St Andrews The One Show - Best of Britain


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Welcome to The One Show: Best of Britain. With Alison Craig.

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And Mike Dilger.

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With another chance to see some of our favourite One Show films.

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Today, we are in the place that claims to be both the sunniest

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and driest in the whole of the UK.

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Hence waterproofs head to toe.

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-We're not in Torquay.

-No, we're not.

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It's a university town, whose seat of learning is 600 years old.

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-It's not Oxford and it's not Cambridge.

-It certainly isn't.

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It also has the oldest golf course in the world.

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We are in St Andrews, one of my favourite places in Scotland,

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where, frankly, everything's ancient!

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-No offence, Mike!

-None taken!

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On tonight's show, we go back to prehistoric times,

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with Ruth Goodman, who unearthed a lost civilisation in Orkney!

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There is a burial of two ladies under that bed.

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Not only that, but the door here can be controlled from the outside.

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So, you could actually be closed in this house.

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This might be some form of cult house

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or a place where dangerous things happen.

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And Miranda heads to the Cairngorms,

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on the trail of the majestic Golden Eagle.

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-He looks like he's claimed your eyrie.

-I think he has!

-He looks comfortable there.

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And don't miss Londoner Danny Baker's moving and hilarious journey

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back to his childhood home. As long as someone lets him in!

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There you go. My very first flat.

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11 Debnams Road, right next to the stairs and the rubbish chute.

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When we used to play football in this actual square, all the neighbours,

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when it got dark, would turn on their bathroom lights to give us flood lights.

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But first, John Sergeant remembers a remarkable family business

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who have kept the light shining in the dark

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for the last 200 years.

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The rugged Scottish coastline has inspired countless

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tales of high drama.

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Many dreamt up by the author of Treasure Island,

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Robert Louis Stevenson.

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But members of Stevenson's family,

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including his father,

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did more than dream of this coastline.

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They transformed it,

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building more than 200 lighthouses.

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"When I smell saltwater", he wrote,

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"I know that I am not far

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"from one of the works of my ancestors.

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"When the lights come out at sundown

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"along the shores of Scotland, I am proud to think

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"they burn more brightly

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"for the genius of my father."

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They were an extraordinarily ingenious family.

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No matter how inaccessible a site was,

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if a lighthouse was needed,

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they built it.

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I'm on my way to see one of their earliest lighthouses,

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on Isle of May in the Firth of Forth.

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With me is Dr Robert Prescott from St Andrews University.

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He has charted the introduction of lighthouses

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along this treacherous coast.

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So, how many wrecks do we know that there were

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around the Scottish coast?

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Around the Scottish coast, it would be many thousands.

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So, lighthouses were brought in,

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was that to save life, or was it to save cargo?

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I think it's always a question of lives and property.

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It's the two things together. A vessel that has a crew of 30, maybe,

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would have hundreds of pounds of cargo on board.

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Lighthouse building really took off in 1808,

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when Robert Louis Stevenson's grandfather, also called Robert,

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became engineer and chief executive of the Northern Lighthouse Board.

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The Isle of May lighthouse is one of his earliest

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and it's a masterpiece.

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He had space, most rock towers are built on very skimpy pieces of rock

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that are perhaps covered by the high tide,

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but here he had the room and the space to spread himself.

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I don't think there's another lighthouse like this anywhere in Britain.

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Not quite so grand. It's like a country house, really, isn't it?

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How much of a pioneer was Robert Stevenson?

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Well, he was a very considerable pioneer.

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No-one prior to him would have dreamed

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of trying to put a light tower on the Bell Rock.

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A rock that is submerged most of the time

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and just appears for an hour or two at low tide

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and is in the fiercest and most exposed locations.

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So, the ability to build a tower

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that's strong enough to cope with those situations, he perfected it.

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Robert Stevenson retired in 1842.

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Then, there were three more generations of Stevensons

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working in the Scottish lighthouse industry.

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It wasn't until 1938

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that the last Stevenson finally retired as chief engineer.

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It's an amazing record.

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Wherever you go round the Scottish coast,

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you're not far from a Stevenson lighthouse.

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Bob McIntosh has visited most of them.

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He built 200 lighthouses around the coast of Scotland, 100 like Scurdie Ness here

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and 100 smaller lights.

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It's something which the mariners around the coast of Scotland

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have been very grateful for.

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These lighthouses have stood the test of time.

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Most are still in use, but with modern technology.

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-When was this built?

-This lighthouse was built in 1870.

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And no lift, so we've got to go all the way up, haven't we, on the stairs?

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-Yes, there's 170 steps right to the top.

-170?

-Mm.

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The Stevenson lighthouses are impressive structures.

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They've endured decades of storms, fierce winds and heavy seas,

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and remarkably, they're all still standing.

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It's a real tribute to the men who built them.

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Right, well, here we are at the top of the lighthouse,

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and this is the light, isn't it?

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Yeah, this is the modern technology, with the car headlight-type lenses.

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We have three levels, which gives us the equivalent of three flashes.

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We've used the original structure with some minor modification inside

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and the modern technology gives us a better, brighter light.

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But otherwise, the structure of the lighthouse is exactly the same

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-as it was at the end of the 19th century.

-Exactly, yes.

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The lighthouse Stevenson's were remarkable men.

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Their ideas spread worldwide and they became legendary figures.

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These Stevenson lighthouses are not just marvels of the Victorian age.

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Here in the 21st-century, they still stand looking magnificent and proud

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and long may they do so.

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Well, St Andrews doesn't have a lighthouse,

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but at 108 feet, Saint Rule's tower is still a pretty steep climb.

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It is. It's part of St Andrews' Cathedral,

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and from the very top you get a panoramic view of what's beyond.

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It's lovely - we've got the North Sea down here.

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Across here we've got St Andrews itself and then,

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follow us over here, we've got the hills and countryside and beyond,

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and by my reckoning,

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you could see the Cairngorms National Park from up here.

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Well, if we had the Hubble telescope that is,

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but that's exactly where we're heading next with Miranda,

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who went to meet a conservation hero

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who is keeping tabs on our precious golden eagles.

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The golden eagle is Britain's most iconic raptor.

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But our relationship with this majestic bird

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has been a rocky one in the past.

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Persecuted for taking livestock,

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the population collapsed in the mid-19th century

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and they were entirely wiped out in England and Wales.

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Nowadays we're very good at protecting adult nest sites,

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but how do we safeguard the young birds

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when they have no fixed territories of their own?

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Until couple of years ago, we had no idea of where

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or how far they ranged, but all that's begun to change.

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Roy Dennis has been working with Scotland's

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400-plus breeding pairs of golden eagles since the 1980s.

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He started tagging birds on the Glen Feshie estate

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in the Cairngorms two years ago.

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The first chick he tagged was Alma.

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Last year he also tagged a chick on the eastern side of the Cairngorms called Tom.

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So this is the heart of the project, basically.

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This is the satellite tag that goes on the back of the eagle.

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-It's incredibly light, isn't it?

-Mm.

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They're 70g and every hour it works out where the eagle is,

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if it's flying, how fast it's flying,

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the direction it's flying and the altitude.

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From this, we know where Tom was last night.

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Yeah, I can be certain that I can show you the wood where Tom is

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and we could probably... We may even find the tree he was sitting in.

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-OK, let's go.

-OK.

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Many Highland estates are overgrazed by red deer,

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but at Glen Feshie their numbers have been kept low

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so heather, trees and shrubs are flourishing.

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So, too, are mountain hare and grouse,

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which attract young eagles looking for food.

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See on the hilltop there, that, kind of, patchwork of heather?

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That's where John and his colleagues are burning heather.

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Some of the heather is old heather where the grouse nest,

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and some is new where the grouse feeds.

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We've gone as far as we can in the Land Rover,

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so now we have to head to the bottom of the wood on foot

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trying to find any sign of Tom.

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We are looking for a bare branch or a broken tree.

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-They like a nice vantage point, do they?

-Yes.

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Right, we've just seen some bird poo so we've stopped to have a look.

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The bird that does do droppings like that is a bird called the goshawk.

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But that's projected quite a long way!

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-It's not your average pigeon, is it?

-No, no, no. That's a bird of prey.

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Right on target, Roy spots a bare branch.

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It's an eagle roost and one he hasn't seen before.

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So that's where he was? That's where Tom was last night, roosting?

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We can see the marks on the tree where his talons have...

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Hang on, Roy has found something over there. Let's join him.

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I reckon this is a grouse that's been eaten by an eagle.

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And what on earth is that?

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That is the gizzard of the grouse where it chews up the vegetation.

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So, you've got the grouse's last meal there

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and then the eagle's last meal here.

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Tom's next satellite readings

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would show us he was only two miles to the south

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while we were picking over his leftovers.

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Day by day, eagle satellite data is building up the evidence needed

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to show landowners they can manage their estates

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for wildlife as well as game.

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And in a neighbouring valley, children at the Alvie primary school

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have also been using Roy's satellite data

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to follow Tom and Alma on a website.

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We've been learning what its habits are.

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We've gone on field trips to find stuff.

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It's, like, amazing to see a real golden eagle.

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The children have built a golden eagle nest, or eyrie,

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with Roy Dennis and Highland Council Ranger Duncan McDonald

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who's given them the very rare chance to come face-to-face with an adult bird.

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-Quince looks like he's claimed your eyrie then.

-I think he has.

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He looks very comfortable there.

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These kids have obviously got very passionate

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about the two eagles, Tom and Alma.

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Having Roy's website there to be able to track them

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on a day-to-day basis has really brought these eagles alive

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to the children and they've thoroughly engaged with that.

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It's been hugely successful.

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Roy's satellite tagging project

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has found a way to help connect the landowners and communities

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with a magnificent animal that is normally so shy of human contact.

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Well, that was back in 2009 and since that film was made

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Alma, the two-year-old golden eagle, was tragically found dead.

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She had been deliberately poisoned and to date, no arrests have been made.

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Tom, the other golden eagle, went missing last year

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and unfortunately there has been no sign of him since,

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but the good news is there are now 11 eagles with satellite tags

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and Roy has been amazed by the huge distances some of these birds are covering.

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Roy is also optimistic that the project

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is helping people to understand how this magnificent bird lives

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and he believes this is helping the battle to protect them.

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Now, although St Andrews Castle is a ruin,

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there is still a place here fit for a king, albeit a future one.

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Yes, this is the street and indeed the house

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where Prince William and Kate shacked up together

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whilst they were at university.

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It's surprisingly low-key and understated, isn't it?

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Which is precisely why I bought this.

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-I think we should mark the spot.

-Go for it.

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Somewhere else that deserves a blue plaque is the childhood home

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of the legendary broadcaster Danny Baker,

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although they'll have to be quick

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because by all accounts it's not going to be there much longer.

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I'm Danny Baker and I'm going back to the street where I used to live.

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It's been abandoned, sealed off and boarded up for years now.

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But today I've been allowed special access.

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There you go. Very first flat. 11 Debnams Road.

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Right next to the stairs and the rubbish chute.

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When we used to play football in this actual square,

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all the neighbours, when it got dark,

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would turn on their bathroom lights to give us floodlights.

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Yeah, I've still got it. I've still got it.

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Incredibly, I left school at 14 and I went to work in a record shop.

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You know, I was pretty liberal with the stock

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and there was a stack of them in my bedroom,

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but my albums started to make the front room ceiling

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actually bend a bit like this. It was a sturdy old flat, so it shows you how many records I had.

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The kids who lived on the higher floors,

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if the ice cream man came round or anything else

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this is what they would yell, "Mu-u-um. Mu-u-um."

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And suppose it's, I don't know, Jimmy Knight,

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"Jimmy Knight's mu-u-um," to identify them from all the other mums,

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and she used to come out, "What do you want?" Looking down.

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"Ice cream man's here," "Wait there,"

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go in, get money, put it in paper, a bit of newspaper,

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and drop it over the balcony - donk - into the square.

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And then you'd pick that up and go and get the thing,

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but you had to identify, "Mu-u-m! "Eddie Gregory's mu-u-um!"

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I didn't have to. We lived on the ground floor.

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There was no numbers 1 to 10 Debnams Road. It started at 11.

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Odd numbers all the way through, and we were the very first one

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and we backed on to the railway.

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I don't remember hearing it. You just simply filtered it out.

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It's like coming down here today -

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there's a load of noise, but I can't hear it.

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I come round here and I just can't hear it.

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We had a dog. He was a black mongrel called, imaginatively, Blackie.

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We used to come, open the letterbox and say, "Come on, boy,"

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and he used to walk up, put his paw on the thing

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and then walk backwards and let us in the house.

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He'd run around the estate and when he came back,

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he would knock at the door. Knock. Knock, knock.

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Sit with his paws up, just knocking the letterbox with his nose.

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We thought nothing of this at the time.

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Nobody believes us now, but our dog was a genius.

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My dad was a docker. He used to bring home quite a lot of stuff out the docks, actually.

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One of the things they exported was shoes.

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And so much stuff was disappearing that eventually

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they decided to export left shoes out of London

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and the right shoes out of Liverpool so they couldn't get pairs.

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That's absolutely true!

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Whatever moderate level of fame I reached, it will never reach my old man.

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We used to go down the road and somebody would go, honk, honk, "Oi, oi!"

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It wouldn't be for me - it would always be my old man. They called him Spud.

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He was an extraordinary, very funny, very, very larger-than-life,

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and very physical, my old man.

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My mum worked in a chocolate factory like Willy Wonka.

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And I remember - and this sounds like a fetish -

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I used to get her Doctor Scholl sandal and smell the sole of it

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because it smelled so terrific of all this chocolate,

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and I can remember sitting smelling this and, "What are you...?

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"Don't do that with my bleeding shoe. Give us it back."

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Can you notice this slight reddening in my cheeks?

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The stairs were popular for courting couples.

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And, uh, I did OK.

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I'm not nostalgic about it at all.

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I think we had the best of it, they should knock it down.

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It's an old ruin, but while it's physically here

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it wouldn't surprise me to hear someone come bursting out

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from these steel shutters going, "Mu-u-um! Mu-u-um!"

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# You haven't looked at me

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# That way in years

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# But I'm still here. #

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Danny Baker, a man who certainly has a way with words.

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Now, Alison, it's only rained a little bit today,

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but we haven't exactly seen a lot of sun either.

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Stop moaning, Mike.

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Do you not realise you're on the West Sands beach,

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iconic for the opening scenes of Chariots Of Fire?

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Ah, yes. Team GB training for the 1924 Paris Olympics

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running barefoot on the sand to the sounds of Vangelis.

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MUSIC: "Chariots Of Fire" by Vangelis

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Yes, it's all coming back now.

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Well, speaking of the Olympics, you know the Olympic torch

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is in the middle of its epic journey right through every nook and cranny in the country

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and it's already been through St Andrews.

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But as British Para-Olympian Ade Adepitan reports,

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the last time the Olympics were held here the message of peace and unity

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had an extra special meaning.

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In 1948, as the torch arrived in Britain,

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it marked the unification of European nations

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after the turmoil of World War II.

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All through the night the flame was carried by relays of Englishmen,

0:17:540:17:58

and by Thursday morning, still accompanied by television newsreel,

0:17:580:18:01

it had reached the outskirts of London.

0:18:010:18:04

The 178 British athletes that completed the 364-mile torch relay race

0:18:040:18:09

from Dover to Wembley for the opening ceremony

0:18:090:18:12

and then down to Torquay for the sailing regatta

0:18:120:18:15

were everyday village men. In fact, they were just a fortunate few

0:18:150:18:19

that were picked from local athletics clubs.

0:18:190:18:21

'One of those men was Frank Verge.'

0:18:230:18:26

The committee decided to put on an eight-mile race

0:18:260:18:29

and the winner was to carry this.

0:18:290:18:31

So where are we exactly, Frank?

0:18:310:18:33

This is where my leg started and it went for two miles

0:18:330:18:37

through Borough Green to the Cob Tree in Ightham.

0:18:370:18:40

We were allowed six minutes for a mile.

0:18:400:18:42

It was 4.05 in the morning

0:18:420:18:46

and the flame appeared in the distance

0:18:460:18:50

and it came towards us and we exchanged the flame

0:18:500:18:53

and then I was on my way.

0:18:530:18:56

We've got 12 minutes to do this in, Frank. Are you ready?

0:18:570:19:00

-Yeah, I'm ready. You'll beat me in that.

-THEY LAUGH

0:19:000:19:04

How did you feel when you got to the end?

0:19:040:19:06

I was right on top of the world.

0:19:060:19:08

And then I handed the flame over, which was quite happy,

0:19:080:19:12

and I must confess I felt almost lonely for a little while.

0:19:120:19:17

But after that, I never saw any of them again.

0:19:170:19:21

Never heard of them again.

0:19:210:19:23

Austin Playfoot ran the Surrey leg from Merrow to Guildford.

0:19:250:19:30

When I carried this,

0:19:300:19:31

the course into Guildford was absolutely lined with people

0:19:310:19:35

on both sides with cars parked, and people even were standing on their cars cheering

0:19:350:19:40

and it was terrific. And people were asking me to sign autographs.

0:19:400:19:43

"Crikey, they want my name?"

0:19:430:19:47

Where did you start your run from...?

0:19:470:19:49

-Right under the sign of the Horse And Groom.

-Superb.

0:19:490:19:51

Well, shall we get going? We've got 30 seconds to make up, haven't we?

0:19:510:19:54

-Well, 1.9 miles. We better get going now, yeah.

-THEY LAUGH

0:19:540:19:58

Now, the guy you passed the torch on to.

0:20:010:20:03

Did you get to talk to him at all?

0:20:030:20:05

Not really, because there were so many people

0:20:050:20:07

jostling and pushing and shoving

0:20:070:20:10

and the moment he lit his torch, he was away.

0:20:100:20:13

How important was carrying the Olympic torch for you in your life?

0:20:130:20:17

Yeah, I think that stands as a highlight for my career, yeah. For my life, yeah.

0:20:170:20:23

It seems both Austin and Frank's experience was common.

0:20:230:20:27

Many of the runners had never met each other...

0:20:270:20:30

until now.

0:20:300:20:32

-Hello there.

-Hello.

-My name's Frank. Frank Verge.

0:20:320:20:36

My name's Austin Playfoot.

0:20:360:20:38

Ah, hello.

0:20:380:20:41

Touche.

0:20:410:20:42

Good afternoon. I'm John Barrett from Deal in Kent.

0:20:420:20:45

-Oh, here's another one.

-Good heavens.

0:20:450:20:48

I was running on the leg from Wembley to Torquay.

0:20:480:20:52

Why don't we put all our torches in the middle

0:20:520:20:54

and simulate relighting them again?

0:20:540:20:57

Yes, why not?

0:20:570:20:59

Yeah, it's a great feeling.

0:20:590:21:01

It's a unique situation. Absolutely fabulous.

0:21:010:21:04

And we'll never be able to do it again.

0:21:040:21:06

Well, I'm hoping next year. Come on.

0:21:060:21:08

THEY LAUGH

0:21:080:21:11

I can't quite believe I'm playing here

0:21:110:21:13

and walking over the Swilcan Bridge.

0:21:130:21:16

This is the old course at St Andrews and, Alison,

0:21:160:21:18

probably the world's most famous 18th hole.

0:21:180:21:22

I would think so, and actually it's a public course.

0:21:220:21:25

There are seven links courses in St Andrews and you don't need to be a member to play.

0:21:250:21:28

You do need to be organised - you can't just pitch up and play.

0:21:280:21:31

-You have to book quite well in advance.

-Oh, of course you do.

0:21:310:21:34

And that's because of an ancient charter that dictated

0:21:340:21:36

the townsfolk could play golf on the links

0:21:360:21:39

and it proved so popular that James II in 1457

0:21:390:21:43

had to ban the game because it was diverting

0:21:430:21:47

too much attention away from archery.

0:21:470:21:50

Good shot, sir.

0:21:500:21:52

Well, we're joined by Alasdair McDougall who's 15 years of age

0:21:520:21:55

and is a member of St Andrews here, and he plays with a handicap of two.

0:21:550:21:58

Now, for those of you that don't know golf, that, frankly,

0:21:580:22:01

is absolutely astonishing. What's it like being a member here?

0:22:010:22:04

Oh, to play in St Andrews is just phenomenal.

0:22:040:22:06

We've got great facilities here,

0:22:060:22:08

the opportunity we have is just unreal.

0:22:080:22:10

The support we get from the coaches is just amazing.

0:22:100:22:14

It's a great opportunity to become the best golfer you can, just to have fun.

0:22:140:22:18

-Best score?

-Best score here? One over, I think.

0:22:180:22:21

-73?

-Phenomenal.

0:22:210:22:24

So, looking at the golf stars of today, who's your icon?

0:22:240:22:27

-Who do you want to be?

-Well, I'd like to say Tiger Woods.

0:22:270:22:29

I think he's a great guy, but my parents, my grandparents,

0:22:290:22:32

really just don't like him, so I have to say Luke Donald.

0:22:320:22:37

-Keep everybody happy.

-Keep everybody happy.

0:22:370:22:39

I'm more of a Rory McIlroy man myself.

0:22:390:22:42

One thing I've always wanted to know is why there are 18 holes in golf.

0:22:420:22:45

Well, around St Andrews there used to be 22 holes -

0:22:450:22:49

11 out and 11 in - and the first four holes, they were too short,

0:22:490:22:53

so they decided to cut them down to two holes

0:22:530:22:55

and then it had to be equal front nine, equal back nine,

0:22:550:22:58

so they decided to cut the last four holes to two

0:22:580:23:02

so that takes four off of 22 for 18 holes.

0:23:020:23:04

And there we go, and, of course, where Saint Andrew's leads,

0:23:040:23:07

every other golf club in the world follows.

0:23:070:23:09

Absolutely, and from the Royal And Ancient,

0:23:090:23:11

we're going to head up to Orkney where Ruth Goodman

0:23:110:23:14

has found a settlement that's six centuries older than Stonehenge.

0:23:140:23:19

The idea of lost civilisations conjures up images

0:23:220:23:25

of abandoned ruins like the Valley Of The Kings or Pompeii.

0:23:250:23:30

But what many people don't realise is that we have one of our own

0:23:300:23:34

that could rival anything in the world,

0:23:340:23:36

here off the tip of mainland Britain.

0:23:360:23:38

Hidden on the Orkney Islands for almost 5,000 years

0:23:400:23:44

it was dramatically brought to light during a violent storm in 1850,

0:23:440:23:48

which ripped open the hill it had lain buried in.

0:23:480:23:50

Very little is known about the people who built it

0:23:500:23:53

six centuries before Stonehenge was erected,

0:23:530:23:58

but we do know Skara Brae is Europe's most intact Stone Age village

0:23:580:24:03

and an invaluable insight into a long-lost Britain.

0:24:030:24:07

Because of the lack of timber on the islands,

0:24:070:24:09

everything had to be built from stone,

0:24:090:24:11

which is why so much survives today.

0:24:110:24:14

But Stone Age most certainly does not mean "caveman".

0:24:140:24:19

This was a sophisticated society, with the village built over

0:24:190:24:23

a system of drains more than 3,000 years before the Romans

0:24:230:24:26

were supposed to have brought plumbing to Britain,

0:24:260:24:29

and all the houses are built to the same plan.

0:24:290:24:32

The focus of the house is the hearth that sits in the centre.

0:24:320:24:35

There's the dresser, which is the most prominent feature, really,

0:24:350:24:38

that you see as soon as you come in the door.

0:24:380:24:40

And then these beds, possibly?

0:24:400:24:42

That's right, you could get quite a lot of people, actually,

0:24:420:24:45

in this space, couldn't you?

0:24:450:24:47

This sort of space is actually much better

0:24:470:24:50

than many of the Victorian working-class houses I've been in.

0:24:500:24:53

How many of these houses were there in the village?

0:24:530:24:55

There's probably about half a dozen contemporary

0:24:550:24:58

in the village that we have excavated.

0:24:580:25:00

The Skara Brae village is actually bigger out towards the back

0:25:000:25:03

and we don't know how much we've lost to the sea at the front.

0:25:030:25:08

House seven is the most intact.

0:25:080:25:11

It's normally off-limits to the public,

0:25:110:25:13

but we've been granted special permission by Historic Scotland to film inside.

0:25:130:25:18

But this is no ordinary house.

0:25:180:25:21

There is a burial of two ladies under that bed.

0:25:210:25:25

Not only that, but the door here can be controlled from the outside

0:25:250:25:31

so you could actually be closed in this house.

0:25:310:25:33

And we've no real idea quite what this house was used for?

0:25:330:25:37

This might be some form of cult house

0:25:370:25:39

or a place where dangerous things happened.

0:25:390:25:41

Perhaps it is a house for menstruation

0:25:410:25:43

or for women to come after childbirth.

0:25:430:25:46

So it's real proof that this is a really complicated culture.

0:25:460:25:50

You do get the feeling that you wouldn't be wanting to step out of line in this society.

0:25:500:25:54

The Orkney Islands may seem remote to southerners,

0:25:540:25:57

but in Neolithic times this was a major hub for sea traffic.

0:25:570:26:02

Also, the soil here is very fertile

0:26:020:26:05

and is still highly valued for its lush cattle grazing today.

0:26:050:26:08

But rising sea levels and increased coastal erosion

0:26:090:26:13

is threatening Orkney's archaeological treasures.

0:26:130:26:15

When it was first built, Skara Brae was over a mile from the sea

0:26:170:26:21

and all this we can see in front of us was fields

0:26:210:26:24

and then reed beds and marshes going out to the loch.

0:26:240:26:27

But in the 1920s, half of this house here fell into the sea

0:26:270:26:33

and this seawall had to be put up

0:26:330:26:34

to try and protect the rest of the village.

0:26:340:26:37

But erosion beyond the wall continues unabated.

0:26:370:26:41

Every site is unique.

0:26:410:26:42

It's a permanent loss, you can't recreate it.

0:26:420:26:46

A quarter of tourists that come say they come because of the archaeology.

0:26:460:26:49

This is a support for a rural economy

0:26:490:26:52

and we have to look after it.

0:26:520:26:54

There's a saying that if you scratch Orkney it bleeds archaeology.

0:26:540:26:58

On the nearby island of Rousay,

0:26:580:27:00

Steve Dockrill and his team are desperately recording

0:27:000:27:03

what's left of yet another recently revealed settlement.

0:27:030:27:08

It dates to the Iron Age, and we know from a sample that we took,

0:27:080:27:11

we've got a date from round about 0 to 100 AD.

0:27:110:27:15

And right over on the other side

0:27:150:27:17

we've got the remains of a Norse hall

0:27:170:27:21

so that gives us a date round about 1100.

0:27:210:27:24

So we've got about 1,000 years of history all, sort of, stacked up?

0:27:240:27:28

And the sea, presumably, is taking it away?

0:27:280:27:30

The sea's taken an enormous amount of the site away.

0:27:300:27:33

Possibly next year, this may not be here.

0:27:330:27:35

The Orkney Islands are home

0:27:350:27:37

to some of the world's greatest ancient monuments,

0:27:370:27:41

yet every year more and more is being lost to the sea,

0:27:410:27:45

much without ever being officially recorded.

0:27:450:27:48

And should it carry on unchecked... For more reasons than one,

0:27:480:27:52

that'll be a price that the Orcadian's can't afford to pay.

0:27:520:27:55

Thanks, Ruth. And part of St Andrews has also ended up in the sea

0:27:580:28:02

and the pier behind was built out of the ruins of the cathedral

0:28:020:28:05

just on top of the hill.

0:28:050:28:07

Well, the pier walk is one of the oldest traditions here

0:28:070:28:10

and on a Sunday it's a sea of red as the university students

0:28:100:28:13

put on their scarlet gowns and walk up and down the pier.

0:28:130:28:17

And they say no-one leaves St Andrews without doing

0:28:170:28:19

the pier walk at least once. So, Alison, I think we've got time.

0:28:190:28:23

-Shall we?

-Why not? Until next time. Bye-bye.

-Cheerio.

0:28:230:28:29