08/03/2018 The One Show


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08/03/2018

Alex Jones and Matt Baker are joined by Susan Sarandon to talk about the life of Hedy Lamarr, while home secretary Amber Rudd discusses the government's Domestic Abuse Bill.


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Hello and welcome to The One Show

with Alex Jones.

And Matt Baker. Do

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were joined a Hollywood superstar

who for almost 50 years has been

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showing us she is not a woman to be

messed with.

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messed with.

Let's have a little

talk. What do you think? Darling!

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Where do you get off behaving like

that with women?

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that with women? Do you have a

problem with this?

Please welcome

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Susan Sarandon!

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Susan Sarandon! Wow. You have

starred in over 80 movies.

That was

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a lot of hair acting.

All sorts was

going on.

I learned that from Cher.

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She figures out her hair first and

goes for the character after. You

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think I'm kidding.

I can believe

that of Cher. She has a lot of hair

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in a lots of films.

But is it right

that all this acting was never

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really on the cards for you and you

ended up acting because you turned

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up at a boyfriend's audition?

Husband. I married him in my senior

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year of college. Chris Sarandon went

on to do dog day afternoon and get

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an academy award nomination. He

still acts. He needed someone to

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read a scene, and I did. It was for

an agent, not a part. And she said,

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why don't you come back too, and I

came back. Then I kept working,

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which seemed hilarious, because I

had never studied acting. It just

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shows you don't have to know

anything. You just have to figure

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out how to survive, but the acting

part is not complicated.

What were

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you focusing on?

Just getting out of

New Jersey. I wanted to go to

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college. I was very interested in

literature and theatre. But the

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school that I went to was more about

an academic approach. And I was

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working my way through, so I had

tonnes of jobs. I was cutting hair,

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ironing, cumin apartments. There are

still people who owe me money.

I

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loved you before, but I found out

today that you came to the UK in

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2006 to discover whether or not you

had Welsh roots in Tondu, near

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Bridgend. I was like, what? That is

a match made in heaven.

So how Welsh

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are you? Well, it's on my dad's side

and I am Welsh, thank God, because

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they spent all that money to bring

me in and all my siblings came with

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me, which is eight siblings. I am

the eldest of nine. They don't want

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to tell you too much because they

are hoping you will cry and be

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emotional. So they said, do you know

who Dylan Thomas is? I said, oh, my

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God, yes, I do! And they said, no.

Your great-uncle drank with him, or

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something.

That's all right, that's

a connection.

And I had already

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spent some Christmases in Swansea,

actually. And then Catherine

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Zeta-Jones was in Feud, and she is

Welsh. And I had a boyfriend who

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went to high school with her.

We are

basically related.

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basically related.

Well, for your

latest project, you talked about

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your love of literature and now it

is very much documentaries. You have

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looked into the secret life of this

remarkable lady. It is the 1940s

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actress Hedy Lamarr. We will be

finding out more about her and her

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story in a little while.

She's so

beautiful. They said she was the

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most beautiful woman in the world.

Snow-white was apparently based on

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her. Now, the Home Secretary, Amber

Rudd, says she wants to change the

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way we as a country think about

domestic abuse. The statistics are

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striking. Nearly 2 million people a

year are subjected to violence and

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intimidation in their homes. 100

calls are made every hour to the

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police and two women are killed

every week in England and Wales.

The

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Home Secretary is with us tonight

and we will be asking her what the

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government will be doing to reduce

those numbers. First, Anita has been

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to see a radical new project in

action.

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OK, guys, we are going to be looking

at emotional abuse.

Everyone in this

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room has their own tale to tell

about domestic violence and abuse.

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Don't want to put up with it no

more. You go through it all,

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violence, anxiety, depression.

People can only take so much. Treats

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on the way you want to be treated.

None of them are the victims.

When

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you were swearing and calling her

bad names, you thought that was OK?

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This session is part of a pilot

project being run by Northumbria

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Police. It's been designed to

identify abusers or those at risk of

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abuse in who it is believed will

respond positively to therapy. The

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scheme has been championed by police

and crime commission Dame Vera

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Baird. What is the purpose of this

initiative?

People go into prison

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and come out again and carry on

behaving the way they did. These

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courses can bring change.

At what

point do you identify the

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perpetrator and say, you are going

to have this course?

We have to find

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the perpetrator. It comes from a

number of sources. Once it is clear

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that somebody has made a valid

referral, the police will say, you

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have been picked out as a domestic

abuse perpetrator. Will you go on

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this course? Does it mean that

because you have witnessed domestic

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abuse of a child, you will go on to

do that?

If you have seen it, you

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think it is normal.

But it is still

a choice you make.

From May, tougher

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sentencing guidelines will mean

people convicted of domestic abuse

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in England and Wales are more likely

to go to prison. These participants

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are working hard to ensure that

doesn't happen to them.

For those

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guys who were here a few weeks ago,

we looked at the effect that abuse

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has on our partners. It's massive.

I

have just stepped out of the session

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and it's really powerful stuff.

When

I first came here, I wasn't thinking

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I should be here. But after this

session, I think I should.

They are

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being made to think about their

actions and the consequences, and

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join the dots together.

But who is

responsible for your behaviour?

But

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can sessions like this really work?

I have arranged to meet a man who

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says they can. He has a history of

violence against his wife, the most

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recent of which led him to become

involved in the project.

I got very

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abusive and I got the point of

physically pushing her against the

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wall. She you need help. -- she

said, you need help.

What did the

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course teach you?

They teach you

these things called time-outs. It is

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a controlling mechanism. You can do

role-playing, which shows you the

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way it escalates.

Do you think it

has taught you to control your rage?

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Yes.

So you can stop yourself before

it escalates?

That is what the

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intention is.

And you couldn't do

that before?

Never had the skill.

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Are you a reformed man?

Yes. I do

have the occasional argument with my

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wife, but it doesn't escalate. That

is the difference.

The Home Office

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is the perpetrator project has

proved so successful that it has

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invested £1 million to roll it out

to neighbouring forces. But what do

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the victims themselves think about

this kind of approach? Melanie spent

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ten years in a physically and

psychologically abusive

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relationship. We asked her to listen

to some of the session.

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to some of the session.

Who

identified using abusive behaviour

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in their assessment?

Threatening

behaviour, yeah.

I don't know

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whether it is an attitude of, I've

got my backside on the seat, I am

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here. I don't know if this is going

to be a positive outcome.

Are you

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respected or feared?

I think it is

brave for

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brave for perpetrators to come

themselves. But I don't think this

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programme has convinced me any

different of my thought that it

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won't work. It is a waste of money,

waste of resources. The money should

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be focused on victims and their

children.

Dame Vera Bird is keen to

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reassure victims like Melanie.

It's

not an either/or, that is critical.

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We continue to spend money on

victims, and that is where the

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fundamental money must go. But we

will just be mopping up the mess

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made by these perpetrators,

supporting people in that way, if we

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don't also tackle it.

For the men

attending the session, there is

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still a long road ahead.

What is at

the top of the list?

Respect.

So

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that be mindful of listening is

really important in a relationship.

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The Home Secretary Amber Rudd joins

us now. So today you have launched

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this Domestic Abuse Bill. It is a 12

week consultation period where you

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will be listing to the general

public. You heard what Melanie, a

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victim, said about her view on the

counselling perpetrators. What is

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your reaction to what she said?

Our

focus is always going to be on the

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victims. This consultation shows

that. We are introducing measures

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and consulting on them to make sure

that victims get more support at

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every stage. We are also identifying

additional victims and encourage

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them to come forward. But what we

saw here was a new programme to stop

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domestic abuse. With perpetrators,

you see a lot of repeat activity.

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What we have seen from this

initiative, which was launched in

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2015, is a 60% reduction in the

amount of people repeat offending.

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It is a big change. We have also

announced that we will be rolling it

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out to five other police forces with

an additional 7 million. So it is a

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big approach in terms of reducing

the amount of domestic abuse as well

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as supporting victims.

Having

watched that film, Susan, do you

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think Melanie is right?

I can

understand Melanie after living for

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ten years in an abusive situation,

why she would be reluctant to trust

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that there can be change. But I

think to break up families and not

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give a shot to someone to learn to

reprogram themselves... It does come

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from either a problem with anger

management or growing up in an

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atmosphere where this seems normal.

Also, in the United States, there

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are programmes in high school or

younger for girls to identify that

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this is abusive behaviour, because

it starts really young. So young

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girls can see that this isn't normal

for them to be shoved around either.

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Very often, "He cares about me so

much that he is jealous and

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violent", whatever, that association

is not healthy, so to make that

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clear early on is also effective.

So

it if you were part of this

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consultation, what would you be

saying to our Home Secretary that

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could work in helping to reduce

violence?

It is totally on the right

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track. It's not an either/or

situation, as she says. You have to

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give families a shot, give these

guys a shot to keep families

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together and to not let it go on

forever. But I can understand that

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if you have been living this way for

a long time, it's hard to believe

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that something would change.

I agree

with this point about learned

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behaviour. We saw that from some of

the comments from the men. They

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might have seen it in their

families. So if we can stop that

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cycle, then the children are less

likely to think it is normal

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behaviour. They need to learn it in

school as well.

And it's not just

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about changing the law, it might be

about the public be more forthcoming

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and reporting abuse if they see or

hear it.

Exactly, is about women

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having the confidence to come out

and talk about it, taking away the

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shame, acknowledging that so much of

it takes place, and for them to be

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confident that when they do report

it, action will be taken. We have

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introduced new training for police

so that when it is reported, they

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are sensitive about knowing how to

approach it. I was at a police

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station the other day and the police

described to me how they had been

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called into a house for something

else entirely and they're one of

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them spotted a post it on the fridge

which said, asked the master before

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opening. And he started asking

questions, and all this coercive and

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controlling behaviour came out and

action was taken. So it is being

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aware and looking for the signs.

You

are here on The One Show because you

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want the public to get involved. So

how can they help?

Talk to your

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friends. Unfortunately, everybody

will know somebody or themselves,

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who is having some sort of

experience of that. They should not

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put up with it. Find out what other

people are doing and make sure that

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if they need help, they get it.

If

you have been affected by domestic

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abuse or you want to get involved

with the consultation and give your

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opinions, there is more information

on our website.

Before you go, we

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can't have you here and not ask

about the current poison situation

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with Sergei Skripal and his

daughter. And their policeman was

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also involved. We are hearing the 21

people are being treated.

What is

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the current situation? This was a

dreadful event and it has been

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unravelling over four days. I have

spoken to the head of

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counterterrorism police, who gave me

the update. You're right, 21 people

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have sought medical advice. Out of

that, two of them, the targets, are

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still seriously ill. I am pleased to

say the policeman is now stable. But

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this is a live criminal

investigation. It is a very serious

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matter, and attempted murder, and we

will give the police space to do

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their investigation so that they can

reach conclusions which we can

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follow up.

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Susan's latest project is one she

has produced, Bombshell: The Hedy

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Lamarr Story. It is about the 1940s

film star.

Yes, she was known as the

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world's most beautiful woman but

there

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world's most beautiful woman but

there was more to her than that.

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It was her hobby. She had a complete

table said up in her house. Howard

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Hughes gave her a set of equipment.

Howard Hughes wanted to build the

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fastest planes in the world so he

could send them -- sell them to the

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airports.

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What a brilliant story to have on

International women's's day. You

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produced the documentary, Susan, and

Alexander directed it. How did you

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come together to work on this

project?

We have a mutual friend in

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her brother. Who also produced. And

has been a friend of mine. We were

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forming a documentary film company.

And Alex was interested in this.

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There was a book. I met with the guy

who had of the book, that led to the

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next thing. Luckily all my children

have left home.

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have left home. And we moved a

couple of extra tables in and

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started to use my apartment.

When

you do all of this there is an

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enormous amount of research that

goes into this, Alex. Was there a

0:17:260:17:29

key moment when you thought, this is

on, let's do this?

There was a

0:17:290:17:35

moment when I thought, we have a

problem. At the beginning we didn't

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have her voice. I wanted to do this

story but I was reluctant to plunge

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ahead without Heddy's on voice. She

had died having become a recluse and

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not really wanting to tell the world

her story. Everything that was

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presented to me at the beginning of

the books about her life was

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somewhat questionable. Scientists

were also saying to me, we want this

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to be true at how likely is it

really?

Yeah. Then some tapes came

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into play.

Yeah, the miracle of my

life.

Your children will not like

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that!

And my two boys! The third

miracle of my life was that moment

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with the tapes. We had been working

on the film six months when we

0:18:310:18:35

finally found them. We found them

just by systematically calling every

0:18:350:18:40

person alive that could possibly

have them. We finally got down to a

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reporter for Forbes magazine, and he

had talked to her in 1990. And I

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contacted him he called me back and

said, "I have been waiting 25 years

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for you to call me." Chill start my

arms.

Then you could go forward

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because you had the proof. She

changed the shape of aeroplane

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wings. It was communication systems

that was the big thing. She formed

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the basis for what we still used

today?

Your cellphone, everything.

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But the Navy just ignored her. Her

mum was in Europe. She escaped, she

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was Jewish, her mum was still in

Europe. She was trying to get her

0:19:260:19:31

mother over. She had an emotional

reason to find out how to get people

0:19:310:19:37

safely over. She came over with this

jamming, finding alternating

0:19:370:19:43

signals, currents what do you call

them? It was no longer possible to

0:19:430:19:49

jam. But they didn't use it. She

ended up dying without any money,

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and six husbands later. Our whole

life is quite dramatic.

This was

0:19:580:20:05

before she became an actress.

She

ran off and started at 16 and went

0:20:050:20:13

to a film studio and then did a

controversial film called ecstasy.

0:20:130:20:19

Then she married at 19 and arms

dealer who was working with Hitler.

0:20:190:20:26

Then realised eventually that maybe

she wasn't in the safest place. And

0:20:260:20:30

hired a maid that look like her.

Then knocked her out in her bed and

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pedalled way to freedom. It just

gets better and better. By this time

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she was kind of known because of

this risk a film. She was almost

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signed to something in England by

Louis Payne Meara. She managed to

0:20:510:20:57

get on the same boat he was going on

to America. Summer by the end of

0:20:570:21:00

that journey she had convinced him

she was worth more money. And then

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she was in Hollywood. She had a lot

of really wonderful roles. And she

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was gorgeous. She learned English.

She changed her name. I don't want

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to give the whole thing away there

must be a film on this. There have

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been people trying to make it into a

film. I think it is more of a TV

0:21:210:21:25

series because there is so much

going on. Then you have the whole

0:21:250:21:28

thing of ages in Hollywood, which I

can relate to.

Is it right that her

0:21:280:21:35

daughter's godmother was Bette

Davis? De Bruyne that is right. --

0:21:350:21:42

That is right.

That is another

connection with you. You played

0:21:420:21:49

Bette Davis in Feud. Is that

something that still happens in

0:21:490:21:54

Hollywood?

0:21:540:21:59

Hollywood?

Maybe in music. Maybe

these rock and roll girls. You hear

0:21:590:22:02

about some of them writing bad

lyrics about each other. But I think

0:22:020:22:11

long ago, it's not true. The power

has shifted. Aligning yourself with

0:22:110:22:15

men and seeing them as your

competition, therefore enemy, is no

0:22:150:22:18

longer really relevant. My

experience has been that everybody

0:22:180:22:23

realises and helps each other. Maybe

you are disappointed somebody else

0:22:230:22:28

got a part you wish you had had, but

being envious is not the same as

0:22:280:22:32

trying to take somebody out.

Do you

still feel competitive in the music

0:22:320:22:37

-- movie industry?

I'm competitive

with myself. By the time you've been

0:22:370:22:44

in the business for more than 50

years, things either come to you or

0:22:440:22:47

you don't. I found dead man walking,

the book, and I developed that. I

0:22:470:22:56

going to get ahead of Meryl Streep

if there is something coming up?

0:22:560:22:59

Probably not. I have more than

enough challenges with the way my

0:22:590:23:05

life is going, so I'm cool with it.

But I think there is enough work for

0:23:050:23:10

everybody, and there are so many

more women now developing projects.

0:23:100:23:16

They are female centric. All

different kinds of women. That is

0:23:160:23:18

what we need. We need more diverse,

more female centric stories.

What a

0:23:180:23:26

brilliant day to have you both on

the sofa. Thank you very much. We

0:23:260:23:30

will say goodbye now as you have to

go to the BFI to see a screening of

0:23:300:23:34

your project.

Thank you for your

company.

Thank you.

0:23:340:23:40

APPLAUSE. It opens tomorrow in

cinemas.

Whilst Hedy Lamarr laid the

0:23:400:23:50

foundations for GPS, Wi-Fi and

Bluetooth, we focus on an inventor

0:23:500:23:54

who solved a British problem.

It is

all to do with tea, of course.

0:23:540:24:01

I'm Dr John C. Taylor. You may not

know my name but he will definitely

0:24:010:24:05

have used one of my inventions. The

switch that turns of a kettle when

0:24:050:24:09

it boils. With the rise in the

number of electric kettles in the

0:24:090:24:16

1960s, I saw an opportunity to

invent a control that did just that.

0:24:160:24:19

And this is it. The buyer metallic

snap action blade. Heat up the

0:24:190:24:27

medal.

0:24:270:24:32

medal. Jump into the air. Once the

blade cools down, it cools -- jumps

0:24:320:24:40

into the air. Mr! So the click their

provides the motion and the force

0:24:400:24:46

that switches of the cattle. And

over 5 billion of these blades have

0:24:460:24:52

been sold worldwide. I have lived

and worked for most of my life here

0:24:520:24:58

in the Isle of Man. And I would like

to tell you a few things that have

0:24:580:25:02

helped to make me the inventor that

I am today. My father was Eric

0:25:020:25:08

Taylor. He was also an inventor. So

I take after him. He invented all

0:25:080:25:15

the flying suits for the bomber

crews during the war. And the

0:25:150:25:20

electrically heated suits kept them

alive in the cold of flying at

0:25:200:25:23

30,000 feet. Inspired by my father,

I began my inventing career at the

0:25:230:25:29

tender age of nine. But at 13, when

my parents sent me to college on the

0:25:290:25:36

Isle of Man, they had the task of

reinventing me. I took the entrance

0:25:360:25:41

exam here. The principal, Mr Wilson,

reported to my parents when we had

0:25:410:25:48

the interview that I was practically

illiterate. He said, "But you have

0:25:480:25:56

done a good paper in maths and you

did a good science paper, I'm sure

0:25:560:25:59

we can find something good in you.

For" it turned out I had dyslexia. I

0:25:590:26:06

used it to my advantage when I

realised I could think differently

0:26:060:26:09

to others. With my gift for maths

and physics I was granted a place at

0:26:090:26:14

Corpus Christi College in Cambridge

to study natural sciences. Setting

0:26:140:26:19

me up for my inventing career. After

Cambridge I joined my father's

0:26:190:26:23

company, where I had the freedom to

invent. It has not all been about

0:26:230:26:27

kettles. I have over 200 inventions.

My most unique one is the Corpus

0:26:270:26:35

Christi clerk, unveiled in 2008 by

Professor Stephen Hawking. However,

0:26:350:26:43

the invention I perhaps most proud

of is the place I call home. I would

0:26:430:26:50

like you -- to welcome you to my

house. I thought it would be fun to

0:26:500:26:56

do something completely different,

which nobody had ever done before,

0:26:560:26:59

and that is to have an atrium in the

middle of the house which is

0:26:590:27:05

elliptical. I wanted the floor to

look like a dearly with a curved

0:27:050:27:11

top. Yes, the centrepiece is my bio

metallic plate. There is a wonderful

0:27:110:27:21

echo here.

0:27:210:27:26

echo here. OK, time to get on with

my life lecturer at University

0:27:290:27:33

College, Isle of Man. I hope I have

invented a useful speech.

0:27:330:27:38

A scientific education teaches you

that if you find new information,

0:27:380:27:42

you change your theory and you start

again. But I think that is the wrong

0:27:420:27:46

way to do it in practicalities. If

the first thing you thought of was

0:27:460:27:51

an invention, then if you can change

it around, which stops it working,

0:27:510:27:56

you've got a really good invention.

You have to turn it to an advantage

0:27:560:28:01

and make it into a success. My motto

is, think the unthinkable.

0:28:010:28:11

is, think the unthinkable. My mother

was a Latin teacher. It is very

0:28:120:28:16

important to have fun. Life goes by

very, very quickly. And here I am,

0:28:160:28:23

81, still having fun. Thank you all

very much.

0:28:230:28:28

That is 30 seconds before we can put

the kettle on. Your nominations have

0:28:280:28:32

been pouring in all week for our NHS

patients award, which we launched on

0:28:320:28:38

Monday with the help of the

Patients' Association.

There is

0:28:380:28:42

still time to nominate anybody

working in the NHS who you want to

0:28:420:28:46

thank for going the extra mile when

you needed them.

Yes, head to our

0:28:460:28:50

website for all of the details of

how to nominate.

Thanks to all our

0:28:500:28:55

guests for joining us. I'm back

tomorrow with Michael Ball and

0:28:550:28:57

wreckage of days. Have a lovely

night.

0:28:570:29:00

Alex Jones and Matt Baker are joined by Susan Sarandon to talk about the amazing life of Hedy Lamarr, while home secretary Amber Rudd discusses the government's Domestic Abuse Bill.