Brecon Beacons The One Show - Best of Britain


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Hello and welcome to The One Show: Best Of Britain with Carrie Grant...

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..and Gyles Brandreth

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and another chance to see some of our very favourite One Show films.

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# One

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# One

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# One

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# One. #

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Today we're in the magnificent Brecon Beacons National Park

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in Wales, of course.

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Yes, home to the wonderful Black Mountains over there in the east.

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Not to be confused with the Black Mountain Range

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over there in the west.

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Now, later in tonight's show, Christine Walkden

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will be digging around for a story in the back garden of Max Clifford.

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I like tidying up which I suppose fits in

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with a lot of what I do anyway.

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And Joe Crowley is going back to the 1970s to a small Welsh town

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that saw an extraordinary drugs raid.

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In here, Kemp made 20 million doses of LSD.

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And I'm heading even further back in time and further north to Bangor

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to remember the day The Beatles came to town.

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But first, Miranda is climbing aboard a town centre tour bus.

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-Stay tuned, she has packed her wetsuit.

-Mm-mm!

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Built in the mid-1800s, the Albert Dock

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was one of the biggest construction projects of its time

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and for a while it made Liverpool an epicentre for world trade.

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For decades, thousands of ships and boats have unloaded

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their cargo here but it wasn't just official goods they were bringing in.

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They had stowaways too.

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From around the world, creatures attached to hulls,

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caught in ballast tanks and swept in from the sea

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made this old, industrial heartland home.

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And the only way to get a really good look at this habitat

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is to get in the water and I'm not going in alone.

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CHEERING # I'd like to be

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# Under the sea

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# In an octopus's garden in the shade. #

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Here we are, ladies and gentlemen, in the middle of the Albert Dock

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in Liverpool. It's a world-famous heritage site.

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'Susan Gilbertson has lived in Liverpool for most of her life

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'and spends her days talking about the history of the Albert Dock.'

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That's where Richard and Judy used to film This Morning.

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Although she works on top of the water she's always been curious

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about what lies below especially as there's a piece of Liverpool folklore

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about a creature lurking in the depths.

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-There have been reports of a ginormous eel. A condor eel, is it?

-Conger eel, yeah.

-Yeah, a conger eel.

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Basically there's a little funny story going around.

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Everyone refers to it as "Dock Ness"!

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-Ha ha! This is your Dock Ness monster!

-Yeah.

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-Wow, so a big conger eel?

-Yeah.

-Living in the docks here?

-Living in the docks.

-Wow.

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So with special permission, in we go.

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-Right, are you ready for this?

-Yes.

-Feeling warm?

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THEY LAUGH

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-I've been warmer!

-It's going to be amazing.

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And it really is. Every structure

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under the water has become an artificial reef packed with life.

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I can't get over this rope. It's just covered in mussels, isn't it?

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-I know.

-Smothered. It's about that fat at the bottom.

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Just with all the mussel growth and all the sea squirts and everything.

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You'd think there'd be plenty of space for everything

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but they're all crowded on top of each other.

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It's not like they find a fresh piece of space, it's just,

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"Oh, there's one, we'll grow on top of that."

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The water here is incredibly clear, partly due to these mussels

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that filter bacteria, plankton and other organic material.

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And they also provide a hearty meal for other creatures.

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But there is one animal that Sue has seen year-on-year

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floating around the docks.

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-There were go, it's a jellyfish.

-Oh, my God!

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It won't sting, it's a mini-jelly and they don't sting.

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-And what do they do?

-They're food for turtles!

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-Oh, is it?

-THEY LAUGH

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Their dinner then! Hello, turtle dinner!

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As the waters warm up during the summer months,

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more and more jellyfish appear here in the docks.

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And I didn't think we'd see anything better

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when we got a glimpse of Susan's Dock Ness monsters.

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Well, OK these conger eels are only about a metre and a half long

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but I never expected to see so many of them in a city.

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Those conger eels were beautiful, weren't they? Those two tails

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-hanging in that green weed.

-They're gorgeous.

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Almost twisted around each other and then suddenly

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one minute they're just off.

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-They were gorgeous.

-Really beautiful.

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Silky, weren't they? You want to touch them. Beautiful.

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Normally these eels live around the coast

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but this artificial reef has attracted them here

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providing great habitat and food.

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-What do you think then?

-It's amazing.

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THEY LAUGH

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I'm lost for words. It very rarely happens

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and it's absolutely fantastic.

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I could just stay and look at it for hours.

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I never expected to see

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so much variety of life in the heart of Liverpool.

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Species from all around the world cohabiting

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successfully in their little hideaway beneath the waves.

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The National Park is famous for its caves

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and this one has the widest mouth in the whole of Wales.

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The widest mouth in the whole of Wales?

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No wonder I feel so at home here!

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The place actually is called Porth yr Ogof

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and I recognise the cave because it features

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in the BBC series Merlin which I've been watching.

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-How are you saying that again?

-DRAMATICALLY: Porth yr Ogof!

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-SHE LAUGHS

-You're right, my pronunciation is terrible.

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Why do they send me to places with impossible names to pronounce

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when I could've been sent to Bangor?

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It's funny you should say that because that's where I'm headed in this next film about The Beatles.

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1967 - Flower Power was gripping the nation

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and The Beatles were caught up in it like the rest of the country.

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The boys were becoming increasingly interested in spiritual matters

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and in August 1967, travelled away from London for a special weekend

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of meditation and soul-searching

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and what better place to come than here...

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in Bangor?

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SITAR PLAYS

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They came to North Wales to see the Maharishi,

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an Indian guru who promised enlightenment through meditation.

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George had dragged them to the Hilton Hotel, I think it was,

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to see a person called the Maharishi

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and they'd been so amazed

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and impressed by this person they decided to go off the next morning

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to Bangor for a course of some sort.

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So I went down to Euston

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the next morning, got on the train and the station was chocker.

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People had somehow found out. There was chaos on the platform.

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The Beatles' London send-off was chaotic

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and there were similar scenes when they arrived in Bangor.

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The conference was held at Normal College which is now a part of Bangor University.

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# Roll up Roll up for the mystery tour. #

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The Beatles actually stayed at the college and it was here

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that Mal Hughes and Roy Flynn, a couple of postal workers,

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were called on to deliver the most important telegram of their lives.

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I was in the sorting office and a telegram came down the chute.

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I picked it up and I says, "A telegram for The Beatles." So...

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So you just happened to be the man that was standing

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-at the bottom of that chute at that moment?

-Yeah, waiting for it.

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-My particular job at the time was a telegram boy.

-Aw!

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Obviously they don't have these kind of things now, it's all e-mails.

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The supervisor says, "You're not going with it."

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I says, "Yes, I am." He says "No, you're not."

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So I says, "Yes!" Anyway, we had a bit of an argument and he says, "Oh, all right."

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-So two of you in a van to deliver a piece of paper?

-Yes!

-Yes!

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# Got to get you into my life. #

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So you get here, you get out the van, what happens next?

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I went in through that door there and that's where they were in there.

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And I just says to John Lennon, "I have a telegram for you."

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-Were you shaking? "Here's-your tele-gram!"

-I just handed it to him. "There you are."

-We're used to it!

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-Cos you would have been, what, 16 at the time?

-16, yeah.

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-How did you feel, standing there with The Beatles?

-Just amazing.

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It's only now when you think back

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that you can realise that it's never going to come again, is it?

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This was also a day that Colin Jones and Geoff Dacre would never forget.

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In 1967, they were 15-year-old music fans and they came to

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the college armed with cameras aiming to get some shots of The Beatles.

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So what was your plan?

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Colin suggested we say we're from the press

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because we both had a camera each and I thought there's no way

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they're going to believe that, we were only 15.

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Then they'll ask for identification which we hadn't got obviously

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so I thought all they can do is throw us back out again, you know.

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There was two, like, bouncers on the door

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-and I think we both said simultaneously...

-Freelance press!

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-Freelance press, yes.

-And they said, what?

-In you go!

-Yeah!

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-This is where you would have seen The Beatles?

-Yes.

-In you go.

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That's right, yeah, yeah.

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# Turn off your mind, relax and float downstream. #

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-What is it feel like coming back in here?

-Strange.

-Very strange.

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We felt so conspicuous and we sat at the side down that wall there.

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-Where were The Beatles?

-On the stage here

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and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi was sat there

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-doing his spouting.

-And there was an audience presumably?

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-Mick Jagger and Marianne Faithfull.

-It was actually... Jane Asher.

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-Have you still got the pictures?

-I have, yes.

-Let's have a look then.

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-There we are.

-That's amazing.

-That's the Yogi.

-You were really close.

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And of course you got the mighty Mick Jagger.

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-He doesn't look very happy, does he? Is that Marianne...

-Marianne.

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-That's Marianne Faithfull, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Have they just had an argument?

-Yeah!

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So you've only got these two pictures left of everything

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-that happened that day for you guys?

-Those were the only two we dared take!

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In the end, The Beatles cut short their weekend in Bangor.

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It was while they were here that they were told their manager and friend Brian Epstein had died.

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Being here in Bangor, you can really feel the excitement

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the city must've felt having The Beatles amongst them.

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That's why years later, they're still talking about the weekend

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the Fab Four came to North Wales.

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-That must have been an amazing day for you.

-It certainly was.

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This is turning out to be an amazing day for me, you know. Memorable.

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Why's that?

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Because it's actually 50 years since I first came to the Brecon Beacons.

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-Half a century ago as a schoolboy.

-You do not look old enough, Gyles.

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I know but still I was brought here on a school trip

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and I am quite a groupie for waterfalls.

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Well, this is the Sgwd Clun Gwyn waterfall

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which if you translate from the Welsh means "waterfall of the white meadow."

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It's very fortunate that you do know the actual name

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because if you didn't, we wouldn't have got here because this is

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one of the few parts of the United Kingdom that does not have

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-a postcode.

-So you don't get your post or your letters here.

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-No, but you get the most fabulous power shower!

-You certainly do!

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-What are you up to next?

-I'm going to climb that hill. Oh, yes.

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-I'd better set of now.

-Bit of a cliff face.

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It is a bit of a cliff face.

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And I'm off to find out more about the National Park from the warden manager, Judith Harvey.

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Judith, this place is called a Geopark. What does that mean?

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Well, it's an area with special rock formations and also an area

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where the cultural history of the area is linked to the geology.

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What kind of plants and vegetation might we find here?

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Well, this, we're within the waterfall's

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Special Area Of Conservation

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which is a really tremendously special area.

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We've got plants that only grow in these deep gorges.

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You can hear the water behind us

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and it tumbles over the waterfall, produces a lot of moisture.

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It's like you've got your own rainforest here, isn't it?

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It is actually. We are in the Celtic rainforest here!

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What a stunning location and how many waterfalls do you have in the park?

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There are seven named waterfalls in this area. Believe it or not,

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I have seen people kayaking over here.

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When the river's in flood, they go over and drop down.

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-Proper extreme sports.

-It is, yeah.

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Judith, what's the most important part about your work?

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To me, it's conservation of the environment

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and also introducing people TO the environment.

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Allowing them and explaining the nature

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and natural history to them so they can enjoy it too.

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-What an amazing location to work in. Thank you so much.

-OK, you're welcome.

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Back in the 1970s, an unsuspecting town in mid-Wales

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became the focus of the biggest police drugs investigation known to these parts.

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Joe Crowley went to find out more.

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Tregaron is a small market town in mid-Wales

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where not much ever happened.

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Until 1977, that is, when locals here

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found themselves at the centre of

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one of the biggest undercover police operations Britain had ever seen.

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No-one in Tregaron had any clue at all

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that the crime of the century

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was being perpetrated under their very noses here.

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HEAVY ROCK MUSIC

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Back in the late '60s, Britain had embraced flower power

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and with it came LSD.

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LSD, one of the most powerful mind-affecting substances known to man.

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The drug has mind-blowing effects.

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In a few cases, it does, in fact, drive people mad.

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It can make them go and kill other people or themselves.

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Despite being an illegal drug, reports suggest

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100,000 acid tabs were being taken in Britain every week.

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Police knew vast amounts were being manufactured somewhere

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but they hadn't got a clue where.

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Leaf Fielding worked in one of the illegal acid factories.

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We thought we'd found a tool that could help us

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solve all the world's problems.

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Don't forget, we're living in a world with the threat of the bomb

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and we thought that by taking LSD, we could live in peace and harmony.

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Leaf and his co-conspirators evaded capture for years but in 1975,

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police found ripped-up pieces of paper

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in a crashed car from Tregaron.

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Pieced together, they read hydrazeme hydrate,

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a chemical used in the manufacture of LSD.

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Believing they'd stumbled on the acid ring,

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police hatched Operation Julie.

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Undercover cops were put into Tregaron disguised as hippies.

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Dai Rees was one of them.

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When I was undercover as a hippie, I had a very unkempt beard.

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I had very, very dishevelled hair.

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There were times when we had to literally sit side-by-side

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with some of the people that we were watching.

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We could very easily have blown the whole investigation

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to pieces and spoilt it all.

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The crashed car belonged to one Richard Kemp

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who lived near Tregaron with his girlfriend, Christine Bott.

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Well, this is where Richard Kemp and Christine Bott lived.

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So the police would've been keeping an eye on this place.

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Were they based around here?

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They used to watch from the top of the hill with binoculars.

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All the houses around here, they also became police houses.

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They even set up a fight between one of the hippies - hippie cops

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and the local policeman, in order to looked genuine.

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Living as hippies for a year,

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police kept tabs on the suspected drugs ring. Breaking into a cellar,

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they finally found the proof they'd been looking for.

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In the cellar, they had to climb over a mountain of debris, walls filthy.

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Suddenly they turned the corner and they find this.

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This cellar was the centre of a worldwide organisation.

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In here, Kemp made 20 million doses of LSD.

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Certainly one of the major illicit LSD laboratories ever found.

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On 26th March 1977, the police made their move.

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800 officers raided 87 houses across the UK making 120 arrests.

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So where were you? You were staying at a house down the lane?

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Yes, just right at the bottom of this lane.

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Is that where you were when the police swooped and arrested you?

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Yeah. At five o'clock in the morning,

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they burst in and I was hauled from the bed by six policemen.

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It's one of the worst moments in my life, actually.

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You recognise what you were doing was wrong?

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I recognise what I was doing was illegal.

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Personally I didn't think it was morally wrong.

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15 of the ringleaders including Kemp and Leaf Fielding were found guilty

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and sentenced to a combined 120 years in prison.

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It was something which every one of us would take pride in for years afterwards -

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indeed, even now - that we were part of that particular investigation.

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I was sentenced to eight years in prison.

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My family were extremely shocked.

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Some of my relatives decided

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they didn't want anything to do with me ever again.

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Of course I had regrets.

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You know, my own actions had put me in prison for a long time.

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Who wouldn't regret that?

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Operation Julie was Britain's first really big drugs bust.

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What had started as an idealistic dream

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ended with the harsh reality of prison.

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This is the Monmouth Brecon Canal.

0:17:390:17:42

35 miles long, 200 years old and when it was built,

0:17:420:17:45

it was designed to transport coal and iron.

0:17:450:17:48

These days it's used for much more leisurely pursuits.

0:17:480:17:51

You could spend a couple of hours on a canal boat up here and see some of

0:17:510:17:55

the most fantastic scenery in Britain.

0:17:550:17:57

And it is truly heaven...

0:17:570:17:59

-BUZZING

-..except for the midges! And here's our very own Mr Insect,

0:17:590:18:04

it's George McGavin.

0:18:040:18:05

Bees are one of the most important insects on earth.

0:18:050:18:08

They provide us with their honey

0:18:080:18:10

and pollinate our fruit and vegetables and now,

0:18:100:18:13

they're set to revolutionise our national security.

0:18:130:18:16

# I'm a bee, I'm a bee I'm a, I'm a, I'm a bee

0:18:160:18:19

# I'm a bee, I'm a bee I'm a, I'm a, I'm a bee. #

0:18:190:18:21

Here in Hertfordshire, Freddy Cook and his team of scientists

0:18:210:18:24

are working on a clever idea

0:18:240:18:26

to harness the exceptional sense of smell

0:18:260:18:29

of one of Britain's hardest-working insects.

0:18:290:18:32

Now, listen. What's happening here? What are you doing?

0:18:370:18:40

Well, we're training honeybees to detect chemicals in the air.

0:18:400:18:44

In airports, for example, we need a quick and cost-effective

0:18:440:18:48

and reliable way of finding when people are trying to smuggle

0:18:480:18:52

drugs, explosives, that kind of thing.

0:18:520:18:54

What's wrong with a nice, wet-nosed spaniel?

0:18:540:18:56

You know, how is this an improvement?

0:18:560:18:59

Well, we know dogs are very sensitive

0:18:590:19:00

and we also know that bees are extraordinarily sensitive.

0:19:000:19:04

So the idea is that we can train a bee

0:19:040:19:06

in a matter of minutes to detect a chemical in the air

0:19:060:19:09

whereas a dog, it takes several months to train.

0:19:090:19:12

It all sounds a bit far-fetched at the moment

0:19:120:19:15

so to prove his point, Freddy's going to show me

0:19:150:19:18

how his sniffer bees are trained.

0:19:180:19:21

So what happens now?

0:19:210:19:23

So now we're going to take a bee out of this cartridge.

0:19:230:19:27

And you're using very soft forceps?

0:19:270:19:31

That's right, just forceps to gently hold her

0:19:310:19:33

so then she goes in to the bee-holder like this. It's not hurting her

0:19:330:19:38

and the spring at the front just holds her gently in place like that.

0:19:380:19:41

Once in the capsule, it's over to the training area.

0:19:430:19:47

Here, a tiny trace of explosive has been mixed with air.

0:19:470:19:50

The air will then be wafted over the bee so she can smell it.

0:19:500:19:55

So I'll turn it on.

0:19:550:19:56

We'll allow her a couple of seconds to recognise the smell.

0:19:580:20:02

And then I will feed her.

0:20:030:20:05

-Out with the tongue, and she has a feed.

-And off.

0:20:060:20:11

How many times would you have to do that, to train the bee?

0:20:110:20:14

As you will see the next time, often they have already learnt it.

0:20:140:20:18

-Wow!

-If I try again, turn the switch... Look, she is responding.

0:20:180:20:24

Out pops the tongue. That is just amazing.

0:20:240:20:28

On just one trial, she has realised

0:20:280:20:32

that the smell of this stuff means that she gets food.

0:20:320:20:35

That's right.

0:20:350:20:37

This incredible memory is what makes bees such experts at detecting food.

0:20:370:20:41

When out foraging, if they like a flower's nectar

0:20:420:20:46

they instantly remember its smell and location.

0:20:460:20:49

Back at the hive they drop off their precious nectar

0:20:500:20:53

and can then navigate their way back to the exact same flowers

0:20:530:20:57

guided by their extraordinary memory.

0:20:570:20:59

And it is this natural ability that is being harnessed here.

0:21:070:21:10

Cohorts of trained bees are placed in a kind of smell-o-meter device.

0:21:100:21:15

So, now is the time for the acid test.

0:21:180:21:20

Here we have six innocent-looking suitcases

0:21:230:21:25

but two contain minute traces of explosives and drugs.

0:21:250:21:30

The question is, can the bees find them?

0:21:300:21:34

Number one.

0:21:340:21:35

If a substance is detected, the bees extended tongue

0:21:350:21:38

will trigger a sensor which shows up as a red light.

0:21:380:21:42

Bag number three.

0:21:420:21:44

Whoa! That is very, very clear.

0:21:440:21:48

Five of these bees have responded.

0:21:480:21:50

These were the ones trained to the chemical found in explosives.

0:21:500:21:54

So that bag contains explosives?

0:21:540:21:55

That is right, we would want to have a closer look at that.

0:21:550:21:59

Bag four.

0:21:590:22:00

Nothing there.

0:22:000:22:02

Clear. And now my bag. Which should be absolutely fine.

0:22:020:22:06

-Ah!

-Woah!

0:22:090:22:11

We have got quite a strong response here.

0:22:110:22:13

From the bees who were trained for cocaine.

0:22:130:22:17

You planted this in my bag!

0:22:170:22:20

-Shall we have a look?

-This is not my bag, officer, really!

0:22:200:22:24

So, in this bottle, I placed the scent of cocaine

0:22:240:22:28

and the bees have picked that up.

0:22:280:22:31

Having done their duty it is back to the hive for these girls.

0:22:330:22:36

Hopefully, with more testing,

0:22:360:22:37

we will soon see sniffer bees in airports all around the country.

0:22:370:22:42

Giles, why are we wearing these silly suits?

0:22:450:22:48

Because I am a coward and I'm about to take you to meet some bees.

0:22:480:22:52

Welsh bees.

0:22:520:22:54

I need to be protected. Here is the beekeeper.

0:22:540:22:56

Now, Kenneth, I love bees because they give me honey.

0:22:560:23:00

I have heard that the bee population is in steep decline.

0:23:000:23:04

Is that true and does it matter?

0:23:040:23:06

Yes, bees are in decline, and yes, it really does matter.

0:23:060:23:10

30% of the food produced in this country is pollinated by bees.

0:23:100:23:14

Without them you will lose 30% of production.

0:23:140:23:18

Things like tomatoes, apples, crops, peas, beans, they will not be there,

0:23:180:23:23

because the number of pollinators will not be around.

0:23:230:23:26

-Why are the bees declining?

-Because of loss of habitat.

0:23:260:23:31

Monoculture, growing throughout the country, oilseed rape,

0:23:320:23:36

and disease, such as Varroa destructor,

0:23:360:23:39

the little mite which has had a massive impact,

0:23:390:23:42

and a significant loss of bees in the UK over the last ten years.

0:23:420:23:47

So what are we going to do about it?

0:23:470:23:49

We are trying to treat them using non-chemical treatments.

0:23:490:23:52

The chemical treatments we used to use, they have become resistant to.

0:23:520:23:57

-We can encourage them by growing flowers.

-Absolutely.

0:23:570:24:00

-Dandelions and stuff.

-Dandelions are good.

0:24:000:24:03

I can only say this once, dandelions are not weeds.

0:24:030:24:06

They are what bees love, aren't they?

0:24:060:24:08

Absolutely, if you want to help the bee population,

0:24:080:24:10

don't spray your dandelions.

0:24:100:24:11

I thought this was an urban myth, but is it true

0:24:110:24:14

that if bees became extinct, human beings would die within four years?

0:24:140:24:18

It is not a theory I would want to put to the test but I suspect

0:24:190:24:23

that the loss of food production would have a severe impact, yes.

0:24:230:24:26

We have Christine Walker next,

0:24:260:24:28

she has been nosing around people's gardens again,

0:24:280:24:30

-through the potting shed keyhole.

-I love her.

0:24:300:24:33

Before you leave, you must come and have a look at my bees.

0:24:330:24:36

Yes. You do that!

0:24:360:24:38

When it comes to digging and muck-raking

0:24:410:24:43

there's usually one person in the middle of it all.

0:24:430:24:46

He owns this garden and his name is Max Clifford.

0:24:460:24:49

Max has made his name and fortune looking after people's reputations,

0:24:510:24:55

and dealing with the press.

0:24:550:24:56

He is always at the centre of things, so I suspect this garden

0:24:560:25:00

has more to do with getting away from it all.

0:25:000:25:03

An oasis of calm, and sweet-smelling roses.

0:25:030:25:06

If I'm in the country, I tend to be the office a couple of days a week.

0:25:060:25:09

So I'll be here two or three days, working in the garden.

0:25:090:25:13

When I say that, I am not doing the gardening,

0:25:130:25:15

I have a very good gardener who does that.

0:25:150:25:18

One of the few things I actually do myself is a bit of trimming.

0:25:200:25:23

I like tidying up. I suppose it fits in with a lot of what I do anyway.

0:25:230:25:30

Roses were my mum's favourite.

0:25:300:25:32

I always think of my mum. Lilian, her name was.

0:25:320:25:36

She giggled a lot. When she giggled, she shook. Which I loved to see.

0:25:360:25:39

She was always someone that everyone came to with their problems.

0:25:390:25:43

So I suppose I have inherited a lot of things from Mum.

0:25:430:25:46

Did she ever show you how to prune it? May I?

0:25:460:25:50

-Please do.

-Because you're making a right hash!

-I am sure, yeah, go on.

0:25:500:25:55

There is no bud there so that would die the way back down there.

0:25:550:25:58

So when you're pruning you should always cut just above, there.

0:25:580:26:02

-There?

-That is fine.

-How about that?

-That is better.

0:26:020:26:06

Max moved to this house with his second wife, Jo, a few years ago.

0:26:070:26:12

It is in a gated estate in Walton-on-Thames,

0:26:120:26:15

not too far from where Max grew up in south London.

0:26:150:26:19

We didn't really have a garden. It was a tiny little postage stamp.

0:26:190:26:22

My dad had runner beans and tomatoes, bits-and-pieces.

0:26:220:26:26

-We didn't really have many flowers because there wasn't room.

-Right.

0:26:260:26:29

So what do you buy a man who has everything?

0:26:330:26:36

Especially one like Max who doesn't drink or smoke.

0:26:360:26:38

If you've got a couple of thousand to spare,

0:26:380:26:42

what about a very large fish?

0:26:420:26:44

-I know as much about koi carp as I do about gardens.

-Right!

0:26:440:26:48

-The big gold one was a gift from Simon.

-Simon Cowell?

-Yes.

-Right.

0:26:480:26:54

-The orange and black was a gift from Louis Walsh.

-What about plants?

0:26:540:26:59

Which of those are from the stars?

0:26:590:27:01

This particular plant, a New Zealand cabbage tree,

0:27:010:27:06

was a gift from Jade Goodie.

0:27:060:27:08

That is something which brings back a lot of memories.

0:27:080:27:11

Some memories, yeah.

0:27:110:27:12

-What about this pool?

-That was a gift from me to me.

-Excellent.

0:27:120:27:16

I swim virtually every day.

0:27:160:27:18

-When there is snow on the ground I am still swimming.

-Really?

0:27:180:27:21

After a hard day's chatting, I reckon I deserve a splosh.

0:27:210:27:25

-Do you consider yourself a lucky man?

-Incredibly lucky.

0:27:290:27:33

Anybody that works for themselves and makes a very good living

0:27:330:27:36

doing something you absolutely love, has got to be.

0:27:360:27:39

But your life hasn't been totally without tragedy, has it?

0:27:390:27:43

No. At the age of six, my daughter, Louise,

0:27:430:27:45

was diagnosed with chronic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

0:27:450:27:49

We had 18 years of hospitals,

0:27:490:27:52

Liz, my wife, and I, were there all the time.

0:27:520:27:56

Then Liz - we had been married 37 years -

0:27:560:27:58

she died very suddenly of lung cancer.

0:27:580:28:03

I suppose about two years after Liz died I met and got to know Jo,

0:28:030:28:07

who was a volunteer bereavement counsellor

0:28:070:28:10

at a Children's Hospice I was involved with.

0:28:100:28:13

We got married just over a year ago, last Easter.

0:28:130:28:16

So, you know, there have been some clouds,

0:28:160:28:19

as there are for lots of people,

0:28:190:28:21

but there has been an amazing lot of sunshine through my life

0:28:210:28:24

and I consider myself incredibly lucky.

0:28:240:28:27

That was a really touching film about Max Clifford, wasn't it?

0:28:280:28:31

It has been quite a special day, this.

0:28:310:28:34

I look forward to coming back to the Brecon Beacons.

0:28:340:28:36

-Maybe in another 50 years.

-And why not? I am up for it!

0:28:360:28:39

-Bye now!

-Bye-bye for now!

0:28:390:28:42