Episode 21 Debatable


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Episode 21

Celebrity panel quiz show hosted by Patrick Kielty. Can Grace Dent, Dan Walker and Jennie Bond talk Susan from Glasgow to the jackpot?


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Hello and welcome to Debatable,

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where today one player must answer a series of tricky questions

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to try to walk away with a jackpot of over £3,000.

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But they are not on their own.

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They will have a panel of well-known faces debating their way to the

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answers. Will they help or will they hinder?

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As always, that's debatable. So, let's meet them.

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All talk today.

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We have broadcaster Dan Walker.

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We have former Royal correspondent Jennie Bond,

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and writer and journalist Grace Dent.

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So we start with Jennie.

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Jennie, let's talk debating skills.

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I'm assuming that you are polite but firm.

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Ah! I always shied away from debating at school,

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or university, I must say.

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But a couple of years ago, I did take part in a debate

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about the future of the monarchy,

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which is something I don't normally do.

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I had six minutes and I made six pretty salient points,

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I thought. Add to my amazement, they all started squirming at one

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particular point in the debate when I was talking about how recognisable

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the Queen is around the world, having travelled with her,

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what an ambassador she is for this country.

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And I said, what other head of state is that well-known?

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I said, "Who is the head of state of Germany?" for example.

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Are you asking me?

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Well, I asked them, and they all squirmed, didn't know.

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Anyway, they were all so embarrassed that they decided, actually,

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the monarchy is a good thing.

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You won them over.

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Now, Dan, of course.

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-Yeah.

-I mean, on Football Focus, I mean, I watch it every week.

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We like a hostile debate.

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You do like a hostile debate.

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My role in there is normally to tee them up and let them go with it.

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But I never really debated at school,

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we didn't have a debating society.

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More sort of shouting at mates, really.

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But as a parent of three, I spend much of my life

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debating with my children

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about how much telly they're allowed to watch.

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That's basically my debating history at the moment.

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Now, when you say debating with your kids,

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does that mean that you try to be the boss and they just do their own

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-thing?

-Yeah, I do that.

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I've been working over the years on the dad face.

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Go on. Give us your dad face.

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This is, "It's got to go now and you need to go to bed," OK?

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What do you think?

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-That's good.

-Yeah. Cross but not angry.

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-Yes.

-Firm.

-So there is no water bottles kicked at home?

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-None of that stuff?

-No.

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Nobody is going to be sent to the stands today then, Dan?

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-No, hopefully not. No.

-OK.

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Grace. Now, Grace, you've got opinions.

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You have knowledge.

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I'm imagining that you're pretty good on debating.

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Well, my job is definitely to be persuasive

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and put up a good argument,

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but I'm always deeply jealous of anybody

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who learned to debate at school.

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I just feel... Cos, yeah, I went to a comprehensive in the '80s

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in the North, and we didn't have a debating society.

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We had a pig.

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A pig? At school?

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Yeah. We did. That's the face everybody pulls.

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We did. We had a pig you could go and look at and kind of learn

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how to keep a pig. This is absolutely true.

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We used to put a hat on it on its birthday.

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Magnificent.

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Now, Jennie, you're in the middle seat.

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You are going to harness...

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Yeah, it's my duty to decide what we're going to go with each time.

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It's going to be quite tricky, probably.

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We'll have very different views, maybe.

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And skills of your panellists?

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Well, I'm relying on this guy for everything sporty.

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-Think carefully.

-Everything to do with pop culture.

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Pop culture, the wide umbrella of pop culture.

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-Cookery.

-And food.

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I'm a restaurant critic. So hopefully we should, between us,

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be able to do some good.

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-Rather than evil.

-That's good. So that's the panel.

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Let's meet today's contestant. It is Susan from Glasgow.

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-Susan, welcome to the show.

-Hiya.

-How you doing?

-Good.

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Tell us a wee bit about yourself.

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My name is Susan, I'm a structural engineer.

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And what does that entail, Susan?

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Architects design buildings, we make them not fall down.

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OK. This appears to be a very important job.

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We like to think so.

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And how do you do that?

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There is a lot of numbers involved.

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We know the weight of everything.

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What do you do in your spare time?

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I like to travel a lot.

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Where have you been? Where would you like to go?

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Oh, the dream is...train travel at the moment.

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-OK.

-So breakfast in London, lunch in Paris, dinner in Barcelona.

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And then how long is the train from Paris down to Barcelona?

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I think it's about seven hours.

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So you can get there in time for a late dinner.

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What will happen on the train for the seven hours?

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-There might be some wine to be drunk, I think, on the train.

-I see.

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Essentially, what you're going to do is you just basically want to do

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a pub crawl on a train, is that it?

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A three-country pub crawl on a train.

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An international pub crawl.

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Doesn't that just sound like fun, though?

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I mean, that sounds like probably the best reason that anybody has

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-come on here to try and win any money.

-Absolutely.

-OK, look,

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you're going to have to pay close attention because you can only

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choose one of our panellists to play the Final Debate.

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All will be revealed as we play the game.

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-Are you ready to play?

-Yes.

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OK, here we go. Best of luck, Susan.

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Let's play Round One.

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Round One, Susan, is multiple choice.

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You have four possible answers,

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there are four questions in this round.

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£200 up for grabs for each correct answer, a possible £800.

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Here comes your first one.

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I've been to a couple of those cities.

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So I know at least one that it isn't.

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-OK. The one that it isn't is?

-Is Ljubljana.

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-OK.

-I think I've a decent idea of what the actual answer is.

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OK, well, if you've got a decent idea what the answer is,

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the fun thing to do will be to tell us nothing.

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So, panel. Your debate starts now.

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Goodness, Susan. I've been to Ljubljana, too.

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I went there with Prince Charles, I remember.

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I remember it was very, very pretty, and for the life of me,

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I can't remember what country it was in.

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But I don't think it was Slovakia.

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Tirana is Albania.

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-Albania, yeah.

-And...

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-Can I throw some football knowledge into the...?

-Go on, then.

-Please do.

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Sam Allardyce's first game

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in charge of England and, well,

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very short reign, was against Slovakia,

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and I think that was Bratislava,

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and they won 1-0. So...

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-You think.

-I know we'll meant to debate these things, but I think

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Bratislava is the answer because that's where they play international

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-matches.

-Actually, I did meet one of the people,

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the many people, you know,

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from Slovakia. He was a waiter.

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Quite recently. And I like to chat with waiters.

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And, "Where are you from?" Blah, blah.

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And he said he was from Bratislava.

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And I said, "Where's that?"

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And he said...

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Slovakia.

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There you go. Your waiter chat is coming in very handy.

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So that's what I would go with.

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There was an advert in the '80s about central heating,

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and it says, "Is it Bratislava on your landing?"

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And it was about how cold your house is.

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This means nothing, but all I can think of,

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it's clearly a cold place and it's clearly a well-known place.

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You've got radiator knowledge,

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you've got friends who are from Slovakia...

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Yeah, but this is me sounding like I know a lot is when I actually know

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less than you could put on a postage stamp.

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OK, so, based on a bit of football knowledge,

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a bit of radiator knowledge and a bit of waiter knowledge,

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we are going to go with Bratislava.

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You see, Susan, broad knowledge.

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Broad knowledge is what our panel brings to these questions.

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Yes.

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That backs up what my instinct was, actually.

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I reckon Bratislava as well.

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You are going with the panel.

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To get you up and running, is Bratislava the capital of Slovakia?

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-It is.

-Thank goodness for that.

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It is indeed.

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Bratislava, the capital of Slovakia.

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-Ljubljana is the capital of Slovenia.

-Ah!

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-There you go.

-Skopje is the capital of the Republic of Macedonia.

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Tirana, you were right, Dan, is the capital of Albania.

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Well done, Susan. You're up and running.

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-£200.

-Excellent.

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Let's see if we can keep it going with this one.

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I...wouldn't have a clue about that.

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So I guess the most useful one would be the stamps.

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OK. Not really sure about this.

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Panel, I'm sure you can quickly sort this out.

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Your debate starts now.

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-What would you sell?

-I can't see why you would sell, auction, anyway,

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first-class stamps cos you'd just go down the post office and get

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-some.

-I'm thinking the first thing sold was possibly sold by the person

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-who wrote the code and invented the site.

-Hm.

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And that type of person would be more likely to have a broken laser

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pointer sitting around their office that they wanted to sell.

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I've got a vague memories, right,

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of somebody I interviewed on 5 Live a few years ago,

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and he had done a Ted Talk about

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auctioning on the internet.

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And I'm sure there was some sort of joke about the laser pointer that he

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-was using.

-Ah!

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This was years ago, but it looks like one of those ridiculous...

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-But then any of them could be.

-I know, yes.

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It's the sort of thing you say,

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"Now we're eBay, it's a multi-million pound business,

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"and it started with a broken laser pointer."

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-Or a chipped teacup.

-Yeah.

-I have attended many, many auctions

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presenting Cash In The Attic,

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and, you know, there are chipped teacups

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and there are chipped teacups.

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I mean, it could be a very, very valuable teacup.

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I think we're going towards the laser pointer.

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-The laser pointer.

-Because it's a little random and you think...

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I just... It's a great story, isn't it?

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Yeah, it's a good story. Shall we go with it?

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-Shall we go with the laser pointer?

-I think we should go with it.

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-Let's do it.

-OK? Decision made.

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We are going to go with the broken laser pointer.

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OK. Based on some vague memories and a tiny bit of knowledge.

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It's like a super vague memory.

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It's a better vague memory that anything I know,

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so I'm going to go with them and go with the broken laser pointer.

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OK. Agreeing with the panel, for a second time.

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For £200, the first item auctioned on AuctionWeb was...

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Yes! A broken laser pointer.

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Well done.

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Very well done.

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The name eBay comes from the domain

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Pierre Omidyar used for his site.

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His company's name was Echo Bay.

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And then eBay AuctionWeb.

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It was sold by Omidyar himself, and he got around 14 for it.

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Oh, no.

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That's the laser pointer, not eBay,

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which is worth significantly more than 14 today.

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Well played, Susan. Well done, panel.

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Another £200 into the prize pot.

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You are up to £400.

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OK. Here's your next question.

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Tom Jones must have some kind of lifetime achievement award

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at some point.

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My guess would be Radiohead.

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Just because the other two are both pop.

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OK. It's not a bad thought.

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You're thinking Radiohead.

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Panel, your debate starts now.

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-Pop queen.

-Oh, this is really difficult.

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I think One Direction, they must have had Brits.

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They must have had Brits, and they would need to be...

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They are such a massive draw that I can't imagine that they haven't been

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honoured, you know?

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They have definitely won Brits. I've visualised it.

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I can see it now.

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Radiohead seems like the obvious answer because it is the Brits.

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However, I think that I have a memory of them getting up

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and looking awkward.

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Matt Goss came on BBC Breakfast at the tail end of last year.

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-OK.

-And he was talking about all the gongs he had won.

-Yes.

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And I am pretty certain he mentioned a Brit.

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-OK.

-At the peak of their powers.

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And I interviewed Tom Jones probably a year ago. I'm sure he has won

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-Brits.

-He has.

-I'm sure he has won Brits.

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And I vague memories, although I've been reading, maybe,

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an article about Radiohead, and they were saying they don't care

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they don't win awards. Cos I don't think they've ever won

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-a Mercury music prize either.

-OK, yeah.

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Through your powers of deduction and through mine, I think we have to go

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with Radiohead. But at this stage, I've got to say,

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nothing would surprise me.

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We are, with not any great degree of certainty,

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going to go with Radiohead.

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Oh, no.

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So, Jennie says no degree of certainty.

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However, Dan is pretty certain.

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Yeah, I would be swithering between Radiohead and Bros myself.

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He's more certain than me, so I'm going with them.

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-I'm going with Radiohead.

-OK, you're going with the panel.

-Yep.

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OK.

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Here we go. Fingers crossed.

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Have Radiohead never won a Brit award as of January 2017?

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Thank you.

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You were right, guys. One Direction have won five Brit Awards.

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Their first was in 2012 for What Makes You Beautiful

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as Single of the Year.

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Bros won the British Newcomer at the Brits in 1989.

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Well remembered from that interview, Dan.

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Tom Jones won an Outstanding Contribution award

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back in 2003 and was voted

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Best British Male Solo Artist all the way back in 2000.

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-Radiohead have been nominated 16 times...

-Wow!

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..and have never won a Brit Award.

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OK, very well done, panel.

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Very well worked out, Susan.

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Another £200 into your prize pot.

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You're up to £600.

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One more question in this round.

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Let's see if we can make it a clean sweep.

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Here we go.

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My guess would be Boris Johnson.

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I know he has a sister,

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but I thought she was, like, a newspaper columnist

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or some kind of...journalist?

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-You're not sure?

-I'm not sure.

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Don't worry. Don't worry.

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Panel, can you shed any light on this?

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-Your debate starts now.

-Well, you're right, Rachel Johnson.

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She's a very well-known journalist, isn't she?

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But you think Boris has a...?

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No, I'm sure I've interviewed his brother.

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-Really?

-His name escapes me.

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-He looks very much like him. He's an MP.

-He looks exactly like him.

-Yeah.

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-Definitely an MP.

-Angela Eagle obviously has a twin.

-Yeah.

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-There's two Eagles, yeah.

-So we're down to Keith and Diane.

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Diane Abbott has been the MP for near my...

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not my constituency but the one along

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for as long as I can remember,

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and I have never heard that she had

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a sibling who was an MP.

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No, I haven't. Diane?

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It feels unfeasible to me

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-that I wouldn't know that Diane Abbott had...

-Me too.

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Whereas Keith Vaz is somewhat of a question mark to me,

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and I do not know anything about him.

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-Yeah.

-Diane Abbott has been involved

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in politics heavily

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-since freshers, university.

-Forever, yeah.

-Forever.

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Yeah, I can't... I mean,

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it's one of those things where you see the answer and you think,

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"Oh, yes, of course, that person." But, like you,

0:16:080:16:11

I can't think of any reference to a family member for Diane Abbott

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-who is also an MP.

-I think we're going for...

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Do you agree with Diane?

0:16:170:16:19

I'm not sure. I don't know.

0:16:200:16:22

-OK.

-I don't know whether that's...

0:16:220:16:24

I'm going to say... So, my strongest thought would be Diane.

0:16:240:16:28

Well, based on two to one...

0:16:280:16:30

..we're going to go with Diane Abbott as the right answer.

0:16:320:16:35

So, Susan, the panel not completely in agreement with this.

0:16:360:16:40

But they're going for Diane Abbott.

0:16:400:16:42

I have a bit of idea in my head that Keith Vaz has a sister

0:16:420:16:46

in politics, so I'm going to agree with the panel and go Diane Abbott.

0:16:460:16:50

OK.

0:16:500:16:51

You think that Diane Abbott doesn't have a sibling who is also an MP.

0:16:510:16:55

For £200, the correct answer is...

0:16:550:16:58

It is Diane Abbott.

0:17:040:17:06

A sigh of relief there from Dan.

0:17:080:17:09

Very well played, Susan.

0:17:090:17:11

Boris Johnson's brother is called Jo.

0:17:110:17:14

-There you go.

-He is the Conservative MP for Orpington.

0:17:140:17:18

So you've got BoJo and JoJo.

0:17:180:17:20

I was trying to remember.

0:17:200:17:21

Keith Vaz's sister, Valerie, is a Labour MP for Walsall South.

0:17:210:17:25

Well done.

0:17:250:17:26

Maria and Angela Eagle are thought to be the first twins ever to sit

0:17:260:17:30

in a Shadow Cabinet. And Diane has a brother, Hugh, but he is not an MP.

0:17:300:17:35

-Ah.

-So well worked out, panel.

0:17:350:17:37

Very well done, Susan.

0:17:370:17:39

I mean, at the end of the first round, it is four out of four.

0:17:390:17:42

You're up to £800.

0:17:420:17:43

So, let's see how we go with pictures.

0:17:470:17:50

It's time for Round Two.

0:17:500:17:51

Susan, Round Two is the picture round.

0:17:540:17:56

We just need you to, he says, to put three pictures in the correct order.

0:17:560:18:00

We all know it's not that simple.

0:18:000:18:02

There are three questions in this round,

0:18:020:18:04

£300 for each correct answer,

0:18:040:18:06

a possible £900 up for grabs.

0:18:060:18:09

Here comes your first picture question.

0:18:090:18:11

-The oldest one is easy, that's the Sphinx.

-OK.

0:18:310:18:34

Then the Venus de Milo, then Michelangelo's David.

0:18:340:18:37

Susan, hold that thought.

0:18:370:18:39

Let's see if the panel can bring anything else to this.

0:18:390:18:41

Your debate starts now.

0:18:410:18:43

I think that's a pretty close call.

0:18:430:18:44

I think that sounded...

0:18:440:18:45

It's got to be the Sphinx is the oldest.

0:18:450:18:47

Well, that's one of the Ancient Wonders of the World,

0:18:470:18:49

-isn't it?

-Yes.

-Like the temple of Mausolus.

0:18:490:18:52

What's the guy that was across the...?

0:18:520:18:55

The Colossus at Rhodes.

0:18:550:18:56

It's up there with all that lot, isn't it?

0:18:560:18:58

So that's got to be the earliest.

0:18:580:18:59

I think so. Don't you?

0:18:590:19:01

-Yes.

-I mean, here we are in very, very ancient Greece.

0:19:010:19:04

-Yeah.

-Aren't we?

-Shall we put this one down here?

0:19:040:19:07

-Right.

-We think.

0:19:070:19:08

-We agree on the Sphinx.

-Yeah.

0:19:080:19:09

I don't know anything about the Venus de Milo.

0:19:090:19:11

But is Michelangelo's David not a Renaissance period thing?

0:19:110:19:16

And is that not 1500ish?

0:19:160:19:20

-Yeah.

-1540...

-Something like that.

0:19:200:19:23

Instinctively, you think Michelangelo is the...

0:19:230:19:25

-Newest.

-..newest.

-Michelangelo is...

0:19:250:19:28

Yes. That has to be before this.

0:19:280:19:31

I think so.

0:19:310:19:33

-Yeah.

-But what period is that?

-We don't know much about it.

0:19:330:19:35

We know what that is. We've got a hold on that.

0:19:350:19:38

I know nothing about the Venus de Milo.

0:19:380:19:40

We're pretty sure this can't be there, but it could...

0:19:400:19:42

I suppose that's the only debate, whether those two...

0:19:420:19:44

Because after that would be...

0:19:440:19:47

I don't connect that with Tudor times or anything.

0:19:470:19:50

I somehow connect it with ancient Greece,

0:19:500:19:52

but I don't really know why.

0:19:520:19:53

-Again I'm just...

-I think we're going to have to stick with this.

0:19:530:19:56

I don't think we're going to get anywhere.

0:19:560:19:58

-Yes.

-OK. All right, then.

0:19:580:20:01

Well, we are going to go with the oldest being the Sphinx,

0:20:010:20:05

then Venus de Milo and then Michelangelo's David.

0:20:050:20:08

OK, Susan, they are pretty sure about the Sphinx,

0:20:100:20:14

they are pretty sure about Michelangelo's David.

0:20:140:20:16

They don't have a lot of knowledge on Venus de Milo.

0:20:160:20:19

Yeah, sticking with my first instinct and with them,

0:20:200:20:23

-I think that's the right order.

-OK.

0:20:230:20:25

The Sphinx, the Venus de Milo and Michelangelo's David.

0:20:250:20:29

That was your first thought.

0:20:290:20:30

With the knowledge the panel has brought to this,

0:20:300:20:32

you aren't changing your mind. You're going with them. For £300.

0:20:320:20:36

Well done!

0:20:410:20:44

Good knowledge, Susan.

0:20:440:20:45

Yeah, we went with Susan, to be honest.

0:20:450:20:47

I didn't like to say that, but, I mean...

0:20:480:20:50

The Great Sphinx at Giza in Egypt

0:20:500:20:52

is thought to be around 4,500 years old,

0:20:520:20:55

dating from the reign of King Khafre at around 2500 BC.

0:20:550:21:00

Venus de Milo was carved from marble probably by Alexandros,

0:21:000:21:04

the sculpture at Antioch during the second century BC.

0:21:040:21:09

David is a marble sculpture carved from 1501 to 1504.

0:21:090:21:14

You were right, Grace, during the Italian Renaissance by Michelangelo.

0:21:140:21:18

Very well played, panel.

0:21:180:21:19

Very well done, Susan.

0:21:190:21:21

Another £300 into your prize pot.

0:21:210:21:23

You are now up to £1,100.

0:21:230:21:25

Here comes your next question.

0:21:290:21:31

My guess is euro would be the shortest.

0:21:500:21:54

Then probably 20 bill, the longest.

0:21:560:21:59

But I...I wouldn't be putting a 20 bill on that answer being right.

0:21:590:22:04

You wouldn't put money on this.

0:22:040:22:05

OK, panel. Let's see if we can get some money for the money.

0:22:050:22:09

Your debate starts now.

0:22:090:22:11

I've got some dollars in my purse

0:22:110:22:12

right now cos I've just got back

0:22:120:22:14

from Antigua,

0:22:140:22:15

and we use a lot of US bills there.

0:22:150:22:17

-They're long.

-They...

0:22:170:22:18

I think they're quite small. They're quite small,

0:22:200:22:23

but they might be long.

0:22:230:22:24

Small and long, aren't they?

0:22:240:22:26

Yeah, but they are quite small.

0:22:260:22:27

I think the £20 note is quite big.

0:22:270:22:29

The Euros are little tiddlers, aren't they?

0:22:290:22:31

Euro, they're quite small.

0:22:310:22:33

Are we all in agreement, gut instinct,

0:22:330:22:35

that the £20 note is the largest out of all of this?

0:22:350:22:38

Because £20, to me, still feels...

0:22:380:22:41

-Massive.

-..big.

-You have to unfold it.

0:22:410:22:43

It still feels like a treat

0:22:430:22:44

when you look into your purse and you see a 20,

0:22:440:22:47

and you bring it out, it still feels enormous.

0:22:470:22:49

But dollars are... They're thin but long, aren't they?

0:22:490:22:51

So we are veering towards £20 being down here, as the largest.

0:22:510:22:55

-No?

-I don't... I mean...

0:22:550:22:57

I've just got...

0:22:570:22:58

Dollars are quite...

0:22:580:22:59

They're long, aren't they? They are thin and long.

0:22:590:23:01

Are we in agreement we all feel the 20 euro is the smallest?

0:23:010:23:06

Because when you've been handling that,

0:23:060:23:08

-that doesn't feel...

-Who wants the euro?! Nobody.

0:23:080:23:11

And they are quite small.

0:23:110:23:13

Dan, you would actually go with that one as being the longest?

0:23:130:23:16

I'm...

0:23:160:23:17

I've just got visions of long dollars.

0:23:170:23:19

LAUGHTER

0:23:190:23:21

They are... Even the 1 bill is quite...

0:23:210:23:24

OK, I see what you're saying.

0:23:240:23:26

Well, maybe that's why I do fold

0:23:260:23:28

them up, because they are so long.

0:23:280:23:30

But Grace is right, the 20 is fat, isn't it?

0:23:300:23:33

It feels like a big old piece of paper,

0:23:330:23:35

doesn't it, in your wallet?

0:23:350:23:36

I think I'd probably go in this order. What do you think, Grace?

0:23:360:23:41

That feels right to me, but I am slightly

0:23:410:23:44

shook by the fact that dollars are actually quite long.

0:23:440:23:49

If it was height, you'd go £20 note all day, every day.

0:23:490:23:52

All right, OK. I'm going to go with you, Dan.

0:23:520:23:53

Be it on your head. There we go.

0:23:530:23:56

So, our answer is the euro comes as the smallest in length,

0:23:560:24:02

and then the £20 note, and then the US bill, the 20 bill.

0:24:020:24:07

Oh, dear.

0:24:070:24:08

-Wrong!

-Oh...

0:24:080:24:11

-So...

-The £20 note, I'm sure, is a bigger bit of paper,

0:24:110:24:16

but I think long and thin thing, might be,

0:24:160:24:18

so I'm going to go 20 euro note, then the £20,

0:24:180:24:23

and then the 20,

0:24:230:24:24

and then I'm going to do this.

0:24:240:24:26

OK. In order of length

0:24:260:24:28

in millimetres of their longest side,

0:24:280:24:31

you're agreeing with the panel again.

0:24:310:24:32

20 euro note, then the £20 note then the 20 bill.

0:24:320:24:36

For £300, which we will pay you in 20s,

0:24:360:24:40

is that the right order?

0:24:400:24:42

It is the right order!

0:24:450:24:48

-Very well done.

-Thank you.

0:24:540:24:56

The 20 euro note is 133 millimetres long.

0:24:560:24:59

Then we have the £20 note, which is 149 millimetres.

0:24:590:25:03

-Then the 20 bill is 156.

-Oh!

0:25:030:25:08

Very well done, panel.

0:25:080:25:09

Very well played, Susan.

0:25:090:25:11

I mean, 100% record continues.

0:25:110:25:13

It means you're now up to £1,400.

0:25:130:25:15

OK, here comes your final picture question.

0:25:200:25:22

Frasier is Seattle,

0:25:410:25:43

so it's got to be the most northerly.

0:25:430:25:46

Sex And The City is New York.

0:25:460:25:48

Arrested Development I have never seen, but I think it's LA.

0:25:480:25:53

And I've no idea...

0:25:530:25:55

I guess LA is warmer so it must be further south than New York.

0:25:550:25:59

So going from south to north, I would go Arrested Development,

0:25:590:26:03

Sex And The City, Frasier.

0:26:030:26:04

OK, Susan, let's see if our panel can bring anything to this.

0:26:040:26:08

Your debate starts now.

0:26:080:26:09

I've never seen Arrested Development. Anyone know?

0:26:090:26:12

I've seen it a few times years ago.

0:26:120:26:14

I've watched Arrested Development

0:26:140:26:16

a lot, and I'm so pleased that you said LA.

0:26:160:26:18

That's what it feels like to me.

0:26:180:26:20

-Yeah. We are going south to north. Are we going south to north?

-Yeah.

0:26:200:26:23

So that would be the most southerly, Arrested Development?

0:26:230:26:25

-Yeah, so you want it there, don't you?

-Oh, is it south to north?

0:26:250:26:28

Yes, exactly. Put it exactly here.

0:26:280:26:29

Sex And The City is definitely New York.

0:26:290:26:31

I have been on the Sex And The City

0:26:310:26:33

bus tour.

0:26:330:26:34

Of course you have!

0:26:340:26:35

Yeah! So, Frasier, where is that?

0:26:350:26:38

-Where is that filmed?

-That's Seattle, is it?

0:26:380:26:40

It's not Cincinnati?

0:26:420:26:43

No, it's Chicago.

0:26:430:26:46

Well, if it Seattle or Chicago,

0:26:460:26:48

do we agree that those two cities

0:26:480:26:50

are probably north of New York?

0:26:500:26:52

That's New York.

0:26:520:26:54

I think Chicago is.

0:26:540:26:55

I think Frasier is Chicago.

0:26:550:26:57

All right,

0:26:570:26:59

so we're going with that. I think.

0:26:590:27:01

-Aren't we?

-Yes.

0:27:010:27:02

You've shown no confidence, team, whatsoever.

0:27:020:27:04

However...

0:27:040:27:05

-Yeah.

-Got to give an answer.

0:27:050:27:06

So we are going most southerly is Arrested Development,

0:27:060:27:10

and then Sex And The City, and then Frasier.

0:27:100:27:13

So our panel going for Arrested Development,

0:27:150:27:18

Sex And The City and Frasier,

0:27:180:27:20

although they are not sure what city Frasier is in.

0:27:200:27:23

They have now given me the fear,

0:27:230:27:24

but I'm pretty sure Frasier is set in Seattle.

0:27:240:27:27

Oh!

0:27:270:27:28

So I'm going to agree with their order, though,

0:27:280:27:31

because it's still the most northerly.

0:27:310:27:33

So Arrested Development, Sex And The City, then Frasier.

0:27:330:27:36

OK, you agree with the order but not the geography.

0:27:360:27:39

£300.

0:27:390:27:41

Is that the correct order?

0:27:410:27:42

It is!

0:27:480:27:49

-Well done.

-Very well done, Susan.

0:27:490:27:52

Arrested Development is set in Newport Beach,

0:27:520:27:54

in Southern California,

0:27:540:27:56

just south of LA.

0:27:560:27:57

Sex And The City is set in New York.

0:27:570:27:59

Frasier is set in Seattle -

0:27:590:28:01

Susan, you were right -

0:28:010:28:02

in the Northwest of the US.

0:28:020:28:05

Very well done.

0:28:050:28:06

Susan, at the end of Round Two, you are up to £1,700.

0:28:060:28:10

So, how do you think the panel is faring now, Susan?

0:28:150:28:18

Are they still proving useful?

0:28:180:28:20

They've not got one wrong yet so...

0:28:200:28:21

-Some people would suggest that you haven't got one wrong yet.

-Well...

0:28:230:28:26

You are going to have to choose one of them at the end of the show.

0:28:260:28:30

There is still another round to go.

0:28:300:28:31

£1,500 up for grabs, as we play Round Three.

0:28:310:28:35

OK, Susan, in Round Three, you will face questions containing three

0:28:390:28:43

statements about a person, a place or a thing.

0:28:430:28:45

Only one of those statements is true.

0:28:450:28:47

We need you to find it.

0:28:470:28:48

Because it is the final round, the money goes up to £500 for each

0:28:480:28:51

correct answer, so a possible £1,500 up for grabs.

0:28:510:28:56

Here comes your first one.

0:28:560:28:58

I don't know which one of those would be the true one at all.

0:29:180:29:21

OK, don't worry. That's what the panel is here for.

0:29:210:29:24

Panel, I'm sure we can sort this out.

0:29:240:29:27

Your debate starts now.

0:29:270:29:28

I think we might blot our copybook here.

0:29:280:29:30

Is she the same age as Neil Diamond?

0:29:300:29:32

How old is Babs?

0:29:320:29:35

70?

0:29:350:29:36

Yeah, they're...

0:29:360:29:37

I would love the Donald Trump thing to be true.

0:29:370:29:39

The first one seems feasible.

0:29:390:29:41

I thought her first film was something like Funny Girl.

0:29:410:29:44

-Was it?

-The one that she did with Omar Sharif.

-Yeah?

0:29:440:29:47

Because I thought that when Omar Sharif arrived on set,

0:29:470:29:49

he had never...

0:29:490:29:51

He didn't really know who she was.

0:29:510:29:53

Went to school with Neil Diamond.

0:29:530:29:55

I don't know how...

0:29:550:29:57

She doesn't have to be exactly the same age as Diamond, does she?

0:29:580:30:01

-No.

-She could have been within, sort of, I suppose,

0:30:010:30:03

seven or eight years of him.

0:30:030:30:04

Donald Trump hates the Tonight Show, doesn't he?

0:30:040:30:06

But I don't know whether he's been on it before.

0:30:060:30:09

In the past. Which he might have been.

0:30:090:30:11

And it could be... They're counting a duet as just...

0:30:110:30:13

..he sings a line in a song that she is singing.

0:30:140:30:16

But I think you would have seen that in the last year or so,

0:30:160:30:19

wouldn't you?

0:30:190:30:20

I think we can discount Hello Dolly!

0:30:200:30:23

-Based on your knowledge.

-OK.

0:30:230:30:24

But also, I would agree with you.

0:30:240:30:26

She could easily have gone to school with Neil Diamond.

0:30:280:30:31

Yep.

0:30:310:30:32

-But we think we might have heard about the Trump thing.

-Yeah.

0:30:320:30:35

So we think the true statement is that Barbra Streisand

0:30:350:30:38

went to school with Neil Diamond.

0:30:380:30:41

Quite possibly, maybe, or maybe not.

0:30:410:30:43

But maybe.

0:30:430:30:45

LAUGHTER

0:30:450:30:46

OK.

0:30:460:30:47

I actually can't fault any of that logic

0:30:470:30:49

so I'm going to go with went

0:30:490:30:51

-to school with Neil Diamond.

-Agreeing with the panel again.

0:30:510:30:56

For £500,

0:30:560:30:58

did Barbra Streisand go to school with Neil Diamond?

0:30:580:31:02

-She did!

-Amazing!

0:31:080:31:11

She did.

0:31:110:31:13

Very well done.

0:31:130:31:15

I never get sick of that feeling.

0:31:150:31:17

Every time we get one right.

0:31:170:31:19

Such a relief.

0:31:190:31:20

It's such a relief.

0:31:200:31:21

I don't know how we did that.

0:31:210:31:22

It doesn't matter how you did it, you did it.

0:31:220:31:25

They were in the choir together.

0:31:250:31:27

Also at the school at the same time

0:31:270:31:29

was the future chess champ Bobby Fischer,

0:31:290:31:31

who Barbra had a crush on.

0:31:310:31:33

Good knowledge from the panel. Well played, Susan.

0:31:330:31:36

It means you're up to £2,200.

0:31:360:31:38

Wow.

0:31:380:31:40

Getting serious.

0:31:400:31:42

OK. It's getting serious.

0:31:420:31:44

Here we go. Here comes question two.

0:31:440:31:47

There's something about Samuel Johnson's dictionary

0:32:130:32:15

in Blackadder the Third.

0:32:150:32:17

So that would be my guess.

0:32:170:32:19

OK, Susan is bringing Blackadder knowledge to this.

0:32:190:32:23

She has a cunning plan,

0:32:230:32:24

panel, but do you?

0:32:240:32:26

Your debate starts now.

0:32:260:32:28

-Right.

-OK, guys, cunning plans?

0:32:280:32:30

-Let's work through it.

-I'm so pleased that Susan said that because

0:32:300:32:32

that's... Like, Samuel Johnson's dictionary,

0:32:320:32:36

he brought it to give to Prince George,

0:32:360:32:39

who was it, King George?

0:32:390:32:41

Who was Blackadder working as a butler for then?

0:32:410:32:43

-Yeah.

-And he was... Was he...?

0:32:430:32:45

It was George.

0:32:450:32:47

-King George?

-Yes.

0:32:470:32:48

Nell Gwyn, wasn't she...

0:32:480:32:52

wasn't she the mistress? Is that Charles II?

0:32:520:32:54

-Yes, I think that's right.

-So that would be 17th century.

0:32:540:32:56

Yeah, earlier.

0:32:560:32:57

And when you know, Vasco da Gama

0:32:570:32:59

and all that were doing their business,

0:32:590:33:01

Abel Tasman, he discovered Tasmania, didn't he?

0:33:010:33:04

So he would have been down there.

0:33:040:33:05

And that, again, was mid-17th century.

0:33:050:33:08

-1600s?

-Yes, 1600s.

0:33:080:33:10

So, based on that scratchy historical knowledge and Blackadder.

0:33:100:33:15

Blackadder is basically our source for this.

0:33:150:33:17

OK. We are done. Yeah.

0:33:190:33:21

Based on Blackadder, purely, we're saying that

0:33:210:33:25

the dictionary was first published in the 18th century.

0:33:250:33:28

OK, Susan, our panel going with you.

0:33:290:33:31

They think that Samuel Johnson's dictionary was first published

0:33:310:33:34

in the 18th century.

0:33:340:33:36

Yeah. Blackadder is never wrong.

0:33:360:33:38

Surely. So I have to go with the dictionary being the 18th century.

0:33:380:33:42

OK, you're going with your first thought,

0:33:420:33:45

you're going with the panel.

0:33:450:33:46

Here we go. For £500,

0:33:460:33:49

was lexicographer Samuel Johnson's dictionary published

0:33:490:33:53

for the first time in the 18th century?

0:33:530:33:55

-Yes!

-It was.

0:34:020:34:03

-Hey!

-Very well done, Susan.

0:34:050:34:08

You're playing an absolute blinder.

0:34:080:34:10

Dr Samuel Johnson published his dictionary of the English language

0:34:100:34:13

in 1755.

0:34:130:34:15

Nell Gwyn was born in around 1650.

0:34:150:34:19

-Perfect.

-Perfect.

0:34:190:34:20

Comedienne on the London stage,

0:34:200:34:22

she was the mistress of Charles II.

0:34:220:34:24

Again, very well done.

0:34:240:34:25

Abel Tasman is officially recognised by New Zealand as the first

0:34:250:34:29

European to "discover the country" in December 1642.

0:34:290:34:35

Very well done, panel.

0:34:350:34:36

I mean, you're doing so, so well, Susan.

0:34:360:34:38

You're up to £2,700.

0:34:380:34:40

OK, Susan. One more question to go.

0:34:450:34:48

Can you make it an absolute clean sweep with this?

0:34:480:34:52

I know nothing about snooker.

0:35:130:35:14

If the answer isn't Steve Davis, I do not know what the answer is.

0:35:140:35:17

-OK.

-So I'm...

-So?

0:35:170:35:19

I'm up to whatever they decide.

0:35:190:35:22

OK. You know nothing about snooker.

0:35:220:35:25

Panel, your debate starts now.

0:35:250:35:27

-He's eager, he's eager.

-I think we can work this out.

0:35:270:35:29

-OK, go on.

-Right, so, the match ball thingy.

0:35:290:35:31

There's 22 balls in a snooker table.

0:35:310:35:33

So there's 15 reds.

0:35:330:35:34

One, two... It's a line of one,

0:35:340:35:36

then two, then three, then four, then five.

0:35:360:35:38

So there's 15, 16, 17.

0:35:380:35:40

Black, pink, blue, 18.

0:35:400:35:44

Yellow, green and brown.

0:35:440:35:46

Yellow, brown and green. Plus the white is 22.

0:35:460:35:48

So it can't be the middle one, right?

0:35:480:35:50

-OK.

-The World Championship has...

0:35:500:35:52

Well, the Strictly Come Dancing.

0:35:520:35:54

With regards to Strictly,

0:35:540:35:55

I know it's been going for quite a few years,

0:35:550:35:58

but I can think of any...

0:35:580:35:59

anyone that could have went through and won it.

0:35:590:36:01

Because it takes people's careers to a different place, and I can't think

0:36:010:36:06

-of anyone in the public eye...

-And also, you see,

0:36:060:36:08

modern snooker players,

0:36:080:36:09

none of them have been on it. Like, the modern bunch.

0:36:090:36:12

It's been from those from the '80s.

0:36:120:36:14

Thorne and Dennis Taylor.

0:36:140:36:15

-I can't think of another one.

-Was Steve Davis on it?

0:36:150:36:17

-I don't think Steve Davis has done it.

-Steve Davis hasn't done it.

0:36:170:36:20

And the top one, I think... Cliff Thorburn is Canadian.

0:36:200:36:24

He won it. But I think that's the closest we've got.

0:36:240:36:26

I don't think an American has ever won the World Snooker Championship.

0:36:260:36:29

-OK.

-So it has got to be the top one.

0:36:290:36:31

I am addicted to Strictly. I watch it the whole time, so...

0:36:310:36:35

I can't...

0:36:350:36:37

They don't really play snooker in America, they play pool.

0:36:370:36:39

So Cliff Thorburn, I'm sure he's the closest, being Canadian.

0:36:390:36:43

-I'm pretty confident.

-So you're pretty sure

0:36:430:36:45

it's never been won by an American?

0:36:450:36:46

-Yeah.

-OK.

-I think so.

0:36:460:36:49

OK, all right, then. Well,

0:36:490:36:51

we have decided that the true statement here

0:36:510:36:54

is that the World Championship has never been won by an American.

0:36:540:36:57

OK, Susan, you've played ever so well right the way through the game.

0:36:590:37:02

You've had some great knowledge.

0:37:020:37:04

This is one that you'd absolutely nothing on.

0:37:040:37:07

The panel, though,

0:37:070:37:08

think that the World Championships has never been won by an American.

0:37:080:37:12

Let's assume the panel are right again,

0:37:120:37:14

and go with never been won by an American.

0:37:140:37:17

OK.

0:37:170:37:18

For £500 and to make it a clean sweep on today's show,

0:37:180:37:22

has the snooker World Championship never been won by an American?

0:37:220:37:25

It's the right answer!

0:37:320:37:34

Fantastic. All that...

0:37:340:37:36

Well done.

0:37:360:37:37

Very well played. Good knowledge from the panel.

0:37:370:37:41

Outside the United Kingdom,

0:37:410:37:42

the only nationalities that have ever had players win

0:37:420:37:44

the World Championship are the Republic of Ireland,

0:37:440:37:47

Australia and Canada -

0:37:470:37:49

Cliff Thorburn. A match starts with 22 balls -

0:37:490:37:52

15 reds, six colours and the white.

0:37:520:37:55

As of the end of the 2016 series,

0:37:550:37:58

the only snooker players to have appeared on Strictly,

0:37:580:38:00

you were right,

0:38:000:38:01

Willie Thorne and Dennis Taylor.

0:38:010:38:03

Neither have won.

0:38:030:38:05

Susan, at the end of that, you've done ever so well.

0:38:050:38:08

It's an absolute clean sweep.

0:38:080:38:10

You've got the maximum of £3,200.

0:38:100:38:13

Which means, Susan, there's only one question

0:38:180:38:21

between you and that £3,200.

0:38:210:38:23

It is the Final Debate question.

0:38:230:38:25

Six possible answers, only three of them are correct.

0:38:250:38:29

We need you to find all three correct answers.

0:38:290:38:31

But you are not alone.

0:38:310:38:33

The good news is that you will be playing the Final Debate question

0:38:330:38:36

with one of these fine panellists.

0:38:360:38:38

So, will your 20s fit into your purse with Dan Walker?

0:38:380:38:42

Will you go with Jennie, who knows her sex and her cities?

0:38:420:38:45

Or will it be funny girl Grace?

0:38:450:38:47

I think because he knows different stuff from me,

0:38:490:38:51

I'm going to go with Dan.

0:38:510:38:53

OK. Dan, would you please join us for the Final Debate?

0:38:530:38:55

-OK, Dan, Susan.

-Ha-ha!

0:38:580:39:00

Ha-ha! Susan has put her faith in you.

0:39:000:39:03

-Oh, dear.

-It's a tidy sum at stake here.

0:39:030:39:06

I can genuinely feel the old heart rate going

0:39:060:39:08

quite significantly at the moment.

0:39:080:39:10

The whole shebang. Every question right so far.

0:39:100:39:13

It's been a clean sweep so far.

0:39:130:39:15

So we're really, really hoping that both of you can do this.

0:39:150:39:18

Because it is the Final Debate,

0:39:180:39:19

we're going to give you the choice of two, Susan.

0:39:190:39:21

Have a look at these categories, tell me what you prefer.

0:39:210:39:24

Yeah, neither of those leaps out at me.

0:39:300:39:33

If you ask me to pick one, I'd pick board games, but I'm not...

0:39:330:39:36

My scientific knowledge is not magnificent.

0:39:360:39:39

I don't know what yours is like.

0:39:390:39:40

No. I'm not great at chemistry.

0:39:400:39:43

Let's go board games.

0:39:430:39:44

OK, you're going for board games.

0:39:460:39:48

We're going to put 45 seconds on the clock.

0:39:480:39:50

£3,200 at stake.

0:39:500:39:53

Six possible answers, we need all three to be correct.

0:39:530:39:56

Best of luck. Here comes your final debate question on board games.

0:39:560:40:00

We've got this, we've got this.

0:40:070:40:09

Yes.

0:40:090:40:11

-That's red.

-Yeah.

0:40:120:40:14

-BOTH:

-That's green.

0:40:160:40:19

Correct, yellow.

0:40:190:40:21

-Your Final Debate time starts now.

-Come on, let's hug it out.

0:40:210:40:24

We're going to win you £3,200.

0:40:240:40:27

I agree with him.

0:40:270:40:29

Leicester Square, Coventry Street and Piccadilly.

0:40:290:40:31

All the ones on the left.

0:40:310:40:33

Yeah, Leicester Square, Piccadilly and Coventry Street.

0:40:330:40:36

Because Pall Mall is pink,

0:40:360:40:38

Regent Street is green,

0:40:380:40:39

Trafalgar Square is red.

0:40:390:40:41

100%. Come on.

0:40:410:40:42

You're going to win the cash!

0:40:420:40:43

LAUGHTER

0:40:430:40:44

What he said. Totally what he said.

0:40:440:40:47

OK, stop the clock.

0:40:470:40:48

Your three answers are?

0:40:500:40:51

-Leicester Square, Piccadilly...

-Yes!

-..Coventry Street.

-Yes!

0:40:510:40:56

OK.

0:40:580:40:59

I'm very excited for you.

0:41:010:41:03

OK. Dan is very excited for you, which means he's very confident.

0:41:030:41:07

Let's hope it's not misplaced.

0:41:070:41:09

First up, you said Leicester Square.

0:41:110:41:14

Is Leicester Square yellow on the classic London Monopoly board?

0:41:140:41:18

It is.

0:41:230:41:25

It's worth £260.

0:41:260:41:29

Next, you said Piccadilly.

0:41:290:41:32

Definitely yellow.

0:41:320:41:34

-Dan says it's definitely yellow.

-I'm sure it's yellow.

0:41:340:41:36

We need this to be yellow to keep you in the game.

0:41:360:41:39

Is Piccadilly yellow on the classic London Monopoly board?

0:41:390:41:43

Yes, it is.

0:41:500:41:51

Worth £280.

0:41:530:41:54

-It all boils down to this.

-Come on.

0:41:560:41:58

You seem very, very sure.

0:41:580:42:00

-Still as confident?

-Yeah, I'm sure.

0:42:000:42:01

Trafalgar is red, Regent Street is green,

0:42:010:42:03

-Pall Mall is sort of purpley-pink.

-OK.

0:42:030:42:06

For £3,200,

0:42:070:42:10

for an absolute clean sweep of today's show...

0:42:100:42:13

Come on. Give her the dosh.

0:42:130:42:15

LAUGHTER

0:42:150:42:16

..is Coventry Street yellow on the classic London Monopoly board?

0:42:160:42:20

Come on, Susan.

0:42:200:42:22

It's got to be.

0:42:240:42:25

Go green!

0:42:250:42:26

Yes!

0:42:290:42:30

-Thank you.

-Very well done.

0:42:300:42:34

Well played, Susan.

0:42:340:42:36

Absolutely amazing. Well done, Dan.

0:42:360:42:39

Good Monopoly knowledge there.

0:42:390:42:40

Susan, you've won £3,200.

0:42:400:42:43

Well done. Very well done.

0:42:440:42:46

You also got the other colours correct.

0:42:460:42:49

Trafalgar Square was red.

0:42:490:42:51

-Regent Street, you said, was green.

-Yeah.

0:42:510:42:53

And Pall Mall was pink.

0:42:530:42:55

Well, well played.

0:42:550:42:57

-Congratulations. Give it up one more time for Susan.

-Yes!

0:42:570:42:59

A clean sweep on today's show.

0:43:020:43:04

That is it for Debatable.

0:43:040:43:05

There's just enough time for me to thank a fantastic panel.

0:43:050:43:08

To Dan Walker, to Jennie Bond and Grace Dent.

0:43:080:43:10

I do hope you enjoyed watching.

0:43:130:43:14

We will see you next time for more heated debates.

0:43:140:43:17

For now, it's goodbye from me.

0:43:170:43:18

Patrick Kielty hosts the daily quiz show where a panel of famous faces debate their way through a series of tricky questions. Can Grace Dent, Dan Walker and Jennie Bond talk Susan from Glasgow to the jackpot?