03/09/2012 The One Show


03/09/2012

Paul O'Grady joins Matt and Alex. Esther Rantzen discusses becoming a grandparent, Miranda Krestovnikoff looks at weevils and Jamie Crawford on the perfect wedding photograph.


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Transcript


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Hello, welcome to The One Show with Alex Jones... And Matt Baker. We

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are joined by a man who fully admits having a dog's life, and he

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could not be happier. With him, some of our weekend medal winners.

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Please welcome Paul O'Grady and our I haven't won a medal. Can I just

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say? I cannot run for the bus! must be pleased to be here. You

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prefer the Paralympics? When I watch it, I forget about any

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disability, it is about ability, not disability. It proves that

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there is no such thing as cannot. It is amazing to watch. First, we

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will head over to the Olympic Park, where Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson

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has been watching the medals coming in. We will start with Ellie

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Simmonds? She had a brilliant afternoon. She won yet another gold

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medal. It's amazing from seeing her this morning, when she got out of

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the swimming pool, she said, what time was it? It was quicker. Then

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going to winning tonight. There was so much pressure on her. It's easy

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to forget she is still a teenager. She was 13 in Beijing. You think

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that she has been in the sport forever. But she has not. She has

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plenty more years to come. What about Lee Pearson? He had a chance

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to match your medal tally? He got a bronze medal today. He's won a team

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gold medal, and individual silver medal and a bronze medal. He's a

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really good friend of mine and I wanted him to come here and when

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Margaret three gold medals. It's tough, when you are beaten. But

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he's been amazing, very magnanimous. He's been very kind and said he has

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been beaten by better people on the day. I think it shows where

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equestrian has got to. A few years ago, they were riding on borrowed

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horses. Now every one of them is a thoroughbred. What about the latest

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news with Oscar Pistorius and his complaint? He basically apologised

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for the timing of his complaint, didn't he? Not what he actually

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said? Yes, he was beaten in the 200 metres final, right on the line, by

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the Brazilian Alan Oliveira. In the post-race interviews he said it was

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not fair, that he has Longo legs, he is four inches taller than he

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should be. -- longer legs. He has been petitioning the are you see to

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get the rules changed. It's quite difficult. They have a maximum

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height that each athlete is allowed to Dave. They were measured and the

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IPC came out and said that he was completely within the rules, he has

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not done anything wrong. When Oscar Pistorius wanted to run the

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Olympics, he had to decide the length he wanted to use. He had to

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pick a fairly standard height and went through the testing process.

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He says if he wants to change the length of his legs, he has to go

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back through the testing process and will not necessarily be allowed

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to run mainstream again. Alan Oliveira has gone through the

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testing, Oscar has disadvantaged himself in a way by going through

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the rules to get into the Olympics. If he ran close to his personal

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best, he would have beaten him. He was not on the best of form last

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night. I think it is the emotion of the race, coming off the track he

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felt very upset and felt it was important to say those things. The

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IPC, very carefully, are pushing those issues away. They are going

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to discuss it after the Games. But we could see a rule change. Very

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quickly, for the rest of the week, who should we be looking out for?

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In athletics, Dave Weir. He's in superb form and he's got three more

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races. He could win another three gold medals. Thank you for keeping

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us up to date. Let's introduced the medallists. Tandem cyclists

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Anthoney and Craig, and the rowers, Naomi, Lily, David and James. David,

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you were Team GB's last hope for in medal on the water. Did that put

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extra pressure on you? Not really. We knew Tom's result. We heard it

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coming over the Tannoy. We had a race plan, we trained all winter

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for it and we focused on what we needed to do. We executed it and we

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did not let anything else affect us. Naomi, James, you are visually

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impaired. What was it like when you crossed the line? Is it really

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something? It really is a roar. I had to ask to clarify we had won. I

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wasn't entirely sure. It's the most incredible feeling. It only came

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home to me when I heard somebody on the press pontoon say, Paralympic

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champion. I thought, that is us, wow. Was it hard for you to

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communicate to them? It was almost like they didn't really need a cox.

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The crowd were doing my job for me. They were so loud. It clearly

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worked. Legacy is the word of the moment since the Olympics and after

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the Paralympics. We have all learned a great deal about his

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ability, especially over the last week and a half. Do you think the

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change in attitude will go on after the Games? Automatic, we will have

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to wait and see. Paralympic sport is a bit different. -- ultimately

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we will have to wait and see. I'm pretty confident that these guys

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compete, and when they compete their disability is neither here

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nor there. It doesn't matter. People that are not disabled will

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probably not be able to relate to that. Disabilities are they on the

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surface, people see and they relate to what they do see. I think it

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will. You know, nobody can ignore what has been going on. Ultimately,

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we will have to wait and see. you think it has made a difference

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with it being a home games? With it not being abroad, there is more

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ownership? There is a culture thing as well. The British are open to

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have stuff. Other countries can hide disability, they do not like

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disability. Well, nobody particularly likes disability. We

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are open to the fact that it happens and it is there. It is

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something you have to having your culture. Your faces on our

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wonderful medal tally that we have over here. We have the game's

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makers, Chris, Anne and Paula. They are a family, living together in

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Paula's house. You have the latest face, Ellie Simmonds, to go on the

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gold medal? I have Ellie Simmonds, her second gold medal of the

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Olympics, for the women's 200 metre medley. And it was a world record.

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Brilliant! Round of applause! And a big thank you to all of our

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Paralympic champions. Brilliant. We are changing tack completely now.

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love that girl, Ellie Simmonds. She is fabulous. You were saying that

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you had learned to swim just a few years back? 10 years ago, I taught

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myself. Are you teaching your grandchildren? No! I can hardly do

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it myself! I get in it and I am like an old crocodile. I slide down

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and back. I don't think you can even call it swimming. You had two

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grandchildren. What type of grandfather are you? Of a morning,

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I am Uncle Silas, pretty mean. Come afternoon, Mary Poppins. They know

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in the morning, don't bother him. I don't get out of bed, I slither. I

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come down and the pans are on the floor and I go mad. Put that back!

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In the afternoon, they can do what they want, I'm not bothered. More

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and more grandparents are taking on childcare duties. It's no surprise

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that it can lead to disagreements on how best to bring up baby.

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Imagine if you were about to give birth and your mother was Esther

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Rantzen. You would stay in! I've reached a very important

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milestone in my life. I'm joining a fabulous club with 14 million other

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members in Britain, with the arrival of my first grandchild. But

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how will that change my life? I hope that I will be as mischievous

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as my grandmother was. I think that relationship, Grand trialled and

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grandmother is so lovely, when it I'm not sure how I feel about my

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impending grandmother status. I first got pregnant and I told her,

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she was really excited and happy. Quite soon afterwards she said she

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did not want to be called Granny. She said, I'm not a granny, I'm at

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glamorous. I cannot share with Becca the fact that I am nervous. I

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don't want to make her nervous. Things can go wrong it. But if

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things go sailing through beautifully and we have this

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wonderful new baby, that would be terrific. Like me, Becca works in

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television. A long, irregular hours can be really tough for a working

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mother. In the 80s, I often took my children into work with me. Who is

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that? Emily and my baby Rebecca, nine months old.

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She will not be able to do that, she will need to find someone else

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to look after her baby when she is at work. It's actually the case

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that one in four Working families is forced to rely on grandparents

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for an estimated �3.9 billion with of child care. But what happens if

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granny does not see eye-to-eye on how to raise the baby? As you might

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have guessed, I have strong opinions. You need to practise how

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to swaddle. Do you know how to? know how anti-swaddle and I am?

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Why?! Baby's hands, they explore the world with them. Not when they

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are asleep! I think it's a disgrace. While the idea of being a

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mischievous granny appeals to me, I'm not very good at biting my

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tongue. It's time for some advice from my closest friends, POW

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Mianzhu, who already have nine grandchildren between them. -- POW

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Is it like this? Chaos every time of grandchildren around? It starts

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slowly. By the time they go, it's like a tornado has hit. Did you

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allow your own children to do this? You know the old saying, if you

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knew how good grandchildren were, you would have started with them.

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They arrive clean and tidy, they are up for it, they are excited,

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and when they are tired and revolting, you give them back.

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had a disagreement. Swaddling. happens is the baby gets out.

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literally for two weeks, if that. But you cannot interfere. You can

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give advice. It's very difficult, to be honest, not to say, I would

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do this. She's right, especially as my daughter has some interesting

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ideas of her around. When you wanted to be fed, you were fed, no

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matter what time it was. I was thinking of going by the clock,

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every three hours. Bloody hell, you're not serious? I will not give

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you any advice, I will stand by... Bloody hell! What do you mean that

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you will do that? Right, every three hours. I can always adjust

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the clock. You are going to be a nightmare, I've got to take your

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keys away. Don't worry, I have several spare sets. I think he will

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be the most fun, the most naughty granny that has ever existed. I

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don't think you will change nappies or help me with the night feeding.

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I don't think you will be very practical. But I think you will

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make them very happy. Sounds good to me. I like that deal. I know you

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So, did she get stuck in and change nappies? Has she swaddled her baby?

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Was it a boy or girl? We can answer that right now. Joining Paul R S

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I just offered my services as the new nanny. It's like Billie

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How many times did you say in the past five weeks, I would not do it

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like that? I have managed to hold us back, haven't I? Sometimes, my

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face tells its own story. Company Matra's is telling the story.

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don't say to do it this way and that way? You do not say it, but it

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is there. I go, that crying means that he needs feeding. That is what

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he is trying to do now. She says, no, he needs a cuddle from granny.

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I think he needs a couple from his nanny! He is just wonderful. This

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is the problem with new babies, everybody wants a cuddle. Benjamin,

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it is going to be like this all your life. You are going to be the

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most lovable, beautiful boy. Remember that I said that when you

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are 16. When he puts your football through the window! Swaddling, she

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is so pleased with herself because he absolutely hates it. Some babies

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really like it. I don't think it is the dramatic torture that she

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claims it is. What about feeding? When he is hungry or every three

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hours? When he is hungry. Which averages every three hours. We both

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win. Fun and games around them! thing that you were concerned about

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is the whole grandfather thing. It's just the title, grandfather.

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It's like widow, spinster, it pigeonholes people. Grandfather, I

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just thought about this old man in the Alps, with a beard, yodelling.

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I think I am more Catherine Tate's What are you going for? I think he

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will choose. That's what tends to happen with grandchildren. I keep

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referring to her as granny and biting it back. I think he will be

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confused. It will be granny, no Esther, no mum. It's lovely to see

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you all. Thank you, I consider this your baby. You followed us right

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the way there. You were nearly there in the labour ward. Is there

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something you want to tell us? I mean a One Show baby! What are

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you implying here on live television. Was gone on. You're in

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trouble when you get home. This is not the Jeremy Kyle show. Let's

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move on. Like many women becka can last minute nesting. She did retile

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the kitchen. Miranda Krestovnikoff - I can't speak now - is in

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Worcester on the trail of a skilled little beagle.

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The Aspen tree is named because of the way its leaves flutter in the

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breeze. Despite being admired for their beauty, Aspen trees vai much

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more important role to play. They form an intriguing relationship

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with a tiny and colourful beetle called the leaf rolling weavil.

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It's just four mm long and has an iridescent coppery red and bright

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green body. They favour the young Aspen, only a couple of metres tall

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and in direct sunlight. Becoming most active for just a few weeks in

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early summer, they're responsible for some unusual craftsmanship. I

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hope that James hitch cock from the Worcester Wildlife Trust can find

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them in action. That looks like a good candidate. That looks like

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it's just been done. It does. of these leave rolls is known as a

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nidus. Delicately crafted to house between one and four of their

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precious eggs. That was made what a day or two ago, it's still attached.

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It could have been a day. But they have been out for about ten days

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now. That is perfect. Beautifully rolled, so neat as well. Now I know

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what I'm looking for. Let's see if we can find another one. The

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weavils in the sunshine just glimmer like little jewels. Oh,

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there's a weavil right here. That is just amazing. These two working

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together as a team. They obviously like it in the mid. Day when it's

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sunny. The temperature plays a big part in their activity levels. As

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it gets warmer the insects are more and more active. That's why they

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choose these suckers because there's good microclimate here,

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nice and low down and sheltered and in a good, sunny spots. The weavils

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choose young, Supple leaves to roll. By biting through the top of the

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leaf, they cut off supplies from the plant, eventually causing the

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leaf to dry up and die. Then, using her legs, she pulls the edges in,

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laying eggs as she goes, sealing with sticky secretions, she rolls

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the leave until it's fully coiled and her eggs are safe and secure.

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They're charming. Such beautiful They're charming. Such beautiful

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insects. They look charismatic. Then they do this amazing thing as

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well. It's well worth a close look. They are a fantastic little beasty.

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The males will occasionally assist the fee males in rolling the leaf.

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Competition is intense and the male will often defend the female from

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others by engaging in fierce battles, involving violent head-to-

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head wrestling. A successful roll will fall to the ground where the

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eggs hatch to become the next generation. Throughout their short

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lifetime the adults will continue to mate with one another and in

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turn create up to 30 different rolls. Here it's a real success

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story. What's the picture around the country? Worcestershire is a

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hot spot. We have four sites now within the county. But nationwide,

:19:58.:20:03.

there are about 12 sites now. Not doing so good. Over the last ten

:20:03.:20:10.

years, the beetle has declined. It's now to a point where it's

:20:10.:20:15.

considered a conservation priority species. These weavils are

:20:16.:20:20.

indicators of healthy woodlands. Their intripbsic relationship with

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Aspen is vital to their survival. By committing their lives to

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rolling these delicate packages, they have become the ultimate

:20:29.:20:34.

masters of their craft. I find it fascinating that such a

:20:34.:20:40.

tiny beetle will go to such lengths to protect her eggs. I hope that by

:20:40.:20:44.

managing these special woodlands our native Aspen will establish new

:20:44.:20:54.

populations of this fascinating Aren't they pretty! Could you love

:20:54.:20:59.

a weavil, Paul? Probably, yeah. course. Overnight I'd develop a

:20:59.:21:03.

very close relationship, I could see it. I'm always putting things

:21:03.:21:08.

out the window you know, spiders. Didn't you get a grasshopper in

:21:08.:21:14.

your bed rl. I have a cricket. At first I would go in the bedroom and

:21:14.:21:19.

it would leap out. I'm used to him now. I'm always at the dogs, "Leave

:21:19.:21:26.

him alone." He's like jimminy cricket. You have a new series that

:21:26.:21:31.

starts tonight over on ITV. For The Love Of Dogs. You are going behind-

:21:31.:21:35.

the-scenes at Battersea dogs and cats home. Let's look at one of the

:21:35.:21:39.

short-term loves of your life that you have while you're there. Roll

:21:39.:21:44.

up and see the beautiful boxer folks. He slobbers, drools, moults,

:21:44.:21:50.

he looks like the back end of a bus and a bit of flatulence. He's just

:21:50.:21:53.

my type. Carmine was brought in because he was too big and

:21:53.:21:58.

boisterous for his old owners. Here's my Carmine, hey. Why haven't

:21:58.:22:04.

you been snapped up a glamour pus like you? Paw. Other paw. High five.

:22:04.:22:11.

Good boy. Do you like other dogs? Do you like company? There would be

:22:11.:22:15.

murder if I turned up with another dog. I know, I know, I shouldn't

:22:15.:22:19.

have favourites, but I can't help it. I'm in love. Aren't you,

:22:19.:22:22.

beautiful boy. Do you think I could sneak him home?

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APPLAUSE That's the main problem, wanting to

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take the dogs home. You did break yourself imposed ban in the end.

:22:32.:22:36.

Carmine I would have taken like. That my three, if I bring a big dog

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in, olga in particular would probably freak and pack her bone

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and leave home. A puppy they'll accept. I thought I was going on

:22:45.:22:53.

tour, otherwise Carmine, otherwise he would be in the kitchen. That's

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Eddie. A little chi wow wau what left tied to the gate. She gave

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birth to this litter. I went back at the end of the series and

:23:04.:23:09.

they've all got homes. He said no, this Rhyl one hasn't. I said oh, go

:23:09.:23:14.

on. He's fabulous, Eddie. How's he settling in? They all love him.

:23:14.:23:19.

Because Olga has a mothering instinct. Look at him! He thinks

:23:19.:23:24.

he's a Rottweiler. He goes up and takes food off the others, bones

:23:24.:23:30.

off them, balls off them and they back off. And he's fiercely loyal.

:23:30.:23:35.

He's probably the loyalest dog after Buster I've ever had. He's a

:23:35.:23:39.

cracking dog. You are busy at the moment. You're doing another series

:23:39.:23:43.

for BBC and is it your third autobiography. Yes the third. It's

:23:43.:23:48.

like Lord of the Rings. I can't stop. What's it's called? Still

:23:48.:23:53.

Standing. After you've read it, you'll think "I'm surprised he is."

:23:53.:23:58.

Is it true Janice long helped you? I wait until everybody has gone to

:23:58.:24:02.

bed. I'm like a vampire. Janice kept me company all the way through.

:24:02.:24:06.

It It's the only time you've got time. This is it. The mind is clear

:24:06.:24:12.

and the phone's not going. With my two fingers on the laptop. Great,

:24:12.:24:16.

well Paul's For The Love Of Dogs starts tonight at 8pm on ITV1. And

:24:16.:24:21.

the book is out on October 11. Everybody loves a wedding. Isn't

:24:21.:24:25.

that right? No, I hate them. I don't mind a good funeral but I

:24:25.:24:31.

can't bear weddings. Enforced joviality and kids in bridesmaids'

:24:31.:24:35.

frocks, posing for photos every ten seconds and buying presents they

:24:35.:24:41.

don't want. You have to trek miles and stay in a Laosy B&B. All right!

:24:41.:24:46.

No I don't. Don't invite me to your wedding.

:24:46.:24:51.

Your funeral you'll turn up. Don't invite Paul. For those of us who do

:24:51.:24:56.

like a wedding, here's how to capture the moment perfectly.

:24:56.:25:01.

Weddings, for those involved having great photos of the big day is

:25:01.:25:04.

vitally important. So, we get professionals in to dot job, but

:25:04.:25:10.

what is it that makes their photos of your big day look more, well

:25:10.:25:14.

professional than uncle Bob's snaps. Sean is one of the best wedding

:25:14.:25:18.

photographers in the business. look for the light and the emotion

:25:18.:25:22.

and interaction between people and we can do it with a smartphone or

:25:22.:25:25.

compact camera. Today I'm riding shot gun to watch him at work.

:25:25.:25:30.

First, Peter, the nervous groom. Sean finds a spot where he can

:25:30.:25:36.

control the light. How come you've closed the curtains? I want just a

:25:36.:25:39.

definition between the light on his face here and shadow on this side.

:25:39.:25:46.

By closing them, I reduce the light ever so slightly.

:25:46.:25:50.

The narrow shaft of light draws the eye to Peter with the background

:25:50.:25:56.

receding into relative darkness. Next, a group shot with Peter's

:25:56.:25:59.

mates. Can you rest like that. That's good. We're trying to break

:25:59.:26:03.

up the lines. We don't want them in a straight line, hands in pockets

:26:03.:26:08.

looking normal. We want to keep a diamond formation. The shot is

:26:08.:26:11.

posed but it appears completely natural. The hall mark of a real

:26:11.:26:17.

pro. It's all go. We have less than an hour to photograph Laura, the

:26:17.:26:21.

bride, getting into her dress. bride into the dress is something

:26:21.:26:25.

that a lot of girls dream of from an early age. It's a key moment to

:26:25.:26:32.

get. It's the details that are important. Like the lacing of the

:26:32.:26:37.

corset. We're going to get really nice portraits of Laura. What I can

:26:37.:26:42.

see now is what Peter will see when he walks down the aisle. I want him

:26:42.:26:45.

to remember that both in his mind and in photograph. Sean controls

:26:45.:26:51.

the light by drawing the curtains. To prove this works just as well on

:26:51.:26:58.

a camera phone... Sean is constantly looking for unusual

:26:58.:27:03.

angles. And using devices like reflections to get something

:27:03.:27:11.

different. In the ceremony itself, Sean makes

:27:11.:27:21.
:27:21.:27:23.

sure he gets all the important After the service, Sean has the

:27:23.:27:27.

couple to himself. This walk allows for lovely intimate shots in a

:27:27.:27:35.

stunning environment. He's constantly directing the couple.

:27:35.:27:41.

up there, practice your first dance for me. Oh, no. That's perfect.

:27:41.:27:51.
:27:51.:27:52.

This is an Aprilure in the gate giving lovely framing for nice

:27:52.:27:58.

moments of the two of them. When the conditions take a turn for

:27:58.:28:02.

the worst, he turn it's into an opportunity. It's horrible, it's

:28:02.:28:05.

pouring down, but getting them running through the rain is just

:28:05.:28:12.

fantastic. Formal group shots can be

:28:12.:28:17.

challenging. People tend to line up stiffly and it's hard work getting

:28:17.:28:23.

them relaxed. The boys think it's a free kick. Put your hands behind

:28:23.:28:29.

your backs. Turn in as well. We're going to have everybody turn two

:28:29.:28:33.

thirds in. It's more flattering. It brings everyone together and looks

:28:33.:28:36.

like a family. If you stand people normally, they stand about this far

:28:36.:28:43.

apart, even the two that just got married. In the late evening, when

:28:43.:28:47.

things get more informal, Sean gets the shots that make a wedding a

:28:47.:28:50.

wedding. If there's one thing I've learned about wedding photography

:28:51.:28:54.

today it's that you can't afford to hang around on the outside looking

:28:54.:28:57.

in. You have to be right in the middle of things, in the action,

:28:57.:29:00.

seeing potential photographs and making them happen. Sean did make

:29:00.:29:05.

it happen. This is a set of photographs that will be treasured

:29:05.:29:09.

photographs that will be treasured for a lifetime.

:29:09.:29:12.

That one's lovely. Great film. So many tips. That tip about

:29:12.:29:16.

pretending to dance. And the curtains. Yeah. There you are. Next

:29:16.:29:21.

time you go. It still hasn't moved me though. I just see him as a

:29:21.:29:24.

Paul O'Grady joins Matt and Alex in The One Show studio tonight. Esther Rantzen discusses becoming a grandparent for the first time with her daughter Rebecca Wilcox, Miranda Krestovnikoff discovers the unique relationship between leaf-rolling weevils and aspen trees in Worcester and Jamie Crawford finds out how to take the perfect wedding photograph.


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