Episode 9 Roar


Episode 9

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Today, on Roar, a baby wallaby is found abandoned.

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The keepers must step in to save his life.

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But even with all this love, can little Joey survive?

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Hello and welcome to Roar. I'm Rani and this is...

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Johny, what are you doing?

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Oh, hey, Rani. I'm just giving myself a bit of a pamper.

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I found the most amazing mud

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and I thought my skin could do with a bit of a treat, so I'm just...

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You do realise that's a Kunekune pig enclosure and that's the mud

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they wallow in, and it's probably not just mud?

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Kunekune enclosure? Not just mud? You mean I'm...?

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I think we should leave it there and get on with the show.

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And quick! The pigs are coming!

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Coming up, there's a new pride of lions up in the safari park,

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and today, we're going to meet them for the very first time.

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It's a big day for the new baby sea lion

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because today is the day she gets her name.

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And they say elephants never forget, but what about keepers?

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Can this lot catch out the boss with some jumbo questions?

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Oh, that's pretty nasty, actually.

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But we're starting today up in Wallaby Wood,

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which is home to over 30 Bennett's wallabies.

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They are some of the smallest wallabies in the world

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and originally come from

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Tasmania and the coastal southeast of Australia. In the spring,

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many of the females here in the park have young babies,

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called joeys, in their pouches.

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The little ones are totally reliant on mum for food,

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warmth and protection.

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But two days ago, the keepers made a shocking discovery

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when they were doing the morning checks.

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A young joey was on his own,

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abandoned in the middle of Wallaby Wood.

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And he was very distressed.

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He was screaming and calling for mum,

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but none of the females were responding to him,

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no-one came and picked him up and got him in their pouch.

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So, either mum abandoned him, maybe she was a young mum,

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wasn't really sure what to do.

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We're not really sure.

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They had to step in to try and save his life.

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For keeper Polly, it was a really worrying time.

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The joey was very weak and she had never hand-reared a wallaby before.

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It didn't look that great. He was shaking. He was cold.

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And he was losing strength, really.

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The keepers think that the abandoned joey is around five months old.

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Usually, joeys stay in mum's pouch for up to eight months,

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so this one won't survive unless he gets warmth and milk.

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I still get worried that something could happen,

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maybe that he would stop feeding or something.

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He's still not totally out of the woods.

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To give him the best chance of survival,

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Polly has re-created, as best she can, mum's pouch.

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At the moment, he's living in a rucksack with a pillowcase in it,

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padded out with towels as well to make it a nice, secure pouch,

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because, obviously, mum would have him in a pouch.

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The first few days of hand-rearing a baby animal are always

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the most difficult.

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Will the little joey pull through? We'll be back later.

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Keepers always looking for ways to keep their animals interested,

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and one way of doing that is to introduce them

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to new smells and textures.

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Camel hair is always a favourite with the monkeys,

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so today, we've come up with a plan to try it out on another animal.

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I've come up to the new area with senior keeper Beth.

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-And, apparently, the camels are losing their hair?

-Yes, they are.

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-Are they stressed? What's going on?

-No, they're fine.

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It's because of the warm weather. We're coming into summer,

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so they've dropped their coats, which they'd do in the wild.

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-Now, is that camel hair?

-Yep, that's camel hair.

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So, we're going to tidy this up?

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-Yeah, I just need to pick a few bits up.

-OK, now,

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rhinos are just over there. Are we going to be safe getting out?

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-If I just pop out, Rani, and you stay safely on the truck...

-OK.

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Should I watch your radio?

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So if anything happens, I can call for help.

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-OK, Beth.

-OK.

-Beth is out of the truck. She's going to collect...

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Yep, Beth, I've got your back. I've got my eye on the rhinos.

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-Yep, she's safe.

-We've got a line of people watching us.

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Oh! Yeah, I'm on the radio to them.

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-OK, so has this just come off a camel?!

-Yep.

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That could have easily come off a shoulder or leg or something.

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It comes off in big clumps. It's something that we'd go along

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and we'd pull it all off... That's a nice beard.

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But it naturally falls off, as well.

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At this time of year, they're basically nearly hairless.

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It's what they'd naturally do out in the wild,

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because they're from, like, Asia and it does get very, very cold

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in the winter, but very, very hot in the summer.

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They're really hairy in the winter, then they shed it all in the summer.

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So what happens to this hair now? What is the plan?

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Well, you know, we do have a lot of it, so sometimes we put it in

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for the monkeys, sometimes we give it down to Animal Adventure,

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see if they need it.

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Why would they need it?

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There's many things down there that might like a camel hair.

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Well, we've got a ton of camel hair here.

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I'm going to take this down to Animal Adventures.

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Join us later and find out which lucky animal gets to play with it.

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What kind of dog chases anything red?

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A bulldog.

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BOTH: Roar!

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What do you call a gorilla wearing earmuffs?

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Anything you like, he can't hear you!

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Glup, glup, glup...

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What do you call a deer with no eyes?

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-I don't know, what do you call a deer with no eyes?

-No-eye deer.

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Back up with the abandoned baby wallaby,

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and it's feeding time for little joey.

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If he's to survive, he'll need regular feeds, and lots of it.

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You can't get wallaby milk, so Polly is giving the little one

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the next best thing, puppy milk formula.

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He does quite like his milk. Now he's got used to the bottle

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and the rubber teats,

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he really does go for it.

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Polly feeds joey every three hours, day and night.

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Sometimes, I stop half way through, for him to digest it a little bit,

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and then have another go at it.

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But he seems quite keen for it all now.

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Done?

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But there are also some yucky bits to being a foster wallaby mum.

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In the wild, baby wallabies would go to the toilet

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inside mum's pouch, which she would then clean out with her tongue.

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Yuck!

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But Polly is mum, and it's time to clean out this pouch.

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He's generally quite good. If I get him out and he'll hop around,

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generally he'll go to the toilet then.

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Otherwise, he's quite clean. He likes cleaning himself a lot anyway.

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Fresh towels go in and the pouch is ready.

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But like most mums,

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poor Polly is getting the runaround from the little one.

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Joey! This way. Little one!

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Baby boy! What are you doing?

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That's it. Done?

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Keepers try not to fall in love with their animals,

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but sometimes it's hard.

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I think he's just really cute.

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Because he's got really big eyes, pretty long eyelashes.

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His ears are too big for his body at the moment,

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he needs to grow into them.

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He's just really, really sweet.

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Polly is doing everything she can for the young joey,

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but will it be enough?

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Hand-rearing can never be as good as a mum's care, the joey is very

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young and very fragile. We'll be back later to see how he gets on.

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ALL: Did you know?

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Here's a parptastic fact.

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Cows produce 18% of the world's greenhouse gases from their bottoms.

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That's more than all the cars and planes put together.

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But even though they eat grass too, kangaroos and wallabies produce

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no greenhouse gases from their parps.

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All thanks to a special enzyme in their tummy.

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ALL: Now you know!

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We've got a special edition of Ask The Keeper today.

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In one corner is this lot. In the other is a celebrity,

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Anne the elephant, whose story from circus to the safari park

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we've been following on Roar.

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They say elephants never forget, but what about head keepers?

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We're fired up and ready to take on the big man, Andy Heaton.

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It's time for Ask The Keeper, and this time, I'm going to ask all

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on Anne the elephant.

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You deal with big animals, but can you take on these four beasts?

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-They're pretty scary, but I'll give it a go.

-OK.

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Well, he seems pretty confident. Who's first?

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Has anyone got a good question about Anne the elephant?

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-James, go on. Make it good.

-Can the elephant swim?

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Elephants can swim really, really well.

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They're really buoyant, so they float really good.

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They look really heavy, but they've got a great big tummy on them,

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so they can. And they can swim long distances as well. In Asia,

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they can actually swim between islands. They'll swim a long way.

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-Where is she from?

-Anne?

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Anne was originally from Sri Lanka

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years and years ago.

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It's an island off of India.

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So that's where she actually came from a long, long time ago.

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-How far do they travel in the wild?

-That's a really good question.

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If they're travelling, say, because they can't find a lot of water

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or anything like that,

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they can maybe do 50km in a day on a big old march.

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So they can cover big, big distances.

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You'd get really tired trying to keep up with them.

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How fast can she run?

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Oh, well, Anne can't run very fast at all because she's an old lady

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and her back legs hurt her a little bit,

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but an elephant can run maybe 20 miles an hour.

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That's about 30km an hour - faster than we could run.

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And such a big animal. Any other questions?

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-He's answering 'em all.

-What do they use their trunks for?

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Elephants use their trunks for lots of different things.

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It's like a big, elongated nose and lip.

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So you can see Anne now, she's picking up a bit of sand

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and she'll throw that on herself, like so, just to show us.

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And what they'll do is pick up food from the ground

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and pop it into their mouth. They'll also drink from it.

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They'll draw water up their nose, up their trunk, to sort back there,

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and then they'll curl their trunk up and put it in their mouth.

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So they use it for loads and loads of things.

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And smelling and touching each other... It's just an amazing thing.

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Andy, all I can say is that you are on fire.

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But it's now time to extinguish those flames.

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It's time for the killer question.

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Roar! OK.

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You're a head keeper, Andy, so we've made this extra tough.

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Right. Anne can get through maybe 25kg of fruit each day.

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And to digest it, she has a series of complex intestines, right?

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So, what I want to know is if you stretched out her intestines,

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her large and small intestines, laid them out,

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-how long would that be?

-Oh, that's pretty nasty, actually.

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-Sorry.

-That's pretty nasty.

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Hmm...

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I'm going to say...

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..that it's going to be about...

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..about 800 metres.

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800 metres?

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Well, I can say, Andy, you might have known the answers

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to the other questions, but you're way off on this one! It's 30 metres!

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-Is that all?

-30 metres, yeah.

-OK. You said stretched.

-Yeah.

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-You could stretch them a long way.

-Look at that, sore loser!

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You didn't get that right, you were way off. But overall,

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you did answer most of our questions. What do you reckon, guys?

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We thwarted him with our killer question,

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but overall, is it a thumbs up or thumbs down for head keeper Andy?

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-ALL: Thumbs up!

-Thumbs up all round.

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Nice one, kids! Yeah, I like that. That'll do, yeah.

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Earlier on, I was with Beth when she collected a load of...

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camel hair. Now, of course, Animal Adventure and the lucky

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animal to get their hands on this is the ferrets,

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and they're nibbling my feet right now.

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Ah! Emma, I have got a whole bag of camel hair.

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Beth just picked it up off the floor because the camels are moulting.

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Look how eager they are to see it! Or are they happy to see me?

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-I don't know.

-It's a bit of both, I think.

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I was going to say it stinks and it's filthy,

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but ferrets are pretty pongy.

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-Yeah, especially boys.

-Especially boys?

-Yeah.

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I think that's across the board. Only joking, Johny!

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All right, so what are we doing with this fur?

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For today, I think we're putting it inside some of their areas.

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-But, look! He's fast asleep!

-I know.

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Hopefully, it will wake him up a bit, he can have some exercise.

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And then he'll make that into a nice bed for him.

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So, if you could put some in the tyres, the shoe,

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and also their beds...

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-You lot, get out of there!

-They're already in there.

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Oh, my goodness! Oh! There are ferrets everywhere!

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They help themselves.

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-They're going... They love this stuff!

-They do.

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It smells really, really weird to them.

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They don't encounter this in the wild, so...

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-Why are they so interested, then?

-It's just a new smell for them.

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They've got a good sense of smell, not a good sense of eyesight.

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So, this is getting them going. It's keeping them awake,

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giving them something to do.

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They absolutely love this stuff! Look at that!

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I suppose it is, it's really cosy, this stuff.

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Yep. They like it to smell first,

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and then they'll start using it as a bedding.

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In about half an hour, they'll all be curled down in it, fast asleep.

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OK, we've got loads of boys here, is there anyone in particular?

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He looks like he's got a little wig on!

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This one's Basil. He's having a nice sleep.

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I was thinking of spreading this around,

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but they are so loving their cosy, new bed.

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-In the wild, obviously, they're not sleeping on soft camel hair.

-No.

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What do they normally sleep on? Hello!

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-Ferrets are a domesticated species.

-Right.

-They evolved from polecats.

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In the wild, polecats would steal other animals' burrows

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and they'd sleep down in there.

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Well, I've got to say, I was coming in here thinking, "Oh,

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"I've got to put the camel hair over here, over here, over here."

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And, thank you, Mr Ferret, you've made it very easy for me.

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I've left you the sack and they're as happy as can be.

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So, on that note, I'll just leave them with a new bed.

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Yep, they're quite happy.

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Back up at Wallaby Wood and it's now two weeks

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since the little joey was found abandoned by his mum.

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The good news is that he's doing well

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and the keepers have named him Joseph.

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Of course, that gets shortened to Joey.

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Keeper Polly has become foster mum to little Joey

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and carries him around in his own pouch all day.

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A rucksack might not be quite as good as mum's pouch,

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but it's the next best thing.

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Joey needs looking after 24-7,

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so even when Polly's doing her other keeper duties, he stays with her.

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But it's a tiring job.

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To start with, I was looking after him on my own.

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But it's really hard work,

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especially while you're working as well.

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So I'm sharing his care with another keeper.

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Keeper Beth is an experienced foster mum.

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She's had to hand-rear animals

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before, including pygmy goats.

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Tonight, it's her turn to babysit little Joey.

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Whilst warming his milk, Beth gets a chance to make herself a cup of tea.

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But, of course, Joseph gets his drink first.

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With this little Joey, he needs 24-hour attention.

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But he's very good,

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he doesn't make a fuss, and he's quite easy to look after.

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It's just, at the moment, it's quite a lot of feeding.

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He's with us most of the time because you need to know

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when he's sleeping and when he wants to come out.

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When he wants to come out, you have to help him out

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and make sure he's hopping about.

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Yeah, he's normally with us most of the time.

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Hand-rearing is a nice thing to do.

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Obviously, it's not the ideal situation.

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Every time, you want mother to rear.

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It's the best for the animal and the mum.

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But if we can step in and help, that's what we're here for.

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But this wannabe wallaby still has a lot to learn.

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And it's down to his two mums to teach him.

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We'll start taking him up into the Wallaby Wood

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so he can see other wallabies.

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Because we don't want him to think that he's not a wallaby any more.

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We'll come back later when Joey starts his first lessons -

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grass eating and learning how to hop.

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Right, all you gamers, pay attention for today's secret Roar code.

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It's a hard one - rock9.

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Type that in and see what you get.

0:18:490:18:51

Actually, that reminds me of a joke.

0:18:530:18:55

What's a rock's favourite transport?

0:18:550:18:57

A rocket! Happy gaming!

0:18:570:18:59

Now, so far this series, we've been spending a lot of time

0:19:030:19:06

with the new lion cubs who are very, very cute.

0:19:060:19:11

But there is another pride here at Longleat that we haven't met yet.

0:19:110:19:15

That's because they've only recently arrived.

0:19:150:19:18

ROARING

0:19:180:19:20

Did you hear that?

0:19:210:19:23

That's the park's brand new pride of lions,

0:19:230:19:26

and I'm about to meet them for the very first time.

0:19:260:19:28

I'm very excited, but I am a little bit nervous as well.

0:19:280:19:31

But luckily, keeper Stu is here to help me along and introduce me.

0:19:310:19:36

Stu, who are they? Who have we got here?

0:19:360:19:38

Well, who we've got here... We've got the two boys.

0:19:380:19:41

They're brothers. This is Henry.

0:19:410:19:44

And Hugo is the slightly larger male of the two.

0:19:440:19:49

We got them from Knowsley Safari Park.

0:19:490:19:51

That was about seven months ago. Then, about a month later,

0:19:510:19:55

we got the young females from Blackpool Zoo.

0:19:550:19:58

And Louisa came about a week after the other three girls came.

0:19:580:20:01

And she came from Bristol.

0:20:010:20:02

They're all here now and you got them from all over the place,

0:20:020:20:05

but they seem to be really content together.

0:20:050:20:07

-They seem like a pride unto themselves.

-Yep.

0:20:070:20:10

Was it hard to get them to gel?

0:20:100:20:13

Well, it was extremely straightforward.

0:20:130:20:17

Obviously, the boys were here first.

0:20:170:20:19

We gave them access out of the house.

0:20:190:20:22

But they didn't actually go into the section itself.

0:20:220:20:25

They just used the tunnel, the run that comes into the house.

0:20:250:20:28

So we got them used to knowing where to come back to.

0:20:280:20:31

We did the same with the girls.

0:20:310:20:32

Eventually, we mixed them in the house.

0:20:320:20:34

And off they went on their merry way.

0:20:340:20:36

It only took us a matter of weeks, I think.

0:20:360:20:39

Now, do you find there's much rivalry amongst the pride?

0:20:390:20:42

The brothers get along, but is there that boy-girl thing

0:20:420:20:45

like at school? "We hate girls." "We hate boys." That kind of thing?

0:20:450:20:48

They do, very much so, especially when they're fed.

0:20:480:20:51

You've got to keep an eye on the boys because they tend to hoard the meat.

0:20:510:20:54

Stuart, they're pacing around now.

0:20:540:20:56

Is that cos they know they're going to be going out?

0:20:560:20:58

Is it like when you say to a dog, "Fancy a walk?" And they go,

0:20:580:21:01

-HE PANTS

-You know, really up for it!

0:21:010:21:03

Exactly that thing. They know their routines.

0:21:030:21:05

-Yeah, they're ready to go now.

-Right.

0:21:050:21:08

So, what do you want me to do?

0:21:080:21:10

What I shall do is open up the main slide there.

0:21:100:21:13

Once that's open, if you can just flip that latch there over,

0:21:130:21:17

then pull that slider out? And then they should be on their way.

0:21:170:21:20

-OK, Johny, when you're ready.

-OK.

0:21:230:21:26

So, that's open, and then I just pull this?

0:21:260:21:29

-Yeah, just pull that. Yep, that's the one.

-Ooh!

0:21:290:21:31

Wow! Look at that!

0:21:330:21:36

They've gone... Look! They're all out together!

0:21:360:21:40

That is an absolutely beautiful sight! Look at that!

0:21:400:21:43

The lions have really bonded. They seem like a proper pride.

0:21:430:21:46

It's been brilliant getting so close.

0:21:460:21:48

It feels like I've made some new friends... I think.

0:21:480:21:51

The baby wallaby abandoned by his mum has been going

0:21:590:22:03

from strength to strength.

0:22:030:22:05

Thanks to the love and care of foster mums Beth and Polly.

0:22:050:22:08

He's eating well and getting stronger every day.

0:22:140:22:17

But he still faces two big challenges.

0:22:170:22:20

He's got to learn how to hop

0:22:200:22:22

and he's also got to learn how to eat grass,

0:22:220:22:25

because when he's weaned of milk,

0:22:250:22:27

grass and other plants will be his main diet.

0:22:270:22:31

If he were still with mum now, he'd still be in the pouch

0:22:310:22:36

a lot of the time, while she's hopping around or she's grazing.

0:22:360:22:39

He might pop his head out, maybe start mouthing grass a bit.

0:22:390:22:42

He's not ready to eat grass yet,

0:22:420:22:44

but he would mouth it, get used to it, work out what it is.

0:22:440:22:48

He'd be copying mum as well. At the moment, I've been picking grass.

0:22:480:22:52

He's been eating it. Well, mouthing it.

0:22:520:22:54

He hasn't managed to eat anything yet. He's still just on milk.

0:22:540:22:58

Oh, Joey!

0:23:010:23:03

The next challenge is the hopping.

0:23:030:23:06

It's something that wallabies and kangaroos are famous for.

0:23:110:23:15

With their large feet and powerful hind legs,

0:23:150:23:18

adult wallabies can hop two metres high and reach speeds

0:23:180:23:22

of up to 30mph.

0:23:220:23:24

But for baby Joey,

0:23:260:23:28

even one little hop

0:23:280:23:29

would be an achievement.

0:23:290:23:31

SHE CLICKS HER TONGUE Come here.

0:23:340:23:35

But will he manage it?

0:23:350:23:38

Come on, Joey.

0:23:380:23:40

Good boy!

0:23:460:23:48

Let's see that again!

0:23:490:23:50

It may be a small hop for us,

0:23:570:23:58

but it's a giant step for Joseph.

0:23:580:24:02

So how does Polly feel now about looking after the little one?

0:24:020:24:06

This is my first time hand-rearing, and it's hard work.

0:24:060:24:10

But it's nice, I do enjoy having him.

0:24:100:24:14

He is really sweet. Now he thinks of me as mum,

0:24:150:24:18

like, him following me and things.

0:24:180:24:19

It's really nice that he thinks of me like that.

0:24:190:24:23

It's nice that he sees me as someone he can depend on and have to

0:24:230:24:28

follow me round and stuff.

0:24:280:24:29

So that's really sweet, I like that.

0:24:290:24:32

And we'll bring you all the news of young Joseph throughout the series.

0:24:320:24:37

Now, last time on Roar, we followed the story of another cutie,

0:24:420:24:45

the baby sea lion that was born down here at Half Mile Lake.

0:24:450:24:49

For a while, it was touch-and-go if she would survive,

0:24:500:24:52

as there were complications

0:24:520:24:54

with her birth.

0:24:540:24:55

Head keeper Mark had to step in to cut the umbilical cord

0:24:550:24:58

between mum and baby himself.

0:24:580:25:01

Since then, she has just got stronger and stronger.

0:25:020:25:06

Keeper Sarah has asked us down because it's a big day today.

0:25:060:25:10

When there's a new baby in the park,

0:25:100:25:12

the talk quickly becomes all about the name.

0:25:120:25:15

I know, so we popped down to Sea Lion Beach to find out

0:25:150:25:17

from Sarah what this little sea lion pup is called. Sarah?

0:25:170:25:22

Well, after much consideration, we've decided to name her Renie.

0:25:220:25:26

-Nice name! So this is baby Renie.

-This is indeed baby Renie.

0:25:260:25:31

-She's almost three weeks old now.

-Three weeks old, and look at that!

0:25:310:25:35

-She's learned to swim already!

-Yep, they do pretty much from the get-go.

0:25:350:25:40

After a week or so, they'll accidentally fall into the water.

0:25:400:25:43

The main time it happens, they accidentally just fall off the edge.

0:25:430:25:46

But they are born with the instinct to move the flippers about and swim.

0:25:460:25:51

The only thing they're not born to do is to hold their breath underwater.

0:25:510:25:54

That's what they actually practise doing when they're out swimming.

0:25:540:25:57

So does she tend to stay close to the edge so she can get out

0:25:570:26:00

-from holding her breath? And does she get quite tired?

-Yeah.

0:26:000:26:04

She won't wander too far from the edge so she can get back quick.

0:26:040:26:08

They do get tired pretty easily, pretty quickly.

0:26:080:26:11

But she will spend the next few weeks practising

0:26:110:26:14

and practising on holding her breath. Hopefully, in a few months' time,

0:26:140:26:18

-she'll be wandering out with the rest.

-So, where's mum in all this?

0:26:180:26:21

-Jo-Jo?

-I think she's over there, getting some fish from the boat!

0:26:210:26:24

-She's not protecting the little baby.

-No, no.

0:26:240:26:27

She's old enough now that she can leave her to her own devices

0:26:270:26:31

on the beach. She's never too far away.

0:26:310:26:33

Obviously, the boat's not too far away.

0:26:330:26:35

But mum does need to feed through the day

0:26:350:26:36

so she's able to produce enough milk to feed pup at night.

0:26:360:26:39

So she'll follow the boat and, every now and then, pop back

0:26:390:26:43

-and come and check on the baby.

-She's a proper little cutie, Sarah.

0:26:430:26:46

-Thank you so much for letting us pop down to see you today.

-Absolutely.

0:26:460:26:49

Unfortunately, time has run out.

0:26:490:26:50

But from myself, Rani, Sarah, and little Renie,

0:26:500:26:53

it's time to say goodbye, and we'll see you on the next episode of Roar.

0:26:530:26:56

Here's what's coming up...

0:26:560:26:59

Next time on Roar...

0:26:590:27:01

Our ranger may be a karate king, but how brave will he be

0:27:010:27:04

when he meets Nico, the silverback gorilla?

0:27:040:27:08

I'm just amazed, because he's a lot bigger than I thought.

0:27:080:27:12

They're small, they're fluffy, and they're as cute as cute can be,

0:27:130:27:18

but how will the meerkat babies get on when they face the dangers

0:27:180:27:21

of the outside world for the very first time?

0:27:210:27:24

And Diego the tegu is licking his lips over the buffet breakfast,

0:27:240:27:29

but will he be a salad or a raw meat man?

0:27:290:27:33

That's all on the next action-packed episode of Roar. Don't miss it!

0:27:330:27:37

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:27:390:27:43

E-mail [email protected]

0:27:430:27:46

A baby wallaby is found abandoned by his mother, so the keepers must step in to try and save his life. But even with 24-hour care, can the little joey survive? Johny meets the safari park's new pride of lions and Rani is off collecting camel hair - but whatever for?


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