Craig Revel Horwood Who Do You Think You Are?


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Craig Revel Horwood

Celebrity genealogy series. Strictly judge Craig Revel Horwood heads to Australia to investigate what happened to his great-great-great-grandfather.


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Here we go. Now, this is where the red carpet begins

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and as you can see it's treachery.

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Mind yourself. And that brings us to the backstage area.

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This is Strictly Come Dancing Live.

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Joy of joy, my favourite thing, a feather fan. Look at that!

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Fantastic! Showbiz everywhere and then we enter,

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and as you can see, we make our way down these wonderful stairs.

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And you can feel and breathe the electricity in the room.

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Dancer and choreographer Craig Revel Horwood is best known

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for his straight talking as a judge on the hit TV series

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Strictly Come Dancing.

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..Anywhere near a four. You were mincing around that stage,

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darling, like you were in an episode of Some Mothers Do 'Ave 'Em.

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Craig has lived and worked in Britain for 26 years,

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but he was born in Australia.

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His father, Phillip Revel Horwood

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was an officer in the Australian Navy.

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My father, unfortunately, and quite sadly, died just over a year ago.

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Now, all the questions I should have asked him

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about our family was too late.

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It really set my mind to thinking to I'd love to know more.

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The only thing I really know are my immediate grandparents.

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My father's side of the family intrigued me the most

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because I think I get a few more traits from them,

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particularly my grandfather, Revel. And we called him Moza,

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because he was such a character, a bit of a clown.

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And my grandmother, Phonse.

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Her real name's Phyllis, a very loving, a very quiet

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and unassuming lady.

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I only know that she was in an orphanage for some reason.

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I would love to know her family history.

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I often wonder because I was the only person out of my family

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really to take up anything theatrical.

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I would love to know that there might be some entertainer

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or something like that in my past.

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I'm hoping to find out something wonderful about my blood line.

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Maybe they did something amazing!

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Craig has flown to Melbourne,

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not far from his family's home in the city of Ballarat.

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He's on his way to see his mother, Bev, and sister, Sue.

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I do love Australia.

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I love coming back.

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This is, of course, the first time that I've been to Ballarat

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since my father died and it does evoke all the fond memories.

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I have a wonderful sister, Sue,

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who has always been interested in family history and tree

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and all of that stuff. She's done a bit of digging around.

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She thinks we were related to a convict that came out from England.

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I think she'd be really able to point me in the right direction.

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Craig, his brother and three sisters were raised in the Ballarat suburbs.

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This is my old neighbourhood, called Brown Hill, Ballarat.

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And this is my mum's home.

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It's very sweet and very Australiana.

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I love that. I love the veranda, it's just gorgeous

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and here we go, I'm home!

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Knock, knock, knock.

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Coming, in coming.

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-Who's this then?

-Me.

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Hello, little brother.

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Long-lost brother.

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-Hello.

-Hello.

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-How are you?

-You look lovely.

-Thank you.

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-Gorgeous.

-You look lovely as well.

-Gorgeous.

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-Oh, look!

-The first ever show you were in.

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-Making Music.

-Yeah.

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-Wow!

-Making Music.

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Wow, those tap shoes!

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I thought I was faking the tap in that!

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I must have learnt it!

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I do love that shot.

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Grandad, Moza.

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-Yes.

-And our grandmother, Phyllis or Phonse, on Dad's side.

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-Yeah.

-Phonse and Moza.

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Funny how we called them Phonse and Moza.

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-That was like a nickname. Where did that come from?

-I have no clue.

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You on Phonse's lap.

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There's me on Moza's lap, with a big finger in my mouth.

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Nice! He was a clown, wasn't he?

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And he loved riding his Penny Farthing.

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I know! That Penny Farthing!

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So there's another character in the family who is our great,

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-great grandfather.

-Yeah.

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Moses Horwood. He was a convict.

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One of the early convicts that came across from England.

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Interesting character.

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Moses was having a drink at the Queen's Head Hotel in Cheltenham

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one night with a few mates.

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Thought he might go and steal a few things out of someone's room.

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Moses was hauled in and he was charged for burglary.

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To think that we come from convict stock!

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How exciting's that!

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Exciting. Absolutely!

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Hardly royalty though, is it?

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Have a look at this.

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Deaths in the district of Ballarat East.

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And this is dated 1881.

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Oh, yeah, Moses Horwood.

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Look how many children he had!

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-Wow!

-But the one I want to show you is Charles.

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That is Revel's father.

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Moza's father was called Charles.

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And this is Charles.

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He looks really dapper, doesn't he?

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He does. It's an amazing photo.

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This is an amazing photo.

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-They look wealthy.

-Does look a wealthy photo, doesn't it?

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I mean, you don't have outfits like that if you're not wealthy.

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-No.

-No.

-So maybe they did well.

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Who's he married? Do we know?

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I know he married into the Tinworth family.

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But I don't know much more about...

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-You don't know about her.

-About her.

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So what relation are they to us?

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-Our...

-Our great grandfather and great grandmother.

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-Yeah.

-It would be really interesting to know more about Charles, I think.

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I agree. Because I mean, this is quite close, isn't it?

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Yeah. Yeah, absolutely!

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Craig has discovered he's descended from an English petty criminal,

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Moses Horwood, who was transported to Australia as a convict in 1841.

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He's intrigued by the photograph of Moses' respectable looking son,

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Charles Horwood and his wife, Craig's great grandparents.

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To find out more about them,

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Craig's come to Ballarat's heritage reading rooms

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to meet genealogist Helen Mollison.

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-Hello. Pleased to meet you.

-Lovely to meet you too.

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Do you want to just come up here?

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I want to know a little bit more about this man,

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who is my great grandfather, Charles.

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I don't know who he's with, mind you.

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Well, maybe if you had a look at this document here.

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Marriages.

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Oh, here we go. Charles Horwood, is that Lizzie Belle Tinworth.

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And that's Charles and that's Lizzie.

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-And that's Lizzie.

-In that photograph.

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So, that's who he married.

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On March 17th, 1891.

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And then, of course, on his side is Moses Horwood and Mary Horwood,

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so they're his mum and dad.

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Her mother and father, James Tinworth and Elizabeth Tinworth.

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And they were hotel keepers.

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It was the mining era in Ballarat.

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It was just enormous.

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There were thousands of people coming and going.

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Owning a hotel was a very good occupation.

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Wow! Hotel keeper.

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I like that.

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Craig's great grandfather Charles Horwood had married well.

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His Tinworth in-laws were running a hotel

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at the height of Ballarat's gold rush.

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In 1851, a chance discovery of gold had brought thousands of prospectors

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to Ballarat, all hoping to strike it rich.

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We can now look at this birth certificate.

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Oh, here we go. Lizzie.

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Her father, James Tinworth.

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Name and surname and profession of James's father, so Charles Tinworth.

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-Labourer.

-Yes.

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And something in England.

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That's Elmdon.

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Elmdon, Essex.

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Oh, yeah, Essex. Essex!

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Oh, no! Really?

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-Essex?

-In England.

-There you are.

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In England.

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Craig's great grandmother Lizzie Tinworth

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was born and raised in Ballarat

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by her hotel keeper parents James and Elizabeth.

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But James's parents, Craig's great-great-great grandparents

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Charles and Elizabeth Tinworth came from Essex.

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But now I have no clue how or why they came here.

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Here we are with some shipping documents that might

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be able to help you.

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Sailed from Southampton on 5th February, 1854.

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Tinworth. Charles and Elizabeth.

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Here we are. What does that mean?

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That's an ag-lab.

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Which is an agricultural labourer.

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Someone that digs dirt.

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Works on farms. Works on farms. Yes.

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-OK.

-Male, was 20, and the female was 24.

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There we go across.

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By whom engaged.

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-Mrs Smith.

-So in other words,

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who was he going to work for when he came to Australia.

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Oh, I see. Yeah, yeah, yeah. For employment.

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-Employment, yes.

-So they sailed from Southampton on the 5th of February.

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-Yes.

-They arrived - February, March, April, May - three months later.

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Literally, almost exactly, on the 4th of May, in 1854.

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-Yes.

-And they sailed into Geelong.

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But they must have wanted to do that.

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Yes, because Australia was a new country

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and we desperately needed people.

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The Government would pay for their fares on the ship.

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Oh, I see.

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As well as sending convicts to Australia,

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to help build this new colony, the British tempted young couples

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like Craig's great-great-great grandparents

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with the offer of a free passage.

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So he came out, sort of fully paid.

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That's wonderful and got fed.

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-And got fed.

-And Geelong's quite nice, isn't it?

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And didn't have to go via Van Diemen's Land, has he? As a convict.

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That's true.

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That's nice to know.

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Now, this here might surprise you.

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Births in the district of Ballarat in the colony of Victoria.

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OK, Charles obviously moved to Ballarat

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because this is where the child was born. This is a Tinworth, isn't it?

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Edward, father.

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Charles Tinworth.

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And Elizabeth Revel.

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And it says Charles is 26.

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-Yes.

-And a miner.

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That is most interesting.

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So that may have been actually the driving force

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behind the whole reason why he left Essex in the first place thinking,

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OK, I hear there's gold, let's get a way out there,

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without having to break the law.

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That's right. He did doing the work for...

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Doing the work for Mrs Smith.

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Perfect! Love that.

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Oh, well done him!

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They chose to come to Australia when they were 20 and 24,

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like a young couple that decided to come and work the land.

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They moved to Ballarat for the gold rush because he became a miner.

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To find out more about Charles Tinworth's life as a miner,

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Craig's arranged to meet Dr Clare Wright,

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an expert on the gold rush in the state of Victoria.

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It's lovely to meet you.

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Lovely to meet you, too.

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It's gorgeous up here, isn't it?

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Isn't it beautiful, this is Black Hill.

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Yeah. I used to come here as a kid, actually.

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The reason I'm here is because I'd like to find out a little bit more

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information about my great-great-great grandfather

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Charles Tinworth.

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I can't imagine what life would have been like, actually,

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-in the gold rush.

-When Charles and Elizabeth arrived here,

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they would have arrived to a tent city of about 40,000 people.

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-Wow!

-So, can you imagine everybody living under canvas,

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not just on 40 degree days with these northerly hot winds,

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but also in the freezing cold of winter.

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Snow. Well I've lived through that and I've lived through the icy,

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freezing mornings, you know, when I was doing my paper round.

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Tens of thousands of miners

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like Craig's three-times great grandfather,

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Charles, brought their families to live in tents

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near the Ballarat gold fields.

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Crowded together with no sanitation,

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diseases like dysentery and typhoid spread quickly.

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Charles and Elizabeth were raising their three young children

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in these tough conditions.

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For the families that came out here, it was incredibly difficult.

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And Elizabeth herself didn't have it easy.

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We have the hospital records.

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There's a Tinworth.

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She's 34 years old at this stage.

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Birthplace Essex, of course.

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She's been hospitalised for a condition called menorrhagia.

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-Menorrhagia?

-Excessive menstrual bleeding.

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-Oh, no!

-Which may have been actually a miscarriage.

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She was in hospital for 37 days.

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That's a long time.

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Oh, my God! That would have been awful.

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That's really sad. I mean you don't often think of that, do you?

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You think of people striking it lucky, striking it rich.

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Great big gold nuggets,

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everyone celebrating and you forget the hardships

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that they actually went through.

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Clare has brought Craig to an area by the Yarrowee River,

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where his three-times great grandfather used to mine.

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Watch your step!

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Prospectors could get to work after they'd paid a licence fee to the

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Government for what was known as their claim.

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Charles would have been entitled to a 12-foot claim.

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So it's not a large piece of land, 12 by 12.

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-No.

-In terms of the kind of mining that Charles would have been doing,

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this gives a really good indication of what it would have looked like

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on the banks of the creek.

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-But it is an awful lot of equipment.

-That's right.

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So every miner would have had to purchase that equipment and

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bring it out here. Hot, heavy, labour-intensive work.

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Not for the faint hearted.

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At the start of the Ballarat gold rush, in the 1850s,

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miners could find loose gold close to the surface

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of river beds and creeks.

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They'd dig here, using pans and cradles

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to separate the dirt from the precious metal.

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After all of the sand and the rock has been dislodged and poured away,

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then what's left is...

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-Gold!

-Is those.

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-The flecks of...

-The flecks of gold left at the bottom.

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Wow! It's a lot of hard work for what seems very little reward.

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It begs the question, did Charles strike it lucky and rich?

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Have a look here.

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This will show you what actually happened to Charles

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-and Elizabeth.

-OK.

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Insolvency jurisdiction.

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-This is 1865.

-1865.

-It's a little hard to see there.

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Charles Tinworth.

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Charles is filing for bankruptcy.

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Oh, no!

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The details actually give us a pretty good indication

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of what's going on in Charles and Elizabeth's life

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over that ten years.

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Grocers... Oh, that's what they owe them.

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Oh, grocery goods, 38 quid and 10.

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Butchers, 17.

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Bread, boots.

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-And this one.

-Oh, dear!

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-Medical.

-Medical attendance.

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-Look at the price there.

-18 quid!

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That would have been a fortune!

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Oh, what's that? Cash loaned.

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-Cash lent.

-Oh, God, he's borrowing cash.

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More cash. Like £10.

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Another £5.

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So, here, James Tinworth lent him £10.

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-Oh, so James...

-So this is his brother.

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-And Joseph.

-Also his brother.

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Brother. So he had two brothers here in Ballarat?

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Wow!

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I mean, when you look at this, the whole total's £107.49.

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What on earth would that be in today's money?

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Well, it's a lot of money.

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I mean it's roughly between £5,000-£8,000.

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Clearly he knew he had no way of being able to pay this off.

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Yeah, and then just had to go into bankruptcy.

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-And start again.

-What a nightmare!

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What on earth happened to them?

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Charles and Elizabeth,

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I was particularly moved by actually,

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because I thought they're real,

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what we would call here Aussie battlers.

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They really battled on and battled on

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until they could battle no longer.

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But you know, good on them for trying.

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I think that's something to be definitely proud of

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and something that I can relate to.

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I'm hoping there is only one way on the wheel of fortune

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when you're down on it, and that's up.

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So, I'm hoping the next part of the story might lift me up

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out of this little bit of glumness I feel today,

0:18:320:18:36

you know, about their lives.

0:18:360:18:38

After a decade searching for riches in the gold fields,

0:18:400:18:44

Charles Tinworth had lost everything.

0:18:440:18:46

To find out what became of his three-times great grandfather

0:18:460:18:50

after his bankruptcy, Craig has come to the old mining exchange

0:18:500:18:55

to meet historian Joan Hunt.

0:18:550:18:58

-Hello.

-Hello, Craig. Pleased to meet you.

0:18:580:19:00

-Lovely to meet you, too.

-Come with me.

0:19:000:19:03

I've just recently discovered that my great-great-great grandfather,

0:19:050:19:09

Charles Tinworth, and his wife, Elizabeth,

0:19:090:19:12

became bankrupt after ten years, bless them, of mining.

0:19:120:19:17

I just wondered if you knew anything about that?

0:19:170:19:20

Well, I know that they became bankrupt in 1865 and,

0:19:200:19:25

you might be interested to read this follow-up.

0:19:250:19:28

That was 1865.

0:19:280:19:29

So is this from Geelong Advertisers.

0:19:290:19:32

Thursday, April 29th, 1869.

0:19:320:19:35

"Before his honour Judge Forbes, commissioner in insolvency.

0:19:350:19:39

"The following is a list of the certificate meetings.

0:19:390:19:41

"William Vowles, Ballarat, Thomas Hanson, Charles Tinworth..."

0:19:410:19:46

Here we go. So, what's that mean?

0:19:460:19:49

Four years after he became insolvent...

0:19:490:19:53

-Yeah.

-He has now been cleared and has a certificate.

0:19:530:19:57

So he's now OK.

0:19:570:19:59

Oh, that's good. So, four years later.

0:19:590:20:02

-Yes.

-Well, what did he do for four years?

0:20:020:20:05

We do know that the two brothers James and Joseph Tinworth

0:20:050:20:11

were with Charles and they had started mining together.

0:20:110:20:17

Interesting.

0:20:170:20:18

By the late 1860s when Charles joined forces with his brothers,

0:20:190:20:24

most of the gold near the surface

0:20:240:20:26

of the river beds around Ballarat had gone.

0:20:260:20:29

Like other prospectors,

0:20:290:20:31

the Tinworths had to invest in more equipment so they could mine deeper

0:20:310:20:35

into old, buried riverbeds.

0:20:350:20:37

They really got to a point where the buried rivers were being depleted.

0:20:400:20:46

So it's very likely that maybe in six months or maybe next year,

0:20:460:20:51

that will be pretty well worked out.

0:20:510:20:54

And they're going to have no more gold.

0:20:540:20:57

-What a life.

-They had a lot of ups and downs.

0:20:570:20:59

Yeah, they did. They really, really did.

0:20:590:21:01

20 years after gold was discovered in Ballarat, the boom was over

0:21:030:21:08

and by the early 1870s, many miners had left.

0:21:080:21:12

Those who stayed moved into a more dangerous and costly type of mining.

0:21:120:21:17

They wanted to get at gold buried deep in deposits of hard quartz,

0:21:170:21:21

a common mineral in rocky higher ground.

0:21:210:21:23

Craig wants to know if his three times great-grandfather

0:21:260:21:29

and his brothers took to this new type of mining.

0:21:290:21:33

He's come to the Whitehorse Ranges on the outskirts of the city to meet

0:21:330:21:37

mining scientist Curtis Noice.

0:21:370:21:39

-Hello.

-Hello, Craig.

-Yeah.

0:21:390:21:43

-Curtis, how are you?

-Curtis, lovely to meet you.

0:21:430:21:46

So, I hear you're chasing some information about your family.

0:21:460:21:48

Yes, I am.

0:21:480:21:50

Well, actually, I've been doing some research into the area

0:21:500:21:52

and see if the Tinworths did have any success with their mining.

0:21:520:21:55

This is a map just showing you

0:21:550:21:56

how much activity actually occurred underground.

0:21:560:21:59

I've just seen Clarke's and Tinworth Mines,

0:21:590:22:02

here in Ballarat East. That is...

0:22:020:22:04

Although not your family's, it's very close to this area.

0:22:040:22:08

So it would be a very similar operation.

0:22:080:22:11

That is huge.

0:22:110:22:13

I mean, this is a massive progression

0:22:130:22:14

from when they first started.

0:22:140:22:16

This is proper mining, isn't it?

0:22:160:22:18

-Yeah, absolutely.

-Industrial.

0:22:180:22:21

To get at the gold-bearing deposits of quartz,

0:22:220:22:26

Charles and his brothers had to build a shaft

0:22:260:22:29

reaching hundreds of metres underground.

0:22:290:22:32

They'd haul the heavy quartz to the surface

0:22:320:22:34

and crush it to extract the gold.

0:22:340:22:36

So, where we stand today is actually where your forebears were.

0:22:380:22:42

-Really?

-And, in fact,

0:22:420:22:44

I discovered a couple of depressions and I thought

0:22:440:22:46

I'd better have a closer look.

0:22:460:22:48

So, there's a slight depression through this area...

0:22:480:22:51

OK. Oh, yes.

0:22:510:22:53

..that had me interested. So I came looking and I actually discovered,

0:22:530:22:58

just here, a footing of what I believe to be the shaft.

0:22:580:23:03

-Wow.

-It was a eureka moment.

0:23:030:23:06

I noticed this tiny piece of concrete.

0:23:070:23:10

And what I noticed that was different about the concrete

0:23:100:23:13

is that it's full of quartz.

0:23:130:23:16

Which means it's not modern concrete.

0:23:160:23:18

-So they're using the materials that are available to them.

-That are available, yeah.

0:23:180:23:22

-So I believe that has been put there by your family.

-Wow.

0:23:220:23:26

Tinworth quartz.

0:23:270:23:29

-Absolutely.

-I'm going to build a house out of it.

0:23:290:23:32

That's amazing, actually.

0:23:320:23:33

Well done. This is a little bit of history right there.

0:23:330:23:37

In fact, a huge bit of history.

0:23:370:23:39

Hasn't been uncovered for years.

0:23:390:23:40

How exciting is that?

0:23:410:23:44

I'm not sure if you're aware, Craig,

0:23:440:23:45

but today we're mining directly under here.

0:23:450:23:49

And if you'd like to come underground,

0:23:490:23:51

I can show you the base of this shaft.

0:23:510:23:53

I'm getting goose bumps.

0:23:530:23:55

I mean, this is ridiculous.

0:23:550:23:56

This is about gold mining.

0:23:560:23:58

-Absolutely.

-This is about mining. And I'm actually starting to...

0:23:580:24:01

-It still exists.

-Wow. Underneath this now?

0:24:010:24:04

500-600 metres below the surface, we are mining today.

0:24:060:24:10

That is insane. I love it.

0:24:100:24:13

Curtis is taking Craig underground into a modern mine

0:24:160:24:19

to see the remains of a shaft from the 1870s.

0:24:190:24:22

The Tinworth mine was only metres away from this site.

0:24:240:24:27

-So, off to our left, there we have...

-Wow. That is tiny.

0:24:290:24:35

-Yeah.

-That is unreal.

0:24:350:24:37

The shaft, you'll just see some timbers in the background there.

0:24:370:24:41

-Yes, I can.

-So, that's where the cage would come down with the men.

0:24:410:24:45

-Oh, OK.

-And because it's the sort of bottom of your work space,

0:24:450:24:48

you'll have to bring out your wheelbarrows and tools for the day.

0:24:480:24:53

So, this level, and the entrance, if you are doing it

0:24:530:24:56

-with a pick and shovel...

-Oh, my...

0:24:560:24:58

It's as wide as it has to be cos

0:24:580:25:00

you've got to haul all of that rock back up.

0:25:000:25:02

It's laborious, isn't it?

0:25:020:25:05

I mean, they must have worked tirelessly on that.

0:25:050:25:09

So, one of the risks working underground, obviously, is the collapse.

0:25:090:25:14

So, while you're tunnelling away,

0:25:140:25:16

they won't have all of the ground support in.

0:25:160:25:19

And a number of men lost their lives.

0:25:190:25:22

Oh, God. I know you hear of like old mines caving in, don't you?

0:25:220:25:25

-Yeah.

-You know, when I look at that and I think that my ancestors,

0:25:250:25:30

you know, my family, were down in among that,

0:25:300:25:35

looking for a new future, you know.

0:25:350:25:38

And what they were prepared to do, to get that new future is beyond me.

0:25:380:25:44

Living on a pipe dream.

0:25:440:25:46

-You know, living on...

-With no guarantees.

0:25:460:25:48

With no guarantees. And it's just incredible.

0:25:480:25:51

-It's a big commitment.

-Yeah. A massive commitment.

0:25:510:25:54

I mean, you're risking your life...

0:25:540:25:57

..just for a better future.

0:25:580:26:00

Curtis is taking Craig a further 400 metres underground

0:26:030:26:07

where miners are still extracting gold from quartz today.

0:26:070:26:10

So, this is the end of the line, it seems.

0:26:120:26:15

That's right. You'll see that the grey rock is waste.

0:26:150:26:18

-Waste.

-The white is the quartz which is what hosts the gold.

0:26:180:26:22

But all quartz doesn't have gold in it.

0:26:220:26:24

See, that's the big shame, isn't it?

0:26:240:26:26

That's right. If it was easy, everybody would be doing it.

0:26:260:26:29

That's right. So what did they do in the old days, then?

0:26:290:26:33

So to reduce your work effort,

0:26:330:26:35

they'd be chasing what was often referred to as an indicator.

0:26:350:26:38

In fact Charles' son Edward was looking at minerals quite closely

0:26:380:26:42

and trying to identify the correlation between certain minerals

0:26:420:26:46

in the rock and the gold-bearing quartz.

0:26:460:26:50

It's amazing.

0:26:500:26:51

By the time he had moved into deep mining, Charles Tinworth

0:26:530:26:56

had spent 20 years searching for gold.

0:26:560:27:00

His sons had joined him in this risky business

0:27:000:27:02

and Craig wants to know if the struggle ever paid off.

0:27:020:27:05

He's come to Ballarat's Gold Museum to meet historian Jan Croggin.

0:27:070:27:13

My great-great-great-grandfather's son, Edward,

0:27:130:27:18

discovered some sort of mineral way of finding quartz and gold

0:27:180:27:23

and mining it. I was just wondering whether or not, number one,

0:27:230:27:27

he was successful at it.

0:27:270:27:29

And how he went about it.

0:27:290:27:32

Edward Tinworth, son of Charles, your great-great-great-grandfather,

0:27:320:27:35

is actually responsible for one of the things that made it possible to

0:27:350:27:39

make a lot of money. He was only 13 years old.

0:27:390:27:42

He worked out that if you could find where the quartz intersected

0:27:420:27:47

with slate, you've found a lot of nuggety gold.

0:27:470:27:51

Now that became more or less a rule.

0:27:510:27:53

-You've probably heard of the indicator.

-Yeah,

0:27:530:27:55

I've heard the word but I've never fully understood it.

0:27:550:27:57

Edward Tinworth found the indicator for the Ballarat East Goldfield.

0:27:570:28:01

-Wow.

-So that's pretty exciting.

0:28:010:28:03

It is. That's an upturn, I can tell you.

0:28:030:28:05

I've been in the doldrums, darling, you know,

0:28:050:28:08

-and then they come up with it. That's brilliant.

-They did.

0:28:080:28:11

Oh, that's exciting.

0:28:110:28:12

And, of course, the second question you asked me was, was it helpful.

0:28:120:28:16

Have a look at that. And see what you think.

0:28:160:28:19

It's a geological survey of Victoria.

0:28:190:28:21

Oh, I see. List of nuggets found in Victoria.

0:28:210:28:24

Ah, here we go. Tinworth's party and that was from the indicator.

0:28:240:28:27

-And how much did it weigh?

-This was in 1880.

0:28:270:28:31

And it weighed about...

0:28:310:28:32

-250.

-250 ounces.

0:28:320:28:35

-That's huge.

-Yeah.

0:28:350:28:36

-It is huge.

-How much was that actually worth?

0:28:360:28:38

-On today's prices, it would be £1,000 an ounce.

-Wow.

0:28:380:28:43

So that's £250,000.

0:28:430:28:45

A quarter of a million...

0:28:450:28:47

-Pounds.

-Oh, that's brilliant.

0:28:470:28:49

They must have absolutely been delighted.

0:28:490:28:51

I mean, they'd been through so much hardship.

0:28:510:28:54

I mean, to finally win the lottery.

0:28:540:28:57

If you'd like an indication of what a nugget might have looked like...

0:28:570:29:01

Yeah, I would love that.

0:29:010:29:02

-We can show you. This is a bit special.

-You're kidding.

0:29:020:29:05

-Would you like to...?

-Yeah, I want to hold it.

0:29:050:29:08

Of course I do.

0:29:080:29:09

This nugget...have a feel.

0:29:090:29:11

29 ounces.

0:29:110:29:12

That is really, really heavy.

0:29:120:29:14

It's amazing.

0:29:140:29:16

It's gorgeous, isn't it?

0:29:160:29:18

The one that Tinworth found, the 250-ounce nugget,

0:29:180:29:21

is about nine times bigger than that nugget.

0:29:210:29:24

I mean, the stuff that dreams are made of, isn't it?

0:29:240:29:27

-Absolutely.

-Seriously. Obviously they must have gone on,

0:29:270:29:30

and were finding nuggets and all of that stuff

0:29:300:29:32

but please don't tell me it all ends in disaster.

0:29:320:29:35

My stomach couldn't take it, darling.

0:29:350:29:37

My heart couldn't take it.

0:29:370:29:39

-What happened next?

-If I could put before you this...

0:29:390:29:41

The last will and Testament of Charles Tinworth.

0:29:410:29:46

"The said Charles Tinworth had at the time of his death real property

0:29:460:29:51

"in the state of Victoria not exceeding in value

0:29:510:29:57

"the sum of £7,820.

0:29:570:30:00

"And personal property in the said state

0:30:000:30:02

"not exceeding in value the sum of £13,615."

0:30:020:30:08

So around £21,000, on current prices today,

0:30:080:30:12

probably £1.5 million. So he died a wealthy man.

0:30:120:30:16

-And if you read...

-A millionaire.

0:30:160:30:18

-That's right.

-Well done, him.

0:30:180:30:20

-Next question.

-Yeah, what did they do with it?

0:30:200:30:23

What did they do with it? If I can find you, can you read that

0:30:230:30:27

where it starts there?

0:30:270:30:29

"And I also give and bequeath the sum of £300 to each of my grandsons,

0:30:290:30:36

"James Tinworth and William Tinworth."

0:30:360:30:41

The important bit is here.

0:30:410:30:42

"Son of my late son James."

0:30:420:30:46

-Yeah.

-What happened to that?

0:30:460:30:48

-He died before?

-Yeah.

0:30:480:30:50

You're absolutely right.

0:30:500:30:51

Well, that's...that is a huge shock.

0:30:510:30:54

Yeah. It is.

0:30:540:30:56

His son died before him.

0:30:560:30:57

Craig's great-great-grandfather James died from kidney failure

0:30:590:31:03

when he was just 48 years old.

0:31:030:31:05

His father Charles, who outlived him,

0:31:060:31:09

left his huge fortune to the remaining living children.

0:31:090:31:12

He also left money to James's sons, but not his daughters,

0:31:130:31:18

including Lizzie, Craig's great-grandmother.

0:31:180:31:21

The thing that sticks out in my mind at this juncture is the fact that

0:31:250:31:29

Charles in his will left the money only to the boys.

0:31:290:31:35

The grandsons in the family, not the granddaughters.

0:31:350:31:40

One of which, of course, is my relative, Lizzie.

0:31:400:31:43

That's right, yeah. Your family didn't inherit the Tinworth fortune.

0:31:430:31:47

-Yeah, the Tinworth huge wealth...

-Damn!

-..and fortune.

0:31:470:31:53

So...what a shame.

0:31:530:31:56

That's just truly unbelievable, isn't it?

0:31:560:31:59

It's a really sad twist of fate.

0:31:590:32:01

Wow.

0:32:010:32:02

And particularly sad because we have discovered that the Tinworth mine,

0:32:040:32:08

between 1871 and 1909, when they closed it down,

0:32:080:32:13

they actually found 30,000 ounces of gold,

0:32:130:32:17

which would be roughly worth, on current prices, about £30 million.

0:32:170:32:22

So...yeah.

0:32:250:32:26

Lizzie!

0:32:260:32:28

Don't you just hate history.

0:32:280:32:29

Pretty disappointing.

0:32:310:32:32

No, it's great, it's amazing, really, it's amazing.

0:32:320:32:35

It does make me wonder what my father, who recently died,

0:32:450:32:50

may think of this journey,

0:32:500:32:52

because I'm sure he knew nothing about all of this.

0:32:520:32:55

The idea that Charles Tinworth had 20 years

0:32:570:33:01

before he really achieved his dream

0:33:010:33:05

was showing great determination and great human nature

0:33:050:33:12

and that's what I love.

0:33:120:33:13

And my dad, I think, would be so proud of his forefather

0:33:150:33:20

in that way too.

0:33:200:33:22

I just wish that he was here now to see all of this, you know.

0:33:220:33:26

That would be good.

0:33:260:33:28

I think it's time to actually find out

0:33:400:33:42

about my grandmother's side of the family.

0:33:420:33:46

I called her Phonse.

0:33:460:33:48

I don't ever really get to see my grandmother that much.

0:33:480:33:50

Last time I saw her was literally four years ago.

0:33:530:33:57

And since then, my father has died, of course, her son,

0:33:570:34:01

so she's probably been dealing with that.

0:34:010:34:03

I can't wait.

0:34:030:34:05

Craig is flying 2,000 miles west across Australia

0:34:080:34:11

to see his grandmother, Phyllis,

0:34:110:34:13

known in the family as Phonse, who lives in Perth.

0:34:130:34:16

Phonse turned 100 last month.

0:34:200:34:22

I mean she was born in what, 1917, for goodness' sake.

0:34:220:34:26

Which is just outrageous.

0:34:260:34:30

I really know very little about my grandmother's upbringing.

0:34:300:34:34

The only thing I really know is that she was in an orphanage.

0:34:340:34:39

Phyllis lives with her grandson, Craig's cousin Logan.

0:34:430:34:47

DOORBELL RINGS

0:34:510:34:52

Hello.

0:34:550:34:56

-Come in. How are you?

-Logan!

-Come on in.

-So good to see you.

0:34:560:35:00

How lovely, long time, eh, come in.

0:35:000:35:03

-You're looking well.

-Thank you. And you.

-Gorgeous.

0:35:030:35:06

-Come in.

-Oh, look, here we are.

0:35:060:35:09

It's been ages since I've been here.

0:35:090:35:11

-Couple of years, I think.

-Oh, it's the Queen Mother herself, darling.

0:35:120:35:17

Sure. Let me bow down before you.

0:35:170:35:21

Oh, thank you, darling.

0:35:210:35:23

-How are you?

-How are you?

0:35:230:35:26

Oh, isn't it lovely to see you?

0:35:260:35:30

It's lovely.

0:35:300:35:31

You look fantastic.

0:35:310:35:34

-Thank you.

-It's lovely to be here.

0:35:340:35:37

I'm glad you could come.

0:35:370:35:39

I believe you got a little card from the Queen herself.

0:35:390:35:43

I sure did, would you like me to show you?

0:35:430:35:46

I would love it.

0:35:460:35:47

Have a look at that.

0:35:500:35:52

Wow. "Mrs Horwood,

0:35:520:35:55

"I'm pleased to hear that you are celebrating your 100th birthday.

0:35:550:35:59

"My sincere congratulations and best wishes

0:35:590:36:03

"on this very special day. Elizabeth."

0:36:030:36:06

Ah, how fantastic.

0:36:060:36:08

-It's beautiful.

-So, Phonse,

0:36:080:36:11

I haven't, over the years, asked you much about your life.

0:36:110:36:15

Your roots. I don't know whether you have any photographs of your

0:36:150:36:19

-mum and dad, by any chance?

-I've just got one.

0:36:190:36:23

And here it is.

0:36:230:36:24

It's a beautiful photo of them.

0:36:240:36:28

That's my mum and dad.

0:36:280:36:30

-Ah.

-That's Julia and that's Harry.

0:36:300:36:34

She was gorgeous.

0:36:340:36:35

-She was.

-He is very striking as well, isn't he?

0:36:350:36:39

Really square jaw line.

0:36:390:36:41

-Wow.

-Strong-looking man...

-Yeah, he looks like a rugby player.

0:36:410:36:44

My mother, I was there the day she died.

0:36:450:36:50

She had the baby at nine o'clock and that was it.

0:36:500:36:53

Your mum died in childbirth, was it?

0:36:530:36:56

She died with childbirth.

0:36:560:36:58

-Nine children.

-Boy!

0:36:580:37:00

And she died at 40.

0:37:000:37:02

When my mother died, I think they all got together, and I thought,

0:37:030:37:08

they decided what they were going to do.

0:37:080:37:10

After a big discussion, they decided they'd take us to Emmaville.

0:37:100:37:15

Went to the aunties and the uncles and they had us for about a month

0:37:150:37:21

and I suppose we got too much for them.

0:37:210:37:23

And so what did they decide?

0:37:230:37:25

They decided to put us in the orphanage.

0:37:250:37:28

What was life like at the orphanage that you can remember?

0:37:280:37:31

It was rigid, it was regimental, but glory be,

0:37:310:37:39

Christmas Day was the best day of the lot.

0:37:390:37:42

Christmas Day.

0:37:430:37:45

It was the same routine, up at six o'clock in the morning,

0:37:450:37:49

and down to Mass at seven.

0:37:490:37:50

You come out into the dining room for breakfast.

0:37:500:37:54

There on your plate was one sausage.

0:37:550:37:59

LAUGHTER

0:37:590:38:02

One sausage, believe it or not.

0:38:020:38:06

You could pick it up in your fingers,

0:38:060:38:08

and you could sit and eat this sausage.

0:38:080:38:11

Isn't that incredible?

0:38:110:38:13

What a fantastic story.

0:38:130:38:15

It was unbelievable.

0:38:150:38:17

They fed us, they clothed us and they educated us.

0:38:190:38:23

What more could we ask?

0:38:230:38:25

-Yeah.

-And that was because your dad couldn't do that for you?

0:38:250:38:28

That's because my dad couldn't do it.

0:38:280:38:30

-No.

-He would never have been able to have looked after all of us.

0:38:300:38:34

Is there any more information that you have about your dad?

0:38:340:38:37

I've got his birth certificate.

0:38:370:38:39

-Wow!

-If that would be of any help to you.

0:38:390:38:41

Yeah, come on.

0:38:410:38:43

OK, here we go.

0:38:430:38:45

-October 5th.

-Is that 91?

0:38:450:38:47

-1871.

-71.

0:38:470:38:48

At Clarevale Station near Emmaville.

0:38:490:38:52

On a station? He was born on a station?

0:38:520:38:56

What, a platform?

0:38:560:38:58

No, no, a sheep station!

0:38:580:38:59

Made Phonse laugh!

0:38:590:39:01

-So where they run the livestock.

-OK.

0:39:010:39:05

There is the father's name, occupation, age and birthplace.

0:39:050:39:08

You've got that.

0:39:080:39:10

Harry. Harry Shaw, 31 years...

0:39:100:39:15

Ashton-under-Lyne, England.

0:39:150:39:18

Ashton-under-Lyne.

0:39:190:39:21

England? British too!

0:39:210:39:24

Ashton-under-Lyne had a big industry of cotton mills,

0:39:240:39:27

and that's originally where he worked.

0:39:270:39:29

Wow! So, OK...

0:39:290:39:33

I would love to know what you might remember about your grandfather,

0:39:330:39:37

-Harry Shaw.

-I might have a photo of him.

0:39:370:39:42

That's him.

0:39:420:39:44

-This is Harry.

-Yeah.

0:39:440:39:46

That's my grandfather, but I don't remember him at all.

0:39:460:39:50

Do you know anything about Harry?

0:39:500:39:52

Well, he worked all around the north New South Wales area,

0:39:520:39:55

and obviously around this station where his son was born, this Harry.

0:39:550:39:58

He was referred to as Harry Macklin Shaw.

0:40:000:40:02

Amazing.

0:40:040:40:06

Well, that's exciting, isn't it?

0:40:070:40:08

It's very exciting.

0:40:080:40:09

-Thank you.

-That's all right.

0:40:090:40:12

Thank you.

0:40:120:40:14

Craig's discovered that his great-great-grandfather

0:40:160:40:19

Harry Macklin Shaw was another Englishman,

0:40:190:40:21

from the cotton mill town of Ashton-under-Lyne,

0:40:210:40:25

who came to Australia to work on a sheep station in New South Wales.

0:40:250:40:29

Today I have embarked on a whole new family once again.

0:40:370:40:41

I mean, it's just brilliant, absolutely brilliant.

0:40:410:40:44

I was really surprised to find that my grandmother's side of the family,

0:40:460:40:50

the Shaw side of the family, came from north-west England,

0:40:500:40:53

up near Manchester.

0:40:530:40:54

Harry Macklin Shaw, my great-great-grandfather,

0:40:560:40:59

was living in the north of New South Wales.

0:40:590:41:03

I mean, I've never been there.

0:41:030:41:04

Craig's travelling back to the east of Australia, to Glen Innes,

0:41:110:41:14

the place where his great-great-grandfather

0:41:140:41:17

Harry Macklin Shaw settled.

0:41:170:41:18

He's come to the sheep station where Harry used to work.

0:41:270:41:30

Local historian Bill Oates has been looking into Harry's life here.

0:41:300:41:34

-Good morning, Craig.

-Good morning, Bill.

0:41:360:41:39

I'd like to know about this man, who was my great-great-grandfather,

0:41:390:41:42

who came out from Greater Manchester,

0:41:420:41:46

and his name is Harry Macklin Shaw.

0:41:460:41:49

Harry came out to Australia following his brother, William,

0:41:490:41:54

who'd arrived in the colony sometime earlier.

0:41:540:41:56

-Oh, OK.

-There was a shortage of labour up here,

0:41:560:41:59

whereas the mills were struggling in England at that time.

0:41:590:42:02

So, there were many people making similar decisions.

0:42:020:42:05

-Right.

-I have got a photo here from the early days.

0:42:050:42:08

-I'll be needing these!

-Clarevale was a head station,

0:42:080:42:13

it would have been over 50,000 acres at this stage there,

0:42:130:42:15

and they would have run about 20,000 sheep.

0:42:150:42:18

That's big, isn't it, really?

0:42:180:42:19

It is, and they're communities in themselves.

0:42:190:42:21

I can imagine it would be quite a tough life.

0:42:210:42:24

It would be a tough life.

0:42:240:42:26

It's also interesting to note

0:42:260:42:27

that there's still a pretty good social life

0:42:270:42:30

that goes around here as well.

0:42:300:42:31

-OK.

-Probably a good time to show you this one here.

0:42:310:42:35

Oh, the Oddfellows' Ball.

0:42:360:42:39

This is from the Glen Innes Examiner,

0:42:390:42:42

Tuesday, November 23rd, 1880.

0:42:420:42:44

"The Oddfellows gave a grand ball in Ezzy's large hall in the evening,

0:42:440:42:49

"at which there were about 70 couple present."

0:42:490:42:51

That's quite a lot of couples, isn't it?

0:42:510:42:54

-It is.

-For a little ball.

0:42:540:42:55

-Yeah.

-"The Glen Innes String Band presided,

0:42:550:42:59

"and discoursed some very sweet music.

0:42:590:43:02

"We were greatly struck with the uniform manner

0:43:020:43:04

"in which everything in connection with this ball was carried out,

0:43:040:43:08

"which was certainly due to the untiring energies of Mr H Shaw,

0:43:080:43:13

"who officiated as MC.

0:43:130:43:15

"Dancing was kept up till daylight."

0:43:150:43:17

He was an MC, a master of ceremonies!

0:43:170:43:21

If you're going to have a party, you've got to have it running till daylight!

0:43:210:43:24

Well, you do, don't you, I suppose?

0:43:240:43:26

That was brilliant!

0:43:260:43:28

Wow! So he was MC-ing this whole thing,

0:43:280:43:30

so he was obviously some sort of out there type performer, in a way.

0:43:300:43:36

-Yes.

-Well, had a personality that could sustain that, for a community.

0:43:360:43:41

-That shows through.

-Yeah!

0:43:410:43:43

When you consider someone that's a labourer,

0:43:460:43:48

you wouldn't think that there's going to be...

0:43:480:43:51

There's no business like show business!

0:43:510:43:53

But, if you consider that he was master of ceremonies

0:43:530:43:57

at local dances, he had to have some sort of showman in him.

0:43:570:44:00

And he must have had a little bit of chutzpah and verve,

0:44:010:44:05

and that's what I love.

0:44:050:44:06

Craig wants to find out more about his extrovert

0:44:100:44:13

great-great-grandfather, Harry.

0:44:130:44:16

He's come to Glen Innes's History House to meet archivist Eve Chapel.

0:44:160:44:20

Craig, Eve Chapel.

0:44:200:44:22

Hi, lovely to meet you.

0:44:220:44:23

Now, Eve, I was just wondering about my great-great-grandfather

0:44:240:44:28

Harry Macklin Shaw, and whether or not you had any other information

0:44:280:44:33

-on him at all?

-We do have.

0:44:330:44:34

Have a look at that article there, "Good Templary at Vegetable Creek."

0:44:400:44:45

"The annual anniversary of the Nil Desperandum lodge..."

0:44:450:44:50

OK. "..The singing and recitations were not up to expectations

0:44:500:44:55

"owing to some imperfections in the stage fittings."

0:44:550:44:59

Everyone's a critic, darling!

0:45:000:45:02

Everyone's a critic.

0:45:020:45:03

"Harry Shaw's step dancing..."

0:45:030:45:06

Oh, step dancing!

0:45:060:45:07

"... And recitation were well rendered."

0:45:070:45:09

-So he was dancing a bit, and acting a bit.

-Yes.

0:45:090:45:12

And reciting.

0:45:120:45:14

Yeah, and reciting stuff.

0:45:140:45:16

"Dancing was indulged in until the early hours of the morning."

0:45:160:45:19

He has a reputation for that, because I read a little bit where,

0:45:190:45:22

you know, he was MC-ing a ball, and it closed at sunrise, you know.

0:45:220:45:30

You can see he's one of these people who's right in with his community.

0:45:300:45:34

-Yes.

-And he's going to enjoy himself.

0:45:340:45:36

How fantastic.

0:45:360:45:37

There's more. This is 1877.

0:45:370:45:41

"A very acceptable performance was given to this club

0:45:440:45:47

"on Wednesday evening last at the Royal Assembly Rooms.

0:45:470:45:51

"These clever performers sang a number of songs

0:45:510:45:55

"in a creditable manner.

0:45:550:45:57

"The ex-champion clog dancer of New South Wales..."

0:45:570:46:00

No!

0:46:000:46:01

"... Mr H Shaw."

0:46:010:46:03

An ex-champion clog dancer!

0:46:030:46:07

You've got somebody famous in your family!

0:46:070:46:10

That's hilarious! Clog dancing!

0:46:100:46:13

That is brilliant.

0:46:130:46:14

Clog dancing was a hugely popular pastime

0:46:160:46:18

in late 19th-century Australia.

0:46:180:46:20

A forerunner of modern tap dancing, performers wore wooden soled shoes

0:46:220:46:27

and tapped out steps in complex rhythms.

0:46:270:46:29

I never really considered anyone in my family to be part of theatre,

0:46:330:46:37

at all. So this is finally ringing some bells, darling.

0:46:370:46:42

We're loving that!

0:46:420:46:43

I'm really intrigued about old Harry getting his clogs

0:46:530:46:58

out and dancing around.

0:46:580:47:01

And I just found it really fascinating

0:47:030:47:06

that there is finally some theatricality in my blood.

0:47:060:47:11

Craig knows that his great-great-grandfather

0:47:150:47:17

danced in Emmaville.

0:47:170:47:18

He's been put in touch with local historian Anne Fairbanks.

0:47:190:47:22

Hello, you must be Anne.

0:47:240:47:25

I am. Hello, Craig and welcome to Emmaville.

0:47:250:47:28

Oh, lovely. This is lovely, isn't it?

0:47:280:47:31

Sweet little town.

0:47:310:47:33

I'm here to actually find out a little bit more about my

0:47:330:47:36

great-great-grandfather Harry,

0:47:360:47:39

and I thought I had to absolutely come here to see where he performed.

0:47:390:47:44

-You may be interested in this little bit.

-Oh, the Sydney Morning Herald.

0:47:440:47:50

That's a big old paper, isn't it, darling?

0:47:500:47:52

-That's like a proper one.

-Yes.

0:47:520:47:53

"Challenge. I, Harry Macklin, am open to dance any man in Australia

0:47:530:48:00

"at Hornpipe Dancing for 20 quid -

0:48:000:48:04

"which dances the most steps, dances them the cleanest

0:48:040:48:09

"and keeps the best time.

0:48:090:48:11

"Man and money ready at Westmoreland Street, Forest Lodge."

0:48:110:48:16

Wow. So is this like an advertisement?

0:48:160:48:18

-Yes. He's challenging...

-He's actually challenging someone.

0:48:180:48:22

Challenging people for 20 quid. That's quite a lot of money back then, isn't it?

0:48:220:48:25

And this is 1871. You know, 20 quid back then was about a thousand dollars.

0:48:250:48:29

-Yeah, that's a lot.

-That's a lot of money.

0:48:290:48:31

I just can't imagine putting an ad in, "I will dance!

0:48:310:48:34

"I'm open to dance any man in Australia at Hornpipe Dancing."

0:48:340:48:38

But who's judging him? This is the thing.

0:48:380:48:40

He's probably going to judge himself.

0:48:400:48:42

Yeah, but he must be! "Man and money ready".

0:48:420:48:44

-That is brilliant.

-It's good, isn't it?

0:48:440:48:46

I mean, he's really throwing it out there, isn't he, to make money?

0:48:460:48:49

But not only that, to get to Sydney from here,

0:48:490:48:52

he would have had to travel overland to Grafton,

0:48:520:48:55

which would have taken three or four days by horse,

0:48:550:48:57

and then from Grafton he would have gone to the coast

0:48:570:49:01

-and caught a steamer to Sydney.

-Yeah.

0:49:010:49:03

Just to go down there to perform.

0:49:030:49:05

-That is amazing.

-I have another little one here too.

0:49:050:49:08

-Have a look at the date.

-Friday January 26, 1872.

0:49:080:49:11

-Which we know is Australia Day.

-Yeah, Australia Day.

0:49:110:49:14

So he's hopped off to Sydney for Australia Day.

0:49:140:49:16

"At half past four o'clock,

0:49:160:49:18

"the champion clog dancer Harry Macklin in his celebrated dances."

0:49:180:49:22

It's just insane!

0:49:240:49:26

It gets even better, Craig.

0:49:260:49:29

Now have a look at this.

0:49:290:49:30

That building there is the one that he performed at on Australia Day.

0:49:300:49:34

It actually made the London News.

0:49:340:49:36

So the rellies back home could see how well he was doing.

0:49:360:49:40

Did he tell the relatives back there "Oh, I'm going to

0:49:410:49:45

"be a champion clog dancer and I'm going to be performing

0:49:450:49:48

"almost equivalent to the opera house?"

0:49:480:49:50

He probably sent that when he left home.

0:49:500:49:51

-He said, "You'll be hearing about me."

-That is amazing.

0:49:510:49:55

I mean, to think actually how on earth

0:49:550:49:58

he learnt any of that is beyond me.

0:49:580:50:01

You know, to become the New South Wales champion for clogging

0:50:010:50:05

is just insane.

0:50:050:50:06

What I find interesting in the parallel that I can draw

0:50:150:50:18

is he moved from this really sleepy town of Emmaville,

0:50:180:50:22

he went to the big smoke to make it.

0:50:220:50:24

That was Sydney of course and I was in Ballarat

0:50:240:50:27

and I moved to what I call the big smoke, which was Melbourne.

0:50:270:50:30

So to think that my great-great-grandfather

0:50:310:50:35

has done the same thing is just madness!

0:50:350:50:38

I can't get my head round it just yet.

0:50:390:50:42

I really need to go to Sydney to find out a lot more about him.

0:50:420:50:46

Craig's retracing his great-great-grandfather's journey

0:50:500:50:54

to Sydney to try to find out how Harry became

0:50:540:50:56

such an accomplished clog dancer.

0:50:560:50:58

Craig's come to meet music and dance expert Heather Clark.

0:51:040:51:08

-Hello.

-Hello!

0:51:080:51:09

You must be Heather.

0:51:090:51:11

Yes, you must be Craig. Lovely to meet you.

0:51:110:51:13

-I am indeed. Lovely to meet you too. Have a seat.

-Oh, thank you.

0:51:130:51:16

I have come all the way to Sydney to discover a little bit more about my

0:51:180:51:22

great-great-grandfather Harry Macklin Shaw,

0:51:220:51:25

who I have discovered became a bit of a clog dancer.

0:51:250:51:29

And I'm just thinking where on earth would he learn it?

0:51:290:51:33

Where would he practise it? And all of those sort of things.

0:51:330:51:36

Clog dancing developed in the north of England.

0:51:360:51:41

The story is that they mimicked

0:51:410:51:43

the rhythms that the machines were making.

0:51:430:51:47

That makes sense.

0:51:470:51:48

Cotton mill workers wore wooden sod clogs

0:51:490:51:52

because of the damp mill floors.

0:51:520:51:54

The rhythms they tapped started as a way to keep warm

0:51:550:51:58

but developed into a popular new style of dance.

0:51:580:52:01

When he came to Australia,

0:52:030:52:04

he still would have been in a community

0:52:040:52:07

where people were dancing and he would have picked up more steps.

0:52:070:52:11

You know, you see a step you like and go "Oh, I'll have that one."

0:52:110:52:14

-Yeah, that's true.

-Yeah.

0:52:140:52:15

You know, you sort of build on it and there's also accounts of

0:52:150:52:20

people like shearers and miners,

0:52:200:52:23

they would take a little board with them

0:52:230:52:25

so when they had a break at lunch time or whatever,

0:52:250:52:28

they would practise their steps.

0:52:280:52:29

They're not set routines.

0:52:290:52:31

Well you improvise, don't you?

0:52:310:52:33

Like they did, I suppose, on the streets of New York.

0:52:330:52:36

The tap dancing. You put a board down, you get your taps out...

0:52:360:52:38

That's exactly the same tradition.

0:52:380:52:40

I have heard references, of course, to Harry, you know,

0:52:400:52:43

that he became New South Wales champion.

0:52:430:52:46

I actually have something here which is hugely significant,

0:52:460:52:51

not just in your family but in Australian dance history as well.

0:52:510:52:56

Darling.

0:52:570:52:59

I need my glasses.

0:52:590:53:02

What's this?

0:53:020:53:03

"Born 5th of July, 1840.

0:53:030:53:09

"Oh, Ashton-under-Lyne."

0:53:090:53:10

Yes.

0:53:100:53:12

"Harry M Shaw, champion of Australia."

0:53:120:53:17

-Is that Australasia?

-Yes.

-Australasia?

0:53:170:53:20

-Wow. Clog dancing.

-Mm, so he must have been fabulous.

0:53:210:53:24

This is the 5th of October 1871.

0:53:250:53:28

Wow.

0:53:280:53:30

That is extraordinary!

0:53:300:53:31

That is something, isn't it?

0:53:330:53:35

-It is.

-That is amazing!

0:53:350:53:37

It is. It's fabulous, isn't it?

0:53:370:53:40

It's incredible!

0:53:400:53:41

I had absolutely no clue whatsoever.

0:53:410:53:46

That is a little gem of histoire right there...

0:53:460:53:52

in my hands.

0:53:520:53:53

That makes it all real actually.

0:53:530:53:54

-It does.

-It really does.

0:53:540:53:56

Oh, I want to learn clog dancing.

0:53:560:53:58

Well, I can help you there.

0:53:580:54:01

Oh, no. Are we going clogging, darling?

0:54:010:54:04

-Yes.

-How excellent.

0:54:040:54:06

Well, I can't guarantee I'm going to be any good at it

0:54:060:54:09

-but we'll have a go.

-Well...

-How exciting.

0:54:090:54:11

Come over this way.

0:54:110:54:13

Now what I have here for you are a lovely, lovely pair of clogs.

0:54:130:54:20

Oh, they're a bit special.

0:54:210:54:23

-There's not a lot of movement in those.

-No. Really solid.

0:54:240:54:27

I'll sling them on.

0:54:330:54:34

They are solid as...

0:54:350:54:37

Not only are we going to dance but we're going to dance to live music.

0:54:390:54:42

-Wow.

-So here they come.

0:54:420:54:44

Oh, no, here they come.

0:54:440:54:46

So if you were competing,

0:54:480:54:50

you'd probably stand with your back to your musicians.

0:54:500:54:53

So it's the break.

0:54:530:54:55

It goes step, shuffle, step, step, shuffle...

0:54:550:54:58

Step, shuffle.

0:54:580:55:00

Yep, that's it.

0:55:000:55:03

Break.

0:55:030:55:04

Oh, I see. Yeah, yeah. And then to the break.

0:55:070:55:09

HE SINGS A TUNE

0:55:090:55:11

-Shall we give it a bash?

-OK.

0:55:130:55:15

Oh, dear. This is like throwing me one, isn't it?

0:55:150:55:19

On the spot.

0:55:200:55:21

OK.

0:55:210:55:23

Break.

0:55:260:55:27

Oh, that's the break.

0:55:280:55:29

OK, try it again. That was terrible.

0:55:290:55:32

So I'll just copy you. And I'll fudge it to the end.

0:55:340:55:37

I'm sure you're very good at that.

0:55:370:55:39

Yeah, good at fudging.

0:55:390:55:40

Good. Well done.

0:56:100:56:12

-Nailed, darling!

-Yeah. Plenty of nails in there.

0:56:120:56:15

These hurt!

0:56:170:56:18

-Thank you, darling.

-That was fabulous.

0:56:180:56:21

I'll practise that. I'll take these away.

0:56:210:56:23

-Yes, they're yours!

-Oh!

0:56:230:56:24

It was just brilliant to see Harry Shaw, you know,

0:56:380:56:44

take that crown for Australasia clog dancing.

0:56:440:56:47

I mean, who would have ever dreamt it?

0:56:470:56:50

And I'm so proud that he made something of himself.

0:56:500:56:54

Harry and Charles Tinworth, two men - very, very driven,

0:56:540:56:59

two very powerful men, in a way, that went against all adversity

0:56:590:57:04

and really came out on top.

0:57:040:57:06

I started feeling strongly that I was very much like them.

0:57:070:57:12

I wanted to follow my heart, my passion, my dreams of dance,

0:57:130:57:17

and it's just amazing to know that that actually runs in the family

0:57:170:57:22

and in the blood.

0:57:220:57:23

Cos it really has put a new twist on who I think I am.

0:57:230:57:29

Strictly judge Craig Revel Horwood reveals his softer side. Heading to his home town of Ballarat in Australia, Craig investigates what happened to his great-great-great-grandfather who risked everything in the Australian Gold Rush.

A visit to his beloved 100-year-old grandmother sends Craig in pursuit of another maverick ancestor. Craig's great-great-grandfather Harry turns out to have been the life of the party and, better still, a fabulous dancer.