Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: Auction Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is


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Charlie Ross vs Paul Hayes: Auction

Antiques challenge where experts go head-to-head to raise money for a charity of their choice. Paul Hayes takes on auctioneer Charlie Ross at his own game at an Essex saleroom.


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'This is the show that pitches the country's favourite antiques experts

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'against each other in a battle for profit,

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'and gives you an inside view on the secrets of the trade.

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'Coming up, our dealers let you in on the keys to success at auction.'

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The secret is don't lose your concentration.

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'They show you the tricks they'll play to gain an advantage.'

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-It's horrible, Charlie.

-Is it English or French?

-It's horrible!

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'And how to get more from a deal than you ever expected.'

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-I was going to ask you 150!

-Oh, God!

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'Today's clash pitches two dealing dandies against one another.

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'They'll be wheeling and dealing to see who makes the biggest profit

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'from buying and selling antiques.

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'This is going to be a battle between north and south.

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'The suave, smooth-talking charmer from the home counties...'

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If I sell it for three times that, I'll take you out to dinner.

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'..versus Lancashire's blue-eyed boy.'

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Chin up!

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'They'll risk their reputations and their hard-earned cash

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'as they attempt to out-fox each other with their dealing daring-do.

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'Today's battleground is Sworder's auction house in rural Essex,

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'where 500 weird and wonderful lots are about to go under the hammer.

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'They've up to £1,000 of their own money to spend.

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'Their mission over a week - to make the most profit to go to charity.

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'In today's clash of the dealers, there can only be one winner.

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'Charlie Ross and Paul Hayes,

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'it's time to put your money where your mouth is.'

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Well, here we are, Stansted, Mountfitchet. The sun is nearly out.

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-And I have got £1,000 in my pocket, burning a huge hole.

-Snap!

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-It's taken a long time to save up.

-What are you going to spend it on?

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-Porcelain, a bit of silver - nice small items, I think.

-Really?

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I'm going to buy some great big whacking bits of furniture.

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-If it doesn't go in your pocket, don't buy it!

-You're lazy.

-No.

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Shift three wardrobes and you've done yourself an injury.

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'It's all very jovial, but don't be fooled.

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'Once our gladiators enter the auction arena, the gloves are off.'

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After you.

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'The first thing our seasoned pros want to do is to have a thorough search through the lots.

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'They dream of finding hidden treasures, known as sleepers -

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'high-worth items that no-one else has spotted.

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'But if you get it wrong,

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'you could end up with serious egg on your face.'

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Every time I think I've found a sleeper, everybody else has found it

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or I make a mistake.

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I remember buying a long-case clock thinking, "This is so reasonable. £50!" Nobody else bidding!

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One or two people smiling.

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I paid for it, slid the hood off,

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and it had a battery movement.

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'Let's hope you're well past making mistakes like those, Charlie, old bean.

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'The Man from Morecambe is rifling through the lots,

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'aware that victory hinges

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'on hunting down the most profitable pieces.

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'He's focused on his strategy of buying porcelain.'

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There's one great porcelain factory out of the north of Ireland.

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This was made in Fermanagh, and it was quite a private industry.

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They came up with this wonderful paste.

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It's almost like an oyster shell decoration.

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Their inspiration was from organic forms and things found by the sea.

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You get seashells.

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You get sea horses.

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A tip - look for the black back stamp.

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The green stuff is the more modern.

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That little lot must be 100 quid there.

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That's definitely one to look for.

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'Across the room, Charlie's homed in on a bizarre mixed lot,

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'which includes a birdcage, a gramophone and an old mangle.

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'It's hardly furniture, but it's set that charming pulse a-racing.'

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This is SENSATIONAL!

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A Victorian doll's Bath chair.

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What I really like is the age. I love the original condition.

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Also, I'm not certain I've ever seen anything quite like this before.

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It's rather quaint. The more I look at it, the more wacky I find it.

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£50 to £100? It's not REALLY furniture, is it?

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But it's more furniture than a cup and saucer,

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so we'll swing that one.

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'Well, the Charmer's fallen for a Victorian relic

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'that's gathered a century of dust - each to their own!

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'The tea ware shelves are like a candy shop for his opposition.

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'Paul homes in on some pre-Victorian silver.'

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Isn't that fantastic quality?

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Beautiful, beautiful.

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This is a lovely Sheffield plate 1820, 1830 tea set.

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Shell and rococo gadrooned. Look at that little butterfly!

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'The Sheffield plate tea set has an estimate of £100 to £200.

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'Now the auction is about to start.

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'Our boys have viewed the lots and picked out their favourites for profit potential.'

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We start with lot 1...

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'Guy is our auctioneer, renowned for his no-nonsense approach.'

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Going to be a long day. Any bids?

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'One of Paul's targets is about to come up - the Belleek porcelain.'

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Belleek tea ware is lot three. 30? 20? 20 I'm bid...

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-There they are, 20 quid.

-..Two anywhere...?

-Must be!

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'What's this? Charlie's jumped in!'

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-It's well worth that.

-..Selling on the Belleek...

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'Paul is known for his good manners,

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'but it looks like he's handing his opponent the Belleek on a plate.'

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-It is modern, you know.

-Yeah.

-..At 45.

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-Well done. 48. Sold at 48.

-It IS modern.

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-Sorry about that.

-I'll give you £60 for it now!

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'The blue-eyed boy gets there with a daring last-second bid.

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'He snatches the porcelain from the Charmer's grasp

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'and even apologises for doing so.

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'Cost, just over £59, with saleroom fees and tax thrown in.

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'Remember, our duelling dealers are risking their own money.

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'The stakes get higher with every buy.

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'Another of Paul's targets comes up - the Sheffield tea set.'

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Electroplated tea set, lot 25...

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'Just look at the way the Charmer's eyeing his rival. What's he up to?'

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-..110...

-Oh, you swine!

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'Charlie's barged in!'

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..150. 160.

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-170...

-'And there's another bidder.'

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-No. It's too much for me.

-..170. Lady in the room. 180...

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'Look at Charlie. He's loving this!'

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..190? Selling at £180...

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-Sold and away.

-Oh, that's a lot of money!

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-Sounds like a lot of money to me.

-Thank you very much(!)

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'Even Guy thinks our boy paid a lot!

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'He's blown more than a quarter of his money.

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'This could be auction fever,

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'when bidders get carried away and go way over their spending limit.

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'And Paul might not be the only one affected.'

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My Victorian doll's Bath chair is getting closer!

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'There's no estimate for the mixed lot,

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'but he doesn't want to pay more than £100, top whack.'

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Lot 98, Victorian doll's Bath chair and the other items.

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-80, I'm bid. Five anywhere? Five.

-He's bid 80 already.

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90. Five. 100. 110.

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-120. 130...

-'That's scuppered that plan, then!'

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..£140 I'm bid. In the centre at 140. 150.

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-Oh, no!

-Stop pulling faces. Just bid.

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'Guy doesn't mince his words.'

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..170.

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180.

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£180... Sold at 180.

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That's typical "getting carried away in an auction".

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'Too right, Charlie, old bean!

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'That's over a fifth of your money gone on your first buy!

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'Guy the auctioneer has this sale gathering speed like an express train.

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'And he's got no intention of applying the brakes.'

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80. Five. 90...

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'Punters and experts have to have their wits about them.

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'If you spot something, you've got to be as fast as lighting.'

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An interesting bit of miniature furniture over there.

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An escritoire. They've called it a secretaire, escritoire.

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I imagine it's not the quality to be fitted inside.

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If it made £30 or £40, I'd buy it.

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'Charlie also spots profit in an Edwardian dome-topped mantel clock

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'that's up next.

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'Auction estimate £100 to £150.'

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The bid at 120...

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Thank you, sir.

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'Charlie bagged the clock for...

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'He's in high spirits and can't resist a gander at his purchase.'

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195, miniature secretaire...

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Ooh, gosh! I was about to talk about the clock!

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'Come on, Charlie! Keep your wits about you!'

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18. 20. I'm selling it, giving it away...

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22. Five. Eight. 30. Two?

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'Charlie's out! That'll have to be the one that got away.'

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The secret is don't lose your concentration.

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I've already missed one lot.

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That clock's going well worth the money, and I was thinking about something else.

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'With Charlie's focus straying,

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'the Man from Morecambe is straight in to seize the advantage.'

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60. Five. 70. Five...

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'In his sights, a pair of miniature portraits, one 18th century,

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'the other Edwardian - auction estimate, £60 to £100.'

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Fingers crossed. It's noisy in here, so, hopefully, people might miss this one.

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20 I'm bid. Five. 30. Five.

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40. Five. 50. Five. 60...

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-'Well, he's nodding away merrily.'

-..80. Five.

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90. Five. 100. And ten.

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110. A bit more than I wanted... Go on. I need to buy something.

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-150...

-150. That's my last bid. I'm going to buy it, I think.

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'Blimey, Paul! That's twice as much as you wanted to pay.'

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'Auction fever strikes again and it seems that both our dealers have caught the bug.

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'After starting each with £1,000 of their own money,

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'Paul has bought three lots and spent almost half his budget.'

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'Charlie has bought two lots.'

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'This great battle is only just beginning.'

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'Charlie and Paul's challenge is to buy antiques at auction,

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'then sell their pieces to see who can make the most profit.

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'Our dynamic duo rifled through the lots to see which items might yield the biggest profit

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'and which items they should bid on.

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'Charlie's trying to stick to his strategy of buying furniture.

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'He's seen a mirror that looks Georgian, but this pro knows better.'

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We'll probably find it's a late 19th or early 20th-century...mirror.

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It is. You can see the strengthening bars.

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It's been broken a couple of times, but it appears to be all there.

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£60 to £80.

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I'd pay £60 to £80 for that.

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'In the fevered hubbub of the auction,

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'the Man from Morecambe is ready to gamble more of his cash.

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'He's set his sights on a pocket-sized lead plaque.'

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I'm listening out for 216, which is the next lot.

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Which is made from the Temple Bar... I'll tell you in a second.

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I'm getting excited! I can't get me words out!

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'Deep breaths, Paul, cos we're off.'

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Commemorative lead plaque from the Temple Bar.

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60. Five.

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-70. Five. 80. Five.

-Yes, 85.

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-90. Selling...

-90, here we go. Nobody else, please.

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For £90.

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'He's got it. The lead plaque cost just over £111, with the premium.'

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Let me show you what I just bought.

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It's called the Temple Bar. Come this way.

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'Meanwhile, Charlie's bidding on a set of BSA motorcycle tools.'

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Selling at 18...

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'It doesn't fit with his strategy,

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'but the Charmer has snapped up another purchase for...

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'Flushed with success, Paul is admiring his lead plaque.'

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-Made from the Temple Bar. See that?

-No. Did you buy it?

-Yes.

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Isn't that a wonderful thing?

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Made from the lead roof that came off the Temple Bar monument.

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Erected 1672, demolished in 1878, and they made that.

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I read it in the catalogue. It was the first thing I was going to look at and I walked straight past.

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I thought anybody that's in the legal profession. Give it a polish.

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Trawl that round the courts. A great thing.

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Too much money, but a great thing.

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-Everything's too much money with you. You're buying the round next!

-'Charlie, you rotter!'

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I don't think that's too much money. I think that's a damn good buy.

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Because judges have got lots of money, and it's got such history!

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I DID spot it in the catalogue and did I walk straight past it?

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I'm such a plonker! I think he's better than I am.

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'Don't beat yourself up, Charlie! Onwards and upwards.

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'It seems both our duelling dealers

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'have been playing more mind games than they've been letting on.

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'Paul never said furniture was in his strategy,

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'but Charlie caught him eyeing up an Edwardian card table.'

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"I'm not going to buy anything that won't go in my pocket!"

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-You've been caught out!

-You've rumbled me.

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You swine! I quite like that little envelope table.

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-It's horrible.

-Is it English or French?

-It's horrible.

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There's a French escutcheon.

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In the back, there's a bag of sovereigns. Keep that to yourself.

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He does talk a load of nonsense! He wants to buy this!

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On the other hand, so do I.

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'Ooh, the plot thickens, as our crafty pair fight for the advantage.

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'Speaking of crafty, looks like the Charmer's happy to go off strategy

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'if he spots something that screams profit.'

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A teddy bear by the most famous maker, Steiff.

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Some people call is "Shteef". There's the button!

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I can hear old Paul saying, "It's not furniture, is it?"

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Not everything can be furniture.

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'Whatever it takes, Charlie. You press on.

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'The Man from Morecambe hasn't abandoned his strategy, though.

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'He's just spotted a piece that's well and truly pocket-sized.'

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Look at that! What a beauty! This is a gentleman's pocket watch.

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It would sit on his albert chain on his waistcoat.

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It's a demi-hunter or a half-hunter.

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This aperture would allow you to take it out of your pocket

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and tell the time without revealing the delicate insides,

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to protect it from damage and so on.

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If I press this button on the top... It's a screw wind, 1910, 1900.

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It says 9, which is 9-carat.

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Then, more importantly, what I'm looking for is the maker.

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It's Rolex, a very important maker, so that really increases the value.

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I'm going to set a budget of 350.

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If it goes for less, I'll have it. I think that's a beautiful watch.

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'The auction estimate is £200 to £400,

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'a mighty chunk out of Paul's £1,000 budget.

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'And he's not the only one who's clocked it.'

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It's not an item, really, that's likely to show a profit.

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It's too much of an obvious item.

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I think I'm wasting my time here.

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'The watch is all yours to go for, Paul, but beware,

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'your opponent doesn't think there's any profit to be had from it.

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'Back in the saleroom, the auction is speeding along.'

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Five. 30...

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'The Man from Morecambe is steeling himself to take a 9-carat gamble.

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'He's got his heart set on that gold pocket watch

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'and is prepared to pay up to 350 smackers.'

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I start the bidding at £300. I'll take 20. Anywhere?

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'£300 is a mightily high starting price.

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'Before our blue-eyed boy knows what's hit him, the bidding races past his £350 maximum.'

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380. Keep going. At 380.

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Commission bid.

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400, if you want it?

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'Oh! And Paul's jumped in!'

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For £420...

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One more. One more.

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-'This is way past Paul's cut-off!'

-440. 460.

-No, it's gone.

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'Charlie's gone from shock to delight.

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'And Guy is still piling on the pressure.'

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-480 to bid?

-480? No, that's 500!

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-Selling at 460. 480?

-Go on. One more.

-Good man.

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'Oh, my goodness!'

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I admire a man with a weak will! It's yours!

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-BANGS GAVEL

-480!

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'Well might Charlie joke.

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'With a hefty auction premium on top, the watch cost Paul...

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'..instantly taking him £171 over his £1,000 spending limit.

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'A dazed Mr Hayes exits for a breath of fresh air.'

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That's the secret - not to get carried away with saleroom fever.

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Guy's a fantastic auctioneer.

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He pushed me over a little bit more than I was expecting to pay.

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It needs a little bit of restoration.

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It's THE name in watches, and I think I bought the best item here.

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'Time will tell, Paul, but first things first.

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'By going £171 over your budget limit of £1,000,

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'you have broken the rules.

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'Oh, dear!

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'With Charlie's agreement,

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'Paul decides to drop the miniature portraits he bought for £185,

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'bringing his total spend back down to just under £986.'

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'The Man from Morecambe is now spent up and out of the buying.

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'The Charmer has an opponent-free run of the auction and around £600 to spend.'

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Selling at £20. All done at 20...?

0:21:370:21:40

'Charlie's 1950s Steiff teddy bear is up next.

0:21:400:21:44

'Auction estimate £100 to £200.'

0:21:440:21:47

-£90 is bid...

-'The Charmer's straight in there.'

0:21:470:21:50

..All done at £95? BANGS GAVEL

0:21:500:21:53

'The half-century-old teddy cost Charlie...'

0:21:530:21:59

'In the space of just ten minutes, Charlie goes on a buying bonanza,

0:22:010:22:06

'spending over £200 on three lots.

0:22:060:22:10

'A 19th-century occasional table for...

0:22:100:22:15

'..the mahogany wall mirror he spotted earlier for...

0:22:150:22:20

'..and a Victorian bamboo whatnot for...

0:22:200:22:26

'Paul can only watch on, as charming Charlie hoovers up the bargains,

0:22:260:22:31

'including the card table both of them were eyeing up.'

0:22:310:22:35

Are we all done and finished at 200?

0:22:350:22:38

'Ooh! That's gotta hurt!'

0:22:380:22:41

He's a dark horse, that one!

0:22:410:22:44

200 quid?

0:22:440:22:46

'After paying £247, including auction extras,

0:22:480:22:52

'Charlie's counting on the card table for serious profit.

0:22:520:22:56

'Now today's auction is finished.

0:22:560:22:59

'Charlie and Paul started out with £1,000 of their own money...'

0:23:000:23:06

'After sacrificing a purchase to correct his overspend,

0:23:100:23:14

'the Man from Morecambe's final outlay is...

0:23:140:23:19

'As they exit the field of battle, Charlie and Paul

0:23:200:23:24

'seize the chance to crow about their buys.'

0:23:240:23:27

-Charlie, was that part of your strategy, to buy a pram?

-No.

0:23:270:23:31

-It's the first thing I saw.

-Really?

-I thought it was just fabulous.

0:23:310:23:37

-What will you do with it?

-Sell it!

-BOTH LAUGH

0:23:370:23:41

'Charlie wants to see the watch that cost Paul an arm and a leg.'

0:23:410:23:46

Ah! I had a look at this. I assumed I couldn't afford it.

0:23:460:23:51

It took a man of immense wealth.

0:23:510:23:53

-It's about 600 quid.

-It's a lot of money, isn't it?

0:23:530:23:56

-If I win the Pools before you've sold this, I'll buy it!

-Right.

0:23:560:24:01

-We'll see. Can I have a lift?

-Do you want a ride?

-Why not?

0:24:010:24:05

'Now Charlie and Paul must try to make

0:24:050:24:08

'as much profit as they can,

0:24:080:24:11

'and it will all be going to the charities of their choice.

0:24:110:24:15

'As well as his watch, Paul will be selling a collection of Belleek,

0:24:150:24:20

'an electroplated three-piece tea set

0:24:200:24:24

'and a lead plaque commemorating the Temple Bar monument.

0:24:240:24:28

'As well as the items in his Victorian dolls chair lot,

0:24:280:24:32

'Charlie will be selling an Edwardian dome-top mantel clock,

0:24:320:24:37

'some motorcycle tools,

0:24:370:24:40

'a 1950s Steiff teddy bear,

0:24:400:24:44

'a 19th-century occasional table,

0:24:440:24:47

'a mahogany fret-framed wall mirror,

0:24:470:24:50

'a Victorian bamboo corner whatnot

0:24:500:24:54

'and an Edwardian envelope card table.'

0:24:540:24:58

'Charlie and Paul will be making every effort to sell their items,

0:25:010:25:05

'putting deals together by phone and e-mail.

0:25:050:25:10

'But until the money's changed hands, no deal is truly sealed.

0:25:100:25:15

'With only four purchases in his selling arsenal,

0:25:150:25:19

'Paul is under tremendous pressure to make as much as possible

0:25:190:25:24

'from every sale if he wants to win today's challenge.

0:25:240:25:27

'As soon as he returns to the bracing elements of Morecambe,

0:25:270:25:32

'he's primed for battle.'

0:25:320:25:34

Charlie Ross, I'm coming to get you!

0:25:340:25:37

'In the heart of rural Oxfordshire, things are more laid-back,

0:25:390:25:43

'as the Ross household arise to another sun-kissed morning.'

0:25:430:25:47

I'm off to see the Skipper, aka John Deeley.

0:25:470:25:51

-I'm going to sell him the table.

-Well, give him a big kiss from me.

0:25:510:25:55

Have a good day. Bye, darling.

0:25:550:25:58

'But don't be fooled by the chirpy cheer.

0:25:580:26:01

'Charlie is no wallflower when it comes to making profits.

0:26:010:26:06

'A local farmer is about to feel the force of the Charlie Ross charm offensive.'

0:26:060:26:11

-Skipper! Good morning to you. How are you?

-Very good.

0:26:140:26:18

-Did your face light up when you saw this?

-Yes. What have we got today?

0:26:180:26:24

Another party piece!

0:26:240:26:26

What we're going to do is most probably replace this one.

0:26:260:26:30

-What about doing a deal, Skipper?

-Ah.

0:26:300:26:33

I was looking on the internet and I was thinking

0:26:330:26:36

on a catalogue it would be 395, 425, something like that?

0:26:360:26:40

-So...

-We're having tough times on the farm these days.

0:26:400:26:45

-I think lower.

-You farmers!

0:26:450:26:47

-What would you be happy to pay?

-A couple of hundred.

0:26:470:26:51

-A couple of hundred quid?

-Yes.

-I'll take it!

0:26:510:26:55

Skipper, I know you well enough to say this. I was going to ask 150.

0:26:550:27:01

Oh, God! I never win.

0:27:010:27:03

'Charlie is delighted. He's got both guns blazing on his old school chum.

0:27:030:27:10

'His 19th-century table purchased for £56 more than doubles its money.

0:27:100:27:15

'Up north, Paul is thinking through the tactics of his campaign.

0:27:150:27:19

'He has to squeeze every last penny out of his four lots

0:27:190:27:23

'if he's to have any chance of beating his rival.

0:27:230:27:27

'First up is the electroplated tea set with its butterfly design.

0:27:270:27:32

'Paul has applied his immense local knowledge to find a buyer.

0:27:320:27:36

'He's headed for the butterfly house in Williamson Park.

0:27:360:27:40

'He's hoping his selling campaign will take flight.'

0:27:400:27:44

Sharon, I feel like I'm on me holidays. I've never seen so many butterflies.

0:27:440:27:50

# Love is like a butterfly As soft and gentle as a sigh... #

0:27:500:27:56

'Paul's selling strategy is simple but risky.

0:27:560:28:00

'Unlike selling to another dealer based on an item's profit potential,

0:28:000:28:05

'he's going directly to the person known in the trade as the "end user" -

0:28:050:28:10

'Sharon, manager of the butterfly house.

0:28:100:28:13

'This is where the most profit can be made,

0:28:130:28:17

'but only if your buyer actually likes what you're offering.'

0:28:170:28:22

-Just have a look at that. Can you see what I'm on about?

-Yes.

0:28:240:28:29

-Fantastic.

-Isn't it beautiful?

0:28:290:28:31

-Can you see the connection there?

-I can.

0:28:310:28:35

-Is it your cup of tea?

-It is!

0:28:350:28:38

'Strike one to Paul.

0:28:390:28:41

'The lady likes his pot, but will his gamble pay off?

0:28:410:28:45

'Charlie chose the safer path to profit by selling his Steiff bear

0:28:450:28:50

'to a specialist dealer and made a small profit of...

0:28:500:28:54

'This is Mr Morecambe's first chance to gain the upper hand today.

0:28:540:28:59

'He's got to make as much profit as he possibly can.'

0:28:590:29:03

If I asked £275, how does that sound?

0:29:030:29:07

I...I think we could stretch to that.

0:29:070:29:11

That would be all right. That's fantastic.

0:29:110:29:14

'What? No haggle?

0:29:140:29:16

'Paul's high-risk strategy has delivered over £50 of profit.

0:29:160:29:21

'But if his buyer was that quick to agree,

0:29:210:29:25

'could our boy have missed a trick by not asking for a higher price?

0:29:250:29:29

'But both our mighty warriors are off to a cracking start.

0:29:290:29:35

'They're hunting down deals that will make dreams of victory

0:29:350:29:39

'a reality as, once again, they hit the road.'

0:29:390:29:44

'First to make a potentially profitable pit-stop is Charlie,

0:29:470:29:52

'who's dropping in on an antiques dealer contact of his - go get 'em, Charmer!'

0:29:520:29:58

The thing about envelope tables is people don't know how to open them.

0:29:580:30:04

A little twist. One piece lifts up slightly, and you open it easily.

0:30:040:30:10

No damage to the middle.

0:30:100:30:12

-Had a bit of a nibble.

-Need a new bit of baize in there.

0:30:120:30:16

What will you do? Keep the edge?

0:30:160:30:19

That's a very nice feature.

0:30:190:30:22

To have that done is expensive.

0:30:220:30:25

So we can keep that and replace the centre.

0:30:250:30:28

'It's like watching a master at work.

0:30:280:30:31

'Charlie has got this fellow dealer to think about what he'll do with the item after he's bought it.

0:30:310:30:38

'A cunning tactic, but will it work?'

0:30:380:30:41

-£400, I'd like for it.

-330?

0:30:410:30:43

-340?

-Could you go to 350?

0:30:430:30:48

Yeah. I'm splitting hairs if I don't. Yes.

0:30:480:30:52

I'm really happy with that and I know you'll do the right work on it.

0:30:520:30:57

I hope you get a decent price for it.

0:30:570:31:00

'A great result for the Charmer. A cool £103 profit in the bank.

0:31:000:31:05

'He's burning rubber now!

0:31:050:31:08

'Mr Morecambe has pulled up in London

0:31:080:31:11

'with the aim of selling his Temple Bar plaque.

0:31:110:31:14

'He's arranged to meet Peter,

0:31:140:31:17

'a collector of historical and architectural memorabilia.

0:31:170:31:20

'Where better to attempt the deal than at the Temple Bar itself?'

0:31:200:31:25

It's only been here since 2004.

0:31:250:31:27

It was built originally by Christopher Wren,

0:31:270:31:31

as one of the seven gates of London, and positioned in Fleet Street.

0:31:310:31:37

You've got horse-drawn buses and carts all trying to get through this gate.

0:31:370:31:43

The Corporation of London decided it would have to be moved.

0:31:430:31:47

They gave it to Sir Henry Meux of Theobald's Park in Hertfordshire

0:31:470:31:53

on the understanding that he would rebuild it at the entrance

0:31:530:31:58

to his grounds, and so he did.

0:31:580:32:01

For 100 years, that's where it stood.

0:32:010:32:04

Recently, the Temple Bar Trust repurchased the Bar

0:32:040:32:09

and transported back into London.

0:32:090:32:11

'Like Charlie, Paul's got his potential buyer on his favourite subject.

0:32:110:32:17

'Will it be enough to convince him to buy the plaque at a great price?

0:32:170:32:22

'With just two more items to sell, Paul's got to make this count,

0:32:220:32:26

'or the game may be up.

0:32:260:32:28

'Because Charlie has taken his BSA motorcycle tool kit to a friend

0:32:280:32:33

'who collects vintage motorcycles.'

0:32:330:32:35

If you say, "Charlie, these are worth ten quid,"

0:32:350:32:38

I've got nowhere else to go, Bob.

0:32:380:32:41

I thought, hopefully, they'd make 30 quid.

0:32:410:32:44

-I hate to see a grown man cry, so OK.

-Are you happy?

-Yeah.

0:32:440:32:48

You won't go to the pub and say, "Charlie took me to the cleaners"?

0:32:480:32:53

That'll make a damn good fishing weight, if nothing else!

0:32:530:32:58

'Charlie's made a nice little profit from that deal,

0:32:580:33:03

'but he's not about to rest on his laurels.

0:33:030:33:07

'Our old rock 'n' roller has got deals to get to.'

0:33:070:33:11

# Get your motor running

0:33:110:33:13

# Head out on the highway

0:33:140:33:16

-# Looking for adventure... #

-Catch me if you can, Hayes!

0:33:170:33:21

# ..Whatever comes our way... #

0:33:210:33:24

'Charlie is feeling confident, and it's hard to blame him.

0:33:240:33:29

'If Paul can't deliver a serious profit on this crucial sale,

0:33:290:33:33

'his dreams of victory will be shattered.

0:33:330:33:36

'What our blue-eyed boy needs is some luck, divine intervention,

0:33:360:33:40

'an omen, a sign.'

0:33:400:33:42

'No? Looks like you're on your own, then, Paul.'

0:33:470:33:52

I was hoping for around the 250 mark.

0:33:520:33:55

Well, let's say 200. That's a compromise.

0:33:550:33:59

Um... You couldn't go to 250?

0:33:590:34:02

-LAUGHS

-I'm trying my best.

-Go on, then.

0:34:020:34:05

'Oh, my word!

0:34:050:34:07

'Good work, Paul! He may be a gentleman, but when his back's against the wall,

0:34:070:34:13

'he pulls out the big guns and fires himself back into contention.

0:34:130:34:18

'With hopes of victory renewed,

0:34:180:34:20

'our hero heads into one of London's most renowned antiques centres.

0:34:200:34:26

'He doubles his money again when he sells his Belleek for £120.

0:34:260:34:31

'So far, Charlie has sold four items...

0:34:340:34:38

'Paul has sold three items...

0:34:400:34:43

'..but he's only got one more item left to sell.'

0:34:460:34:51

'It's the infamous gold pocket watch.

0:34:530:34:57

'Paul needs something pretty special to deny the Charmer victory.

0:34:570:35:01

'But Charlie's campaign is not without its problems.

0:35:010:35:06

'Our dapper dealer may have lost his way.'

0:35:060:35:09

Sharon the mirror lady? I can't believe Sharon the mirror lady is there.

0:35:090:35:14

Does anybody know Sharon the mirror lady?

0:35:140:35:17

Ah. Antiques.

0:35:170:35:19

Knock, knock.

0:35:200:35:22

-Sharon?

-Charlie Ross?

0:35:230:35:25

-It's me.

-Hello. Lovely to see you.

0:35:250:35:28

'Having just opened her first shop,

0:35:280:35:30

'Sharon is relatively new to the antiques game.

0:35:300:35:34

'Rather than take advantage, old-school gentleman Charlie is doling out some useful tips.'

0:35:340:35:41

I'll tell you a tip.

0:35:410:35:43

When you alter a price, take the label off, write the new price on

0:35:430:35:49

and rewrite it.

0:35:490:35:51

People love buying a pair of trousers reduced from 40 quid to 35.

0:35:510:35:56

-But not antiques.

-You know what it says?

0:35:560:35:59

"Haven't sold this, have they? Been here a while."

0:35:590:36:03

So, what I would do,

0:36:030:36:06

is put a different label on it.

0:36:060:36:08

'A top tip, but don't think Mr Ross has gone soft.

0:36:080:36:12

'The advice might have been free, but his mirror certainly isn't.'

0:36:120:36:16

I was hoping to try and get about 250 for it.

0:36:160:36:21

-Oh, no. I don't think 250.

-Try me. No?

0:36:220:36:25

I'll sell it to you for...

0:36:250:36:28

..£195, which just tweaks it below 200, and I won't take 190.

0:36:290:36:36

190 cash.

0:36:360:36:38

-HE LAUGHS

-I just said I wouldn't take 190.

0:36:380:36:41

190 cash.

0:36:410:36:43

-Do you want to go away and think?

-No, I don't. Give me a kiss.

0:36:450:36:50

Done!

0:36:500:36:51

'Well, the kiss alone was worth it,

0:36:510:36:54

'and the Charmer gets a solid profit of...

0:36:540:36:58

'Charlie's profits have been steady rather than incredible.

0:36:580:37:02

'Paul's bout of auction fever

0:37:020:37:05

'has left him needing a spectacular profit

0:37:050:37:08

'on his fourth and last item - one 19th-century gold pocket watch,

0:37:080:37:13

'purchased for a massive £590.

0:37:130:37:16

'He's arranged an appointment with a London dealer in vintage timepieces.

0:37:160:37:21

'Go get 'em, tiger!'

0:37:210:37:23

Look at that!

0:37:240:37:26

When I open the back up, those are the golden words - Rolex.

0:37:260:37:31

The truth is, what everybody's really looking for

0:37:310:37:35

is wrist watches by Rolex, especially this period.

0:37:350:37:38

1920s, '30s. It's a reasonably nice watch.

0:37:380:37:42

Unfortunately, the enamel around the dial is badly damaged.

0:37:420:37:48

It can be restored, but it's a question of money.

0:37:480:37:51

If that was mint, what would you be looking at?

0:37:510:37:55

Absolutely mint condition, like the day it was made, 1,500 to 2,500.

0:37:550:37:59

That's a massive amount of money.

0:37:590:38:02

'Paul's watch might need a little TLC,

0:38:020:38:05

'but he would only need to get close to £1,500

0:38:050:38:09

'to snatch a mighty victory from the jaws of defeat.'

0:38:090:38:13

-ROAR

-Do you mind?

0:38:130:38:15

'Charlie's combined lot of the Victorian doll's pram,

0:38:150:38:19

'gramophone, toy mangle and birdcage cost him just over £220.

0:38:190:38:24

'The next step in his campaign is to try and sell the doll's pram.

0:38:240:38:29

'He's gone to the man who bid against him, Alan, who owns a toy museum.

0:38:290:38:34

'The problem is,

0:38:340:38:36

'the only thing they agree on is their choice of trousers.'

0:38:360:38:41

-I would be happy to sell it to you for 200 quid.

-HOW much?

0:38:410:38:46

-You're...! 2....? No. No way.

-You bid more than that.

0:38:460:38:50

There were four items - a birdcage, a record player,

0:38:500:38:54

there was that and that.

0:38:540:38:57

-Look at the hood.

-A tatty old thing.

0:38:570:39:00

You've got holes in it, covered in dirt.

0:39:000:39:03

-You haven't even tarted it up.

-You wouldn't want me to.

-That's true.

0:39:030:39:08

-If I had started doing this up, you wouldn't have entertained it.

-No.

0:39:080:39:12

-You're right.

-We both know that.

0:39:120:39:15

If I put that in the toy museum,

0:39:150:39:17

I'm not going to get one extra person come because of the pram.

0:39:170:39:22

-I'll visit you.

-Cos you're a nice guy, I'd give you £100 for the two.

0:39:220:39:27

'With both Charlie and Paul locked in last-minute deals,

0:39:270:39:31

'today's challenge could go either way.

0:39:310:39:35

'Charlie spent nearly all of his £1,000,

0:39:350:39:39

'but with this sale up in the air, he's far from home and dry.

0:39:390:39:44

'Paul had to give up one of his purchases

0:39:440:39:47

'after going over-budget on his pocket watch.

0:39:470:39:51

'It's that watch that will decide who is the winner.

0:39:510:39:55

'All of the profit that Charlie and Paul have made will go to a charity of their choice.

0:39:550:40:01

'Without further ado, time to find out who has made the most cash,

0:40:010:40:06

'and who is today's Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is champion!'

0:40:060:40:11

-Hey, how are you doing?

-How are you, mate?

-Good.

0:40:110:40:14

-Why are you looking so chipper?

-I'm a little bit nervous.

0:40:140:40:19

I know auctions are your thing.

0:40:190:40:22

-They aren't yours.

-No, they're not.

-WATCH out! There's a loss about.

0:40:220:40:27

I was put firmly in my place with that pocket watch by you and other people.

0:40:270:40:32

-What happened to your silver, was it a tea service?

-Silver tea service.

0:40:320:40:38

-Probably the nicest I've ever seen.

-Good profit?

-Great profit.

-What?

0:40:380:40:43

Shall we find out? I'll give you a run for your money, I think.

0:40:430:40:47

-I know this is your game. Shall I call it?

-Yeah.

-Three, two, one...

0:40:470:40:52

CHARLIE LAUGHS

0:40:520:40:55

-Swine!

-I've given you such a drubbing!

0:40:550:40:58

-I'm going to buy you a sausage roll.

-Well done, mate.

0:40:580:41:02

'So, it's a victory for Charlie.

0:41:020:41:04

'Alas, Paul's watch did not perform quite as well as he'd hoped.'

0:41:040:41:10

I wouldn't go to any more than £600.

0:41:100:41:13

'That deal of £600 gives poor old Paul a profit of just...

0:41:130:41:19

'Even though Charlie failed to sell his doll's pram to the toy museum,

0:41:190:41:24

'he did sell him the child's mangle for £35.

0:41:240:41:28

'While he failed to sell his birdcage, his gramophone was sold to a collector in the United States.

0:41:280:41:35

'He found a buyer for his Victorian doll's pram also in the USA,

0:41:350:41:41

'netting him a total profit of...

0:41:410:41:45

'Charlie also sold his Edwardian clock in an auction.

0:41:450:41:49

'It made a profit of...

0:41:490:41:52

'He failed to find a buyer for his Victorian whatnot.

0:41:520:41:57

'It's been a sterling performance from today's champion,

0:41:570:42:00

'Charlie the Charmer Ross.'

0:42:000:42:02

I win. I win. I win.

0:42:020:42:05

I win. I win. I win. You lose. You lose. You lose.

0:42:050:42:08

You lose. You lose. You lose. Ha ha ha ha!

0:42:080:42:12

'Thank you, Charlie.

0:42:120:42:14

'As for Mr Morecambe, well, there's always next time.'

0:42:140:42:19

You win some and you lose some.

0:42:190:42:22

I've made some good money for my charity.

0:42:220:42:25

Charlie, you've won this battle,

0:42:250:42:27

-but you haven't won the war.

-'That's the spirit.'

0:42:270:42:30

'Paul's got the chance for revenge tomorrow, when he and Charlie lock horns at a car-boot sale.'

0:42:300:42:36

-Are you open to offers?

-I am.

-Even from rude men like me?

0:42:360:42:41

Charlie's fallen on hard times. I'm sure he was wearing that yesterday.

0:42:410:42:45

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:010:43:04

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Two well-known experts from the world of antiques go head to head over a week of challenges to find out who can make the most profit buying and selling collectables, all of which will be donated to a charity of their choice. Our dealers are in a different buying location each day: an auction house, a car boot sale, a foreign antiques market and a UK antiques fair; they then sell their purchases for as much profit as possible. On Friday, the duelling experts compete to make the most profit in the ultimate dealers' showdown - a 48 hour buying and selling challenge. Once the deals are done, one expert will be crowned the Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is overall weekly champion.

Blue-eyed boy Paul Hayes takes on auctioneer Charlie Ross at his own game in a competion to discover who can cut the best deals for bargains bagged at an Essex saleroom.