28/05/2012 The One Show


28/05/2012

Cheers star Ted Danson joins Matt Baker and Alex Jones in the studio. Plus, why Blackpool beach could soon become a no-swim zone and there is a wild encounter for Larry Lamb.


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Transcript


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# Sometimes you want to go where everybody knows your name

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# And they're always glad you came # You want to go where everybody

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:00:33.:00:35.

knows your name. # It worked. It did work. Hello,

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welcome to The One Show and yes, tonight we are joined by the star

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of one of the funniest and longest running sitcoms in television

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history. He is the former Boston barman, now keeping us on the edge

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of our seats in CSI, it's the most watched drama in the world. Yeah.

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Please raise your glasses and say cheers to Ted Danson. APPLAUSE AND

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CHEERING. Lovely to see you, Ted. Welcome to

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outside. Anything can happen outside. Anything can happen. They

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preare -- they are predicting rain. I think we are all right. We are

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good. It's five degrees warmer than in California. I heard that. That's

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not right. All the Englishmen that went to Santa Monica to live are

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furious probably. It's temporary, it's usually colder. We will catch

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up. You will love what we have in store for you tonight. There we go.

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Sorry that was a dodgy pass. But he got it no problems. As the

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selection for the paralympic basketball squad has been announced

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we have four of the girls and guys who are representing the UK.

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played basketball, Ted. Nearly! did, in high school and fancied

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myself quite good and went to college and discovered I was not

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good. I think acting became, well, all right it's not as good as

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basketball but I will give this a try kind of thing. We are going to

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be chatting to them later. The glorious weather this weekend

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meant that beaches around the country were packed. But, hol Kay--

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- holiday-makers could soon find themselves banned from swimming at

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one of our most famous resorts. It's because of what's lurking in

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the water. We gave Simon Boazman and wetsuit and licence to

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investigate. All right, all right, I am not

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James Bond and this isn't the Caribbean, this is Blackpool. The

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reason I am here is because what should be one of this resort's

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greatest assets, could become its biggest embarrassment because in

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the future holiday-makers coming here could be told not to go in the

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sea. The Marine Conservation Society has

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found the quality of sea water here is amongst the dirtiest in Britain.

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In fact, by 2015 under new European rules the water quality doesn't

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improve, no swimming zones could be on the famous beaches. This is the

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problem. It may look clean, but when they tested it last year it

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failed to meet even the minimum standard for water quality. On one

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occasion, they found three and a half times the acceptable level of

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bacteria in it. Mike is from the Marine

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Conservation Society. It's a question of public health. When

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people come to beaches they expect seas to be clean. If I was to go in

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the sea and start swimming what would happen? What could I catch?

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If you are unlucky enough to pick something up, ear infections, nose,

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eyes, throat, stomach upsets. Infections like these can be caused

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by things such as raw sewage in the sea. This is part of the pumping

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station. During heavy rainfall everything washes off the streets

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and beaches, including dog waste, farm waste, even donkey droppings.

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If the sewers fill up, some pumping stations like this one act as a

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safety valve to prevent flooding, sending diluted sewage out to sea

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through an underground pipe. Lots of rain, so the system doesn't back

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up, they spill that sewage out into the sea. We don't know how often

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they're spilling. None of this, of course, will help attract visitors.

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In the last few years they spent over �300 million here, revamping

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everything from the iconic tower, investing in their mile-long

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promenade, and updating their famous trams.

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But if visitors are advised not to go in the sea, what impact could

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that have on tourism? Local hotel owner Vicky believes no

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swimming signs on the beach wouldn't just ruin her morning

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routine... That's pleasant. Let me buy you a cup of tea. What do you

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think the impact will be on business, if at some point there

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are signs on the beach saying don't go in the sea? Tragic for Blackpool.

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I don't think the majority of people who come here come to swim

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in the sea but it's part of the experience of being here. We have a

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fantastic promenade and beaches. A lot of money spent in the area. It

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would be tragic if you can't swim in the sea. Is the fact someone is

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telling you that could make you sick, is that going to put you off

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going in there? Well, it should do, shouldn't it? Probably not,

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actually. I think I will probably be all right. Vicky may be amongst

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those willing to brave waters but what do visitors think? Would signs

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put people off coming here? I don't think. You have lots of other

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attractions. If that was here it would probably put me off for a a

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start. If you have young kids you want them to go paddling. The water

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off 754 of Britain's beaches were tested. 516 were rated excellent.

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But Blackpool was one of 25 where the quality is so bad swimming

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could be banned. The town leaders have spent money on beach cleaners

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and bins for litter and for dog waste. Plus, millions regenerating

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the seafront. But is it all in vain if tourism suffers? How bad a pr

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exercise is it going to be if, as is threatened, there are signs

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saying please do not use the water? It's not the situation we want to

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be in and we are working hard to make sure that doesn't happen.

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you didn't deal with the situation, would it have an impact on tourism?

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People worry it would do. You can ask the question again and again

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and I am not going to answer in that way. Do you think it would? Do

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you fear would if signs went up? job is to make sure signs don't go

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up N the event that they did, yes it would have a negative impact and

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that's one of the reasons we are working hard to make sure they

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don't. United utilities told us they're spending �250 million

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updating the sewage system. And they work closely with local

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councils and the Environment Agency to improve the network.

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Now, Blackpool have to 2015 to meet the tough new EU regulations on

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water quality. If they don't, signs like this could become a common

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sight on the beach. Very interesting to see what

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happens there. Ted, it's very well publicised in America, I am sure

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lots of people don't know, that how much of a seasoned campaigner you

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are for ocean consrerisation -- conservation. It was one of those

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signs that got me started about 25 years ago and I started a small

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organisation that then merged and grew to the world's largest oceaned

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a sroe Casey group and it's pretty much what I do when I am not acting.

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And books and all sorts off the back of that. The major threat the

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oceans face is overfishing. We are doing is in a wasteful des

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instructtive manner. The good news is you can turn that around if you

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start doing it a smart way. You are a busy man. As well as that work

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you have also joined the cast of CSI. It's the most popular TV drama

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in the world. Why do you think it's so popular? Wow, you know, I ask

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myself that. I think it's taking something dark and scary and then

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looking at it from a scientific perspective that we all don't think

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of usually. It's a forensics mystery. So you get to look at the

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dark scary side of murder and mayhem from a scientific point of

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view and I think it probably captures people's imaginations.

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play the new supervisor. Let's look at the first time we see new the

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series. I thought you said two dead. I did.

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What's going on? Should I be worried about something here?

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:09:05.:09:05.

Welcome back. You must be Stokes. Yeah. You must be contaminating the

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crime scene? No, I already cleared the area. Give me a hand. Thank you

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very much. DB Russell. New guy. APPLAUSE. We did notice that DB

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Russell is not your sort of conventional character. He is quite

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a home person, and not quite as as tough as hard as these guys usually

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and he likes to do things like we saw in that clip, lying down where

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the victim is and get a sense of what they experienced. I think the

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difference of this character of some of the others that he was a -

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he is a family man, he has kids and wife and he wants to keep that

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separate. Work, the dark side, and life and his family. He is kind of

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a mentor now to this group that got out of hand and everything. It's

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interesting that quote you said, each crime is a story and the

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victim's the story-teller. Right, he was a literature major and then

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he wanted to write mysteries and he was terrible at it. He would hang

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around police bars talking to people and then that's how he got

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into the science part. Obviously you have an incredible background

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in comedy. This is new for stphaou now for --. Now for something

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completely different. Did you do a lot of research. I ended up in a

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quadruple autopsy and it was shocking. It changed my life a

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little bit really. It was massively life-changing. You see these people

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being worked on. Did you go back in for more or was once enough. That

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will be my one-off. Your dad was an archaeologist, I suppose that

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helped pave the the way somewhat. grew up around bones and skeletons

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and all of that. Got into trouble once, because I found a skull that

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had a bullet hole in it and instead of - I was playing with my friends

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and instead of calling the police and getting my father and doing the

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archeologically correct thing, I stuck it on the end of a pole and

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played Romans and Galls for the rest of the day. I got into a lot

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of trouble. We understand as well that you are into period dramas and

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you would like to have a crack at Downton Abbey. Yes, only if thee

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hire myself -- they hire myself and my wife at the same time. We are

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hooked on that. If you did get the call this is potentially how you

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might look. Here you are. We mocked it up in front of the Castle they

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film in. Looking good there. that upstairs? Would you be

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upstairs or downstairs? Downstairs. Much more fun. Well, this is a

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family show, both of us, absolutely. Good lad, Ted. CSI is on Tuesday on

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Channel 5 at 9.00pm. Now, when Larry Lamb researched his family

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history we had a bit of a shock. Turns out that one of his ancestors

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earned a living by taming wild animals. He was keen to discover

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more so we sent the lamb into the lions' den.

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Throughout my entire life I have never spared a second thought for

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lions, or man's relationship with them. Then I discovered that my

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great-great uncle Tom was a famous lion tamer who worked under the

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name of Martini Bartlet. This revelation came while I was taking

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part in the history series Who Do You Think You Are. He was known as

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the lion King. I am overwhelmed.

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It gave me a fascinating glimpse into a world I knew nothing about.

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Now I want to explore more and find out how lions have been

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entertaining British people for hundreds of years.

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The first evidence of lions being brought to these shores was in the

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13th century when they were kept at the tower of London as part of the

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Royal menagerie. They were mainly for showing off, a status symbol

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that the royalty and rich could afford and this was the lions lot

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until the late 18th century. With exploration widening our horizons

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and a new thirst for knowledge our relationship with these big cats

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changed. They moved out of palaces and into zoos whose purpose was

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scientific and educational. But this wasn't the end of the story.

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With the expansion of the empire there were a lot of exotic animals

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brought to the country. It happened to coincide with the time when the

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roads in Britain were finally good enough to transport by cart for the

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first time. Showman of the day put these two things together and the

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travelling menagerie was born. Lions could make people serious

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cash by going on the road and performing with tamers.

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These are men who were there as performers. They are playing a role.

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This is a wonderful picture of Martini Bartlet, wearing a

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military-style uniform and braiding. He would be on the front of the

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show, strutting up and down with Once in the lians it was about man

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dominating nature. They would often wear medals, this

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one has a chest full of hardware. They are not military medals, but

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they were awarded for bravery by the menagerie owner himself.

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Was it an act? Or were people like my great-great uncle at risk?

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are lots of reports of people dying quite horribley.

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That is the frisson of going to the menagerie.

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The thrill of tamers brushing with death kept audiences entertained

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well into the TV era, where it became a staple of family viewing,

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but as performing animals in circuses, fell out of favour, in

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the 1980s and the 90s, this marked our changing relationship with

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lions, now most people want to see them in safari parks, like here in

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Woburn. Not only have our attitudes to keeping lions have changed, but

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also towards our safety. I'm not getting in the cage with them. The

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next best thing. Woburn have 12 lions who spend each night in an

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enclosure in the building and are let out into the main reserve in

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the morning. Today I'm giving Casanga some breakfast.

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There you are, beautiful boy. Just to think that my great, great

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uncles would put their heads in the mouth of a lion like that?! Many

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tame pressures killed by their lions, but my great, great uncle

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lived until 63 after making and then losing a fortune with the

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animals. He always said, that you must never forget they are wild

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animals can't can always return to that state. Getting so close to

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these animals has entranced me and gave me a great deal of respect for

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my ancestors who goat in the cages and worked with them every day.

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Perhaps the medals were not just for show after all. Cheers, Larry.

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You can't beat sitting outside with an ice-cream, watching lions with

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Ted Danson?! I tell you what, we are nearly halfway through and the

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rain has stayed away. These are lollies, not popsicles,

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is that right? Yes, and now we are going to ask you a lot of questions

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with your mouth full! Sorry, do you have sensitive teeth?

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Because they are not mine! Next question.

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I had a flash back of the vicar... Well, so is it right you have

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ancestors up in Scotland on your mum's side? Yes, my mother was a

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McMaster. My father was James Eric McMaster, but he was born in London,

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but we were ferociously Scottish, he was never really able to live

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there. So we were Anglophiles from the day I was born.

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My grandfather on the other side came from, not Manchester, where?

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Shoot... Liverpool! Liverpool! We know more than you do, Ted!

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more. We have a great photo- you of you

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as a young lad, sat there at the end of the table there. You are! We

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think that is you, you can confirm it? I'm going to deny it! Yeah,

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that's me. Yeah, that is definitely you.

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There is my sister on the left. It's a great photo.

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Let's get on to Cheers it is the 30th anniversary it did influence

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lots of other comedies in America, but was it a hit from the start? Or

:18:49.:18:54.

did they think it was to be a short-lived project? No. There were

:18:54.:18:59.

70 shows on the air that year. We were last. We were 70, we were

:18:59.:19:03.

almost cancelled. I think we would have been if they had anything that

:19:03.:19:07.

they thought was better to put if there, but luckily the media and

:19:07.:19:11.

the critics loved the show. That's what kept us on the air.

:19:11.:19:15.

You are brilliant bar skills as well. Let's remind ourselves. I

:19:15.:19:19.

love this. Sammy, this guy here doesn't

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believe me about your bar slide. Can you serve him one up?

:19:26.:19:30.

pleasure. Let's get this rubbish out of the

:19:30.:19:37.

way. Clear the runway! OK, Sammy, any time you are ready... There you

:19:38.:19:47.
:19:48.:19:48.

go, sir. APPLAUSE Hit the brakes, pal!

:19:48.:19:51.

missed a trick, we should have set up a bar.

:19:51.:19:58.

Oh, that's not a trick. That's a skill! People are still watching

:19:58.:20:03.

Cheers 30 years later, still laughing at the jokes, why is it

:20:03.:20:08.

relevant today? I think it was great writing. They were funny, the

:20:08.:20:12.

writers. It finished in 1983, it was one of

:20:12.:20:18.

the most watched second to Mash? Yes.

:20:18.:20:27.

84 million watched it. More than Friends. Matt Le Blanc was here.

:20:27.:20:33.

I hope you told him that?! We did. It makes you think, why don't you

:20:33.:20:38.

make anymore? Is there a thought of you getting back together again?

:20:38.:20:44.

would make asses of oifs. It would be terrible. A bunch of old people

:20:44.:20:52.

pretending they were hip in a bar. Now, both of us are really big fans

:20:52.:20:55.

of Three Men and a Baby and Three Men and a Little Lady, now, is

:20:55.:20:58.

there going to be Three Men and a Bride? There has been talk, but I

:20:58.:21:07.

think we are bog to hop over it and do Three Very Old Men and a woman

:21:07.:21:12.

going through Menopause! Well, as long as you dress up and put a

:21:12.:21:16.

plastic face on, brilliant. Well, we will be back to Cheers, it

:21:17.:21:22.

is being repeated at 6.00pm every weekday on CBS Drama.

:21:22.:21:26.

30 years ago this week, the Falklands War was taking a dramatic

:21:26.:21:35.

and decisive turn. Here is what happened in the next seven days.

:21:35.:21:40.

N-the last hour we have heard on the ground in East Falklands, the

:21:40.:21:45.

British have achieved their first major victory in the drive to

:21:45.:21:51.

repossess the island. The goose Green Airfield have

:21:51.:21:56.

fallen to British Forces. We get the impression, they are on the way

:21:56.:22:00.

to Port Stanley and an end to the war. They did not give in easily.

:22:00.:22:04.

They fought until they realised that they were beaten. Then they

:22:04.:22:14.
:22:14.:22:14.

showed the white flags and then they showed the faulgt fought a

:22:14.:22:21.

little further. -- we very much regret to announce that Lieutenant

:22:21.:22:30.

Colonel H Jones was killed in the action to take Goose Green.

:22:30.:22:38.

Kievkiev in Liverpool, 60 merchant seamen joined the ferry to take

:22:38.:22:43.

1,500 troops to the South Atlantic. The men gathered to await coachs to

:22:43.:22:53.

take them to Devenport, where the 9-,000 -- 9,000-tonne ferry is

:22:53.:22:56.

being prepared. Some had been out- of-work for months and saw it as a

:22:56.:23:02.

chance to earn money in a job. It is a matter of earning money.

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I'm proud to go. I want to do something that I believe in. That's

:23:06.:23:10.

why I want to go. I don't want him to go. I want him

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to stay at home. Well, you heard what your mother

:23:13.:23:17.

said, do you feel the same about signing on? Yeah, I still want to

:23:17.:23:23.

The Pope travelled to the Midlands and Mersey, and made a plea for

:23:23.:23:30.

world peace. Today, the scale and the horror of

:23:30.:23:40.
:23:40.:23:42.

modern warfare makes it totaly unacceptable as a means of settling

:23:42.:23:50.

differences between nations. Now to a less serious aspect of the

:23:50.:23:54.

grim business of the battle for the Falklands. The challenge of keeping

:23:54.:23:58.

the troops relaxed and entertained in off-duty hours that they are

:23:58.:24:03.

able to snatch. The artists taking part in the Task

:24:03.:24:08.

Force Special, paraded this morning, all are giving their services free

:24:08.:24:12.

in making an hour-long video cassette, the copies to be rushed

:24:12.:24:16.

out to reach the fleet in about a week.

:24:16.:24:21.

Anybody who was asked who was able to do it, was free to do it and did

:24:21.:24:31.
:24:31.:24:33.

it with pleasure. It is a very exciting, visual act.

:24:33.:24:37.

The British Forces are pressing on to their main objective, Port

:24:37.:24:43.

Stanley. Full preparations were under way to

:24:43.:24:48.

use anyway Pam, a burning jelly that sticks to the skin of British

:24:48.:24:52.

Forces. The British commanders fear that there may be more stocks at

:24:52.:24:58.

Port Stanley and Argentine forces may be turning to it in a desperate

:24:58.:25:01.

tactic. And they were well aware that one

:25:01.:25:08.

battle remained, the one for Port Stanley, but the reaction was short

:25:08.:25:12.

that Argentina may surround. I don't understand that word. That

:25:12.:25:18.

world is not in mire dictionary. they say they are going to withdraw,

:25:18.:25:22.

withdraw within the next ten to 14 days, there would be no need for

:25:22.:25:26.

battle. # I don't want to spend the rest of

:25:26.:25:31.

my life # Looking down the barrel of a

:25:31.:25:36.

northern knife # Now, more on that next week.

:25:36.:25:42.

Now, we have the basketball team for the Paralympics training.

:25:42.:25:46.

There they are. Now, Murray Treseder is the coach of the men's

:25:46.:25:52.

team. How influential were you in deciding who the squad would be?

:25:52.:25:57.

have been together over a four-year cycle, players had the final

:25:57.:26:03.

selection last week, but... The men got silver that the last

:26:03.:26:09.

competition? Yes, we are on track. We won the European championships

:26:09.:26:13.

in Israel last year, the first time in 16 years. The progress has been

:26:13.:26:18.

pleasing. The women's squad are young. They are the youngest group

:26:18.:26:22.

at the Paralympics, they have shown remarkable improvement.

:26:22.:26:28.

It is not just about performance, fiscal abilities matter, there is a

:26:28.:26:33.

point system? You do. People watch the Paralympics and they have to

:26:33.:26:37.

understand that people have a class fiction if you are severely

:26:37.:26:41.

impaired, that the sense of balance is not great, you are a one-pointer,

:26:41.:26:46.

but one of the things that your coach has to be good at is adding

:26:46.:26:52.

up to 14 quickly, as once you get the 14 points, that disadvantages

:26:52.:26:55.

your team. Well, let's have a wander over

:26:55.:27:00.

there. Come on, Ted. From the women's team

:27:00.:27:05.

we have Sarah Grady, Helen Turner, also Matt Sealy and Ian Sagar from

:27:05.:27:11.

the men's team. Come on in, first of all, a huge

:27:11.:27:16.

congratulation! Give us an idea, how did they tell you? What was the

:27:16.:27:21.

process? We had an individual meeting after the World Cup this

:27:21.:27:26.

weekend. You walked in, you were told whether you were in or out,

:27:26.:27:30.

but thankfully we auld made it. It was difficult, as some of the

:27:30.:27:38.

people that you were training with for a long time, you had to console

:27:38.:27:41.

those people? We did not know on the day until after, but after

:27:41.:27:44.

there was a lot of e-mailing and phoning.

:27:44.:27:50.

Is Murray a hard task master? He looks to be a tough coach? Firm by

:27:50.:27:53.

fair. And what about training. Of course,

:27:53.:27:57.

we are edging closer to the Paralympics, are you going to amp

:27:57.:28:01.

it up now? It is managing the training we have been doing,

:28:01.:28:05.

working towards the goals that we have to achieve. So some may have

:28:05.:28:12.

to up their goals a little bit. Do you have a spare balls? Ted, you

:28:12.:28:18.

know you were say before you were really good as basketball? I have a

:28:18.:28:28.
:28:28.:28:28.

wand on my back! Well if you feel like having a pop... That's a long

:28:28.:28:34.

way! Oh! Absolutely brilliant stuff. Lovely stuff. Well, that is all

:28:34.:28:39.

that we have time for, unless, Ted, you want another pop. Go on. Get as

:28:39.:28:45.

close as you want. Yes, go! Oh! So close! This is why

:28:45.:28:49.

Ted Danson, Cheers star and CSI's new recruit, joins Matt Baker and Alex Jones in the studio. Plus, why Blackpool beach could soon become a no-swim zone and Larry Lamb has a wild encounter after discovering lion tamers in his family.


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