11/01/2018 The One Show


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11/01/2018

Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley are joined on the sofa by chef Gordon Ramsay, while Lucy Siegle will be chatting about what we all can do to use less plastic.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to

The One Show with Matt Baker.

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And Michelle Ackerley.

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Now if I were to compare tonight's

guest to a kind of food I'd say

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a pineapple would be pretty close.

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Surprisingly sweet on the inside but

cased in a rather spikey exterior.

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It's Gordon Ramsay!s

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APPLAUSE

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With a new hairdo that is very

appropriate.

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Talking of pineapples,

you've been very vocal

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about your hatred for them on pizza,

especially when your fans send

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you photographs of their Hawaiian

feasts I believe?

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Who puts pineapple on a pizza?

I

like a bit of pineapple on a pizza

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with some ham.

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Obviously the big news today

is the plan to dramatically cut back

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on our use of plastic products.

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What's your take on that?

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Really important move. 25 years, I

think it should be fast tracked. I

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swim a lot in the ocean and we spend

a lot of time in the ocean at

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Christmas and even with a wet suit

on, plastic bottles, it is a shame.

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Let's see if we can fast-track it.

It is packaging on certain foods,

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this coming out from the

supermarkets. Plastic coconuts.

I

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know you want to feel a product,

make sure it is tangible, and why,

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it isn't breathing properly. Crazy.

We want to hear from viewers at home

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to tell us what you're doing to cut

back on plastic and if you have any

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tips, let us know.

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First here's our our own

anti-plastic warrior

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with her take on today's news.

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If this is a tipping point in the

story of how we saved our seas and

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countryside from ourselves, it has

been a long time coming. Since I

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joined The one Show in 2007 I have

done my best to give a voice to

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people and organisations trying to

change our behaviour and force

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politicians to take a lead. Each

spend £470 a year on packaging we

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don't want ask for. Liley 400

beaches revealed nearly 2000 pieces

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of litter for every kilometre

survey.

That is around 800 earbud is

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in there.

It hasn't always been

easy. In the end it was a nesting

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albatross and the baby whale that

focused everyone on an issue that

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often rises up the political agenda,

but rarely stays there.

Plastic has

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become an integral part of our daily

lives. But every year, 8 million

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tonnes of it ends up in the ocean.

And there, it can be lethal.

On the

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day the Prime Minister went to a

west London wetland Park and

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revealed she put up an owl nesting

box, we asked the public how the

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attitudes have changed to help the

environment.

I have decided

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consciously, not to buy a 5p bike so

I'm carrying my items to work.

I

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always take a back like this and

something like this which folds up

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and I can put in anything so I don't

need a plastic bag.

I just put my

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drink in a plastic cup.

I try and

buy from the market because they

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don't try and decorate the product

and give me the product.

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Supermarkets spend more money on

packaging.

Milk comes in plastic

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containers and it used to be in

glass bottles. We wish it was in

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glass bottles again.

The government

said it would extend the 5p plastic

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bag charge to all shops and avoid

all avoidable plastic waste.

We have

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created the chaos, if you like, but

now we need to solve it.

Not doing

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down the plastics issue but there

are larger issues people in this

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country need to face rather than

worrying about plastic bags.

By

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2042I hope they have eradicated

plastic. I will be long pushing up

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daisies, so

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you have plenty of time.

2042 seems

like a long time, Lucy?

Especially

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when you think about the amount of

plastic that will be prorated in the

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interim. But we know the plastic

that has been created is still

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pretty much in existence, because we

have very poor recycling rates for a

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number of reasons. If you think by

2042, by my calculations, because

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plastic production is set to

increase, we could be looking at an

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extra 19 billion tonnes globally.

Yes, we absolutely need to act now.

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A lot of good feeling Abeid green

today, it is the first time since

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2000 2003 British Prime Minister has

given an environmental speech on

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domestic environmental policy in

this way. But people are saying

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there is no legislation underpinning

it and no targets we need to stick

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to. My theory is we will have to

break up with plastic ourselves on

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an individual basis to get things

going. The string bag, we had the

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lady in the clip say, always take it

with you. Very, very easy. The few

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things we absolutely need to make

sure we substitute immediately.

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Cotton buds, switch. Make sure you

are not buying the one with the

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plastic, but they are cotton ones.

Some supermarkets have already

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switched, which is good. The

Scottish Government said it is

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launching a consultation which will

hopefully lead to a policy change.

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We have banned micro beads a lot of

cosmetic products and that is coming

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into effect in the early summer.

The

options are the paper ones?

Yes,

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there is a substitution. It makes it

crazy we do this stuff. Plastic

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cups, they have plastic lids, we use

something like 2.6 billion a year.

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It is crazy. We need to substitute

these immediately. One of the great

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ways of doing this is with one you

can reuse and wash easily. We saw

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the Environment Secretary holding

one of these the other day.

That

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will be tricky, it has become a

culture to be wandering around with

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one of those cubs in your hand.

We're not saying you cannot have a

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beverage, but just carry one of

these.

It is not easy is it.

I carry

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one in my handbag, it is easy.

It

isn't easy.

Would you struggle with

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that, Gordon?

You would make it

work.

It is not that easy, that is

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what I am trying to say.

What is the

impact of not doing that.

Stay in

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the coffee shop, drink it and then

leave.

Slowdown everyone.

Another

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thing, maybe have your water in the

establishment as well because we are

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getting through 38.5 million of

these every day.

Every day?

Yes,

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something like a million on the

planet every second being discarded.

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On the one Show, we are switching to

these.

It has happened for about a

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year. Everyone in The Office has

them.

We have to do these things.

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Straws, talk about egregious. Most

of us don't need a receptacle to get

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from the mouth to the receptacle.

This is the biggest overselling of

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anything. Used for 20 minutes on

average, let's get rid of them.

You

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can get paper ones.

Gordon, tell me

your establishments are going to

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stop using these straws.

Under

pressure.

Fingers crossed, I love

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the idea of cardboard as opposed to

plastic. When you are having a drink

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and it is full of ice and magical

excitement in the gas, you need a

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straw.

I will help you, you need

cardboard.

No thank you. OK, I will

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change. We need a commitment from

you. Today is about commitments. You

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are worse than my mum.

She's going

to be after you.

OK, I will change.

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APPLAUSE

Good night.

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He has actually gone. You might

consider taking up a new hobby, try

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and find Gordon Ramsay in the

studio.

He is back.

He went to order

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some paper straws.

They are en

route.

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Now, if you've got some

spare time on your hands,

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you might be considering taking up

a hobby, something like

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painting or maybe cooking.

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But what about spending time

at Her Majesty's pleasure in prison?

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Well, people from all different

backgrounds are being sought to do

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just that, even if they haven't

done anything wrong.

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Here's Nick.

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I am at HMP Peter Barrett to meet

the woman with the keys to the

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prison. But former teacher, Susan

isn't the governor.

Just coming down

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to do what I normally do, which is

being nosy.

Susan is part of the

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Independent monitoring board,

members of the public who have

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unrestricted access. They can go

anywhere they like, any time of day,

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completely unannounced, on their

own. They are giving us exclusive

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access to their work. Do you have a

panic button on your wrist.

I have a

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whistle, but I have never used it. I

did carry a rape alarm for well but

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I kept dropping it down the toilet.

It is Susan's job to monitor living

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standards in the prison from

conditions and drugs.

I have a chat

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with the staff about how things are

going, get a feel for is this a

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constructive place for them to spend

their time.

The prisoners are free

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to speak to Susan at any point.

How

are you today.

Susan spent 20 years

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as a French and German teacher

before Rich Rowe in -- retiring. Can

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you understand how some people might

see you as a do-gooder?

Absolutely,

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but I don't think we are. We're not

on the side of the prisoner, it is

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just whether they are treated

fairly, not whether they have sky TV

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or lots of fluffy cushions on the

bed.

Like the prison service as a

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whole, there has been a rising tide

of violence in this prison with

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assaults on staff and prisoners at

record levels.

One of the things we

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are expected to report on is the

food. Do you try the food? Yes, I

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might try some of these wedges.

That

is my first taste of prison food.

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Not bad. In her nine years with the

IMB, she has reported on population,

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poor living conditions, drugs and

inexperienced staff.

She becomes our

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voice, we give our problems and she

goes directly to the management of

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the department we need. They come

straight back to us.

If I see

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something that should absolutely not

be happening and it is a serious

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issue, I could go straight to the

Secretary of State.

Susan has never

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had to go right to the top and

although IMB can push the change,

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they have no authority over the

prison system. Does it frustrate you

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you only have the power to advise?

That is our job, we are there to

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monitor, tell the prison what we

have seen and we think it is worth

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raising. And then we see how long it

takes them to act on it.

You still

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think there is a point to do what

you are doing?

I think we are like a

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conscience.

But the IMB have come in

for criticism over a lack of

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diversity in their recruitment. Last

year, three prisoners were killed by

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other inmates so we looked at the

IMB reports. The IMB report from

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long-lasting in lustre should fail

to mention an incident where one

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prisoner killed another in their

cell. The IMB said the incident was

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excluded because they had no direct

experience of it that the time and

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to avoid prejudicing ongoing

investigations. But we found depths

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under investigations at other

prisons that were referenced in

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their reports. Does this

inconsistency highlight another lack

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of credibility they have been

criticised for? I am eating their

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national chair. Their lot is

criticism about IMB, what powers do

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they have?

Nobody has any powers and

the IMB is like the canary in the

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mine and they are telling you when

things might going wrong. As a

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consequence, cutting staff and as a

consequence of drugs getting into

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prisons, prisons are less safe and

less likely to rehabilitate

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prisoners than they were.

Will you

take any steps to ensure IMB members

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will reflect the diversity of the

prison population?

Diversity is

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something we had to look at. But you

don't have to have walked the same

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road to know whether the conditions

and treatment people are being held

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in our right and proper.

It is good

to feel I came in that day and I

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went home and I actually had done

something that was valuable.

It

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sounds like you are the empathy

gland of the prison system.

We can

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be yes, but we're not suckers.

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Such a fascinating take on that.

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And if you're interested

in volunteering and becoming an IMB,

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the details are on our website.

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Theoneshow@bbc.co.uk.

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Gordon, you did a show based

in Brixton Prison where you taught

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inmates how to cook.

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How did you find life behind bars?

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That culture inside, they need to

lead that something tangible so when

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they go back into society they have

something to hang onto. Then their

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reoffending becomes very limited. I

wish we had that focus group in

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restaurants.

Behind the scenes to

see what's going on?

Great insight,

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you want these guys and girls to be

more educated. Before they come back

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home. It is important.

I was reading

you would get people to come into

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your restaurants and cause hassle so

you can see how your staff react?

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Yes, mystery shoppers, from knocking

over glasses of wine and sending

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feedback when there is nothing wrong

with it, to seek what the reaction

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was. I am a big advocate because you

get it instantly, within a minute

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back. Last Friday we closed a

restaurant round daily-macro down

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for a weeks and we had mystery

shoppers in their and that is a

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three Michelin star standard. This

year we celebrate 20 years.

Amazing.

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You are on a mission to teach the

nation how to eat healthily?

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And now you're teaching the nation

how to eat healthily?

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Yes, but it isn't all about diet, it

is just about eating healthily,

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cutting back on being a little

smarter with the portions.

There are

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three categories, you can go quite

extreme with the fitness side of it,

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or leaner food.

I was cranky and

overweight, and chefs have the worst

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eating habits because we graze all

day long, so the idea was to cut

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back a little on the dairy, little

more protein and be more smarter

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with the dressings and cream

substitute, and be more fragrant

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with herbs and spices, and then just

being smart.

It is hard when you are

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eating out, you want to look at the

menu and choose loads of different

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things, so what would your tip speed

to help people eat healthily?

Going

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out is a treat, so you have to enjoy

that. I changed from flat the

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sparkling -- flat water to

sparkling, it helps to fill you up.

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I have a snack in the afternoon

before dinner, and share a couple of

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items, share a starter or

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items, share a starter or dessert.

Share a dessert?! .

Yes, why not. I

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was unfit, and I was overweight, and

I started getting fit and running

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marathons, and it helps you feel

better.

And you are very good at

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treating people back. We have got a

few.

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When one asked, "What do you think

of my flatmate's meal?"

0:18:190:18:21

You replied, "Look

for a new flatmate."

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And when another tweeted, "How's my

dinner looking, Mr Ramsay?"

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You tweeted back, "Congratulations,

I've never seen eggs that dry."

0:18:250:18:32

No mention of the pineapple!

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And finally, this fan who asked,

"What do you think, mate?"

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Your three word reply -

"I feel sick!"

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What do you reckon to my lunch -

spag bol with pasta shells?

0:18:420:18:45

Are you a fan of pasta shells?

Taylor Black plastic ones! We are

0:18:500:18:56

cutting back on the plastic!

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Well, my dogs loved it.

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They didn't actually eating it, they

just looked lovingly at it! It was

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very tasty.

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Now, we want your help.

0:19:180:19:19

Part of the huge Robin Hood Gardens

estate in east London

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is currently being demolished,

but the Victoria and Albert museum

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is going to be taking away a section

of it to form part of an exhibition.

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It's now considered

a significant piece of British

0:19:330:19:35

architectural history.

0:19:350:19:36

We'd love to speak to people

who've lived in Robin Hood

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Gardens at any stage.

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So if you have any memories

or photos you'd like to share

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with us, please get in touch.

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Now, over the past week Mike

has covered many miles

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on his deep sea adventure.

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In a moment we'll be catching up

with him on dry land, but first

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let's see how his journey ended.

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Over the past few weeks, I've

travelled more than 1500 miles

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aboard the Celtic Explorer, a

research vessel on a complex survey

0:20:040:20:10

of marine life to write British and

Irish waters. I have had some

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extraordinary encounters with rarely

filmed marine mammals, including a

0:20:140:20:20

close encounter with

0:20:200:20:32

close encounter with minke whales.

But my time is running out, so my

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chances of coming across a real

ocean monster is slim. Sensing an

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easy meal, began its turn up. These

specialist divers have reinforced

0:20:440:20:53

next to prevent damage as they tear

into the water at more than 60 mph.

0:20:530:21:01

They are just dropping like arrows,

they fold their wings and go into

0:21:010:21:04

the water. I have seen it before,

but never this number going in at

0:21:040:21:09

the same time. It is a feeding

frenzy.

0:21:090:21:16

frenzy. Then as quickly as it began,

the feast is over. Coming across

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this many is a great side as the

surrounding water is productive,

0:21:210:21:29

meaning it is likely there are other

predators feeding nearby.

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Then, out of the stillness...

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Look at that for a massive blow!

There is the back, and the Finn. A

0:21:490:21:55

blow this high can only be produced

by one of the two biggest creatures

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on the planet. The blue whale or it

aptly named cousin,

0:21:580:22:07

aptly named cousin, the fin whale.

They can grow up to 27 metres in

0:22:070:22:12

length, and weigh 90 tonnes. That's

as much as seven double-decker

0:22:120:22:16

buses. Sometimes called the

greyhound of the sea, their

0:22:160:22:22

streamlined bodies make them one of

the fastest Wales in the ocean.

0:22:220:22:33

the fastest Wales in the ocean. We

have seen a leviathan of the oceans,

0:22:330:22:36

the second-biggest animal the planet

today, the fin whale, the most

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enormous cherry on top of this

incredible expedition. I begin the

0:22:420:22:47

journey home, believing I have seen

the best the ocean has to offer, but

0:22:470:22:50

I'm wrong. We have just had an

incredibly exciting moment on board

0:22:500:22:56

the ship. I'm standing next to one

of the biologists, and we were

0:22:560:23:01

looking out to sea and just caught a

very large splash. We ran over to

0:23:010:23:05

see a shark leapt clear of the water

from about 150 metres away. He

0:23:050:23:14

managed to get a picture. Have a

look at that. Look at the size of

0:23:140:23:20

that fin

0:23:200:23:24

look at that. Look at the size of

that fin. This thresher shark's body

0:23:240:23:29

is eight feet long, and the tail the

same length again. They are normally

0:23:290:23:32

found in tropical waters, so to see

one let alone that one beach in just

0:23:320:23:37

ten miles from the Scottish coast is

truly extraordinary. There is a

0:23:370:23:43

wealth of marine life in the seas

around Britain and Ireland, and over

0:23:430:23:47

the last three weeks, I've had,

doors by riding, Rhys Evans Mac

0:23:470:23:54

Dolphins leaping up into the air,

basking sharks meandering past the

0:23:540:24:02

ship, my best ever

0:24:020:24:08

ship, my best ever views of minke

whale, and to top it all, the

0:24:110:24:14

majestic fin whale. And all you have

to do to see this amazing variety of

0:24:140:24:22

marine life is just go a little bit

deeper.

0:24:220:24:28

What a way to end a wonderful trip.

0:24:280:24:30

Well, Mike is here, along with Lucy.

0:24:300:24:33

Watch out, Gordon!

0:24:330:24:35

What a trip, Mike.

0:24:350:24:39

This wasn't just about a lovely boat

ride.

0:24:390:24:41

What did the scientists learn?

0:24:410:24:45

I had an amazing time. The focus of

the survey was to look at herring

0:24:450:24:54

and mackerel. They want to manage

the stocks of them sustainably for

0:24:540:25:02

people and wildlife, and only when

they know what is out there and what

0:25:020:25:05

is under the wave, and manage the

fishery levels sustainably so that

0:25:050:25:11

people can enjoy their fish and

chips in the future, as the results

0:25:110:25:14

are interesting. They collated all

the data. Boarfish, the little fish

0:25:140:25:21

I saw for the first time, levels are

good in the North Atlantic, horse

0:25:210:25:26

mackerel, numbers are going up and

down, currently very good, but they

0:25:260:25:30

are susceptible to big changes, and

herring are lowered the moment but

0:25:300:25:35

good in the North Sea. Because of

the service, cod and haddock are now

0:25:350:25:40

considered sustainable, what they

are doing is incredibly important

0:25:400:25:44

for future proofing our fisheries

for our fish.

And results of surveys

0:25:440:25:49

like this one are relevant for EU

policy, but recently the Environment

0:25:490:25:53

Secretary Michael Gove is saying

that we should reclaim our fishing

0:25:530:25:55

rights.

0:25:550:25:57

So what will the implications be

for surveys like this?

0:25:570:26:01

It is the intrusion of other

fisheries across Europe. We take a

0:26:010:26:05

lot of flak, but I always say to my

chefs, look, we run out, it is fine,

0:26:050:26:10

if you go to a restaurant, and you

have run out of something, it is

0:26:100:26:14

fresh, that is a good sign. But it

is intrusion from the foreign

0:26:140:26:19

fisheries that are damaging hours.

European investors can fish within

0:26:190:26:28

six or 12 nautical miles, and

Michael Gove says that we will take

0:26:280:26:32

back control of our territorial

waters, but for the first time in 50

0:26:320:26:35

years, it will be on our terms and

under our control. But it is

0:26:350:26:40

important that these EU sponsored

surveys carry on, because the fish,

0:26:400:26:43

for example, British waters, Irish

waters, we have to manage the stocks

0:26:430:26:50

collectively, otherwise they will

collapse everywhere.

And as you are

0:26:500:26:55

saying, as a chef you have to be

receptive, and it is all about

0:26:550:26:59

seasonal eating.

And that is a

chef's responsibility today, Mick

0:26:590:27:03

make it seasonal. You don't want to

eat sea bass or called 12 months a

0:27:030:27:10

year.

Root vegetables are the same.

0:27:100:27:17

Lucy, it seems to me

that it's wildlife

0:27:170:27:19

programmes like Blue Planet,

which was the highest-rated

0:27:190:27:21

programme of 2017 by the way,

which have a real impact

0:27:210:27:23

on the public, especially

when they see such powerful images

0:27:230:27:26

of the damage that plastic is doing.

0:27:260:27:31

It is so important, and it resonates

with so many people. However, that

0:27:310:27:36

is a charismatic species, and a lot

of the damage that is being done by

0:27:360:27:40

plastic pollution is quite mundane.

And we also need to think about, we

0:27:400:27:45

need behavioural change. We can't

emotionally get involved in a series

0:27:450:27:49

that comes out once a year, I want

us to be talking about this stuff

0:27:490:27:53

all the time. I would like every day

to be like today, and I want younger

0:27:530:27:58

voices as well. They are going to

inherit some huge environmental

0:27:580:28:03

problems, so what do they think

about it?

0:28:030:28:09

Lucy, earlier on we asked our

viewers to tell us how they're

0:28:090:28:12

doing their bit to cut down

on the use of plastic, and we've had

0:28:120:28:15

some interesting ones, haven't we?

0:28:150:28:16

Sarah from Dorset, no plastic in the

bathroom, soap all the way, she

0:28:160:28:19

makes shampoo bars to wash her hair.

Is she still single?

Louise says she

0:28:190:28:32

has started using the local milkmen.

For what? Sorry!

You are so naughty!

0:28:320:28:45

To deliver milk!

Not babies.

That

Israel 70s humour. Courtney wants a

0:28:450:28:55

cut down her use of plastic by using

cardboard boxes to carry things

0:28:550:28:58

instead.

0:28:580:29:03

instead.

She can use that box for my

straws!

And Sophie takes a water

0:29:030:29:07

bottle out with her and asks cafes

to let her fill it up with water

0:29:070:29:11

instead of buying plastic bottles.

I'm sure Gordon's restaurants will

0:29:110:29:15

be receptive to that request as

well.

Yes, £4.50 per bottle!

0:29:150:29:24

well.

Yes, £4.50 per bottle!

In the

inshore waters, we are seeing so

0:29:240:29:26

much litter, and even further out,

still seeing marine litter, fishnet,

0:29:260:29:32

it is astonishing how pervasive this

has got.

We need to turn the tide on

0:29:320:29:38

plastic, we absolutely have to do

it.

We will turn the tide!

0:29:380:29:43

People are talking about it, and

that is the main thing.

0:29:430:29:46

Well, thank you all

for your suggestions.

0:29:460:29:48

That's it for tonight's show.

0:29:480:29:52

Thanks, Gordon, and good luck

with your Ultimate Fit Food book.

0:29:520:29:55

Tomorrow night Patrick Kielty's

here, and we'll be joined

0:29:550:29:57

by Oscar-winning star Eddie

Redmayne.

0:29:570:29:58

Have a great night.

0:29:580:30:01