Talbot Absolute Genius with Dick and Dom


Talbot

Dick and Dom reveal the genius of Fox Talbot, a pioneer of photography. They come up with their own genius idea when they turn a bin into a giant pinhole camera.


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Transcript


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This is Absolute Genius.

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Dive in to a world of action, adventure and explosions.

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Each show will introduce you to a different genius.

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An amazing person who had a genius idea which shaped the world.

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And they will inspire us to come

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up with our own genius idea at the end of each show.

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-But, will it be any good?

-Will it be any good?!

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BOTH: It'll be Absolute Genius!

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Exploding onto your screen today...

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A genius of photography.

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Expect chemicals...

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..secret surveillance...

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..and a celebrity photo shoot with a difference.

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ALL: CHEESE!

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-Right a bit. Right a bit more. Bit more.

-This way?

-OK, say "bogies".

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-No.

-Got it.

-Get my good side?

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Absolutely.

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Today's genius didn't just change the world,

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he changed the way we see the world.

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Magazine covers, news photos, and the pics you take on your mobile phone.

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-Even those embarrassing school photos.

-Like this one.

-Yes.

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in the development of photography one mammoth mind was key.

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Ladies and gentlemen, we give you..

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-William...

-Henry...

-Fox...

-Talbot!

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-Otherwise known to his friends as...

-Foxy!

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-Foxy? No, Henry.

-Henry.

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Say 'Cheese'.

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Cheese! Brie, stilton, cheddar red Leicester or mozzarella?

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Exactly! See? Told you he was clever.

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Inspired by Fox Talbot's genius idea,

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we'll be coming up with our own genius idea later in the show.

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When we build a giant camera to photograph a giant city!

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Photographs are everywhere. It's thought that there are over

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one billion of them taken every single day!

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But when Fox Talbot was born in Dorset

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back in 1800 the total number of photographs

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ever taken was a whopping great...zero!

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In the days before digital cameras there was camera film,

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photos had to be printed before you could see them.

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And in the days before camera film, there was Fox Talbot!

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One of a small group of people racing to invent photography.

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But how were real life images created before photography was invented?

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Ah, look! A lady enjoying her prawn sandwich. Look at the view!

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It's amazing, isn't it?

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This is the Clifton Camera Obscura in Bristol and the

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images you can see on this table

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are being beamed down from a tiny little

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hole in the roof right up there.

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It's kind of like Victorian CCTV.

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Camera Obscura means "Dark Room" and the cameras you and I use

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today got their name because they're portable camera obscuras.

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So this is a not very portable camera!

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But how does a camera obscura work?

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If only Fran, our genius scientist, was here to tell us more

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Can we spot her on here?

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There she is!

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There! Carrying a big box.

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This is Fran.

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She just loves experimenting...

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..to help explain the ideas of our geniuses.

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And she's sure to pop up just when you really need her.

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Camera obscuras are the basis of all modern cameras.

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All you need to make one is a blacked out box

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and a small hole to let in the light.

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Plus Fran to show you how it works.

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So, what we're going to try

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and do is create an image of you inside that box.

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The light coming from the sun, bouncing off your head

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and going in all different directions.

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Light is a little bit funny, it likes to travel in straight lines.

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We've got a nice straight rope there.

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-So the rope represents the light?

-Exactly, yeah!

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So the light bouncing off Dick's head is going through our hole here,

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keeping on going,

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and it just so happens that it ends up at the bottom of our box

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-and that's where it forms the image of the head.

-OK.

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So that's the top of him, what about the bottom?

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That's a good point, that. This is the light bouncing off your foot.

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And it's travelling in a straight line. And let's post it through.

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Light is a little bit faster than this, though.

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-There.

-So my image is now in there!

-Yep.

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We've got the light going from the bottom of your foot,

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through the hole and up to the top of our box.

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But he's upside down. Why?

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He is upside down, and that's because you can see,

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as the light is going through,

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the only light that can get through our hole,

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it's travelling at a certain angle, so they end up crossing at the hole.

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-Ah, and it flips the image over.

-Yeah.

-I see!

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So, the small hole in the front of the camera obscura lets in just

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enough light from outside to project a clear image on the inside.

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Genius! Even if it is upside down.

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And that is the very basics of a camera obscura.

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For centuries, no-one could work out how to capture the real life

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images inside camera obscuras.

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Sitting in a dark room tracing around an image was

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the closest it got to photography.

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Come and get your passport portraits.

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In you go.

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But that took patience and skill.

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There's a guy in there called Finn, and he wants a portrait doing.

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No wonder they wanted to invent the camera!

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Here it comes!

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LAUGHTER

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The race for photography started in the early-1800s

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when people began to experiment with light sensitive materials

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placed inside small camera obscuras.

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They replaced the hole with a lens and the camera was born!

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This is the first photograph ever taken, by Frenchman Nicephore Niepce.

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The blurry buildings are a big

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improvement on earlier attempts that simply faded away.

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Another French pioneer, Louis Daguerre,

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had big success but his images were

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captured on metal so couldn't be reproduced.

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The world was waiting for a genius idea.

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Fox Talbot was the first person to master all three

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stages of photography.

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He captured images on light sensitive paper and fixed them

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so they didn't disappear.

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Better still, his negative images could be reproduced many times.

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So for the first time ever you could

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send snaps to all your family and friends.

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Genius.

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Oh! Another 4,000 holiday snaps!

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And when Fox Talbot finally invented photographs

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he couldn't stop taking them.

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He travelled all over Europe taking snaps with his camera.

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All over Europe? So where are we going next?

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-Don't tell me - Barcelona!

-No.

-Milan?

-No.

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-Paris?

-Wiltshire.

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Wiltshire? I love Wiltshire!

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This is Lacock Abbey in Wiltshire.

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And here it is in one of the earliest photographs ever.

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Taken by the genius William Henry Fox Talbot.

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And he actually lived here! It's absolutely stunning.

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No wonder old WHFT wanted to take pictures of it.

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His wife made some beautiful drawings of their travels.

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But our Henry was a rubbish drawer.

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There was nothing else for it, he had to invent photography.

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Meet genius photographer Betsy Reed. An expert on early cameras.

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This is actually the window where Fox Talbot made his first image.

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It's a really ideal location because it's a southward facing window

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so you get a lot of light, which is

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really important for these early photographic processes.

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So how exactly did these photographic experiments work?

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I'll tell you what.

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We need some chemicals and some flowers and then I can show you.

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-Chemicals... Right, well, we'll get the flowers!

-You get the chemicals.

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Fox Talbot figured out that the key to capturing an image

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was light sensitive paper.

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Lots of his early experiments involved paper, chemicals

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and flowers.

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Not another dark room!

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Our next step will be to coat the paper with silver nitrate.

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Silver nitrate changes colour when exposed to light.

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Why does it have to be so dark in here?

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Because if we had lights on the paper would react too

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quickly before we want it to.

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Squish it down nice and tight.

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Our flower arrangements definitely aren't going to win any awards.

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The thing that got Fox Talbot so excited is what happens to the

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light sensitive paper once it's exposed to the sun.

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Hold on to your hats!

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Just set it right there.

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How long will this take then?

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Um, it will probably start to show in just a few minutes.

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It's already changing.

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What's happening there?

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Well, your silver nitrate is reacting to the sunlight.

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After five minutes' exposure to sunlight

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the image on the paper has fully developed.

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Fox Talbot knew he had discovered the genius chemical reaction

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he needed to capture the image in a camera.

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Where the flowers weren't, the sun has reacted with the silver and

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it's gone dark, but where the flowers were it's left a lovely white print.

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It's actually a negative image,

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which means that all of the light bits

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are dark and all of the dark bits are light.

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And Fox Talbot was the first person to discover the negative.

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The next stage of the process is fixing,

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another breakthrough for Fox Talbot.

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Without a chemical to fix it, the image would simply fade away.

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A quick rinse to get rid of the chemicals, and we're done.

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Or in Dick's case, overdone.

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-Ah.

-Ah! And there we have it. My picture is well and truly fixed!

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Look at that. Perfect.

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-Don't do it!

-No, no, no, no!

-Don't let it rip!

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-All right, that.

-And this will stay like this for ever?

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Yes, it should.

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Fox Talbot placed this light sensitive paper

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inside a basic camera.

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And was able to capture negative images of the real

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world for the very first time.

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It was the big breakthrough in the race to perfect photography.

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But why were negatives so important?

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Other photography pioneers could make images.

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But only Fox Talbot could easily make copies. By treating

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his negative image he could make as many positive prints as he liked.

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This really was a breakthrough for Fox Talbot.

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And everyone wanted their photo taken with this

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incredible, affordable technology.

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The problem was, because the chemical paper

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took a while to react to light, you couldn't move during the exposure

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or the picture would come out blurred.

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And because faster reacting film wasn't going to be around for another

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30 years, people had to sit still.

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-Very still.

-Sorry!

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So how hard was it to take a great snap at the dawn of photography?

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To find out we've borrowed an old camera

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and are going to help Betsy take a photo 1860s-stylee.

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All we need are some subjects who are really good at staying still.

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-RUMBLING What's that noise? That noise!

-What, like a rumbling noise?

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Like there's a stampede!

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SHOUTING

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No pushing and shoving!

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Don't be silly, no sticking out your tongue,

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smallest ones at the front. I sympathise.

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It's going to take 10 seconds to expose it,

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so you've got to stand still for 10 seconds, is that possible?

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No!

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Have you ever stood still for 10 seconds in your life?

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-Yes, she has.

-No.

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-This is going to be quite tricky.

-Well, we'll make sure you do.

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Stay, stay, stay. We'll stand at the back here.

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-OK, listen to Betsy, everyone.

-OK, everyone, quiet.

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I'm going to count to three.

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At three, I need all of you to be perfectly still for me

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until I tell you you can move again.

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Does anyone not understand? Good.

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One, two...

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Who fidgeted?

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Look, kid, stop it.

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Do you understand me? Never again.

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I think I'll put you on the naughty step.

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-Freeze.

-Stand still.

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Ten...nine...

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-BOTH:

-..eight...seven...six...five...

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four...three...two...one.

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CHEERING

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Not bad for a 150-year-old camera.

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So thanks to Fox Talbot, people could capture an image in a camera,

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chemically fix it so it wouldn't fade away,

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and with his invention of the negative, print lots of copies.

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Genius.

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Photography was on its way to taking over the world.

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It's the genius top five photo facts.

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Five - the most photographed city in the world is New York,

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and the most photographed thing is the Empire State Building.

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With or without a giant monkey on top.

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Four - the most reproduced photo ever is Che Guevara,

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the famous revolutionary leader.

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It was taken in 1960 and since then has been

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reproduced on everything from mugs to T-shirts to buildings.

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Three - Apollo astronauts left behind

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12 state-of-the-art cameras on the moon.

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There was hardly any room on the spaceship

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and it was more important to bring back moon rock.

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Two - ever been asked to get somebody's good side?

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Scientists reckon that the left side of your face is better looking

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than your right.

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I reckon either's fine, so long as it's not your backside.

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One - the most expensive photo ever sold was a print called Rhein II.

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For your £2.7 million you got a snap of some grass, some sky,

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a bit of river, and that's it.

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So photography was really capturing the world,

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but because of slow exposure, it meant that you could only take

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photographs outdoors in the sunshine with bright light.

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If you wanted to take a snap of something

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like your dad's dodgy dancing indoors,

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then you'd have to wait several years

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until the invention of flash photography.

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Today, almost every camera has a flash.

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But in the early days of photography,

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taking pictures indoors was very dangerous.

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And we know just the man

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to bring old-fashioned explosive flash to life.

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Our mate, chemist and genius helper, Professor Andrea Sella.

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Andrea, good to be here again.

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We need an explosive amount of light to light a photograph.

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We thought, "Who better to come to than you?"

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Well, that was the real problem in the 19th century -

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how you could get a really bright, really fast light.

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Remember there was no electricity.

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The only thing that was available was chemistry.

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Some time around 1870,

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people proposed that this reaction here might be used for photography.

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I'm going to put... This is going to be a fire. I've got some fuel.

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Inside, we actually have the oxidiser, right,

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which is going to do...

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You can see this bit of colour in there. It stinks a bit.

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Do you want to hold the end on really firmly?

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Get your hands right round. It might pop off.

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Just give it a shake.

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Give it a quick shake. It stinks, doesn't it?

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This is what came to be known as the barking dog. Get a match.

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We've got to get the lights out.

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Lights out, please.

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Thank you.

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Now we're going to light it at the top. You ready?

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BARKING SOUND

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DOM SCREAMS

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This is why it's called the barking dog.

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The reason is because you have this flame that travels down.

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It makes the air inside, the gas inside the tube vibrate.

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It's like an organ pipe.

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Do you really want to be travelling around with fire?

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It doesn't seem like such a brilliant idea.

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So today, what we use inside a regular camera

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is a tiny capsule that contains a gas called xenon,

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which was actually discovered here in London.

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When you pass a spark through it, it gives this incredible flash.

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In fact, the temperature goes up to about 5,000 degrees.

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5,000 degrees in the palm of your hand?

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5,000 degrees in the palm of your hand.

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Who'd have thought that you were carrying something

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so hot around in your pocket?

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If you think blowing things up to take pictures isn't very sensible,

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check out this other...

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Self portraits. Taking pictures of yourself. The selfie.

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We've all done it, even Fox Talbot.

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I bet he never knew what he was starting.

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Miley. Pharell. Justin.

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What were you all thinking?

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Actually, Justin, we don't want to know what you were thinking.

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Just don't think it again.

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Photography started with the camera obscura,

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the invention of light-sensitive materials

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and Fox Talbot's genius breakthrough of the negative.

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We want to pay tribute to Fox Talbot with our own genius idea,

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so we've come to London to take photos with a difference, using...

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-this. A pin.

-All right, be careful.

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Sharp. Dangerous. Ouch.

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Clearly we have no idea what we're doing, but luckily this man does -

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genius pinhole camera maker Justin Quinnell.

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-All right, Justin?

-Hello there.

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-How are you doing? All right?

-Hi there. Yeah.

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We've got our pin, but what exactly is a pinhole camera.

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A pinhole camera is a camera which makes an image

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using a small hole rather than a lens.

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You can make them out of anything -

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things you'd normally throw away, like your old shoe box.

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-You can make a camera out of that?

-Yeah, it's a light-tight container.

0:17:450:17:48

-All you need to do is make a small hole in there.

-On the top.

0:17:480:17:51

Yes, why not?

0:17:510:17:52

Push it in, take it out again. Always handy.

0:17:520:17:54

-So this is now the lens of the camera.

-It is.

0:17:540:17:57

There's light travelling through this hole

0:17:570:17:59

and making an upside down image on the back inside the box.

0:17:590:18:02

So this is similar to a camera obscura.

0:18:020:18:04

To capture an image, you have to cover up the hole of the shutter

0:18:040:18:07

and get some very special light-sensitive photographic paper.

0:18:070:18:11

Similar to what we were using with Betsy.

0:18:110:18:13

Then you'd hold the camera up, peel the shutter off.

0:18:130:18:17

Light starts travelling through the pinhole.

0:18:170:18:19

After a few seconds, it'll make an image.

0:18:190:18:21

-So you've taken a photo, genuinely with a shoe box.

-Yeah.

0:18:210:18:25

You can take photographs with virtually anything.

0:18:250:18:27

So long as it traps the light.

0:18:270:18:29

-Crisp packets?

-Yes.

-Coke cans?

-Yes.

0:18:290:18:31

-Table?

-No.

-Ah, OK.

0:18:310:18:33

Hold on a minute.

0:18:330:18:34

-You said something hollow that you could project an image inside.

-Yep.

0:18:340:18:37

Aren't we looking at it right here?

0:18:370:18:39

Could you get photo paper the size of this?

0:18:390:18:41

-You can't use a bin as a camera.

-It's empty now.

0:18:410:18:44

-It's genius.

-Can you, Justin?

-Yes.

0:18:440:18:46

-Put a hole in the front.

-Yeah, we can do it.

0:18:460:18:49

Not a pinhole camera, but a bin-hole camera. Genius.

0:18:490:18:52

This is it, our genius idea.

0:18:530:18:56

We're going to turn a bin into a giant pinhole camera

0:18:560:18:59

by drilling a small hole in the front

0:18:590:19:01

and putting a big roll of light-sensitive paper inside.

0:19:010:19:04

Our challenge, to take some very big photos of a very big city - London.

0:19:060:19:11

The problem, it's a bulky old bin with no view finder.

0:19:110:19:14

I can't see a thing.

0:19:140:19:16

The photos could be rubbish.

0:19:160:19:17

Our genius idea will take in all stages of Fox Talbot's

0:19:190:19:22

photographic process - developing, fixing...

0:19:220:19:26

and printing.

0:19:260:19:28

Well, that'll be up to one man.

0:19:280:19:30

Alan Sparrow - genius picture editor of daily newspaper the Metro.

0:19:310:19:36

No photo gets in the paper unless Mr Sparrow says so.

0:19:360:19:40

OK, boys, I'm a busy fellow,

0:19:420:19:43

so we're going to go out and take some pictures today.

0:19:430:19:45

This is the very pointy end of the business.

0:19:450:19:47

It brings back some fantastic views of London. Some monuments.

0:19:470:19:50

I need a celebrity. Someone with the X factor. I need a scoop.

0:19:500:19:55

Not a problem. Not a problem.

0:19:550:19:57

We want to print these pictures. They're not just for fun.

0:19:570:20:00

How many megapixels is your camera?

0:20:000:20:01

-What sort of kit are you working with?

-Well, eh...

0:20:010:20:04

Just give us one minute.

0:20:040:20:06

Here it is. This is the kit.

0:20:120:20:15

It's a pinhole bin camera.

0:20:150:20:19

Oh, my word.

0:20:190:20:20

With a hole in it.

0:20:200:20:21

I'm not sure this is going to work, really, boys.

0:20:220:20:25

We've got our work cut out to impress Alan.

0:20:250:20:27

-With just one day to get our photos in the can...

-Bin.

-Yeah, bin.

0:20:270:20:31

..we hit the streets of London.

0:20:310:20:32

Oh, we've got to get Nelson's Column in.

0:20:320:20:34

Think he'll fit?

0:20:360:20:37

The thing is, there's no view finder like you see on a phone

0:20:370:20:40

or on any camera. How do you know what you're taking a picture of?

0:20:400:20:45

You've got to guess.

0:20:450:20:46

OK.

0:20:460:20:47

We've got to lock the bin so it doesn't move around over

0:20:470:20:50

the duration of time, and take the photo.

0:20:500:20:52

Oh, so peel off the...

0:20:520:20:53

As you'd expect, a pinhole doesn't let much light into the bin, so

0:20:540:20:59

it's going to take eight minutes to make the light-sensitive paper react.

0:20:590:21:03

And anybody moving won't show up in the photo.

0:21:030:21:06

So it will look like Trafalgar Square is empty.

0:21:060:21:08

Completely.

0:21:080:21:09

Our pinhole camera is attracting attention and inspiring

0:21:090:21:12

its own photo opportunities with cameras that are a lot smaller.

0:21:120:21:16

-ALL:

-Bogies!

0:21:160:21:18

What time are we on?

0:21:180:21:20

-That's eight minutes.

-OK.

0:21:200:21:22

-Oh, it's not a real bin.

-It's not a real bin.

-Don't put it in the bin.

0:21:220:21:25

-Do not put that in there.

-It's not a real bin.

0:21:250:21:27

And now you're standing in front of that.

0:21:270:21:30

It's all her fault.

0:21:300:21:31

Where's the picture now?

0:21:310:21:32

The picture right now is invisibly on a piece of photographic paper.

0:21:320:21:35

So it's no good for you lot, is it?

0:21:350:21:37

You're used to just going, click, and you can see the picture.

0:21:370:21:39

-We have to wait.

-You're pretty sure it worked?

0:21:390:21:42

We'll see.

0:21:420:21:43

Now we have to change the roll after every shot.

0:21:440:21:47

The paper can't be exposed to light,

0:21:470:21:49

so we use our hi tech mobile dark room.

0:21:490:21:53

Once the exposed paper is out,

0:21:530:21:54

we have to put fresh unexposed paper in, ready for the next shot.

0:21:540:21:58

-We've got one London landmark in the can.

-Bin.

-Bin, hopefully.

0:22:000:22:04

We even find a Londoner who will stand still for us for eight minutes.

0:22:040:22:08

Oi, we said don't move.

0:22:080:22:10

Onwards.

0:22:100:22:12

But with our deadline pressing,

0:22:120:22:14

we're desperate for a celeb to impress Alan back at HQ.

0:22:140:22:18

Isn't that guy from X Factor?

0:22:190:22:21

Jahmene.

0:22:210:22:22

Jahmene. Hey, we've both got your album. We love it.

0:22:220:22:28

Bring it this way, Justin. Come on.

0:22:280:22:30

Yes, it really is X Factor star and chart topper Jahmene Douglas.

0:22:310:22:35

We really are going to try to get him to pose in front of a giant bin.

0:22:380:22:43

All you have to do is sit totally still over there for eight minutes.

0:22:430:22:46

Easy as that.

0:22:460:22:47

Go and sit next to those weeds.

0:22:470:22:49

This is interesting.

0:22:490:22:50

Thanks.

0:22:500:22:52

Where do we want it, Justin?

0:22:520:22:54

You've got it, yeah. Just next to the weeds. Nice and clean. All right?

0:22:540:22:58

-Yes.

-Good.

0:22:580:23:00

All right, let's get it nice and close,

0:23:000:23:01

cos we want to get a nice portrait here.

0:23:010:23:03

OK. I don't trust you guys.

0:23:030:23:05

Lock it off.

0:23:050:23:06

Go.

0:23:060:23:08

Right, Jahmene, very simple.

0:23:080:23:09

What's happening right now is your image, as we see it, is being

0:23:090:23:12

projected through this tiny little hole, flipped upside down.

0:23:120:23:16

Stop talking at him now. He's trying to pose.

0:23:160:23:18

I think he thinks something's going to squirt out the hole

0:23:190:23:22

into his face.

0:23:220:23:23

That's three minutes.

0:23:230:23:25

You did remember to put the film in, didn't you?

0:23:250:23:28

If this goes right, this picture could be in Metro.

0:23:280:23:31

-An actual paparazzi.

-A proper one.

0:23:320:23:35

BUZZER

0:23:350:23:36

-OK, time's up.

-Time is up.

-You can move.

-Shutter.

0:23:360:23:39

Put the shutter up. Put the shutter up.

0:23:390:23:41

Nothing squirted out the hole, nothing came out the bin.

0:23:420:23:45

A fly went into my eye.

0:23:450:23:47

-Fantastic.

-A fly went into my eye. I tried to maintain normal face.

0:23:470:23:51

-Try not to cry.

-You're a pro to the end.

0:23:530:23:55

Job done. A proper celebrity scoop.

0:23:560:23:59

As photoshoots go, that was probably the most awkward one I've done.

0:23:590:24:02

Whether or not bin-hole cameras will catch on or not...

0:24:020:24:05

We'll see how the picture turns out.

0:24:050:24:07

With time running out,

0:24:070:24:08

we cross over the river to squeeze in one final photo.

0:24:080:24:11

-MUFFLED:

-Whatever you do, don't move.

0:24:150:24:18

All this work and just four photos.

0:24:180:24:20

They're big, but will they be any good?

0:24:200:24:22

-MUFFLED:

-Dom.

-DOM GRUNTS

0:24:220:24:24

I've got an itch.

0:24:240:24:25

In the dark room the next morning, it's the moment of truth.

0:24:270:24:31

Has our bin-hole camera even worked?

0:24:310:24:33

We follow Fox Talbot's ground-breaking process,

0:24:330:24:36

and the chemicals develop our images.

0:24:360:24:39

CHEERING

0:24:390:24:40

There's something here.

0:24:400:24:41

We fix the images so they don't disappear, but the big question

0:24:410:24:45

is will our photos be good enough to print in a national newspaper?

0:24:450:24:50

It's back to the newspaper offices for Alan's verdict.

0:24:520:24:55

Don't you let me down.

0:24:560:24:57

-Hi again, Alan.

-OK, let's have a look.

0:24:580:25:01

-This is Trafalgar Square.

-It's not Trafalgar Square at night.

0:25:020:25:05

This is a negative at the moment.

0:25:050:25:06

Everyone seems to be in motion around the picture.

0:25:060:25:09

That happens because each photo takes so long to take,

0:25:090:25:12

if you're moving, you're a blur.

0:25:120:25:14

This next shot, the light wasn't actually as good.

0:25:140:25:18

We were at the London Eye.

0:25:180:25:20

The only person that's there is Rich. He looks like a ghost.

0:25:200:25:23

-It's really interesting.

-It's OK.

0:25:230:25:26

The problem is, here, it was too sunny,

0:25:270:25:29

so it's been totally overexposed.

0:25:290:25:32

We need to pull something special out of the bag to save the day.

0:25:320:25:35

You asked for someone with the X factor.

0:25:350:25:37

I reckon we've pretty much delivered what you asked for.

0:25:370:25:40

That is actually Jahmene from The X Factor.

0:25:420:25:44

Really? That's very, very good.

0:25:440:25:46

He was a very patient sitter then.

0:25:460:25:48

Right, so, the big question is, do you think you will print

0:25:500:25:53

any of these photos in your paper?

0:25:530:25:55

Well, let's make sure we can find a positive, see how it goes

0:25:550:25:58

and see if any of these can make it for the grade for the paper.

0:25:580:26:00

-No promises yet. You have to talk to your team.

-I think so.

0:26:000:26:03

Thank you very much.

0:26:030:26:05

So it's a maybe from Alan

0:26:080:26:10

until he sees the positive versions of our photos.

0:26:100:26:13

That's where the genius of the negative is revealed.

0:26:130:26:16

Trafalgar Square.

0:26:160:26:18

Big Ben and the London Eye.

0:26:200:26:22

A human statue.

0:26:240:26:25

And a pop star with the X factor.

0:26:280:26:30

It's been an incredible journey. We've been inside a camera obscura.

0:26:340:26:38

We've experimented with chemicals.

0:26:380:26:40

And discovered the power of the negative.

0:26:400:26:43

All thanks to Mr William Henry Fox Talbot.

0:26:430:26:47

Well, the good news is that Alan has decided to print

0:26:470:26:50

a couple of the pictures that we took using the bin-hole camera.

0:26:500:26:53

Look.

0:26:530:26:54

There we are. This is a dummy copy.

0:26:540:26:56

This is what it's going to look like in the paper.

0:26:560:26:58

It's crazy to think that we fixed, developed and printed pictures

0:26:580:27:02

using Fox Talbot's original methods.

0:27:020:27:04

So, William Fox Talbot, we thank you. You are an absolute genius.

0:27:040:27:09

Say cheese.

0:27:090:27:10

Cheese.

0:27:100:27:11

THEY SCREAM

0:27:170:27:18

DOM SCREAMS It smacked me in the face.

0:27:180:27:21

-Dom's...

-Oh, no!

0:27:210:27:22

What are you doing?!

0:27:240:27:25

Let me get it straight.

0:27:260:27:29

DICK GROANS

0:27:290:27:30

But what's all that?! What's all the black stuff?

0:27:300:27:33

LAUGHTER

0:27:350:27:37

THEY SCREAM

0:27:380:27:40

Dick and Dom reveal the genius of Fox Talbot, a pioneer of photography. Inspired by him, they come up with their own genius idea when they turn a bin into a giant pinhole camera.


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