that's hideous, but it's hugely collectible.

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His work is typified by this sort of bark effect here.

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This is known as the Bristol goblet.

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It's really clever knowing that,

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but if you just turn the bottom up, it says on the bottom, Bristol goblet.

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It's a limited edition

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of 600.

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Would I want this in my home?

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Truthfully, I think the answer's no.

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But I've got to change my views with this programme, because this isn't about buying a lovely goblet

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to sit on my shelf at home, this is about me buying a profit, and I think this man is collectible.

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The auction estimate is 40 to £60.

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I think if it comes anywhere in that range, it's cheap.

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So, he doesn't like it, and he wouldn't have it in his home,

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but the Fox does think he could make a profit from the goblet, and that is what this game is all about.

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Philip's clearly got his business head on for today's contest, but his rival is also calculating

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how to win today's competition, and he's got his eyes on a classic designer watch.

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With the sale about to start, the auctioneer is in place, and our contenders have taken up

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prime positions on opposite sides of the room.

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David and Philip can spend up to £1,000 of their own cash, and they'll have to factor

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in the auctioneer's commission to everything they buy.

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It's time for today's auction battle to begin.

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It's the silver goblet with the coin motifs, or medallions, all round it.

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I've got a bidder here, and I'm going to start at £100.

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Oh, no, that's not good news for the Fox.

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£100 is way over the estimate of 40 to £60, which he was hoping to pay for the goblet.

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Anybody give me 110? 120, 130, 140, 130 seated. Anybody give me 140?

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All done at 130. Yours, madam.

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Determined bidder, that lady was just sat there like that.

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When they sit there like that, they mean to have it, and she has.

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Faced with a determined bidder, Philip decided not to get into a bidding war.

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Will he have more luck with his next target?

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He's decided to make a move for another silver lot,

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a collection of napkin rings with an estimate of £40 to £60.

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Seven silver napkin rings, a couple of pairs amongst them.

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I've got some bids and I can start here at £50. Anybody give me another five?

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I'm getting 60 and five, and 70 and five, and 80 and five, and 90 and five.

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110, I'm out, anybody give me 120?

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The bidding has reached double the top estimate and Mr Serrell still hasn't made a move.

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Has he decided that the napkin rings are just too expensive?

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120 here, anybody give me...

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130, 140.

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-Oh, Foxy magpie's having another go.

-180.

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Top estimate £60.

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190 I've got, anyone else?

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All done at 190?

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-190.

-He's got it.

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The old Fox magpie has spent £130 over the top estimate.

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Good one.

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So I've just bought seven napkin rings for £190 plus commission, which is the thick end of £220.

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If my maths is right, they've cost me about £32 each.

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Where am I going to go with those?

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Well, we were rather hoping you were going to tell us that, Philip.

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Including the auctioneer's fees,

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the napkin rings have cost him just over £222.

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That's more than 3.5 times the top estimate.

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No wonder his rival is so pleased.

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Speaking of devilish David, he may have been biding his time,

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but it's now his turn to try and secure a buy of his own.

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Lot number 163 is the Rolex.

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-Here we go.

-This is it.

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I've got a bid here on the book, I can start at £400.

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-It needs to be £400.

-Anybody give me 420?

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420, I'm out. Anybody give me 440?

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Go on, David, get your hand up. Go on, be brave.

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Are we all done at £420?

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440. 460? 480?

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No.

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It's got to be, if I had any more money to spend, I'd have it.

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It's a bargain for somebody, but not for me today.

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That's the problem with having such little amounts of money.

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The story of my life.

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Well, a £1,000 budget isn't too small an amount of money, David.

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But having a limit is all part of the game.

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Having splashed out on some silver napkin rings and bagged his first buy of the day, the Fox has also got

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his eye on some pieces of pottery from his home town.

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He's hoping to snap up a Royal Worcester George V blush ivory carafe jug,

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and a Victorian ivory carafe jug by the same factory.

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First up is the George V version.

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Philip doesn't want to pay more than £150.

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I've got a bid on this and I can start here at £70.

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I'll take 80 from anyone else.

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Will you give me an 80, Philip? 80, I'm out.

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The bloke behind him is bidding, he won't like that.

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90, and five?

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100, and 10?

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120, 130. 120 I've got, anyone else?

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120.

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-Oh, he's got it.

-5200, was it?

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Oh, I'm sorry.

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-Thank you very much.

-Try and remember what you've got to do in auction, Philip.

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With commission, the first carafe jug has cost Mr Serrell

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just over £140.

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110 I've got. Anyone else?

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And he quickly snaps up the second for just under £130.

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I'm pleased with that, because I think that's quite cheap. I'm pleased with that.

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After a less than successful start, Philip has now

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bought three items, and David is beginning to feel the pressure.

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You see, I've been having some fun here, but now I'm worried because

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I haven't spent a pound and he's on a bit of a roll.

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Indeed he is, Mr Harper. But all is far from lost.

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There are hundreds of lots in today's auction, and earlier today

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David and Philip cast their expert eyes over the pieces on offer.

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Mr Harper spotted something that he thinks has real profit-making potential.

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I've got to tell you, I've always had a great love for anything oriental.

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It's so exotic and interesting, and they always are very, very different.

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Oriental pieces always have fantastic stories.

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This is Guanyin, the goddess of mercy, Buddhistic goddess of mercy.

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A great talking piece, number one, which helps when you come to sell it

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because anything with a good story really goes a very long way.

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The downside to this, for some of you, is that it's ivory.

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Ivory, of course, is a very emotive subject so my tip to you, you've got to make sure that it's pre-1947.

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If you buy something that was made after '47, it's illegal, and you must make sure

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that when you're buying ivory it's a genuine antique, so buy it

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from an auction like this that will categorically tell you it's 19th century, or from a proper dealer.

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She's gorgeous, estimated 300 to 350, and if I can get her

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for anywhere around three, I think I can get five for her in the trade.

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You can't keep a good man down for long.

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If David can get the ivory figure for the right price, he thinks he could be on to a winner.

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He's also decided to try and buy this antique African antelope's head.

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Elsewhere in the sale room, his rival has been browsing through

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the lots trying to find small, quirky, but more importantly, potentially profitable pieces.

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I think these are absolutely lovely. This is 19th century earthenware.

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Look at this motto here.

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This is Dr Franklin's maxims.

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"Diligence is the mother of good luck, and God gives all things to industrious."

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It's got a moulded border.

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It's a little bit crazed, but they've all got these

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wonderful lines on them.

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Look at this one. "He that hath a trade hath an estate."

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I can just imagine some really prim

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Victorian vicar's wife teaching the children with these mugs.

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I think they're absolutely lovely, but the one that really appeals to me is this one here.

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Have a look at those boys there.

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That suspiciously looks to me like a cricket match, and I've got a friend who's

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a collector of cricket memorabilia, and this is just going to look absolutely wizard in his collection.

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What am I going to give for them?

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I think I'm going to give £50 for this lot.

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I hope they come a bit less, though.

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It sounds as though Philip has got plans for

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some of the earthenware pieces, if he can get them for the right price.

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I've got some bids and I can start here on the book...

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Bids on the book.

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At £20. Anybody give me 22? On the book at 20, 22.

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He's on a roll.

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He's confident now, isn't he?

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32, 35...

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He's so cool!

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He's so laid back.

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The price is climbing, but once again the Fox is refusing to back down.

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I'm in trouble.

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-And 80? 75 I've got there. Anybody else?

-I'm quite pleased with those.

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£15 apiece, that doesn't seem dear to me, really.

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I hope I can sell that cricket one, that's where the profit is. Fingers crossed again.

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With commission, the collection of earthenware has cost Philip

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just under £90, but he's bagged himself another lot.

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With the items sliding by and the pressure building to purchase the right lots at the right price,

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both our experts are raising their hands in an effort to secure more potentially profitable pieces.

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# Hands up... #

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30 quid? Thank you. 40? And five?

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-Yeah.

-50? 5, and 60? And five, sir?

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Despite a flurry of bids from both experts, neither one succeeds in buying anything.

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But David has still got hundreds of pounds left in his kitty,

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and his eyes have been drawn to a rather exotic item.

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It's an antique stuffed African antelope's head with an estimate of £150 to £250.

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Living in the Durham Yorkshire Dales, I do have clients for this sort of thing.

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-So let's see. It has to be cheap.

-It's the Rowland Ward gemsbok.

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mounted on the shield there. I've got 80 bid on the book.

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90, 100, 110, 120, is it? 110 it is, at 110, are we all done at 110?

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-I'll have one go.

-120, 130 now? 130 is it? 120 I'm going to sell it.

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All done at 120.

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Yes! And £10 below bottom estimate. Right, Philip?

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He's got a fixation with deer.

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He keeps talking about dear, it's too dear, it's not dear, and he's bought a deer.

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True to his strategy of trying to snap up bargains, David's paid

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just over £140 with commission for the antelope's head.

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It's below the £150 bottom estimate, and he's aiming to repeat his success with his next target.

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Estimated at three to five, but again it's got to be cheap to make a profit.

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I can't be paying stupid money for it, so here we go. Bottom estimate or nothing.

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Another Japanese ivory, possibly an immortal. 300 for this one?

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250 to start, 250 there. 250, 260 do I hear?

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-Leave it, leave it...

-280, 300 now.

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At 280, it is. 300, 320? 320?

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-300 it is.

-I'm going to get it.

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I'm going to get it. Guanyin is coming home with me.

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-Thank you, very much indeed. Excellent.

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That's probably a good buy for him. Oh!

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£300 plus commission. Come on, baby.

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Well, with commission, David has paid just over £350.

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Judging from his rival's reaction,

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he could have got himself a bit of a bargain.

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After a slow start, Mr Harper is gradually finding his way back into the battle.

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Both our experts started the day with up to £1,000

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of their own money to spend.

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Philip has parted with just over £580 for four items,

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leaving him with almost £420 to spend.

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His rival has spent a little over £490 on two items,

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leaving him with almost £510 to play with.

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With hundreds of pounds still in their pockets and plenty of

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lots still on offer, the quest to buy potentially profitable items continues.

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Earlier today, our experts cast their experienced eyes over

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the items for sale and David spotted a table in need of a little TLC.

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Here we have a late Georgian early Regency British mahogany tea table.

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Made about 1820. A very posh one indeed.

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You know it's a tea table, because when you lift the lid up,

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it's all wood. Of course, if it was baize, it would be a card table.

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But of course, if you want to pay cards, you want to play games, you can do anything you like with it.

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It's a simple action. It just folds out on that

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gate leg action to give it support, lift the lid over, and then it can seat for people for tea or games.

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It can be transported and moved around the house at your leisure.

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It's lovely, but the big downside here, can you see the front?

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That little kink to it. That's a major issue when it comes to pieces

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like this, because it aesthetically doesn't look quite right.

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However, at £100 - £150 estimate, there's got to be some room in that.

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Anywhere around £100 - £150, I'll be delighted.

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Well, David seems very taken with the mahogany tea table.

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But when it comes to the furniture lots, Mr Harper isn't going to have things all his own way.

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He's keen on a Victorian occasional table.

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It's also caught the eye of his opponent.

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Brace yourselves for a battle when that comes up for sale!

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First, it's time to see if devilish David can get another of his targets for a heavenly price.

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My lovely late-Georgian early Regency mahogany fold over tea table.

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£100 - £150, and I want it desperately.

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But, it's got to be cheap. Here we go.

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George III Regency mahogany tea table.

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80 I'm bid, the bid is there at 80. 90 is it? At £80, only at 80.

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The maiden bid. Do I hear 90?

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90, 100?

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At £90, I'm going to sell it at 90.

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I want it at 90. I want it at 90. Yes!

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That's brilliant.

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Brilliant!

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Including commission, David has paid just over £105 for that lot.

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It's time now for the Victorian occasional table that both our experts are keen on.

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Philip has come up with a cunning plan to try and outfox his rival.

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He's popped outside to bid by phone so that David doesn't know

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-he's bidding.

-50 there, 60.

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70, 70, 80.

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80, 90, 90, 100. 100, 120.

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Here we go. Going ballistic.

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140.

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-130.

-130, 140? 140, 150?

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Yes.

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150, 160? 170.

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-Yes.

-Oh!

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Estimated at 40 - 60, now 180.

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-190...

-200.

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-190 it is.

-Too much.

-Telephone bid at 190. All done?

0:18:560:19:02

I bought that.

0:19:020:19:04

Do you know, that's really sneaky, isn't it?

0:19:050:19:08

The devilish David Harper is going to hate me for that.

0:19:080:19:11

Actually Philip, David doesn't sound too upset at all.

0:19:110:19:14

At just over £220,

0:19:140:19:16

the fox has paid a big price for a table that was estimated at

0:19:160:19:19

just £40 to £60.

0:19:190:19:22

Will he be able to make a profit on it?

0:19:220:19:24

With the lots sliding by, but pressure is beginning to build on David.

0:19:240:19:27

He's refusing to panic, and has got his eye on him rather nice Georgian mahogany side table.

0:19:270:19:33

-Got to be cheap.

-We've got an opening bid here of £50.

0:19:330:19:36

Who's got 60? I've got 50, who has got 60? 60. Thank you.

0:19:360:19:40

60, I'm clear. 70 anywhere?

0:19:400:19:43

-At £60, all done then at £60? All done.

-Yes!

0:19:430:19:48

£60 for a Georgian table.

0:19:480:19:50

-How does he do that?

-Thank goodness, I'd buy anything for 60 quid.

0:19:500:19:54

Actually, with commission, Mr Harper has paid just over 70 quid.

0:19:540:19:58

But he seems very taken with the table

0:19:580:20:01

and it's not the only lot he's fallen in love with at today's auction.

0:20:010:20:05

-Do I hear 90? 90.

-Yes!

0:20:080:20:11

He bagged a pair of hand-carved walnut table legs for just over £20.

0:20:110:20:17

A bureau for just over £160.

0:20:170:20:22

I've just bought a Georgian bureau.

0:20:220:20:23

And in a moment of inspiration, or madness, a pair of wagon wheels for a little over £105.

0:20:230:20:31

Got to spend the money. It's two big wheels.

0:20:310:20:34

Mr Harper snapped up lots left right and centre, and those three items

0:20:340:20:37

have set him back just under £290.

0:20:370:20:41

It's been a real fight to the finish in today's auction and it's time to

0:20:410:20:44

find out who's sitting pretty, and who has been left standing.

0:20:440:20:49

Both our experts started the day with up to £1,000

0:20:490:20:53

of their own money to spend.

0:20:530:20:55

Philip "the Fox" Serrell has parted with just over £800.

0:20:550:20:59

After a slow start, devilish David Harper

0:20:590:21:02

has spent almost his entire kitty.

0:21:020:21:06

It's been a tough day in the sale room but before our two experts head

0:21:080:21:11

for home, they're keen to have a look at their opponent's purchases.

0:21:110:21:15

Is that all you've got, Foxy?

0:21:150:21:19

-You know you love being called the Fox.

-Small but beautifully formed.

0:21:190:21:23

Do you know what upsets me about society today?

0:21:230:21:26

Somebody has been along, and they've dumped those wheels there.

0:21:260:21:29

No, no! I bought the wheels, please!

0:21:290:21:33

I hadn't really seen him before I bought them, but now that I own them, I love the wheels.

0:21:330:21:37

You could make them a feature of that wrought iron fencing along there as well.

0:21:370:21:40

Just drop them into the weeds?

0:21:400:21:42

You tell me, what's great about an amount of - what?

0:21:420:21:47

I'm hurt. I thought I liked you.

0:21:470:21:50

I'm actually very jealous of the table. I wanted that table.

0:21:500:21:54

But I do think you paid too much for that.

0:21:540:21:55

-I hope I can get £100 out of it.

-I think you probably will.

0:21:550:21:58

We live in hope.

0:21:580:22:00

-Best of luck.

-You too.

-It's been a very tiring day.

0:22:000:22:03

-I've enjoyed it.

-I have as well.

-Thank you for looking after me.

0:22:030:22:06

I haven't, I haven't at all.

0:22:060:22:07

I don't really know how I'm going to get that into my car.

0:22:070:22:10

-Good luck. See you soon.

-See you later.

0:22:100:22:15

So, after a fiercely fought auction battle, our two experts

0:22:150:22:18

head for home, where Philip's hopes for victory rest on...

0:22:180:22:21

two Royal Worcester claret jugs.

0:22:210:22:24

A mixed lot of 19th century earthenware.

0:22:240:22:28

A Victorian occasional table.

0:22:280:22:30

And of course, the rather pricey silver napkin rings.

0:22:300:22:34

David will be hoping to cash in on...

0:22:340:22:37

an early 20th century stuffed African antelope's head.

0:22:370:22:40

A carved late 19th century Japanese ivory figure.

0:22:400:22:44

A pair of hand-carved walnut legs.

0:22:440:22:48

A Georgian bureau.

0:22:480:22:50

A pair of mid-19th century wagon wheels.

0:22:500:22:53

A British mahogany tea table in need of a little TLC.

0:22:530:22:57

And a Georgian mahogany side table.

0:22:570:23:00

After their day in the saleroom, our two warriors are busy preparing for the next part of today's challenge.

0:23:040:23:10

They now have to try and sell their purchases for maximum profit.

0:23:100:23:13

For me, Stratford was really, really hard.

0:23:170:23:19

You've got the fire of the auction place, and I was in the furnace.

0:23:190:23:25

It was a learning curve.

0:23:250:23:27

Well, I'm back from Stratford with all my wares, including the wagon wheels. Why on earth did I buy them?

0:23:270:23:33

I've never wagon wheels in my life.

0:23:330:23:35

I kind of lost the plot towards the end.

0:23:350:23:37

I was desperate to get rid of my money and get some stock.

0:23:370:23:40

But I do love my ivory.

0:23:400:23:42

That's a great piece of kit.

0:23:420:23:44

Both our experts find buying at the auction a tricky challenge.

0:23:460:23:48

They've got plenty of items and they'll both be pulling out all the stops to find the right buyers.

0:23:480:23:54

They're working their way through their little black books, putting deals together on the phone

0:23:540:23:57

and by e-mail.

0:23:570:23:59

Until they've shaken on it and money has changed hands, no deal is truly sealed.

0:23:590:24:05

I'm in my saleroom in Malvern today, waiting for a client to come,

0:24:070:24:10

whose family I have been selling furniture to for the last 30 years.

0:24:100:24:14

It's not the auction room today though, for me it's a cold-blooded deal. Not under the hammer.

0:24:140:24:19

I'm going to try and sell him this table I bought in auction at Stratford.

0:24:190:24:24

-Anthony, how are you?

-Hello, Philip.

0:24:240:24:26

-Hew are you?

-Good to see you.

0:24:260:24:28

Pretty much everyone that our experts try to do deals

0:24:280:24:30

with will be aware that they're on a mission to make as much money as possible for charity.

0:24:300:24:35

Our experts will be doing everything in their power to persuade people to

0:24:350:24:37

give them the best possible prices when they sell the items that they hope will drive them to victory.

0:24:370:24:44

Philip paid just over £220 for the table.

0:24:450:24:49

He's given it a polish, but will he be able to turn a profit?

0:24:490:24:52

First impressions, looking at it, I thought

0:24:520:24:56

the top didn't belong to the base.

0:24:560:24:59

Really?

0:24:590:25:01

Just to see.

0:25:010:25:03

-Just looking at the runners there...

-These?

-Yeah, they look a bit fresh.

0:25:030:25:08

Saying that, it's still a nice quality, isn't it?

0:25:080:25:10

This timber is lovely, isn't it?

0:25:100:25:13

Whether it is or whether it ain't, it's still a nice furnishing piece.

0:25:130:25:16

Is it of interest to you?

0:25:160:25:18

It is of interest, yeah. It's not a bad table.

0:25:180:25:20

I think that's worth £375.

0:25:200:25:23

£320, I'll have a deal.

0:25:230:25:26

-£320?

-Yeah.

0:25:260:25:30

Anthony, you're a gentleman. Thank you very much, mate.

0:25:300:25:33

Do you want a hand out with it?

0:25:330:25:34

-Yeah.

-Will I put it straight in the car?

0:25:340:25:36

-Yes.

-Yes, that's how it's done.

0:25:360:25:38

The Fox bagged almost £100 profit for the occasional table.

0:25:380:25:42

And, he's hit the road to try and sell the napkin rings that cost him over £220.

0:25:440:25:51

I've brought these napkin rings.

0:25:530:25:56

I think they're really nice.

0:25:560:25:59

Be generous.

0:26:000:26:02

I'd think they're worth £100.

0:26:020:26:04

You're bidding me £100?

0:26:040:26:06

No more. Something tells me you have paid slightly more than that.

0:26:060:26:10

I paid £220.

0:26:100:26:13

£220!

0:26:130:26:15

Unbelievable.

0:26:150:26:17

I think you're going to struggle.

0:26:170:26:21

Oh dear. That's brought Philip back down to earth with a bump.

0:26:210:26:25

He's going to need to think laterally to try and find a buyer willing to splash out on the silver.

0:26:250:26:29

David is hoping one of his lots will send him rolling to success.

0:26:310:26:35

So, what do you reckon? Mid or late 19th century?

0:26:350:26:38

They could be, actually, it looks like a casting with the maker's mark and things on it.

0:26:380:26:43

When I bought these things, I kind of bought them blind.

0:26:430:26:45

Someone said to me afterwards, they were a great buy.

0:26:450:26:48

You can use them as little herb gardens.

0:26:480:26:52

A lot of people either put them down on the floor, plant them in sections, or a lot

0:26:520:26:56

of our customers ask for pieces to actually hang on the walls in courtyards and things like that.

0:26:560:27:01

-What about prices?

-The iron wheels cost David over £105, so he needs to work hard for a profit.

0:27:010:27:07

Value wise, I was kind of hoping for £100 a go?

0:27:070:27:11

May be with the pair I could do for 190?

0:27:110:27:13

190. So, 95 each?

0:27:130:27:15

OK. I'll not shake your hand Sarah...

0:27:150:27:18

-Do you want to shake my hand?

-We will do.

-Oh, go on then.

-Cheers.

0:27:180:27:20

-Brilliant.

-Thanks to his years of dealing experience,

0:27:200:27:24

David has come up trumps and I think it's fair to say, he's a happy man.

0:27:240:27:28

What a relief!

0:27:280:27:30

I didn't fancy wheeling those blighters down here again.

0:27:300:27:34

I tell you what, that wasn't bad going for an impulse purchase.

0:27:340:27:37

Although, if I'm honest, a panic purchase!

0:27:370:27:42

Well, that's very true.

0:27:420:27:43

Almost £85 profit on the wagon wheels is a great result.

0:27:430:27:48

He's also bagged over £132 from the sale of his Georgian tea table.

0:27:480:27:54

OK, speak to you soon. Thanks, bye.

0:27:540:27:57

With his opponent making quick-fire sales, the Fox needs to seal some deals of his own.

0:27:570:28:02

He's found a dealer who might be interested in

0:28:020:28:05

his mixed lot of earthenware, but there's been a slight hitch.

0:28:050:28:09

Down to business.

0:28:090:28:11

I bought these at auction.

0:28:110:28:14

That, as a cricket mug, could be worth £100 - £150.

0:28:140:28:17

When I got it home I looked at it and thought, actually it's not two boys playing cricket,

0:28:170:28:20

it's two kids just chucking a ball around with a kite in the background, isn't it?

0:28:200:28:24

-Yes.

-So it's not £100 - £150.

-No.

0:28:240:28:28

I quite like that one.

0:28:280:28:31

Dr Franklin's maxims, what's all that about?

0:28:310:28:34

They're a series of sayings, educational, and righteous sayings,

0:28:340:28:40

that were applied at the time. About 1860.

0:28:400:28:43

Philip paid almost £90 for the set but without the cricket connection,

0:28:430:28:47

will he be able to bank a decent profit?

0:28:470:28:50

I thought that the five bits would average out at £40 apiece.

0:28:500:28:54

What do you think they're worth?

0:28:540:28:56

They probably are worth the £200, but that's not what I'm going to pay.

0:28:560:28:59

I'll go to £125.

0:28:590:29:03

Is that your best shot? Give me a last, final best shot.

0:29:030:29:06

-Right, OK. 140. That's it.

-Finished.

0:29:060:29:10

-And I've got the chequebook, of course.

-Yes, well I'll take that, Julie.

0:29:100:29:14

He might have made a small mistake with the cup, but that's an impressive bit of digging

0:29:160:29:18

from Mr Serrell, and over £50 worth of profits.

0:29:180:29:23

Cash is changing hands at a rate of knots today

0:29:230:29:25

and devilish David is on the road and has an unconventional plan for his next lot.

0:29:250:29:31

This is quite an unusual situation I've got here.

0:29:330:29:36

I'm about to try and sell a George III mahogany circa 1790 side table, to a guy, Mad Mark, who absolutely

0:29:360:29:45

hates antique furniture, doesn't understand it, doesn't want to understand it, and can't abide it.

0:29:450:29:50

Doesn't sound like the best plan, David.

0:29:500:29:52

And having bought the table for just over £70, Mr Harper needs his potential purchaser to dig deep.

0:29:520:29:59

Mark runs a hotel, but the decor is more animal print than antique.

0:29:590:30:04

This I reckon you could do something with.

0:30:040:30:07

Now first of all, I'm going to try and sell it to you as what it is,

0:30:070:30:10

1790 mahogany strung in satinwood, a very fine and elegant Georgian antique.

0:30:100:30:17

-It just looks like an old table to me.

-You can't get with it, can you?

0:30:170:30:21

You could make that modern though, because with your flair, and I've seen what you've done with other

0:30:210:30:23

things before, with your skins and your paint.

0:30:230:30:27

Actually, what I really would like to do with it would be

0:30:270:30:31

to cover the top in a cow hide, so it fits in with the rest.

0:30:310:30:36

This handle would actually be a cow horn.

0:30:360:30:38

Oh, stop it! Really? Seriously?

0:30:380:30:41

-Yes, seriously.

-A cow horn?

-And the legs, maybe spray them silver,

0:30:410:30:47

to look like metal.

0:30:470:30:49

Spray-paint?! Animal print?!

0:30:490:30:51

Is this really a good home for an antique table?

0:30:510:30:54

What you've got there's a fantastic structure.

0:30:540:30:57

-Yeah.

-I mean it's 200 years old.

0:30:570:30:59

It was hand-built.

0:30:590:31:01

To make it like that today it would cost an absolute fortune, so as a blank canvas for the Mad Mark...

0:31:010:31:07

200 years old and I'm just going to butcher it.

0:31:070:31:10

The thing is, you know what?

0:31:100:31:12

People criticise me for not being bothered about that, but I'm not bothered at all. Why not?

0:31:120:31:17

It's £180, thereabouts.

0:31:170:31:19

-It's a bargain of a table.

-120 quid.

0:31:190:31:22

120? I'll go 170.

0:31:220:31:25

-I'll go 140, then.

-I'll go

0:31:250:31:28

160, then.

0:31:280:31:30

-All right, we'll meet in the middle.

-Where's that?

-150.

0:31:320:31:35

You'll have it?

0:31:350:31:36

150, yes.

0:31:360:31:38

And we'll start work on it straightaway.

0:31:380:31:40

Good man.

0:31:400:31:43

Who knows what will become of the poor table.

0:31:430:31:46

David kept his mind focused firmly on profit,

0:31:460:31:48

and walked away with almost £80.

0:31:480:31:52

Our two treasure-hunters are both desperate for victory today

0:31:540:31:58

but the winner will be the one who banks the most profit.

0:31:580:32:01

The Fox has sold £460 worth of goods and banked a profit of almost £150.

0:32:030:32:10

His opponent has sold £578 worth of goods

0:32:100:32:14

and made a profit of almost £300.

0:32:140:32:19

Our Worcester gent may be short on profits so far

0:32:220:32:24

but he's got two lots to sell that are rather close to his heart.

0:32:240:32:29

He's got high hopes they'll turn a profit, so he's headed to his personal man.

0:32:290:32:32

He's hoping for some advice from a famous face from Antiques Roadshow.

0:32:380:32:41

Henry Sandon is one of the leading a authorities on Worcester porcelain.

0:32:410:32:47

Who better to give the Fox some vital extra info, which could help him boost his profit margins.

0:32:470:32:53

-Tell me all about it, Henry.

-A very pretty pot, isn't it?

0:32:530:32:56

Old ivory, this lovely old ivory ground, with beautiful decorative flowers and fine gilding.

0:32:560:33:02

Here's the gilder, TR, one of the great gilders of the factory.

0:33:020:33:05

Topham Roberts, George Topham Roberts. He signed TR. Made in 1888.

0:33:050:33:11

It was a long time ago. In very good condition.

0:33:110:33:15

I like that very much.

0:33:150:33:18

-Henry, I paid £130 for that.

-Did you? That's very, very cheap.

0:33:180:33:21

I'd put several hundred or more on this.

0:33:240:33:27

Really?

0:33:270:33:29

Bit of a result there.

0:33:290:33:30

Well, that's great news for Philip.

0:33:320:33:34

That was the cheaper of his two jugs.

0:33:340:33:36

Will Henry have more good news on the second piece?

0:33:360:33:38

This is usually called a claret jug. Made in different sizes.

0:33:380:33:41

Not such a good piece, quite a common object.

0:33:410:33:44

In fact, there's one in the museum here. What did you pay for this?

0:33:440:33:48

I paid £140 for it.

0:33:480:33:49

Yes, well it's on the top side, isn't it, really?

0:33:490:33:53

I did detect a sharp intake of breath then.

0:33:530:33:55

Can you show me where the other one of these is?

0:33:550:33:57

I will, yes. Come on, yes!

0:33:570:34:00

Well, this is all well and good Mr Serrell, but surely you should be focusing on selling, not chatting.

0:34:000:34:06

Actually, there are finer ones than this one...

0:34:060:34:09

Philip's rival is working flat out to sell his remaining items.

0:34:090:34:13

Remember that both our experts are setting up deals on the phone and by e-mail.

0:34:130:34:18

Until they've shaken on it and money has changed hands, no deal is truly done.

0:34:180:34:23

250 shake on it.

0:34:230:34:24

-Cash or cheque?

-Cash!

0:34:240:34:26

Please!

0:34:260:34:29

Mr Harper means Business, and a quick deal for his mahogany bureau

0:34:290:34:33

pulls over £90 into his profits.

0:34:330:34:35

His opponent needs to find a buyer for the porcelain if he's to be in with any chance of catching up.

0:34:350:34:42

I bought that one for £130 or thereabouts.

0:34:420:34:45

That one is £140 or thereabouts. Do you want to pull up a chair?

0:34:450:34:49

You might need one. £400 I'd like for them, please.

0:34:490:34:53

It's just too much money.

0:34:550:34:57

I like that, I do like that. That's just boring.

0:34:590:35:03

-Come on, how much?

-£360.

0:35:030:35:06

And that's, seriously, for that, that's good money.

0:35:060:35:10

If I can squeeze another tenner out of you, they are sold, done and dusted.

0:35:100:35:14

-Oh, go on.

-I'll love you forever!

0:35:140:35:17

So, he's a happy man, then. A profit of over £100 is an excellent deal.

0:35:170:35:22

But the Fox isn't done yet.

0:35:220:35:24

This is just a wonderful collection

0:35:240:35:27

of napkin rings.

0:35:270:35:29

Philip, look! They've got initials on.

0:35:300:35:33

What I am I going to do with those?

0:35:330:35:35

They've got initials on.

0:35:350:35:36

-ABTW.

-Yeah...

0:35:360:35:40

I'd like £250 for them please.

0:35:400:35:44

-Philip, here's your bag.

-Don't you want to buy them?

0:35:440:35:46

-I don't.

-Well, make me an offer.

0:35:460:35:48

Philip, I'm not going to be able to get near that.

0:35:480:35:51

OK, fine.

0:35:510:35:53

Plenty of napkin rings, OK then.

0:35:530:35:55

Oh, don't be like that.

0:35:550:35:57

Well, the good news is I've just made £100 on my Worcester jug.

0:35:570:36:03

However, the napkin rings...

0:36:030:36:06

Yes, if the Fox doesn't come up with a plan soon to sell those napkin rings,

0:36:060:36:10

he's going to be looking at a loss today. So, he hits the phones.

0:36:100:36:15

Yeah, I'm really well, thank you. And you think they're worth how much?

0:36:190:36:24

Right. And you don't think that you want to buy them?

0:36:240:36:29

No, not at any price?

0:36:300:36:33

Philip won't be giving up without a fight, though.

0:36:330:36:36

In County Durham, his opponent has also hit stormy waters.

0:36:360:36:39

He's failed to find a buyer for his table legs,

0:36:390:36:42

denting his profits by over £23.

0:36:420:36:45

And it's not only his legs that were causing David to wobble.

0:36:450:36:47

What about his African antelope's head? He paid over £140 for it, and has been unable to find a buyer.

0:36:470:36:54

So he's decided to put it back into auction.

0:36:540:36:56

But as he has to pay auctioneer's commission he has to sell it for at least £170 to make a profit.

0:36:560:37:03

Coming up next is my head.

0:37:030:37:05

There it is on the wall. It's my last chance saloon.

0:37:050:37:09

Here it goes.

0:37:090:37:11

What are we bid for this? Start me at £100?

0:37:110:37:13

100, £100. At 80, bid.

0:37:130:37:16

Thank you, at 80, 90, 100?

0:37:160:37:20

At £100, at 100, Rowland Ward, 100, at 100, 110.

0:37:200:37:24

120, 130, 140, 150.

0:37:240:37:29

-It's getting better.

-£150.

0:37:290:37:31

-Come on.

-No? At £150, are you all done this time?

0:37:310:37:34

Paper profit, but minus the commission, no, ...

0:37:340:37:37

-Go on, go on, Rodney!

-All done.

0:37:370:37:40

HE BANGS GAVEL

0:37:400:37:41

Ouch! £150. Now then.

0:37:410:37:44

15% off. My maths is not good.

0:37:440:37:46

It's about £22.

0:37:460:37:48

So, I've got a loss of, I don't know, a couple of tenners.

0:37:480:37:52

He might have made a small loss but at least

0:37:520:37:55

David sold his antelope's head.

0:37:550:37:58

Had I not sold it, and kept it, I would have had to hang it on the wall, and I don't want it at home.

0:37:580:38:03

Could I have sold for 250 and made a profit?

0:38:030:38:05

This is the funny thing about auctions.

0:38:050:38:06

It also could have sold for 50 quid. In honesty,

0:38:060:38:09

I'm quite relieved.

0:38:090:38:12

That's the spirit! You can't keep a good dealer down for long.

0:38:120:38:15

This contest could still go either way.

0:38:150:38:18

If Mr Serrell is going to win, he needs a buyer for

0:38:180:38:21

the napkin rings that have been causing him so much trouble.

0:38:210:38:25

I found out who the under bidder was.

0:38:260:38:29

That's the guy who was the unsuccessful bid

0:38:290:38:33

before me at the auction, and I'm going to try to sell him

0:38:330:38:37

the napkin rings.

0:38:370:38:39

Clever thinking, Mr Serrell , and after some tough negotiations

0:38:390:38:42

there is some good news as the Fox manages to sell the napkin rings.

0:38:420:38:47

Yeah!

0:38:470:38:49

It might not be much to shout about,

0:38:490:38:51

but Philip has banked a small profit and a profit is a profit.

0:38:510:38:56

The pressure is now on David. If he wants to win today's competition,

0:38:570:39:00

he has to sell his most expensive purchase from the auction - the ivory figurine costing over £350.

0:39:000:39:08

If he can turn a profit, he will romp home to victory.

0:39:080:39:11

But if it proves too pricey for his potential purchaser, David will be relegated to second place.

0:39:110:39:18

-It's make-or-break time.

-Absolutely beautiful.

0:39:180:39:22

Even better than the photographs.

0:39:220:39:25

I'm going to handle her now, George.

0:39:250:39:26

-OK.

-I want you to just hold her, and feel the weight.

0:39:260:39:30

And look at the quality. So, she's Japanese.

0:39:300:39:34

-Ivory, a single piece carving, so there's no two pieces joined together

-Amazing.

0:39:340:39:40

-It's Meiji period so that's 1868 - 1912.

-Is this signed?

0:39:400:39:46

Yes, the Buddhist Goddess of Mercy.

0:39:460:39:49

She's long, she's elegant, she always wears flowing robes - and look at the flowers she's holding.

0:39:490:39:55

The Lotus.

0:39:550:39:56

That's so important.

0:39:560:39:58

It's a really important flower.

0:39:580:40:00

-It's beautiful.

-What's the budget?

0:40:000:40:02

-750?

-I haven't got 750.

0:40:020:40:04

-You haven't?

-I haven't, David.

0:40:040:40:06

Why don't I just say to you, let's pay 470, get it done, David. No.

0:40:060:40:12

I can't go to 470.

0:40:120:40:14

It's as simple as that.

0:40:140:40:16

Well, George, it looks like she's going to be living with me for just a little bit longer.

0:40:160:40:20

Devilish David is living up to his name - playing hardball. But it's a risky strategy.

0:40:200:40:25

If he doesn't sell the ivory, he will lose today's competition.

0:40:250:40:28

We'll find out very shortly whether David managed to seal the deal.

0:40:280:40:32

Right now it's time to count up how much our battling experts have made

0:40:320:40:35

and reveal which one of them will be today's winner.

0:40:350:40:39

Philip spent a total of just over £800 in the saleroom.

0:40:410:40:45

David, on the other hand, parted with over 955.

0:40:450:40:49

Don't forget, all of their profits today will be going to charity.

0:40:490:40:53

So without further ado, it's time to reveal who is today's Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion.

0:40:570:41:03

How are you feeling about your auction? How did you get on?

0:41:030:41:06

The auction was good. The auction was really good, actually.

0:41:060:41:08

But this dealing thing is completely alien to me.

0:41:080:41:10

Get over, you're a natural!

0:41:100:41:12

No, we went to that auction, and I just panicked and

0:41:120:41:16

I nearly bought something that I could well have died with.

0:41:160:41:20

I tell you what, I did panic. I'm supposed to be the one that's happy down there on the floor.

0:41:200:41:24

I lost the plot and bought loads of stuff at the end of it.

0:41:240:41:26

I tell you what, those serviette napkin rings. Remember those?

0:41:260:41:30

-Oh, my life. I got ridiculed the through the streets of Worcester with those.

-Did you get out of them?

0:41:300:41:33

Eventually I made a tenner profit but at one point in time, I thought I was going to lose £50 - £100.

0:41:330:41:37

A real eye-opener for me.

0:41:370:41:39

I don't know, I think you slipped in quite naturally, actually.

0:41:390:41:42

You're very modest. Are you ready?

0:41:420:41:43

-Go on, then.

-This is the moment.

0:41:430:41:47

-3, 2, 1.

-You have absolutely banjaxed me, haven't you?

0:41:470:41:50

That's what we call a £200 stuffing, that.

0:41:500:41:53

It's not bad going.

0:41:530:41:55

-Sulking! I've had enough.

0:41:550:41:57

So, Devilish David is victorious today and his ivory figurine

0:41:580:42:04

that he bought for £350 helped him to seal victory.

0:42:040:42:09

-We will go for 445.

-No, George.

0:42:090:42:12

That's what I can go to. No more.

0:42:120:42:15

Do you want to go home with George Bond for £445?

0:42:150:42:20

-There you are. She's spoken to you.

-She has.

-And?

0:42:200:42:24

Give me your money.

0:42:240:42:26

There you are. Deal done.

0:42:260:42:27

A very tidy profit of over £90 was an excellent result for David.

0:42:270:42:32

He might have won the challenge, but both our experts made

0:42:320:42:35

some stellar sales and all their profits will be going to charity.

0:42:350:42:40

My charity is the Witham Hall, which is Barnard Castle's town hall.

0:42:410:42:45

It's a great place for young and old to meet and to have a good time.

0:42:450:42:49

I love Worcester and Worcestershire.

0:42:490:42:51

The charity I've chosen to support is our local hospice, St Richard's Hospice.

0:42:510:42:55

It's been a closely fought battle today, but the competition doesn't stop here.

0:42:550:42:58

Because tomorrow our experts will go head-to-head again at a car-boot sale.

0:42:580:43:03

Everything you want to see - hand-made, 40 quid a go. Happy, happy, happy.

0:43:030:43:08

Heads.

0:43:100:43:13

-That is the story of my life!

-To end up paying £15 from a car boot is a bit of a shock.

0:43:130:43:19

The joy of car-boots.

0:43:190:43:22

Subtitles by Red Bed Media Ltd

0:43:220:43:25

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:250:43:29

Two experts from the world of antiques go head-to-head in a competition to raise money for a charity of their choice. They are challenged to buy antiques and collectibles in a different location each day, and at the end of the week the duelling dealers compete to raise the most money at a special one-off event. Once the deals are done, one expert will be crowned the Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion.

Going head-to-head at an antiques auction are experts Phil Serrell and David Harper.