13/07/2017 The One Show


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13/07/2017

Presented by Alex Jones and Kevin Duala, and Greg Davies graces the green sofa to talk about his new comedy series Man Down.


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Transcript


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Hello, and welcome to The One Show, with Kevin Duala...

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It was fantastic! We had the best welcome and the best fish and chips!

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It was like a 9.5, 9.9 out of ten. I thought you were going for a classy

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burger? The first thing I have won on The One Show ever, Matt was

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furious! First time in the hot

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seat for you, Kev. And you're in luck, because tonight

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we've got a massive guest. Some might say he's

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a magnificent beast. He's towered over everyone he meets,

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has entertained the masses over the years, and is currently

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preparing to go on tour. Is it Dippy the Dinosaur

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from the Natural History Museum? APPLAUSE

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Hi, Greg, you all right? Fabulous. Nice to see you. You

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couldn't guess it was me when I'd been sitting here all along, Kevin!

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Play along! It was drama, Greg, that was acting, of course!

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of Dippy's replacement, Hope, the blue whale,

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and he'll be meeting the public from tomorrow.

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The whale has been given the name Hope as a "symbol

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of humanity's power to shape a sustainable future".

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Greg, you've chosen a meaningful name for your forthcoming tour -

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A meaningful name, might hope. Your tour has an equally meaningful name.

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And I have been called Hope before! You have gone for You Magnificent

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Beast! Go one... Y?! What the inspiration? The truth is, I was in

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London and I got in a taxi. A really drunk student saw me and ran and

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jumped through the open window of my taxi and grabbed me by the collars

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and went, oh, You Magnificent Beast! And then he just fell away! Male or

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female? Mail! I thought, that's it, that's my show title by an! And

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there's a good story to go with it, perfect. Why a young man would want

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to call me a magnificent beast, I don't know, but I'm delighted! Have

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I ever told you the story of the topless picture of me? I wasn't

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allowed to put it on Amazon because it broke bendable policy! -- it

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broke their Nepal policy. I can say nipple on The One Show?! You've

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already said it many times! Do you find that when you are in a taxi you

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wind up the windows so that people don't throw themselves at you? It

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hasn't happened again, but thank you to that young man!

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We'll be talking about your fourth series of Man Down later, too.

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And we have a surprise for you as well...

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I would advise you, start getting a little bit nervous... Oh, I did

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expect that an The One Show! Tonight we're launching our

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One Show Phone Plan, According to exclusive statistics

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provided to us by Deloitte, 15.5 million of us think

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we use our phones too much. And last week, even Prince Harry

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said that young people should try to take a break

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from checking their mobiles So we've been asking

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for your suggestions on how we can all achieve

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a better phone-life balance. You haven't let us down, thanks for

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sending them on. We've had loads in, including this

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sign on the school gates sent in by Gail from Witney -

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"Greet your child with Rhyming and everything! It's like

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the start of a little rap song, isn't it?! Not a great one! We can

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give it a go... # Greet your Child with a smile

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# Not a mobile! #. I won't be part of this, Kevin!

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And the Smiths showed us about the way they deal

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with excessive phone use in their house - confiscate all

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Our plan is made up of the best suggestions we've had,

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and the Farnworth family are going to be the first to try it

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Like many families up and down the country, the Farnworths family from

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Bolton Lancashire were worried that no news was getting out of hand.

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What are you doing? I'm reading the news. I do don't know where it's

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going, and I don't like it. When we asked them to monitor their mobile

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use over one weekend, the results truly shocking. You spent 32 hours

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on your phones. GASPS

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That's over a day! So they've currently agreed to by our guinea

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pigs and test out the one shown Phone Plan for a whole week to see

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if the suggestions that you have come up with can really help them

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get the perfect phone- life balance. Although, until I present it to them

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on this giant smartphone, of course, they have really no idea how far

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they will be asked to go. Hello! Is managed to negotiate you an update!

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As you know, this isn't about stopping using your phones

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altogether. It's about reducing the amount of time you spend on your

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phone. How are you feeling about plummeting these recommendations?

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Not very good! The first suggestion that has made it onto our plan was a

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popular one. Turn off notifications. Make sure that all notifications and

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are turned off of your mobile, just leaving the ring turned on. Every

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time it goes off, you spend log on your mobile. I think turning the

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notifications offers a really good idea. Turn of the notifications. I'm

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going to turn all of them off. Come on! Stop it, Jake, give it to me!

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OK, for the next one, follow me into the hole. Next onto the list, you

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suggested that every household should have a central charging

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point. And that means you're not going to be looking at your phones

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while it is an charge. So you spend a bit less time on your phone. And

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it takes you back to the old days when you use have one phone in the

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whole house, and it was in the hallway. The third suggestion was

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the most. Keep mealtimes phone free. It gives us a chance to catch up on

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the day, and to sort out any problems that we might have. And to

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really make sure you're not tempted to check your devices... Put them

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all in a bowl. The first person to get their phone gets to do the

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family chores for the next week! LAUGHTER

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I think this will do. Four, in order to get a proper night's sleep, don't

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take your phones to bed. Because the blue light, you are bound to wake

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up, actually. We've got to give it a go, we have. We have two. If you

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worried about your kids sneaking their phones into bed without you

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noticing, you can always follow suggestion number five. Turn off the

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Wi-Fi. As long as you keep them on a low data bundle. Six, my personal

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pet hate. Don't check your phone whilst chatting. If you want to talk

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to some the end they pick their phone up, you think, oh... I think

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it depends. Sometimes they might be having a conversation about

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something that doesn't interest you, it's really boring. Thanks very

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much, Jake! Meet up with friends in person instead of sending them

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messages... You might realise who your real friends are, perhaps these

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are people that he would make friends with. Something tells me

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this is all getting a bit too much for super SnapChat user Grace. Is a

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vague friendships. These are not real friends. Friends are people you

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have a coffee with or go for a walk with. Number eight, stroll without

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looking at your screen, Jacob! We're going to send you on a family walk,

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when none of you has a mobile phone with you, so that you can enjoy the

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sights and the company. I think that's a really good idea.

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Suggestion number nine is one for mum and dad. Phone free date night.

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Geis! Last, but by no means least, if all else fails, implement the

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final selection. Turn off the phones for a whole day. My grandchildren

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have much more thundering things together, and it helps their

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communication skills as well -- have much more on doing things together

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at. That's quite manageable. I think I'd go mad. There's no other way to

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describe it. There you have it, The One Show ten point Phone Plan.

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There's no excuses, Grace, for missing out on any of these. Will

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the family stick to it for a whole week over the summer and will it

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reduce their phone use? I can't wait to find out! You might find if

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you're not on it all the time that there are other things that you do

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which are more enriching to your life.

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I'll tell you what, Grace didn't look too happy. I can understand

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why, frankly! Tommy is here with us -

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or Technical Tommy, He's been elevated. Technical

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telephone Tommy, I'm elevating myself! This could change

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everybody's lives, this ten point plan. We want everyone to give this

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a go. There are loads of apps out there that you can download onto

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your phone which will help you monitor how much you use your phone.

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If you download these free apps, things like quality time, break

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free. A phone app to stop you from using your phone! This is what I

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said earlier! It is like the app to end all other apps. It will tell you

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that you are only using your phone at night or in the day or WhatsApp

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or whatever it is that you were doing. You find out where you are

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overly using your phone and then you can reclaim your life. So, which of

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these are you going to implement, Alex? How many of these do you think

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you can get a go? This is our One Show Phone Plan. You can do all of

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those, Alex! No, I'm not turning off notifications or having a central

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charge point! You go a lot more Welsh when you get defensive! I

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don't even notice myself! OK, I'll do no phone mealtimes because I

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think it's rude to have a phone on the table. I won't take the phone to

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bed, I've started doing that for the last week. And I sleep a lot better,

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actually. I'm not unplugging the Wi-Fi, no. I will go for a walk

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without my phone, at a push. Device free date night, that's a good one.

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No... I'm joking! We'll try that, yes. Greg, could you do any of

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those? Not at the moment, I'm as addicted as anybody else to my

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phone. I would put this is my number one thing. I would like to stop

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sending myself messages to remind myself of things! I do this

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everyday, I sent myself a message, remember to do this. The message

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comes through and I go, message! Everyday! Send yourself a message

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that says, don't use your phone so much. Then we can reclaim our lives.

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It is a good idea because it is getting out of hand. The audience

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don't have to do all of these. Do some of them and let us note. We

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want everybody to get in touch over the summer. If you go on holiday and

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give any of these a goat. Don't ring us! -- if any of these a go. You can

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e-mail us. It would be so lovely to hear from the people who are having

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a go, actually, we had much more quality time together, it was great.

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Thanks, Tommy, we will let you know how the Farnworths got on over the

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summer. Something that had millions

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of people glued to their screens back in 1980 was the siege

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of the Iranian Embassy, You watched it too,

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didn't you, Greg? I did watch it, Alex. I was 12. I

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was one. Why do? -- you made me feel awful! I didn't mean to!

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The story has been brought to life in a new film set

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for release later this summer, and Lucy's been to meet

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How old were you, Kev?! Why have you taken hostages inside the embassy...

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Because we have to get what we want. April 1980, and a six-day siege has

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the country gripped to its TV screens. It began when six Arab

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Iranian gunmen wanting sovereignty in the southern region of a province

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stormed the embassy. They took 25 hostages and they said they will

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start killing them if their demands were not met. Look, we are ready...

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6 Days of negotiations keep them alive. But on the sixth day, one is

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killed. That's when the SAS are ordered to go in. Millions watched

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the events unfold live on television. Viewers could only

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imagine what was taking place inside the embassy. A new film, 6 Days,

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starring Jamie Bell, tells the story of the raid through the eyes of the

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SAS troopers. Tell your government, one more day, and we begin shooting

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them. We know those images of the news footage, so iconic, these men

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coming down. But we've never been inside the building, we've never

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been with those people during that time in that moment. And that's what

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the film does, it opens doors and gives you access to things that you

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wouldn't normally have access to. I felt as a film experience, it kind

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of let you go behind the scenes in the way, this is something that is

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kind of heralded in British history. The Prime Minister wants the world

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and the British people to see how this government deals with

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terrorism. Jamie plays Rusty Fuhrman, leader of one of the

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assault teams. The film-makers wanted the film to be so authentic

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they asked Rusty to give Jamie some SAS training. We had a lot of things

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in common to start with. He is from the North of England, I'm from the

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north Ringwood. He's 30 now, I was 30 when I did the siege. Rusty says

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he had to teach you to be him. What did you learn? Rusty was very

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specific about certain things. He wanted the pistol to be a certain

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way. The way I had my finger on the trigger, all of that kind of stuff.

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He was very specific about it. More than anything, it was about trying

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to get rid of my dancing feet. I would do this thing with my feet all

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the time, and he wasn't into that. Rusty, what did you make of Jamie's

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performance of you? Getting him to become the, getting him to play

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Rusty, he learned very quickly, and in the end, what you see on the

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screen is just an too hard work and dedication. This is his memory, this

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is his legacy, his friends who were with him. So if it is important to

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him than it is important to me. Jamie Lovemark and just how to act

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the part. He discovered just how much of a formidable force the SAS

:15:53.:15:54.

actually are -- Jamie Lund more. The tactic is to overwhelm

:15:55.:16:07.

aggressively and never stop moving. Once they gain momentum they never

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stop until it's done. It works. It puts the opponent in a submissive

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state. It is very frightening. I would imagine a lot of those

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hostages who were in there were terrified, as terrified as the

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gunmen who had held hostage for six days. It is a film about good guys

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and bad guys and that distinction is not very clear. The SAS is an

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aggressive counter-terrorism group. It is difficult to embody them as

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good guys in a way because the truth is six men armed with weapons

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entered the building and then six days later a lot of other men armed

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with weapons entered that building. I did not want to over glorify these

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men because they are taking lives. Few had heard of the SAS but at this

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precise moment... They would become one of the most recognised military

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forces in the world. That looks like a brilliant film.

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Look out for 6 Days in cinemas later this summer.

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Man Down is about your experience as a teacher. Not all of it is true.

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Your character is quite ineffective. A complete loser. He tries. He is

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not good at being an adults, which is why it is so fun to play him. For

:17:55.:18:00.

those who are not familiar with the series, can you sum it up? It is a

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stupid... An idiot manchild and two equally strange friends trying to

:18:11.:18:14.

navigate their way through life. But idiot man has grown up because Dan

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has become a father. Yeah. He did the Berman on to become a father.

:18:21.:18:31.

There are various ways of doing it. He has become a father but through

:18:32.:18:41.

an encounter with a previous love interest and he found out at the end

:18:42.:18:44.

of the last series the that resulted in a pregnancy. This series starts

:18:45.:18:50.

with heart on her way back, she has gone overseas, on her way back

:18:51.:18:56.

heavily pregnant. We are going to watch a clip. Dan always thinks

:18:57.:19:01.

everything is against him in life and when the baby is born he thinks

:19:02.:19:06.

the baby gets him. He thinks every time he looks at the baby turns

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away. This is the first day he is allowed to take the baby out on his

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own and he is upset because he thinks his son hates him and he

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meets someone in the Park who tries to make him feel better. He is

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played by Derek Griffiths who, if you are as old as me, which you are

:19:26.:19:32.

not... We established... You are only looking at Alex. You will

:19:33.:19:40.

remember Derek Griffiths from Playschool and programmes from the

:19:41.:19:44.

70s so it was brilliant to have him. Let us see you in action. May I...

:19:45.:19:53.

There he is. He is looking straight at you. I know. And yet I have no

:19:54.:20:05.

eyes. Incredible. Don't panic. You'll get there. You take him back.

:20:06.:20:13.

It's bolted with my kid on its back. Not again! Sheba! I made the mistake

:20:14.:20:31.

of watching an episode on the train and I had my headphones on and I was

:20:32.:20:35.

laughing my head off. It is hilarious. That is fairly highbrow.

:20:36.:20:44.

We hope it makes people laugh. That is what we set out to do. We do not

:20:45.:20:52.

have a specific date but Man Down is out mid-August. I think it is the

:20:53.:20:59.

16th. You can catch all series on all four.

:21:00.:21:09.

And Greg, as the series was inspired by your time

:21:10.:21:11.

as a real-life drama teacher, you'll no doubt be pleased to hear

:21:12.:21:14.

we'll be returning to those happy days very shortly.

:21:15.:21:16.

Despite the downpours this week, apparently July is the month

:21:17.:21:21.

to ensure thirsty plants such as celery, peas, courgettes,

:21:22.:21:25.

and tomatoes are regularly watered. Patrick has been to visit a grower

:21:26.:21:28.

in Teesside who is taking tomato tending to a whole new level.

:21:29.:21:37.

The UK tomato industry is booming. Under the ruse of high-tech

:21:38.:21:43.

glasshouses cutting-edge science is allowing lawyers to produce

:21:44.:21:49.

bountiful crops of super home-grown tomatoes. Last year the industry was

:21:50.:21:59.

worth ?190 million. Just like all plants, tomatoes absorb carbon

:22:00.:22:01.

dioxide from their surrounding environment and use it to produce

:22:02.:22:06.

sugars which helps them to grow. To speed up this growth producers had

:22:07.:22:12.

to pump in carbon dioxide to the glasshouses. This one particular

:22:13.:22:17.

uses over 23,000 tonnes every year. It creates an artificial environment

:22:18.:22:22.

which is perfect for these tomatoes. With carbon dioxide being the

:22:23.:22:27.

leading cause of climate change, the industry has been trying to minimise

:22:28.:22:30.

its carbon footprint while keeping their tomatoes sweet. On an

:22:31.:22:36.

industrial site in Teesside one tomato grower has teamed up with a

:22:37.:22:41.

leading fertiliser factory to pump their waste CO2 directly into their

:22:42.:22:46.

glasshouses. Phil Pearson is the man who sported the opportunity. We

:22:47.:22:52.

wanted to increase the amount of carbon dioxide to give to our crop

:22:53.:22:57.

in the fertiliser factory were previously emitting it into the

:22:58.:23:00.

atmosphere so they saw a benefit to giving it to us and we had the

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benefit of taking it and putting it in the crop so it was as biotech

:23:05.:23:10.

opportunity. Instead of the carbon dioxide being released into the

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atmosphere that is being fixed into these plans and put to good use.

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Exactly right. Something that was previously thrown away. He tomato

:23:18.:23:25.

that lasts longer, the eating experiences better. The consumer

:23:26.:23:31.

gets the benefit. Some people might ask why you do not grow these

:23:32.:23:34.

tomatoes outdoors in a really sunny climate. We are growing very close

:23:35.:23:42.

to the market so we have a quality food for the UK consumer. You have

:23:43.:23:47.

other challenges when you are in the sunshine, lack of water, problems

:23:48.:23:52.

with pest control, other challenges would make it more difficult to

:23:53.:23:57.

grow. Although this gas is completely invisible to the naked

:23:58.:24:00.

eye we have brought along a specialist piece of kit to help show

:24:01.:24:06.

what is going on. This is a state-of-the-art gas visualising

:24:07.:24:08.

camera. Normally used to detect industrial gas leaks we can show the

:24:09.:24:13.

carbon dioxide coming off of my breath... And the carbon dioxide

:24:14.:24:22.

inside the glasshouses. When we use this camera one full's CO2 outlets

:24:23.:24:26.

we can see that almost immediately the air around his hand changes,

:24:27.:24:32.

giving off a blue hue. This is the first time Phil is able to visualise

:24:33.:24:36.

the carbon dioxide feeding his tomatoes. Incredible. I have never

:24:37.:24:44.

seen that before. That is fascinating. Being able to see it in

:24:45.:24:48.

real time allows us to pinpoint when we introduce it. Currently the crop

:24:49.:24:52.

is using about 30-31% of what is coming out of the tube. It is

:24:53.:24:57.

interesting to me to see if we should be moving the tube further up

:24:58.:25:03.

to perhaps use more than 30%. Even though it is quite a lot of waste

:25:04.:25:08.

CO2 it is better than the alternative. Absolutely. We come

:25:09.:25:14.

from an industry that was zero, and we are up to 30%. Not being able to

:25:15.:25:20.

see it before we were guessing, now we can target it. Capturing carbon

:25:21.:25:26.

dioxide from factories and using it to fuel food production is a simple

:25:27.:25:32.

step with the big impact. Hear it provides us with a super-sweet tasty

:25:33.:25:38.

tomato. Greg was telling us how he had three

:25:39.:25:47.

pounds of tomatoes last night. I had a sudden craving for them. Some

:25:48.:25:54.

would say I am pregnant. Cherry or plum? Plum. Do you grow your own?

:25:55.:26:08.

No. You have a lovely patio. Thank you. We have a picture of it. You

:26:09.:26:17.

have a dwarf Peachtree. That is the only edible thing I have got. I do

:26:18.:26:22.

not really know what it is. Out of all the things you could have

:26:23.:26:28.

chosen, why that? I don't know. I just thought, you're coming home

:26:29.:26:29.

with me. Across the country... Across the country many of us

:26:30.:26:38.

are getting ready for the end of the school year and will be

:26:39.:26:41.

saying goodbye to many of our terrific teachers and maybe

:26:42.:26:44.

plying them with wine But tonight, Greg, we are reuniting

:26:45.:26:46.

you with some of your former pupils in what we're calling

:26:47.:26:50.

This Is Your Teaching Life. Behind this screen are some

:26:51.:27:00.

of your former drama students Each will tell a story about you,

:27:01.:27:05.

Greg, and all you have to do is try I mean... I know, it's a long shot.

:27:06.:27:24.

You laughed at me when I had to dress as a punk rocker for Gregory

:27:25.:27:30.

is Carol. You had me singing in all. You wrote the word nerd on my

:27:31.:27:35.

script. I already sound like the dream teacher. I brought a dog in

:27:36.:27:39.

for rehearsals and I wrote nerd on her script. Would you like a clue?

:27:40.:27:51.

What school was it? Sandhurst. You bumped into this person actually

:27:52.:27:55.

petrol station ten years ago and you pulled a face when she said she was

:27:56.:27:58.

going to go on to train as a teacher. Really? I don't know why

:27:59.:28:03.

because it is a very noble profession. Any idea? No. Let's

:28:04.:28:21.

reveal. Bring their own Bethan. I can hand on heart say that Bethan

:28:22.:28:27.

was a lovely pupil. That is true. Pupil number two. You called me and

:28:28.:28:35.

a group of friends trash in a drama studio at break time. I'd tried to

:28:36.:28:41.

run away but you got me and put me in detention. I remember. Is it

:28:42.:29:01.

Sandhurst again? Yeah. Timmy Bacon? Fantastic. I started as a reporter

:29:02.:29:09.

in your production of Bugsy Malone and you helped me perfect my

:29:10.:29:13.

American accent. We used silly string for the guns. Bugsy Malone. I

:29:14.:29:19.

directed it twice through sheer laziness. I don't know. We will

:29:20.:29:36.

bring her in. Tanya Little. Go and say hello to your former pupils. Man

:29:37.:29:47.

Down starts mid-August on Channel 4. Greg, thanks for joining

:29:48.:29:51.

us this evening. Comedian Rob Beckett will be

:29:52.:29:54.

on presenting duties with me tomorrow night in our last show

:29:55.:29:57.

before our summer break when we'll be talking

:29:58.:29:59.

to the stars of Cars Three,

:30:00.:30:00.