10/01/2018 The One Show


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10/01/2018

Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley chat to Ardal O'Hanlon and Josephine Jobert about their hit show Death in Paradise, and Lorraine Kelly talks weddings.


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LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to

The One Show with Matt Baker.

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And Michelle Ackerley.

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Outside it may be cold and grey

but in our studio this

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evening love is in the air.

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We have three special couples

who by the end of the show will have

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renewed their wedding vows live

on the show.

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Get your tissues and confetti ready!

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They are very nervous, it will be

marvellous, do not worry.

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marvellous, do not worry.

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Our best man Dan is here to talk

about a girl's best friends -

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diamonds - specifically those

belonging to her majesty the Queen.

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And our wedding guests tonight

certainly don't fall

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into the category of people that

you just want to invite

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to the evening do.

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The first puts the ding into wedding

- our very own master of ceremonies.

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It's Lorraine Kelly.

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And swapping murder for matromony -

from Death in Paradise it's

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Ardal O'Hanlon and Josephine Jobert.

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It is a special night. It is all in

honour of you, Lorraine. Are you all

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feeling the love in the studio? I

wish I had brought my confetti.

You

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have only been to one wedding.

Are

you not a fan? I don't have that

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many friends I guess. I went to one

and it was a lovely wedding and they

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were two good friends of mine. What

I did is I made them a surprise. I

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filmed the wedding and gave them a

video as a souvenir.

You will be

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inundated with offers now. Lorraine,

recently you have been to 12

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weddings in your new programme. But

let's talk about your wedding. What

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atmosphere did you have yours?

There

was a lot of Titan, lots of pipers

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and whiskey and dancing. We even had

friends of mine who do a

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re-enactment of a battle and they

did a Braveheart thing. You know

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when the bride and groom go away to

get their pictures taken and it

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takes ages. We got people something

to do. They did a re-enactment of a

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battle. It is very romantic.

You had

quite an unusual wedding.

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Well, we hope everything

goes without a hitch

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with our ceremonies tonight,

but if your wedding day didn't go

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quite to plan or something went

wrong and you captured the moment

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on camera, send us a snap

and we'll show the most

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embarrassing ones later!

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Now, it's fair to say that it

certainly isn't a marriage made

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in heaven when it comes

to the relationship between rail

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operators and commuters.

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Not only have fares increased,

today the UK's biggest rail

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franchise has been officially

named the worst.

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The National Audit Office branded

Thameslink, Southern

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and Great Northern poor value

for passengers, with 900,000

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travellers a day suffering the worst

disruption on the network.

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Dom Littlewood spent the first

strike day of 2018 with passengers

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on the London to Southampton train

who found themselves on a bus.

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There are five train companies

affected by strikes, which is why I

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am ditching the train and going on a

coach. Hello, there. This coach is

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travelling from London to

Southampton is an alternative to the

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train service and is a coach with a

difference because there are

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questions that need answering. So to

pass the time of day we are going to

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play off the rails, a quiz about the

railways. Last year what percentage

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of trains were on time?

95%?

I think

25.

That is low.

90.

87.7.

Well

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done. 25, you don't catch a train

very often. Why are you on this

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code? I just went to visit my mum in

Yorkshire for Christmas and New Year

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and I am on benefits and it is

cheaper than the train. Who controls

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the price increases, the government

or the train operators? The

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government. The train operators. The

government. Spot on. If they do not

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address this now, the prices will

keep on rising. Can I ask why you

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are on the coach? We intended to go

by train but there was a problem.

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How do you feel about that?

A bit

annoyed because I am not used to my

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plans being in disarray.

When was

there a first union dispute about

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driver only operation?

I would say

more recently, so 2007.

It was

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actually 1981. That surprised me as

well. Personally I love train rides,

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this is just fine. If you love train

ride, why are you on the coach? We

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are a couple and wherever he goes I

follow. This is tough. In the year

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1900, how many tickets were sold by

British rail?

The first one.

It is

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1.1 billion.

Good gracious.

Last

year train operators paid more money

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to the government than they received

in subsidies? True or false?

True.

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Troupe.

Spot on. How much does a

one-month season ticket from London

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to Southampton cost? 80,000? £451.

How can you say AT ground? It

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probably will be soon! Some of that

was tricky. Normally we are used to

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seeing you on TV in the morning. How

are you enjoying this?

It is

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unashamed good fun, it is completely

crazy, it is over the top and it

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makes you smile in January when it

is a bit miserable outside and you

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need to have a laugh. We laughed our

heads of doing it, but we cried as

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well. When it comes to the end of

the show there are two weddings and

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it is really emotional. I tried so

much.

Amongst all of the fun and

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games, at the root of this are real

people and a real love story and

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they care about each other so much.

And the audience is very involved

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because they are the guests you

would have at your wedding.

How does

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it work?

There are two brides and

grooms and they have got their

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family and friends and you are up

against one another to win a

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fantastic honeymoon and the chance

to get married and to have the

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wedding shown. But the runners up

the mini honeymoon and they get

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married as well. I have been to 12

weddings and every single one is

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different and joyful and I cried at

every single one. What is not to

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like about two people who love each

other standing up and telling people

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they love that they want to say we

love each other for the rest of our

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lives? But it is crazy as well

because there are games.

What is

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going on here?

Everybody had a pad

they sat on and bounced up and down

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and buy some jiggery-pokery and

electronics they popped a massive

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champagne corks and they won a

prize. Did you not do that at your

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wedding? Everybody will do it and it

will catch on. It got everybody

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warmed up. Some of the girls were

happy to hold on because they were

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bouncing.

I noticed that.

They got

so competitive and they went for it.

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Did you have a favourite of the 12

weddings?

To be honest I really did

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love them all, they were all

amazing. The two boys who got

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married was very special. It meant

so much to them. Of course it means

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so much to everybody, but for them

to have their friends and family

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together and they said they thought

they would never see the day. And

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their dogs came down the aisle with

them, beautiful black labradors.

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They had bows and flowers on and it

was joyful.

In the news today they

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are talking about same-sex marriages

in Australia now which is great.

And

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about time as well. But it was great

and that was a very special one. But

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every single wedding is special and

there is something so lovely about

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these vows.

It chokes me up.

Everyone has their idea about what

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their dream wedding would be. What

would yours be? Would you keep it

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low key or go all out?

Probably a

simple one, very intimate with my

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closest friends and family.

You

would not be jumping up and down

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dressed in a wet suit is trying to

make a cake whilst on stage is going

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around?

Would it be a Caribbean

wedding?

Probably, on a beach with a

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live band or something like that.

Is

it right that you wore a wig in the

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second series of Father Ted because

of your wedding?

Yes, it is true.

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This is a major revelation. I got

married during the Christmas period.

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We shot the video inserts, so all

the locations for the second series

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of Father Ted just before Christmas.

Just after Christmas I got married

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and I was feeling pretty rough on

the day of my wedding. My best man

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had taken me out the night before

and I went to a barber and I got my

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hair cut. I went back into the

studio, two weeks after filming, and

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we are back in the studio to shoot

the whole series but I had no here,

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so they had to make a special week

at very short notice. I was

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unrecognisable.

I was feeling rough

and I went and I shaved off all my

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hair?!

I remember the look of horror

when I went back into the studio and

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we were filming for eight weeks and

it didn't match. It could not have

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been more different. They had to

manufacture a wig at very short

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notice and it was the budget for the

second series! During the entire

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second series it is a wig to match

my own hair.

We are now joined by

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somebody who you know very well. She

is part of the programme, registrar

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Kate Tremain, who will be helping us

tonight. A lot of people are

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renewing their wedding vows. More

and more people are doing this, why

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do you think it is a trend?

It is

hard to put your finger on it, but

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it is a jolly good excuse for a

party.

It is all about the knees up.

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Yes, and you can invite your best

man and your bridesmaids back ten

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years on, it is a wonderful record

to have.

Is it a legally binding

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ceremony?

No, not in the same way as

signing in the register, but vows

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are binding in as much as they are

things that you say to each other

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that mean something to you and they

are repeat of the vows that you made

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to your wedding is a good

commitment.

As we will see very

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shortly, these vows are very

personal and they mean so much.

They

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are, absolutely.

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It's time to meet our first couple,

Carol and Rohan, who will be

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renewing their wedding vows shortly.

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Here's your story.

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We met in our hometown in Paignton

in Devon whilst out walking and we

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just started chatting to each other.

We arranged to go on a date.

We will

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have been married ten years in

August. We thought about renewing

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our vows on our ten year

anniversary.

To have all our family

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and friends with us.

I lost my dad

about ten or 11 weeks ago and he

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would have enjoyed it.

So very much

missed.

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Louise and Aidan, you met on this

very day 14 years ago and you are

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here to celebrate ten years of

marriage together. When you married

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you promised to care for each other

and share your lives. Today, you are

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going to demonstrate your continuing

love for one another and renew the

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vows you made. Louise and Aidan,

please, would you like to join

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hands? Tell us your vows and we will

start with you, Louise.

Aidan, I

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will love and care for you always,

whatever our life brings, I know we

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will always be happy. You will

always be by my side, making me

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smile and making me laugh. I will

love you for evermore.

Lovely, aid

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and it is your turn.

Louise, you are

my falling star come you fell from

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the heaven and stole my heart. You

made me the man I am today and I

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thank God I am privileged enough to

be ready. You are my world and I

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would have married you every day.

Gosh, thank you. Aidan, Louise made

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the love that joins your heart never

fail but grew deeper and stronger

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with every passing year. You have

now made a very public pledge to

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your continuing commitment to each

other. So very big congratulations.

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Thank you.

APPLAUSE

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Needed tissue, are you all right? If

you have been watching BBC One over

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the past few days you may have seen

this trailer for a documentary

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featuring Her Majesty the Queen

sharing memories of her coronation

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and explaining the symbolic meaning

of the Crown Jewels?

I have seen one

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coronation and been the recipient in

the other.

Dan will be here in a

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moment after Ruth reveals the role

the Royal made daily-macro mail

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played in bringing the diamonds to

London.

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A South African spotted something

what looked like a shard of glass.

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He dug out a rough gemstone. It was

the biggest diamond ever found. They

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called it after the minor who sold

it to the local Transvaal government

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for £150,000, which in today's money

is 16.8 million. It is believed the

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miner who found it was paid enough

money to buy a herd of cattle. The

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Transvaal government gave the

diamond to King Edward VII as a

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birthday present, a goodwill gesture

after the ball war. And that is when

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the challengers began. The rough

diamond had to travel over 8000

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miles from South Africa to London

without being stolen. Jeffrey has

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the details and a replica diamond.

Moving valuable things around

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requires all kind of stratagems and

the decoy is the best.

How did they

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move it?

They gave the impression

the diamond was to move by the sea

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and in the Captain's safe on-board

and all the focus and public

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attention was going there, if

anybody knew about it. The diamond

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was popped into the registered post

in England.

The ordinary post,

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albeit register.

Maybe people were

cheering on their nails anticipating

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its arrival.

It gets back to England

in the post, what happened to it

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then?

It gets shown to the king and

the job is to convert it into

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something more beautiful.

Two years

earlier, the world's second biggest

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diamond had been cut, and he was

chosen to cut this one, but he was

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based in Amsterdam. One of the decoy

was based on two and naval ship to

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Holland well the real one was in a

pocket. Cutting such a precious

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gemstone, that was going to require

great skill and accuracy. They have

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been cutting gems since 1890 and

they will show us how it is done.

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This is a rough diamond.

Perfectly

formed crystal. Stuart Beckley

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studies the diamond to see how best

to use it. Using a modern 3-D

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scanner, you can check for any

imperfections in the diamond and see

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a visual representation of how it

should look when it is finished.

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Next, we are shown how the diamond

is gently sawn to the correct size.

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Would this have been how the other

diamond was cut?

No, they had to

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find the grain of the diamond and

they would hit it very hard.

What if

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it broke the wrong way?

Then you are

in trouble.

Without modern

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equipment, the diamond cutter's

skill was key in cutting one of the

0:19:310:19:35

hardest substances on earth. His

first blow broke his steel blade,

0:19:350:19:41

rather than the diamond but his next

attempt was successful. The stone

0:19:410:19:46

was then faceted and polished over

nine months. Clive does this with a

0:19:460:19:53

spinning diamond encrusted

grindstone.

This is where we are

0:19:530:19:55

getting the maximum life out of the

diamond and this is what makes it

0:19:550:19:59

sparkle and look pretty. Now you can

see all the lustre.

Gosh. The

0:19:590:20:09

diamond was cleaved into nine major

stones and 96 smaller fragments.

0:20:090:20:14

This is a replica of the largest

stone which is called The Star Of

0:20:140:20:20

Africa. This is the second one, it

is in the front of the Imperial

0:20:200:20:26

State Crown, worn by the Queen at

the State Opening of Parliament. And

0:20:260:20:30

this was used at her coronation. Two

more stones were brought out and be

0:20:300:20:36

replicas here. The Queen wears them

because she inherited them from

0:20:360:20:39

Queen Mary and they are called

Granny's chips.

They don't look like

0:20:390:20:45

my chips. The diamonds are now kept

in a tower of London, 8000 miles

0:20:450:20:52

away from where the original stone

was discovered. I wonder if the

0:20:520:20:57

minor who plucked the diamond out of

the rock, had any idea how many

0:20:570:21:02

stories and myths would grow up

around it? One thing is certain, the

0:21:020:21:07

diamond will be a lot around a lot

longer than of us. Am amazed that

0:21:070:21:15

diamond made it to the post but is

not the only one that's gone through

0:21:150:21:19

the Royal system?

There is another

diamond but it went through the

0:21:190:21:24

American system. The Hope Diamond.

Look at the blue, it is rare. It

0:21:240:21:32

will go very nicely with your dress.

Ask if you can borrow it. It was

0:21:320:21:39

owned by Louis XVI when he had his

head chopped off in the French

0:21:390:21:45

Revolution. It was stolen them

popped in the post the $2 from New

0:21:450:21:51

York to Washington. $140 for

insurance and arrived at the

0:21:510:21:55

Smithsonian, where it has been ever

since.

And we heard about part of

0:21:550:22:01

that other diamond in the Queen's

crime. How many diamonds are in the

0:22:010:22:08

collection?

140 objects in the crown

jewels. My favourite story, there

0:22:080:22:12

would be a lot more if King John

hadn't lost them in the wash. Just

0:22:120:22:18

before his death, he has distantly,

his empire has collapsed, the French

0:22:180:22:22

have invaded, he goes across the

watch, the tide comes in and he

0:22:220:22:26

loses the Crown Jewels. Medieval,

lots of them lost. My dream is to

0:22:260:22:32

find them in the ocean.

I am coming

with you.

There has been a new

0:22:320:22:38

collection since then?

Yes, they had

to get new Crown Jewels. Guess how

0:22:380:22:43

many gemstones there are in the

Crown Jewels?

Are there for?

Just a

0:22:430:22:48

guess.

Go higher than that. 140.

More than that.

A lot more than

0:22:480:22:58

that.

Go big. 500. 23,500 gems in

the Crown Jewels. Amazing. In fact,

0:22:580:23:12

I have got...

The real thing!

This

is not the real thing. This is the

0:23:120:23:24

replica used in the TV show, The

Crown.

There are a few of the

0:23:240:23:32

Queen's favourites?

Yes, the one we

have just seen and this is the

0:23:320:23:39

Queen's favourite, the Prince's

Ruby. It is a spindle, but it is

0:23:390:23:47

like a Ruby, still very precious. It

was given to the Black Prince, one

0:23:470:23:52

of the great warriors in British

history by a Spanish king that was

0:23:520:23:55

fighting his brother for the Crown

and the Black Prince helped him

0:23:550:24:00

defeat is brother. Then it belonged

to the Royal family, Henry V wore

0:24:000:24:03

it. Apparently a French axe hit it

and got knocked off. That is the

0:24:030:24:14

Queen's favourite part of the Crown

which she wears at the opening of

0:24:140:24:16

Parliament.

What is the father?

Just

fur around the edge. All them

0:24:160:24:28

precious diamonds and you have asked

me about the fur. This is a saint

0:24:280:24:37

Edward Safire. This is allegedly,

1000 years old. It is allegedly

0:24:370:24:42

Edward the confessor, the king that

received a sainthood. That is very

0:24:420:24:48

old, if it is true, which I am sure

it is. Then we have the Stuart.

0:24:480:24:53

Let's turn it around.

That is

massive.

James II took that with him

0:24:530:25:02

when he escaped in 1688 when he was

kicked off the throne. His

0:25:020:25:07

son-in-law and nephew invaded

England, and he took that as an

0:25:070:25:15

insurance policy as he was leaving.

The pearls are hanging down?

Be a

0:25:150:25:22

lovely and they apparently belonged

to Queen Elizabeth. She wore them

0:25:220:25:27

has England but she wore them in

their hair and on her clothes. We

0:25:270:25:31

love history. This is it.

Thank you

so much and there is a special

0:25:310:25:36

series of programmes, part of the

Royal collection season on the BBC

0:25:360:25:40

starting with the coronation on

Sunday at 8pm on BBC One. This is a

0:25:400:25:44

special thing for the Queen to be

involved in?

I have never seen the

0:25:440:25:48

Queen speak like that about her

memories so it is a special and

0:25:480:25:53

historical record in its own right.

Make sure you leave back round

0:25:530:25:58

behind, don't go sneaking it out.

It

will go with anything.

Good luck

0:25:580:26:03

with your digging in Norfolk. In

honour of the rain's BBC One

0:26:030:26:10

programme, we are renewing vows.

0:26:100:26:13

Carol and Rohan are here today

to renew the vows they made to each

0:26:130:26:23

We met at a nightclub. And then we

arranged to meet and I stood him up.

0:26:240:26:30

We have been married for 30 years in

August.

We said every ten years we

0:26:300:26:35

would renew our vows. We went to

Vegas, and we said we couldn't go to

0:26:350:26:41

Vegas without meeting Elvis. We tell

each other we love each other every

0:26:410:26:46

day, so why not do it in front of

everybody.

0:26:460:26:56

Carol and Rohan, as you start

a new phase in your life together,

0:26:560:27:00

You celebrate your continued

commitment to each other and

0:27:040:27:09

together you have experienced joys

and sorrows. Have shared tears and

0:27:090:27:14

laughter and have given each of

comfort and support. Carol and

0:27:140:27:21

Rohan, you are very welcome to hold

hands if you like. As you join hands

0:27:210:27:25

I will offer you the floor first to

read your vows.

I have stolen my

0:27:250:27:32

words from Queen, but I will not

sing them to, I will not even try to

0:27:320:27:37

form the tune. You are the best

friend I have ever had. I have been

0:27:370:27:41

with you such a long time. You are

my sunshine and I want you to know

0:27:410:27:47

that my feelings are true. I really

love you. You are my best friend,

0:27:470:27:51

you make me live.

Lovely, thank you

very much. Are you ready.

When we

0:27:510:28:01

married 30 years ago I said I would

love you for ever. Nothing has

0:28:010:28:04

stopped me from feeling the same

today as I did then and I hope you

0:28:040:28:08

feel the same. I will love you

always and still we have a groovy

0:28:080:28:13

kind of love and you are still my

best friend.

0:28:130:28:15

APPLAUSE

I was just going to say

0:28:150:28:27

congratulations on the affirmation

of your love. Well done.

0:28:270:28:31

You could have warned the Crown,

Carol. That was magic, thank you

0:28:310:28:37

both very much. Very brave.

0:28:370:28:45

We have sent somebody new to the UK

to learn about our British cultures

0:28:450:28:48

and values.

My name is Hassan and two years ago

0:28:480:28:56

I risked my life in an overcrowded

dinghy to flee the war in Syria. I

0:28:560:29:01

now call the UK my home but I have

only experienced London and still I

0:29:010:29:06

have a lot to learn about this

country's culture. Pantomime, what

0:29:060:29:10

is that?

Men dressed up as women...

Its values.

They say traditional

0:29:100:29:19

British values of fairness and

justice, but that is not always the

0:29:190:29:22

case.

And what life is like the

people here.

What is it like?

Very

0:29:220:29:28

depressing, no work. I have taken my

camera on the road and The one Show

0:29:280:29:33

have sent me to the seaside in the

middle of winter to a place called

0:29:330:29:37

Lowestoft. It is absolutely

freezing. I need to get some

0:29:370:29:47

breakfast. Morning. You all right? I

would love a cup of Coffey. And an

0:29:470:29:55

egg roll. OK?

This is the most

easterly point of Great Britain.

How

0:29:550:30:03

is the fishing industry?

In the old

days, going out for the herring and

0:30:030:30:12

you could walk from one side to the

other but now it is down to 12 or 13

0:30:120:30:17

fishing boats in the whole fleet.

Have you got brown sauce?

We have

0:30:170:30:23

brown sauce.

I had never heard of

brown sauce until I came to this

0:30:230:30:28

country. Stunning. I have heard

reports of people like me not being

0:30:280:30:32

made welcome in places like this.

Although I am an outsider, people

0:30:320:30:36

are happy to chat, even in the

freezing cold. The beach is

0:30:360:30:40

beautiful. Are you happy?

Yes, very

happy. Not a lot of the children to

0:30:400:30:47

do around here.

When your children

grow up, will you encourage them to

0:30:470:30:52

leave?

I will encourage them, but I

like living here.

My parents are in

0:30:520:30:59

Syria and my brother is in Iraq and

we miss that time, it is the best

0:30:590:31:03

times. Really good to meet you.

0:31:030:31:13

Seems like there is a community

centre here. The 60 plus club. It

0:31:130:31:17

looks very interesting.

136.

That is

really cute. When I walked in I saw

0:31:170:31:32

you guys playing something.

This is

our Christmas raffle today.

We do

0:31:320:31:38

not have this where I come from.

We

raise money. Four tickets for £1.

0:31:380:31:47

They are quite cheap! I am about to

try this for the first time, so wish

0:31:470:31:51

me luck. And that is 32.

No, sorry.

No, sorry. 200.

Hurray. I will leave

0:31:510:32:08

with something from Lowestoft.

Lowestoft is not an easy place to

0:32:080:32:15

get to. You do not pass through it

on a journey elsewhere. You have got

0:32:150:32:19

to want to be here and a lot of the

people I have met really do. Hello.

0:32:190:32:28

What restaurant is this? Indian,

great. Indian is quite big.

It is

0:32:280:32:39

like an English cuisine now.

Where

are you from?

Bangladesh.

Have you

0:32:390:32:45

been here for a while?

For many

years.

Does it feel like home?

I

0:32:450:32:53

feel British like everyone else, but

my roots are in Bangladesh and it

0:32:530:32:58

feels like a special place.

I can

relate to that because Syria and

0:32:580:33:02

Damascus is a special place for me,

but now I am building my life here

0:33:020:33:07

and it feels like home. Cheers.

Hello, guys. I am from Syria. Is

0:33:070:33:14

that OK? That is great. Some fellow

out-of-towners have asked me to join

0:33:140:33:22

them for dinner. Pleased to meet

you. Cheers, guys. The town is on

0:33:220:33:28

the edge of Britain at the seaside,

what is so special about them?

They

0:33:280:33:34

are normally run down. Nobody goes

to the British seaside for holidays

0:33:340:33:38

these days. It is probably cheaper

for a family in Manchester to go to

0:33:380:33:42

Spain.

Whether they are visitors

like us who call Lowestoft home, I

0:33:420:33:49

have asked pretty much everyone here

about British values and no one

0:33:490:33:54

seemed to give me a clear answer.

However, people gave me a warm

0:33:540:33:59

welcome and they did not care where

I came from. From my experience

0:33:590:34:04

these are what the British values

are.

0:34:040:34:06

From Syria to Lowestoft is very much

a journey.

I am looking forward to

0:34:060:34:14

seeing more of that.

As a French

national, what would you say is the

0:34:140:34:20

strangest thing culturally that you

have experience?

During series six

0:34:200:34:25

we came to London to fill a few

episodes and I experienced something

0:34:250:34:31

called pork scratchings. It is

horrible. What is it? And the beer,

0:34:310:34:38

the Guinness. I don't drink alcohol

and I have a glass of champagne

0:34:380:34:45

sometimes.

It is very bitter.

During

the seen my character drinks beer.

0:34:450:34:51

And she goes yuck. I was not acting.

You don't drink it? No, not really.

0:34:510:35:01

Do you promise to tell the truth? Is

it right that you told somebody in

0:35:010:35:07

an interview that you did a musical

with Frank Sinatra to see what would

0:35:070:35:12

happen M it is true.

I felt the

interviewer was not paying much

0:35:120:35:16

attention to my answers, so I threw

in this.

It was not me.

No, it was

0:35:160:35:26

not Lorraine. She asked me what I

was doing and what my last job was

0:35:260:35:31

and I said I was in a musical in Las

Vegas with Frank Sinatra, and her

0:35:310:35:36

years picked up. She said, oh,

really? And then I said I was in a

0:35:360:35:43

camel and he played the years.

Give

us your best poker face.

That

0:35:430:35:53

features in the next episode. You

have spent five months out there

0:35:530:36:00

filming the new series, how has he

fitted into life in the Caribbean as

0:36:000:36:02

a detective?

Pretty good. He knows

it. He is a real actor. I know what

0:36:020:36:09

it is like to be the new guy in a

show because I arrived in series

0:36:090:36:15

four so we did our best to make him

feel comfortable. I think he did a

0:36:150:36:20

great job. It was not easy for you

because in the last series you had

0:36:200:36:25

to understand your character.

You

were involved in two episodes?

There

0:36:250:36:33

was a little handover in the second

half of last series and we had a

0:36:330:36:37

transition period where Chris's

character was leaving, he fell in

0:36:370:36:42

love, and then I joined in. I

suppose it was easier this year to

0:36:420:36:47

start from scratch in the series we

have just done.

We can see how you

0:36:470:36:52

are settling in in tomorrow's

episode.

Some point during the final

0:36:520:36:56

hour killer was able to get the

froggy poison onto this card with

0:36:560:37:01

anybody seeing. How is that

possible?

They play for 90 minutes,

0:37:010:37:08

the debt was shovelled, the cards

pass from player to player, hand to

0:37:080:37:12

hand, so how come no one else was

poisoned?

Was it definitely meant

0:37:120:37:18

for Bobby alone?

We have to assume.

Why was he the only one who died?

0:37:180:37:24

How can our killer know that this

exact card, the ace of spades, would

0:37:240:37:28

wind up in Bobby's and?

It has got a

poker storyline been going through

0:37:280:37:34

it. You are quite a good poker

player yourself. Did you chat with

0:37:340:37:40

the producers?

Not really. It is a

great episode I have to say. A big

0:37:400:37:48

international poker tournament comes

to the island and one of the players

0:37:480:37:52

died at the table. How did it

happen? I did play poker all right I

0:37:520:37:57

was younger. I used to spend a lot

and I got the name, the nickname,

0:37:570:38:03

pockets O Hanlon. I used to leave

the table with my pockets full. But

0:38:030:38:09

I used to love poker, so I was into

this episode.

I enjoyed the first

0:38:090:38:16

episode. I did not get it. I will

not say anything in case anyone has

0:38:160:38:21

not seen it. As far as life is

concerned out there and the filming,

0:38:210:38:25

how does it fit into your normal

life? Where do you live normally? I

0:38:250:38:31

live in Paris. How long do you go

over there for?

It is five months.

0:38:310:38:38

It is a long time, do your family

visit?

My family came over to visit

0:38:380:38:43

for two months. It is a very long

time, so it is good to have people

0:38:430:38:48

there.

It is a great opportunity to

experience a different lifestyle and

0:38:480:38:55

it is a great privilege for the

families to be able to join in. We

0:38:550:38:59

should during the summer so during

the holidays my teenagers can come

0:38:590:39:03

out and my wife and they have a

great time and they get to know the

0:39:030:39:07

place. It is a different pace of

life for them and it is all outdoors

0:39:070:39:11

and it is great.

Would you ever

fancy a part in this, Lorraine?

It

0:39:110:39:17

sounds fantastic. This is you as a

detective. That was hilarious, that

0:39:170:39:25

was great fun. Yes, I would love

that. Can you put a word in? But

0:39:250:39:30

everybody is clamouring to be on it.

There are so many guest actors.

0:39:300:39:37

Jennifer Lawrence next week!

And

Nigel Planer?

Yes, he is in this

0:39:370:39:45

episode and he plays one of the

poker players. A genuine hero of

0:39:450:39:49

mine. That was the show more than

anything that inspired me to get

0:39:490:39:55

into comedy when I was a teenager. I

was glued to it on television. To

0:39:550:40:00

meet him was great and to work with

him is doubly brilliant.

We will

0:40:000:40:06

talk more about the Caribbean and

hopefully we can go live there

0:40:060:40:10

shortly. You were there during the

hurricane season. What was it like

0:40:100:40:17

when the weather was like during

filming for you guys?

A few weeks

0:40:170:40:23

before the hurricane arrived it was

very hot, more than it normally is.

0:40:230:40:30

And it was a bit scary of course,

but the production handled it very

0:40:300:40:35

well. We had what sap group and sent

messages to each other to make sure

0:40:350:40:43

everybody was OK. We started filming

in the morning and then the police

0:40:430:40:46

came on the set and said we had to

stop and go home. That was at your

0:40:460:40:54

place? So we came back to our villas

and waited until the next day.

It

0:40:540:40:58

was a very long night. It is the

uncertainty. You do not know what

0:40:580:41:03

you will face the next morning and

whether you will have water or

0:41:030:41:07

electricity. Or whether you will

have food. So you are not quite sure

0:41:070:41:14

and you have a long and dark night

of the soul because it puts it into

0:41:140:41:19

perspective. We are just making a TV

show, but for people living in the

0:41:190:41:23

Caribbean they live there all the

time and it is something they have

0:41:230:41:28

to contend with once in a

generation.

Hopefully we are about

0:41:280:41:32

to go live to the Caribbean to the

neighbouring island.

0:41:320:41:37

Death in Paradise is filmed

on the Caribbean island

0:41:370:41:40

of Guadeloupe, which along with much

of the Caribbean, was ravaged

0:41:400:41:42

by hurricanes Irma and Maria

towards the end of last year.

0:41:420:41:45

In the aftermath, Angellica brought

us a series of films from Dominica.

0:41:450:41:48

So we thought we'd revisit

the island to see how

0:41:480:41:50

they're getting on in 2018.

0:41:500:41:51

We have Emerline Anselm on the line.

0:41:510:41:53

She's a local school

teacher on the island.

0:41:530:41:55

Thank you so much for joining us.

Tell us first of all how everyone

0:41:550:41:59

was affected by hurricane Maria.

Hurricane Maria devastated Dominic

0:41:590:42:05

Raab. It left most homes without a

roof. It left the island turned

0:42:050:42:11

upside down. It left most schools

without a roof, the police station

0:42:110:42:19

destroyed, churches destroyed. There

was no water on the island,

0:42:190:42:23

absolutely no connection could be

made with the outside world. There

0:42:230:42:29

was no electricity, we were

devastated by hurricane Maria.

How

0:42:290:42:34

did you react to that? What did you

do to help out other islanders?

When

0:42:340:42:40

I woke up the next morning I was

speechless, I could not believe it

0:42:400:42:44

was Dominic Raab. I could not

believe that Maria did this to my

0:42:440:42:49

beautiful island. The place looked

so pale, all the greenery was gone.

0:42:490:42:55

Then I decided to take to the

streets and I went from village to

0:42:550:42:58

village and try to make connection

with relatives and friends near and

0:42:580:43:03

far. I went to villagers, I took

names, contacts and numbers and

0:43:030:43:07

output messages onto my notepad and

I put it on Facebook so that family

0:43:070:43:12

members would know it was OK.

That

was amazing work. How is life now?

0:43:120:43:18

Are things turning back to normal?

There is some sense of normality.

0:43:180:43:23

Schools have opened. There were 200

passengers who came to the island a

0:43:230:43:31

couple of weeks ago. We have

communication back. We have water in

0:43:310:43:38

most villages in Dominic Raab. And

also the road network is much

0:43:380:43:43

better.

We are here with the actors

who have been filming on the

0:43:430:43:50

neighbouring island of yours. They

just said how beautiful the island

0:43:500:43:56

was.

We had a week off in the middle

of the summer and myself and my

0:43:560:44:02

family visited your island and I

have to say it was the most magical

0:44:020:44:07

place I have ever visited in my

life. It is so unspoiled and the

0:44:070:44:13

people are so independent and

wonderful and self-sufficient. When

0:44:130:44:17

the hurricane hit we were so

devastated. I would like to ask is

0:44:170:44:21

it open for tourism again? Are

people welcome and wanted?

People

0:44:210:44:27

are welcome. Now they are clearing

the site and the trails and they are

0:44:270:44:31

fixing up different areas. You can

calm biplane and boat and visit the

0:44:310:44:39

island. Now the green is coming back

and it is still beautiful.

Thank you

0:44:390:44:44

so much. Thank you so much for your

time and all the very best with all

0:44:440:44:49

the work you are doing and send our

love to everybody out there.

0:44:490:44:54

We've been on board all week

with Mike, who's been braving

0:44:540:44:57

the elements around our islands.

0:44:570:44:58

He's searching for the giants

of the sea - whales.

0:44:580:45:00

Tonight his journey takes him

to the Minches, the area

0:45:000:45:03

between the outer Hebrides and north

Scotland where he's in for a treat.

0:45:030:45:13

I am two weeks into an epic

three-week journey, passing through

0:45:170:45:22

some of the richest marine life

areas in British and Irish waters.

0:45:220:45:28

Aboard the Celtic Explorer I am with

a world-class team of oceanographers

0:45:280:45:33

as they use cutting-edge technology

to assess the abundance and

0:45:330:45:37

distribution of life within our

oceans. Along the way, my mission is

0:45:370:45:41

to find and film marine life that

would normally be out of reach. We

0:45:410:45:46

are watching seven or eight

dolphins.

0:45:460:45:58

The main objective of the survey is

to assess the abundance of fish such

0:46:000:46:06

as herring, horse mackerel and

others. Assessing all levels of the

0:46:060:46:11

marine ecosystem is hugely

important. Starting at the bottom

0:46:110:46:15

involves some unique equipment. This

high-speed machine is a remotely

0:46:150:46:23

operated device that incorporates a

fine net to catch plankton.

0:46:230:46:30

Basically, this high-speed sampler

is towed off the back of the boat.

0:46:300:46:35

Really, it is a plankton net inside

a steel torpedo. I am manually

0:46:350:46:41

controlling the Sam Powell right

now.

You are fishing for plankton?

0:46:410:46:45

That is the main game of the

sampler.

Small things matter?

They

0:46:450:46:54

play such a huge part of the marine

system on a global scale.

A vital

0:46:540:47:03

step in the food chain, plankton

consists of tiny animals like

0:47:030:47:09

crustaceans, fish larvae and

jellyfish. That is see soup.

It is

0:47:090:47:20

full of plankton. They are the base

of the marine food chain. They feed

0:47:200:47:28

of fish and the fish feed larger

whales, sharks and dolphins.

The

0:47:280:47:35

only way to truly appreciate these

ecosystem energy providers is

0:47:350:47:40

through the microscope. That is

absolutely beautiful. What is it?

0:47:400:47:48

This is called Asego Jewsbury. It is

different from other jellyfish

0:47:480:47:52

because of these lines. They move

together in unison to help it move

0:47:520:47:56

in the water.

It is only when you

look through the microscope that you

0:47:560:48:02

realise they are miniature works of

art?

Absolutely, the diversity and

0:48:020:48:08

complex a TUC in these plankton is

overlooked a lot of the time. And if

0:48:080:48:12

you take plankton out of the

picture, you have nothing else. You

0:48:120:48:17

don't get fish, you don't get any

higher organisms that we love and

0:48:170:48:21

hold dear.

Plankton feed quail and

then they feed bailing Wales. Which

0:48:210:48:29

is what I hope to see. After a few

days with no sightings, the weather

0:48:290:48:34

is looking good for spotting. We've

just come round the butt of Lewis,

0:48:340:48:41

so we are in between the outer

Hebrides and North Scotland. An area

0:48:410:48:47

brilliant for whales and dolphins

and the conditions are perfect. It's

0:48:470:48:50

not long before... There it is. I

saw the snout. Beautiful Axel we

0:48:500:48:57

spot Menke Wales. Menke Wales can

grow up to ten metres in length and

0:48:570:49:05

weigh in at nine tonnes. Twice as

heavy as an elephant. It is really

0:49:050:49:13

close to the boat. Like all filter

feeding whales it has two blowhole

0:49:130:49:19

is to maximise the oxygen needed to

support its huge body. Personality,

0:49:190:49:24

it is an introverted whale and

incredibly difficult to get on film.

0:49:240:49:31

Despite being one of the smallest

filter feeding whales, they can

0:49:310:49:36

consume 300 kilograms of food a day.

Finding the Menke Wales is an

0:49:360:49:41

incredible experience but I will

have to go deeper if I want to find

0:49:410:49:45

the real giants.

0:49:450:49:50

Lorraine, you were lost in that.

I

was, I have been lucky to see Menke

0:49:500:49:55

Wales and Scotland and I have been

to Antarctica. I would go back

0:49:550:50:02

tomorrow.

It is a very special thing

to experience.

It makes you feel

0:50:020:50:08

very small, that is a good thing.

Was that part of your wedding

0:50:080:50:12

anniversary?

It was, we were married

the 25 years and we went to

0:50:120:50:18

Antarctica. We followed Ernie

Shackleton's journey and it was

0:50:180:50:21

incredible.

What a cool thing to do

for your anniversary.

Luckily my

0:50:210:50:28

husband shares my passions, or that

would not have worked out.

Which

0:50:280:50:33

leads is beautifully done for the

couple theme.

0:50:330:50:36

Time to meet our third and final

couple Valerie and Mark

0:50:360:50:38

who are going to renew their vows.

0:50:380:50:41

We met in a single club. We have

been married 20 years.

We had

0:50:410:50:49

arranged to renew our vows last year

on our 20th anniversary.

We had an

0:50:490:50:54

accident in Dubai. I was off work

for several weeks. Without Valerie's

0:50:540:51:01

support, I don't think I would have

got through it. I would like to

0:51:010:51:04

thank my son Ian, my boss who has

given us the day off to come here

0:51:040:51:11

today. Thank you very much, Ian.

No doubt Ian will be watching. Kate,

0:51:110:51:17

it is over to you.

0:51:170:51:20

Valerie and Mark are here today

to renew the vows which they made

0:51:200:51:23

to each other when they married

20 years ago.

0:51:230:51:26

Over those 20 years their marriage

has grown richer, today

0:51:260:51:28

they demonstrate their continued

commitment to one another.

0:51:280:51:32

Valerie and Mark please join hands

and share your vows.

0:51:320:51:40

Valerie, is it OK if we start with

you?

0:51:400:51:44

Mark, I love you because you made me

smile, when I almost forgot how to.

0:51:440:51:47

I feel everything in life

has led us to this...

0:51:470:51:50

Choices, regrets, heartbreak...

0:51:500:51:51

We've fought hard to

overcome so many obstacles,

0:51:510:51:53

but always together.

0:51:530:51:55

A strong marriage doesn't

always have two strong

0:51:550:51:57

people at the same time.

0:51:570:52:00

As we we know, it's a husband

and wife who take turns being strong

0:52:000:52:03

when the other feels weak.

0:52:030:52:06

I look back over our life together,

the houses we've had,

0:52:060:52:09

the cars we've drove,

the things we own that really

0:52:090:52:11

don't matter at all.

0:52:110:52:12

What matters more than anything,

is our family, and that I've got

0:52:120:52:15

you and you've got me.

0:52:150:52:23

Well done. Are you ready, Mark?

Valerie, you have been my friend, a

0:52:230:52:30

wonderful wife. Which I cherish so

very much. I will be forever

0:52:300:52:38

grateful for the years we have been

together and hopefully, spend many

0:52:380:52:44

more years together. Thank you, I

love you.

0:52:440:52:48

May your hands be forever

clasped in friendship

0:52:480:52:50

and your hearts be joined in love.

0:52:500:52:52

May your life continue to be full

of kindness and understanding,

0:52:520:52:54

thoughtfulness and joy.

0:52:540:52:57

You have renewed your vows,

congratulations to the both of you.

0:52:570:53:07

There isn't a dry eye in the house.

APPLAUSE

0:53:080:53:20

Congratulations. Thank you both very

much indeed.

0:53:210:53:33

We have are going somewhere now that

is thanks to our industrial past. At

0:53:340:53:47

the height of the mining boom, Wales

was one of the largest coaling

0:53:470:53:55

countries in the world.

These black diamonds have

0:53:550:53:58

fundamentally change the way people

live around here. There's virtually

0:53:580:54:02

nothing left of mining any more in

these valleys but it has left an

0:54:020:54:06

indelible mark the landscape.

Dockyards, stately homes, even

0:54:060:54:17

entire villages owed their existence

to Cole, ripped from the Earth and

0:54:170:54:21

the valleys are littered with what

mining left behind but the most

0:54:210:54:27

inescapable reminders are slack

heaps, massive man-made hills, built

0:54:270:54:31

from the waste product of mining.

Not so long ago, slack heaps was

0:54:310:54:36

seen as nothing more than a dirty

blot on the landscape or a

0:54:360:54:41

dangerously menace, at worst. But

today, there are people who actually

0:54:410:54:45

like them. Leah is an entomologist

who studies insects on slack heaps.

0:54:450:54:52

One of his favourite locations is

this tip in south Wales. Lee, it is

0:54:520:54:57

unbelievable looking at this place,

how fast it is.

It is a fantastic

0:54:570:55:03

habitat.

You can see fresh water

down there, wetlands and then you

0:55:030:55:09

have this almost lunar like expanse

in front of us. We couldn't design

0:55:090:55:14

it better?

You couldn't, and we will

never get anything like this again.

0:55:140:55:18

It is unique in the way it has been

tipped. Nothing like it anywhere in

0:55:180:55:26

the British Isles, so fantastic for

invertebrates, butterflies,

0:55:260:55:28

bumblebees, dragonflies.

It brings

it into perspective how much they

0:55:280:55:35

did mine here.

Supposed to be 1200.

This is like scaling Everest as

0:55:350:55:45

well. Liam has found 50 varieties of

bumblebee as well as other

0:55:450:55:56

endangered insects, but the most

exciting news is a millipede,

0:55:560:56:00

unknown to science has been

discovered on a nearby tip.

That is

0:56:000:56:05

the species known to science,

nowhere else in the world.

He is the

0:56:050:56:11

Usain Bolt of the millipede world. I

have never held a species new to

0:56:110:56:16

science in my fingers at all. It is

awesome. We are here in the valleys

0:56:160:56:22

on a waste product of an industrial

age that did so much damage to the

0:56:220:56:26

environment holding a species that

wouldn't be here at all if it wasn't

0:56:260:56:29

for the coal tips?

It shows how

special these sites are and we

0:56:290:56:34

should be preserving them.

A few

miles away, this is an example of

0:56:340:56:40

what can be done with mining's

legacy. It has been turned into a

0:56:400:56:45

park for everyone to enjoy and

features a massive pit pony, carved

0:56:450:56:50

out of the coal waste by a landscape

artist. How long did it take you to

0:56:500:56:54

Bill Butler?

It was done in a

six-month period and the whole

0:56:540:57:00

purpose was to create a windbreak

for this arena.

You can almost see

0:57:000:57:04

the muscle in this light.

How did

you do it? 60,000 tonnes of coal

0:57:040:57:12

shale, two excavators and someone

helping me with the marking out.

You

0:57:120:57:16

do have to come on it to see it at

its best. What has the reaction been

0:57:160:57:20

from the local people?

Really

positive, people standing on the pit

0:57:200:57:25

pony and they said, you know what

this should be called? It should be

0:57:250:57:31

called Sultan, a prize-winning pony

from a local pits.

And it has stuck

0:57:310:57:35

ever since. There we are, we will

see your creation from the air. It

0:57:350:57:41

is awesome. He looks pretty happy,

running free on the side of the

0:57:410:57:46

hill.

The sunlight is perfect.

Mining may have been dangerously and

0:57:460:57:58

destructive, but it was once

massively important. It is good to

0:57:580:58:02

see its legacy in the landscape has

been totally swept away. People are

0:58:020:58:07

trying to keep the heritage alive in

a positive way, that looks to the

0:58:070:58:11

future.

0:58:110:58:21

Earlier we ashes to send in photos

of your photo mishaps.

Laura had the

0:58:240:58:32

Fire Brigade turn up when the candy

machine set up a smoke detector.

0:58:320:58:38

Cheryl from Ayrshire and her nephew

Logan who had a wardrobe malfunction

0:58:380:58:44

as he came down the aisle.

Katie's

sister-in-law crashed into her car

0:58:440:58:49

on the wedding day. Husband told as

they were walking up the eye.

We

0:58:490:58:53

thank you all couples. We will see

you tomorrow Gordon Ramsay.

0:58:530:58:58

APPLAUSE

0:58:580:59:00

Presented by Matt Baker and Michelle Ackerley. They chat to Ardal O'Hanlon and Josephine Jobert about their hit show Death in Paradise. Lorraine Kelly talks weddings and in, a One Show first, three couples renew their wedding vows live on air.