Episode 16 Film 2011 with Claudia Winkleman


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Episode 16

Film news and reviews. Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh review Moneyball, The Deep Blue Sea and My Week With Marilyn. Plus Chris Hewitt counts down his top five sports films.


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Hello and welcome to Film 2011. We are live if you want to get in

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touch. The details are on the screen. Coming up tonight: Brad

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Pitt is looking for a home run in Moneyball. If we win with this team,

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we change the game for good. Everything is at stake for Rachel

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Weisz in the The Deep Blue Sea. not blaming you. There is dark

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comedy in 50/50. Me? Yes. That doesn't make any sense. I don't

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smoke. I don't drink. I recycle. Plus Stephen Frears talks about the

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making of My Beautiful Laundrette. First, Moneyball, starring and

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produced by Brad Pitt, based on the book by Michael Lewis. It is the

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story of Billy Beane, General Manager of the Oakland As. There

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are rich teams and there are poor teams. Then there's 50 feet of crap

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and then there's us. Welcome to Oakland! My job is to take this

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team to the Championship. I need more money. It is a classic

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underdog story. You have a team that has a $40 million payroll.

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It's never going to work. It is an unfair game. Billy is in the

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process of trying to figure out when the odds are stacked against

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you how do you even the playing field. Your goal should be to buy

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wins. Who are you? When I meet Brad's character I have all these

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ideas that are pretty pradical and pretty frowned upon. -- radical and

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pretty frowned upon. People are overlooked for a variety of biased

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reasons - age, appearance, personality. Of the 20,000 notable

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players for us to consider, there is a Championship team of 25 people

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that we could afford. Everyone else in baseball undervalues them.

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It is the saying the Earth is round instead of the Earth is flat. He

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makes me the youngest assistant GM ever. We are going to shake things

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up. Tell them. Want me to speak? When I point to you, yes. This is

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the new direction of the Oakland As. We are card counters and we are

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going to turn the odds on the casino. You don't put a team

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together with a computer. Adapt or die! Billy had the powers but the

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Peter character was the arsenal. They needed this together to pull

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this off. Billy says he will pay for him himself. When he sells him

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for more next year, he is keeping the profit. They are these two

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unlikely heroes, two Davids versus the one hundred Goliaths. We will

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call you back. Come on! They were courageous and they changed the way

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people thought about this stuff. are doing something unexpected and

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special and the whole city is feeling it. If we win with this

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team, we change the game for good. It was never a movie about baseball.

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It was about how to break people's expectations of what you are

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capable of by original thinking and courageous action. This better work.

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I'm kidding you. Danny, I don't understand sport.

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But I love, really love a sports film. You have a glint in your eye.

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I'm going to, if you are awake, brilliant - hi dad - if you are

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near a computer tweet in or e-mail. Let me say some sports films. Tin

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Cup. Come on. Rocky. Field of Dreams. If you build it, you know

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what is going to happen. True Blue. The Natural. There are hundreds and

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thousands. I don't know why I am talking about sports films because

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Moneyball is not a film about sport. Brad Pitt, it's beautiful, it's an

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exciting film. It is not a sports film but I would recommend it?

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Moneyball, whatever it is, it is not a sports movie. It is almost as

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if they had a post-it note on their head with a list of things they

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weren't going to do. There wasn't going to be the stadium clock,

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there wasn't going to be a cruel injury to the star player, there

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wasn't going to be a single moment of slow-motion. Fine, what's left?

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What we have got instead is this weirdly gripping film about the

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business of sport and the wound Rouse statistics. If anyone is

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still with us after that, it is also an excellent character study -

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- wonderous statistics. It is about Billy Beane. I think it is that, it

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is on that level that it works best. The thing about Billy Beane is that

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he doesn't like baseball either. His life has been wrapped up with

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baseball. When the passion is flowing and when the crowds are

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screaming, all the stuff that a sports movie would revel in, he

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likes to work out and he's kept up- to-date with the results on the

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phone. That is how he relates to the game. It is a business. He

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likes getting the better of people. He is not a baseball fan. It's

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about taking on the old guard, is it? That is what is so exciting.

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Brad Pitt almost said it is about taking on the old guard of

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Hollywood as well. A star is worth $20 million but it is looking at

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what people are really worth. It is worth saying Philip Seymour Hoffman

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is brilliant in it? Also I want to mention Aaron Sorkin. These

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individuals are symbols that are something a bit bigger. I don't

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know if it's got the same pop as The Social Network. It has got Brad

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Pitt. As a younger actor, he used to be self-conscious. He was trying

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to prove himself as an actor. It was always the hand motions. He's

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settled into his own skin a bit more. We will probably talk a lot

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about film stars on tonight's show. Moneyball wouldn't have happened

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without him. It wouldn't be half as interesting without him. I felt it

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was Sorkin-light. If you are a big fan and you love The West Wing and

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you are waiting for a "this is what it means to be American to play

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baseball" - there is none of that. You want to eat up the words?

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are right. For a confirmed Sorking fan, it's still recommended. Yes.

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Next, Terence Davies's adaptation of Terence Raligan's play The Deep

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It's about love. It's about three people who want different kinds of

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love from each other which is a kind of odd relationship, but that

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is what love can do and does do to you. It's about a woman who leaves

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security, she leaves her husband for a younger man who has no money

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and who is mentally unstable in many ways. She just falls in love.

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Freddie, darling, would you come home with me, please? No, I will

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not. You did not leave your husband. She finds sex at 40. It's

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overwhelming. It makes her experience a revelation and the

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revelation is that there can be sensual... I still love you. When I

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was looking for people, I saw Rachel by accident. I looked at her

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name. I Raj my manager and said, "Have you heard of someone called

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Rachel Weisz?" "You are the only one who hasn't." She read it, she

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rang me and she said I would do it. I read the play when Terence

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offered me this film. He did a beautiful adaptation of it. I know

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what it felt like, no primary colour for instance. Everything was

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washed out and really rather faded. I was in houses like that - dark,

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one light, that was it. I wanted to get that over more than anything

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else. A lot of people don't like what I do. One woman jumped up and

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said, "Why are you filming so slow and depressing?" I said it was a

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gift! It always leads to something ugly. What would you replace it

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with? A guarded enthusiasm. It's safer. But much duller. The Deep

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Blue Sea is an adaptation of the Terence Ratigan play from the 1950s.

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I think that is a bit unfair. For a start, I don't know what is wrong

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with that. It is more than very well filmed. It is beautifully

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filmed as cinema. Terence Davies, this is his territory, the early

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'50s. He's got this - he mentioned "luminous" - a good use of words.

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It was shabby as well. He brings that sense of 1950s and he brings

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the sense of London to life as well. So I think it's very wide of the

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mark to suggest that this is just a film with a play where they have

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parked the camera and let the actors do the rest. I don't think

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anyone but Terence Davies could have made this movie. More power to

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him. I thought it was beautiful, like you. I thought it was haunting.

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I thought Rachel Weisz was brilliant. That is a very difficult

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woman to pull off. Somebody who you believe because you are shouting,

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"Go for the bloke with the nice library and the fire who will love

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you forever! Are you mad?" She does it whole heartedly, she totally is

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believable. Also what I love, I have to mention this, Barbara who

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plays her mother-in-law, she might be the most terrifying character

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you will see all year? I hear you. The set is so rich and detailed

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that it almost overwhelms the play a bit. You are wrapped up in the

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creek of the leather arm share that it distracts you from what is going

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on. I will disagree with you about Rachel Weisz. It is a very

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difficult part to play. I don't quite buy it. I do... What? She

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loves him. Tom Hiddleston is incredibly well cast here. He nails

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perfectly that idea of playing the charismatic idiot. If you want to

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see a melodrama, see this instead! Top five time. This week, Chris

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picks his all-time favourite sports films which do contain some strong

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language. Movies and sport make a dream

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pairing. There is an inherent drama in sport that movies have been

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perfecting for years now. Here is my top five. At five, it's Escape

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To Victory. The Germans are powerful. Football has not been

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well served on the big screen. For his movie, John Huston drafted in

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some of the best players of all time - the likes of Pele and

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Sylvester Stallone! You can't helped but be swept along because

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Pele does stuff like this. At four, it's Any Given Sunday. I am totally

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baffled by American Football. But this three-hour epic is on this

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list for one reason - Al Pacino's famous locker room speech. It's a

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We claw with our finger nails to that edge, we know when we add up

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all those inches, that's going to make the difference between winning

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and losing. It's a speech that's been used by

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real life football managers, none of whom can match Al Pacino's

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delivery. Then again wo, can. At number three it's rocky VI. Why?

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Because it's the cheesiest film of all time. It's a film which dared

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at the height of the Cold War to unite America and Russia by getting

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a capitalist and Communist together and making them fight. It's a film

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in which Dolf Lund gren says. I must break you. At number two the

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Hustler. How much am I going to win tonight? Most sport movies aren't

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even about sport. Ten grand, I'm going win ten grand in one nights.

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OK, yes, it's about pool. But it's about overcoming personal demons

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and more besides. In this speech, Paul Newman sums up what it feels

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like to be blessed with genius. of a sudden I have will in my arm.

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The pool cue is part of me. It's a piece of wood, it's got nerves in

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it. I feel the roll of those balls, you don't have to look, you just

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know. I know, Paul. I know. Number one, it's Dodgeball. It propelled

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the little known sport of Dodgeball onto the global stage. It pits

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Vince Vaughn against Ben Stiller's Dwiet Goodman. There's a last

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minute winner, there's a moment of doubt before the ultimate triumph

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and a team of miss fits, while being amazingly funny.

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I'm really sorry. Are you all right? Why would you hit a girl?

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Why? I am so sorry, are you OK? my money, it's the funniest sports

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movie of all time. At the end of the day, you have to

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be pleased with that. This is going to run and run.

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yes. We've had so many tweets I can't read them all out. Chariots

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of fire, Gerry Maguire, quite a lot for The Big Blue. No an mall

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lympics. A comedy now about cancer, yes I just said that, starring

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Jonathan Levine and Seth Rogen. -- Joseph Gordon-Levitt. A tumour?

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Yes. Me? Yes. I don't drink, I don't smoke. I recycle. How do you

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feel right now? Fine. I can't remember being so calm in a long

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time Would you describe what you're feeling as a kind of numbness?

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would describe it as fine. It's a comedy about a young guy who gets

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cancer and how it affects his life and the people around him. I think

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I'm going to throw up. Open your eyes. Look at me, all right? What

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kind of cancer snfpblts it's some rare kind of cancer. What's it

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called? Swanoma... I had a massive tumour in my spine, and secretary-

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general and I are long time good friends. He went through the whole

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deal with me. What are your odds? looked it up and it says 50/50, but

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that's the internet. It's not that bad. That's better than I thought.

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You're going to be fine. Young people beat cancer all the time.

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Every celebrity beats cancer. am ends up comforting the people in

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his life maybe more than they comfort him. Everyone sort of

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freaks out and he has to be like "Are you owe ka. I'm sorry this is

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happening to you." I'm moving in. No. No. I'm your mother Adam.

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Exactly, that's why. Mum, mum. You really think a girl's going to go

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for me because I have cancer? Help me help you get laid.

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think that would work? While he was still sick, we'd were at a bar one

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night. He was having one of the odd interactions with people when they

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found out he had cancer. It's your hook man. It's what you've got.

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that's the first thing I say, "Hello I have cancer?" That's what

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makes you different and sets you apart. You joke about a guy gets

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cancer and his best friend uses it to do all the stuff he always

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wanted to do. Great song. Totally. I have cancer. I was wrong. It was

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weird. We thought there should be a movie that showed the lighter side

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to the experience. It can be sad rbgts tragic and trying, difficult.

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But a movie that exposes the dysfunction and find a way to

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infuse humour into the cancer experience.

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I really liked it. I cried. I thought it would be very smaltzy,

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but it's not. Parts of it are properly out-loud funny. The way he

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tells his parents that he's sick is properly clever. It was a really

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good film. It's funny, a cancer comedy, it's a tight rope act from

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the start. You're thinking, is the film going to make it across? Lots

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of films wouldn't. He would topple off and either give up the comedy

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halfway through or there would be a misjudgment of taste and decency,

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which would be so horrific that it would end someone's career. No-one

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wants to see the Hangover on a cancer ward. It makes it across. A

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lot of the credit will go to Joseph Gordon-Levitt, deservedly so for a

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fine performance. The script is the star here. We saw the script writer

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talking about how he drew from real experience for the story. That

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gives the story a kind of power. Beyond that, he has a really kind

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of canny sense of when to play funny and when not. He realises

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that the funniness comes from other people's reactions and people not

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knowing what it do or say, even professionals. He also knows when

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to stop. He doesn't do it, he keeps the funny coming for an unusually

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long time, but when he stops it's a powerful moment. You end up with a

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rare beast, the feel-good movie that may make you feel good at end.

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It's worth mentioning the supporting cast, Anna Kendrick is

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fantastic and Anjelica Huston. And you like when he's having the

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treatment. There's a couple of nice scenes when Joseph Gordon-Levitt's

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character meets Philip Baker Hall. They are almost throw away scenes,

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but so beautifully handled that they're the film at its best.

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Cary Grant died 25 years ago this month and Antonia looks back on his

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life and work and what made him so special.

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Born in 1904 into a working class family in Bristol, Archibald

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Alexander Leach left home at 15 and joined a troupe of akro bats. He

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travelled to New York and then Hollywood. He starred opposite the

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likes of Mae West who said something rauk us to him in 1933.

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Why don't you come up some time and see me. I'm home every evening.

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Yeah, but I'm busy every evening. Busy? So what are you trying to do,

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insult me? He was looking for work in the early 30s. They were looking

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for faces. If there was one thing he had was a great face. They

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started to use him opposite some of their most glamorous leading ladies.

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So Marlene Dietrich for instance. Any time you have a moment to spare,

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I'd be glad to drop in. I heard you. An embryo of Cary Grant emerges,

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it's a work in progress. This is the opening paragraph in that film.

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Grant was a physical comedian. As a child he was obsessed with the

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keystone cops and that combined with his early training as a

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gymnast meant he liked to move his body in a witty, graceful way.

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There's an unforgettable moment in Holiday when he did a somersault

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for the sheer pleasure of being physically gifted. You know me

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fellas, when I feel a worry coming on, you know what I do... There!

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And then the worries are over. He combined all these different

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facets of star per sown yaz that he saw when he arrived in Hollywood.

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He was a fan of Douglas Fairbanks with his dashing persona. There are

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hints of that. Throw in a kind of cheekiness and his circus

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background gives hints of it too. He's able to inject a sense of play

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into potentially staid or talky material and always seems light on

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his feet. It wasn't until the mid- 1940s that he came into his own as

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the slapstick Prince charming in screwball comedies, with his

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entirely made up transatlantic, rich Playboy voice, he was a genius

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with farcical banter, most beautifully opposite Katharine

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Hepburn. You lied to me. No... was a reduck lus story. I don't

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believe you. You have to believe me. It's part of your unbridled

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imagination once more. There's a great exchange of wise cracks and

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quips. It's a dance they do. He had the perfect rhythm for those kind

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of films that required a cha-cha- cha rhythm to it. It's almost like

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an extension of his physical dexterity and agility that he

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should be so agile with his tongue. I don't like leopards. Think of him

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as a house cat. I don't like cats either. Stand still. Don't be

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nervous. Off screen there were rumours about his sexuality. On

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screen he managed to transmit a deep affinity with his leading

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ladies. You always felt he wanted their company as much as their body.

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That made him so sexy. He was the supreme object of desire. There's a

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sense in which his female leads are kind of like playmates for him, not

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in a kind of Playboy bunny sense, but in the sense that they gently

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mock each other and the women mock his reserve. He mocks their

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overtalkiness or whatever or their overexuberance. Out of This Isn't

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Everything You Are great chemistry is born. Look at Ingrid Bergman

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virtually RAFish him in this scene. I have a chick anyone the ice bomb

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and you're eating it. What about the washing up afterwards? We'll

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eat it with our fingers? Don't we need any plates? Yes. One for you

0:26:220:26:29

and one for me. Get in line. Even Katharine Hepburn came over in

0:26:290:26:34

Charade. How about getting out of here, come on, out. Won't you come

0:26:340:26:40

in for a minute? No, I won't. don't bite, you know. Unless it's

0:26:400:26:44

called for. How would you like a spanking? How would you like a

0:26:440:26:49

punch in the nose? If you compare him to Clark Gable. Gable's a man,

0:26:490:26:53

he was a leading man would wanted to rip off your clothes and drag

0:26:530:27:00

you to bed. Cary Grant wanted to stay up all noigt and talk to you.

0:27:000:27:04

Alfred Hitchcock exploited the fact that Cary Grant looked like a guy

0:27:040:27:09

who could do what he wanted. So droll, urban and sophisticated.

0:27:090:27:14

Might he be a bad guy too? He went that way. I think he got off.

0:27:140:27:24
0:27:240:27:28

Thank you. Quite all right. Seven parking tickets. Oh. I think it's

0:27:280:27:34

terribly interesting that Hitchcock who didn't have a lot of use for

0:27:340:27:38

actors, except they were a necessary evil, that Cary Grant was

0:27:380:27:43

the only actor I ever loved. Everyone agrees that he was the

0:27:430:27:46

greatest film star of all time. I think some people undervalue what a

0:27:460:27:51

good actor he was. He did not really do much for the craft of

0:27:510:27:56

acting in terms of innovation, however, what he did was he created

0:27:560:28:01

something more than an actor. He created Cary Grant, a man, that

0:28:010:28:08

people aspire to today. There's no doubt he was a complicated man. He

0:28:080:28:13

binged on hallucinogenics, he married five times. At 62 he

0:28:130:28:19

retired, perhaps it got too hard being carry groont -- Cary Grant.

0:28:190:28:24

Because everybody wanted to be him. Even Cary Grant said he wanted to

0:28:240:28:29

be Cary Grant. Brilliant. Next, Resistance

0:28:290:28:39

starring Riseboroughise and Michael Sheen.

0:28:390:28:48

The invasion continues to advance north and west. We have established

0:28:480:28:52

an observation post in this valley. Resistance is the version of what

0:28:520:28:56

might have happened had the Nazi invasion been successful in 1945 in

0:28:560:29:00

Great Britain. It's told from the perspective of a small, Welsh

0:29:000:29:10
0:29:100:29:24

valley. Is your husband at home? If you tell him of my visit when he

0:29:240:29:30

returns, I will be most grateful. My character wakes up one day and

0:29:300:29:38

her husband's gone and each man in the village is gone.

0:29:380:29:42

The civilian must not do nothing which will be considered slightest

0:29:420:29:52
0:29:520:29:53

help to the enemy. I appreciate that. My character is in a constant

0:29:530:29:57

inner conflict between following the orders that he was given and

0:29:570:30:04

doing the things that he feels are right morally. I never thanked you

0:30:040:30:12

for helping me. You should hate me. Unusually heavy snow comes in

0:30:120:30:17

during the winter and German soldiers help the women run the

0:30:170:30:20

farms and this uneasy truce develops between the women of the

0:30:200:30:24

valley and the German soldiers. know what happens to collaborators,

0:30:240:30:33

do you? We must leave. I can't leave. If you stay now, you die.

0:30:340:30:37

Trying to deal with the question of collaboration, the nature of those

0:30:370:30:41

two, how they work hand in hand sometimes, that feels like a very

0:30:410:30:45

contemporary discussion to be having at this moment in time.

0:30:450:30:51

the choices that we make that will decide the nature of our resistance

0:30:510:30:57

to nature, of our survival. Our choices will be the mark of who we

0:30:570:31:07

Every bit as Moneyball doesn't want to be a sports movie, Resistance

0:31:070:31:14

doesn't want to be a war movie. The Germans have invaded Britain in

0:31:140:31:21

1945, they steam into Wales. Resistance is a film of meaningful

0:31:210:31:25

glances and silences and ailing livestock. It unfolds incredibly

0:31:260:31:30

slowly. It is a strange criticism for me to make. The majority of my

0:31:300:31:34

favourite films are films in which nothing happens very slowly. There

0:31:340:31:38

is a difference between slowness and a film building to a mood and

0:31:380:31:44

slowness when it is ponderous. For me, Resistance is more often than

0:31:440:31:48

not ponderous. There was one scene where I thought the film had

0:31:480:31:54

stopped on screen. That can't be good. I liked it much more than you.

0:31:540:31:59

I found it moving and ponderous, correct, but I love Andrea

0:32:000:32:04

Riseborough, so I could watch her looking sad for hours. She does a

0:32:040:32:12

lot of that! I also love Wales, Danny. It is my favourite location

0:32:120:32:17

for a holiday, almost. So it looks so incredibly beautiful. I was

0:32:170:32:21

overwhelmed by the landscape? hear you. Wales looks fantastic.

0:32:210:32:26

Not sure the point of the film should be to make Snowdonia look

0:32:260:32:30

attractive even when occupied by Nazis. I hear you about Andrea

0:32:300:32:34

Riseborough. She is a film star. She's not found the film yet. I

0:32:340:32:39

don't know, maybe I'm a bad person, but after the 15th shot of Andrea

0:32:390:32:43

Riseborough looking concerned, I wanted a load of sheep to start

0:32:430:32:47

driving a clown car around! LAUGHTER This is me. OK. I don't

0:32:470:32:54

think that is your film of the week. What is it? It is very difficult.

0:32:540:32:58

It's always good to have Terence Davies in the cinemas. I'm going to

0:32:580:33:04

say 50/50. You? Moneyball with bells on! We are covered. Now it is

0:33:040:33:07

time for Director's Cut. Stephen Frears talks to us about My

0:33:070:33:17
0:33:170:33:24

Nothing but a toilet in a youth club! Constant boil on my bum.

0:33:240:33:28

remember the joy, the pleasure and the intelligence, you know, it was

0:33:280:33:35

everything that I liked doing. It was a very, very intelligent film

0:33:350:33:41

and it was everything that I love. It was enormously enjoyable. And

0:33:410:33:51
0:33:510:33:53

then it changed our lives. I saw four actors - Tim Roth, Daniel,

0:33:530:34:03
0:34:030:34:06

Gary Oldman and Ken Branagh. Daniel was top of the crumpet list. The

0:34:060:34:10

girls squealed. I'm dead impressed by all this. You were the one at

0:34:100:34:20
0:34:200:34:24

school, the one they liked? All of them liked me. I need to raise

0:34:240:34:29

money to make this place good. I want you to help me with that. I

0:34:290:34:39
0:34:390:34:43

want you to work here with me. funny and good characters. And told

0:34:430:34:48

you something new. It was both educational as well as entertaining.

0:34:480:34:56

It's everything you want. I didn't realise that the gay theme was

0:34:560:35:00

going to be quite so sensational and sort of what took it around the

0:35:000:35:04

world. So I didn't find that particularly original. I thought it

0:35:040:35:11

was very, very good, believe it or not on Thatcherite economics. We

0:35:110:35:15

made it in complete innocence and we made it with a lot of joy and

0:35:150:35:20

with very little care. No, that's the wrong word - we made it with

0:35:200:35:24

immense care. It was very carefree. I remember coming down to the set

0:35:240:35:31

and there was a crane there, "Why was there a crane here?" "You

0:35:310:35:36

ordered it." There is a shot that comes down over the launderette. I

0:35:360:35:41

invented that on the spot. Some days things worked! It is all to do

0:35:410:35:46

with railway lines. I will make sure he is fixed up with a good

0:35:460:35:52

business future. Marriage? working on it. Is Tania a

0:35:520:36:02
0:36:020:36:06

possibility? Mmm! Where the hell are you going?! We sent some boy

0:36:060:36:11

out to find a house that was nearest to several railway lines. I

0:36:110:36:16

said let's build a balcony so we got even nearer! The trains became

0:36:160:36:25

a theme. We had a lot of trouble with the ending. I kept saying it

0:36:250:36:30

had to have a happy ending because these characters, you can't turn

0:36:300:36:34

the audience away depressed. It only gets happy in the last ten

0:36:340:36:44
0:36:440:36:47

seconds, only in a very eccentric way. It is very interesting, he had

0:36:470:36:54

working with him Hans Zimmer, the most successful composer in the

0:36:540:36:59

world, and he was the boy in the backroom. Stanley used to sit in

0:36:590:37:05

the front room and Hans was working out all that funny man in white

0:37:050:37:14

suit sort of music. Nobody had any idea that a film this scruffy -

0:37:140:37:21

there are people walking around the streets, who would go and see a

0:37:210:37:27

film about a gay Pakistani in a launderette? It touched people.

0:37:270:37:31

can see more from that interview on the Film 2011 website. That is all

0:37:310:37:35

for tonight. Next week, we will be reviewing The Thing, Romantics

0:37:350:37:40

Anonymous and Happy Feet 2. Playing us out is The Descendants, directed

0:37:400:37:43

by Alexander Payne starring George Clooney. It is in cinemas January

0:37:430:37:52

2012. Thank you for watching and good night. My friends think I live

0:37:520:37:57

in paradise. I haven't been on a surf board in 15 years. 23 days ago

0:37:570:38:02

my wife was launched from a powerboat and hit her head.

0:38:020:38:07

might not be able to hear this. She was lonely. Who is he? I would like

0:38:070:38:12

to know who the guy is that my wife was seeing. I have always been the

0:38:120:38:16

back-up parent. I don't know what to do with her! With Elizabeth in

0:38:160:38:20

the hospital, my daughters are testing me. This is Sid. He will be

0:38:200:38:25

with me. I will be more civil with him around. Don't ever do that to

0:38:250:38:31

me again! What would you do if you were me? I would beat him with a

0:38:310:38:39

Film news, reviews and interviews with Claudia Winkleman and Danny Leigh.

They review Brad Pitt getting sporty in Moneyball, Rachel Weisz going back to the forties in The Deep Blue Sea and Michelle Williams finding her inner diva in My Week With Marilyn. Plus Chris Hewitt counts down his top five sports films.