The Fallen The People Remember


The Fallen

History documentary series. As Remembrance Sunday approaches, Sophie Raworth and Andy Torbet are joined by broadcaster Angela Rippon to remember the fallen.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to the Imperial War Museum in Cambridgeshire,

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a former RAF base and now a magnet for visitors.

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Today, as we approach Remembrance Sunday,

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we are celebrating the heroes who fought for our freedom

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and paying tribute to the men and women

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who made the ultimate sacrifice.

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This is how the people remember.

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All week, I've been exploring some of the treasures here with former

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army officer Andy Torbet.

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And celebrities from the worlds of entertainment and broadcasting

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have been telling us the role their families played during the war.

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On today's programme, we remember the fallen.

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We hear from a family whose son was killed in Afghanistan.

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I was always there.

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And that was the hardest thing, not saying goodbye.

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Broadcaster Angela Rippon shares her father's wartime stories with us.

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And a piece of music written in the trenches 100 years ago

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is brought to life.

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Very, very emotional. Thank you so much.

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Good morning and welcome to Duxford.

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This weekend, thousands of people will pay their respects

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to the fallen at war memorials up and down the country.

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Our special guest today is someone who is acutely aware

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of the sacrifices families make for the security of the nation.

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Angela Rippon, welcome to Duxford. Thank you very much.

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Now, your dad missed the first few years of your life

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because of the war, didn't he? Oh, very much so, yes.

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My father was a Royal Marine and he had a very busy war,

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as his rack of medals show! I was spotting that on the sofa.

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He was a bit busy during the war because he was in Italy

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and Africa twice. The Pacific, the North Atlantic.

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He was on the Malta convoys.

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So he was all over the place and he didn't actually get back...

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I was born in 1944 and he didn't come back to England

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until the beginning of 1948 when I was three-and-a-half.

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And when I met him for the first time,

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I have a wonderful photograph of me meeting him on board the ship

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when he came back to his home port in Plymouth

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and I have a face on me like a plate of sour milk

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because of course I had been bought up by my mother, my granny

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and my aunt and I had never seen this man before.

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But he was very much the hero of my life,

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as I am sure an awful lot of young children at that time felt

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when I got to know him better.

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And I always say that my dad spent the rest of his life

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making up for the fact that he hadn't been around

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until I was three years old and he had missed all those baby years.

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Did it really affect your relationship with him?

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Oh, very much so. I became very, very close to my dad

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and I always feel...

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My mother couldn't have any more children after me, unfortunately,

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and I think my father being a very macho Royal Marine

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would have loved to have had a son. Instead he got me.

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He wanted me to be a young lady, but at the same time I always feel

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he helped to instil in me all of those qualities of self-reliance

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and courage and determination -

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all of the things that he would have wanted, as a man,

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to pass on to his son.

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And, um...I think they have stood me quite well,

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as you will appreciate, in the job that we do.

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Well, as you say, he had a very busy war

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and you're going to tell us plenty more about that in a moment.

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But first, in 2014 our troops withdrew from Afghanistan.

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It was the end of a costly chapter in a campaign which

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lasted 13 years with hundreds of British soldiers losing their lives.

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This is the story of one young man

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who served with the Mercian Regiment.

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'A guided tour around an army patrol base in Helmand province.'

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'Lance Corporal Jamie Webb recorded this video to

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'show his family back home what life was like in Afghanistan.'

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'Jamie's cheerfulness in adversity shone through in the letters

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'he sent home.'

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"Dear Mum and Dad and Luke, smiley face. Hope you are well and OK.

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"I received some air mail today with some letters.

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"It is quite a hot area, that means where helicopters can't land

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"because they have been targeted by Taliban.

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"Just counting the days till I am home again.

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"Mum, Dad and Luke, I love you all so much.

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"Love from Custard Cream Jamie."

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To tell the story of Jamie - he was brave.

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He was more than my brother, he was my best friend.

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And he was more than my best friend, he was my hero.

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A very loving little boy.

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He was into football, he used to do a lot of running at school,

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a very fit lad.

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Always very jolly person.

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A lovely young man.

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He was. He was lovely.

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He was a loving son to me and Sue.

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And to Luke, a loving brother.

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I'm very proud of Jamie.

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Jamie joined the Army when he was 18. He served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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I worried about him all the time.

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And when I spoke to him on the phone,

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I'd ask him how he was or what he was doing and then sometimes

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he couldn't tell you and he would say the base has been attacked.

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And then he'd say, "Not long until I'm home now, Luke."

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On his second tour in three years,

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the British withdrawal from Afghanistan was gaining pace.

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Jamie rang his family to tell them he would soon be heading home.

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He was on a high. Really happy to think it's over, the tour, like.

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But later that day, there was a knock at the door.

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Sue came upstairs and said, "There's a man at the door in a suit,

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"he wants to see you." And he came in.

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He explained that Jamie had been in a major incident.

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I said to him, "You'd better check his number

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"because I just spoke to him this morning."

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I said, "There's no way it could be my son. No way."

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He said that there was an insurgent attack on the base.

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And that a truck had been driven through the wall

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with explosives and chemicals.

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And it had gone through the wall and it blew it up.

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I couldn't stand the thought of not being with him.

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I wanted to know someone was with him when he died.

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That's what it was. He's never been without me.

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Anything, when he was poorly, when he was little.

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I was always there.

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And that was the hardest thing, not saying goodbye.

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We miss him terribly.

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A British soldier has been killed by insurgents in Afghanistan.

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Jamie's body was flown home to Cheshire.

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The people of Handforth lined the streets in his honour.

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Thousands, there was loads.

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It was covered all that side, all the other side of the streets.

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And all the children were in a line throwing roses on the coffin.

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It was just full. That was so much respect for my son.

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Jamie's name was recorded on the Bastion wall -

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a memorial standing in the Army's main base in Afghanistan.

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It has since been dismantled and recreated in Staffordshire.

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His family are going to see it.

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I think it'll be weird going to look at the memorial wall

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that was in Camp Bastion.

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To think that Jamie was looking at that, when his name's on there.

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Weird.

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It means a lot to have a memorial there for the fallen of Afghanistan.

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They gave everything.

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I will be proud of Jamie,

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he should be remembered but I would rather have him here.

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For me to go...

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It's hard but good.

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I'm proud. Such a lovely man.

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Heartbreaking.

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And later in the programme, we will be with the Webb family

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when the Bastion Memorial is unveiled

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in memory of those who died.

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Well, Angela, let's talk more about your father

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and what he did during the war.

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Did he talk much about his time with the Royal Marines? Um...

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I think that my father was similar to just about all of the men who

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came back from the Second World War, probably the First World War too,

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in that my dad talked about the fun times, and there were fun times,

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as you will know, in the Army and the Marines and the Navy.

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But he didn't talk very much about the terrible things that happened,

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not until he was well into his 80s when I sat him down

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with a tape recorder and said, "Come on, Daddy, I've got to know.

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"I'm a journalist, for crying out loud. I've got to know what you did."

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What was it like when he was recounting it?

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He hated talking about the fact that

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so many of his comrades were killed and lost,

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and I think that's perhaps the lasting impression

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that an awful lot of servicemen have -

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that they were the lucky ones to survive.

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When he was on the Malta convoys, his ship was ploughing through

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and others were being shot out of the water by the German

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air force, they were being attacked by submarines.

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He knew that people on ships who were comrades of his

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were going down and dying. He didn't want to talk about that.

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Angela, what was your dad's job on board the ship?

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He was on the guns, the big 16 inch guns.

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For instance, when he was in the Atlantic,

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he was part of the mission that sank the Bismarck

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and I think they had quite a hairy time of it

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because he was on the Rodney, which was a small battleship, and because

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the German big guns off the big German battleship were really

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reined in on the Admiral of the Fleet, my father...

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He loved to tell the story of how the captain of the Rodney was

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such a good sailor, he was able to sail underneath

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the range of the guns

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and the ship went along the bottom of the Bismarck and strafed along

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its water line and helped to sink it and then came out the other side.

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But it was a noisy job, an awful lot of his comrades went deaf

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which is how I learned to do sign language, because that was how

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my father, who didn't go deaf, used to be able to speak to his comrades

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because they all went deaf so he taught me the language.

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How extraordinary. And explain some of this,

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because you have this wonderful certificate here

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from the Japanese surrender.

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It was awarded to your father. Um...

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The reason I didn't see him until I was nearly three was

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because at the end of the war in Europe, his ship was assigned

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to the American forces in Japan where they were still fighting.

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It went on after the end of the war in Europe.

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And my father, being a British Royal Marine, was seconded to

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a group of American marines and when the Japanese surrendered,

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to mark the end of the Second World War, my father was there

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and he got this certificate saying it was

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presented at the "surrender of the Japanese Empire to

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"United Nations at Tokyo Bay on 2nd September 1945.

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"Issued to Marine John Rippon who was serving on HMS Newfoundland

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"on this great day of final victory."

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And this, along with this, is something I treasure very much.

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That is quite an unusual medal. This is a very unusual medal.

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It was a medal that he got when, with the Americans,

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they went on to an island in Yokohama harbour,

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which is where the two-men submarines, kamikazes, were trained.

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And when they attacked the island, it was abandoned,

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but one of my father's trophies of war was finding this medal which

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apparently is the medal the Japanese nation sent to the families of

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the kamikaze pilots who were not air pilots, but two-men submarine pilots.

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And I don't think there can be too many of those around

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so that is a unique memorial of my father's time in Japan,

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because it has the Japanese chrysanthemum in the middle,

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the anchor,

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and down on the bottom here, the two mini submarines.

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Amazing. Wow. Fantastic to see that.

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I'm not sure he should have taken it, really.

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But it has been in the family ever since! Angela, thank you.

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Well, now to the extraordinary story of a piece of music which was

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composed on a scrap of paper in the trenches of World War I.

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Historian Richard Van Emden has been investigating.

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Soldiers in the trenches had to cope with death,

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disease and destruction almost every single day.

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But there were moments of respite amid the carnage

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and men sought out any comfort to distract them from the battlefield.

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At the front line,

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many soldiers craved a reminder from home.

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Such a simple thing as music gave men the escape they needed

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from the horrors of war.

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I've come to the museum at the Royal Academy Of Music to discover

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more about the importance of music for soldiers in World War I.

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Joanna Tapp is the exhibition curator.

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So, what role did music play at the front line?

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It served all sorts of purposes from instilling pride

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and patriotism - military bands and religious music,

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to the more nostalgic reminders of home

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and the sort of music that soldiers would want to listen to

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when they got some downtime and were sitting around with

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their friends making music, listening to records.

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So, we have here a gramophone. Did they have these in the trenches?

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They did indeed, and it's called a trench gramophone

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because for the first time during the First World War,

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gramophones were made to be entirely portable and you could pick it up

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and carry it from camp to camp or dugout to dugout.

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It is a fantastic contraption and really gives that feeling of,

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if you had that playing in the dugout, of a little bit of home.

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That's right. That's one of the things that music can do.

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It can transport you to somewhere else.

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But one man in the trenches wasn't just listening to music,

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he was scoring it.

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Composer Harry Farrar served in the Royal Field Artillery

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in northern France.

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He survived the war and died aged 70.

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After his death, Harry's family discovered a diary

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he'd written on the front line.

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I'm meeting Harry's son John and grandson Nick to hear Harry's story.

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So John, did your father see much action?

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Well, he must have done, because on 24th April he was at Villers-Bretonneux.

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And he has written, "Jerry came over, fiercely exciting day.

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"Saw Jerry advancing and fired point-blank.

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"Machine gun bullets flying all around us."

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I think it was probably quite a pivotal point in the war

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because they pushed the Germans back. You are spot on.

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Your father was part of a very, very significant battle.

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The Germans were trying to push to take the strategic town of Amiens.

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And they were held up there. That was the critical point of this battle.

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So, during the fighting, did he lose any of his comrades?

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Yes, there's an entry in here where he says

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he loses three from one shell.

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"Corporal Watts, Sanderson, Lancaster killed with one shell.

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"Everyone felt pretty rotten." "Everyone felt pretty rotten."

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It is so understated, isn't it? I know, yes, it is.

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And I think that was the issue then, because you were losing so many friends.

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There was death all around, you couldn't dwell on it.

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No, you couldn't.

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The diary didn't just reveal the horrors Harry went through.

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Hidden within it, the Farrars came across a special piece of paper.

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In the diary, we found this little piece of music

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which he has written while he was out in France.

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So, one could imagine him trying to take his mind off what he has seen and done...

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I would imagine so. ..finds a bit of sheet music and starts composing.

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There is one entry here where he says he found a piano,

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a grand, and enjoyed myself "up to the mark," he says.

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So, it could very well have been he played whatever he liked to play

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and may have written this piece of music at the same time.

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He must have had an incredible mind-set to be able to block out

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all those horrors and to concentrate on the better things in life.

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Quite extraordinary, really. But he was a very talented musician.

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No doubt about that. And went on to make a good living out of it.

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MUSIC PLAYS

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After the war, Harry had a successful career at De Wolfe Music

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composing over 700 pieces for film and television,

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including this one, but the piece of music Harry wrote

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almost 100 years ago is being given a new lease of life.

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And we have arranged a surprise for the Farrar family.

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The score that your father wrote that we found in the rear

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of his diary has been put to an orchestral arrangement

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by De Wolfe, and you are going to hear it right now for the first time.

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This is going to be amazing.

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I'm sure we are going to enjoy it very, very much,

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and remember it for a long, long time.

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SOMBRE ORCHESTRAL MUSIC

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That was awesome. Very, very emotional. Thank you so much.

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Thank you very, very much. You can see what effect that has had on me.

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Quite incredible.

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It emphasises the power of music and what it can do to people,

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and also how fortunate we were that he survived.

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So many of his colleagues did fall, and their legacies will

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hopefully live on with this piece of music as well.

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And later in the programme you can hear the whole piece performed

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here at the Imperial War Museum.

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Now, I am in a hangar here at Duxford

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and this is where they restore these beautiful planes,

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the Spitfires, and one of the engineers here is Mo Overall.

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Lovely to see you. How long does it take to restore one of these?

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It takes about 12 guys up to two years to restore one of these.

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Two years! So it is painstaking work? Yeah.

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Where do you get all the parts from?

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We try and source as many original parts as we can,

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parts that we can't source we make in-house here.

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We have our own machine shop so we can replicate all the parts we need to.

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Are they really difficult to refurbish and rebuild?

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Yeah, they are. Parts are becoming ever so rare now

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so a lot of effort is put in to making these parts.

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You put all this effort in but these planes are really worth

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a lot of money. This one just got sold, how much for?

0:19:460:19:50

It sold for ?3.1 million at auction in July.

0:19:500:19:53

?3.1 million! Wow. Because it is so rare.

0:19:530:19:56

Yeah, it's a Mark I aeroplane.

0:19:560:19:58

There's not many around,

0:19:580:19:59

especially that have been restored to this level of detail.

0:19:590:20:02

They're wonderful planes, wonderful, beautiful planes to look at

0:20:020:20:06

and they just inspired such affection and awe from both the pilots and the public.

0:20:060:20:11

That's right, wherever you go, whatever air show you go to,

0:20:110:20:14

everybody wants to see a Spitfire.

0:20:140:20:16

The noise and the shape is just fantastic.

0:20:160:20:18

And you yourself have just started flying them

0:20:180:20:21

after many, many years working here. What has that been like?

0:20:210:20:24

It's a dream come true to actually be in control of a machine

0:20:240:20:28

that you know so much about mechanically is fantastic.

0:20:280:20:31

Absolutely fantastic. Better than you imagined? Yes. In what way?

0:20:310:20:35

Just everything. It is actually better when you have landed, when it is over with

0:20:350:20:38

and you can sit back and think what you've just done.

0:20:380:20:41

Yeah, it's great. Well, what a wonderful job

0:20:410:20:44

and what a huge responsibility to keep these things going.

0:20:440:20:47

Mo, thank you. Thank you.

0:20:470:20:49

Next year marks the 100th anniversary of

0:20:560:20:59

the Battle Of The Somme - one of the bloodiest episodes in human history.

0:20:590:21:04

More than one million men were wounded or killed in the battle

0:21:040:21:08

and it also left its mark on the landscape.

0:21:080:21:11

The One Show's Joe Crowley has been to France on a pilgrimage.

0:21:110:21:15

Richard Dunning's en route to his property in France.

0:21:210:21:25

Have you ever owned a holiday home or a villa with a pool or a gite?

0:21:250:21:30

Yeah, I've had those and they are not half as interesting as this.

0:21:300:21:34

He bought it 37 years ago, but it's no holiday home.

0:21:350:21:39

It's a massive crater formed in the First World War.

0:21:390:21:43

Do you remember how you first felt when you set eyes on it?

0:21:430:21:48

Yeah, I'd seen a photograph and read a little bit

0:21:480:21:51

but the sheer size of it, I was just absolutely blown away.

0:21:510:21:56

I have to say, that is exactly how it is.

0:21:560:21:59

I didn't really expect to feel anything looking at a crater,

0:21:590:22:03

but the depth and the sheer volume of earth that's been displaced

0:22:030:22:06

is phenomenal.

0:22:060:22:08

'100 metres wide,

0:22:080:22:09

'the crater was formed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme.

0:22:090:22:13

'British miners, like these, tunnelled through

0:22:130:22:16

'no-man's-land to pack 27 tonnes of explosives under German lines.

0:22:160:22:21

'It was witnessed by pilot Cecil Lewis.'

0:22:230:22:25

Suddenly the whole earth heaved, and up from the ground came great

0:22:250:22:31

dark, cone-shaped...lifts of earth, up to 3,000-5,000 feet.

0:22:310:22:37

And we watched this and then, a moment later, of course,

0:22:370:22:40

we struck the repercussion wave of the blast

0:22:400:22:42

and it flung us right the way backwards.

0:22:420:22:44

On the day of fighting that followed,

0:22:460:22:48

over 20,000 soldiers would die.

0:22:480:22:50

Sometimes the word apocalyptic is used, isn't it? It is a wound.

0:22:530:22:57

And you see the power

0:22:570:22:59

and the force that man has brought to bear on his fellow man.

0:22:590:23:03

When you first announced you were buying a crater,

0:23:030:23:06

what did your friends and family think of you?

0:23:060:23:09

I think they all thought I was mad.

0:23:090:23:11

With the German trench obliterated, British troops captured the crater.

0:23:110:23:16

Richard has disturbing evidence.

0:23:160:23:18

This I found 30-odd years ago.

0:23:180:23:20

A British rifle, and you can see the force of the explosion

0:23:200:23:25

that has caused this damage. It's incredible, isn't it?

0:23:250:23:28

The barrel has been swept right round! Yeah.

0:23:280:23:31

And what happened to him, we don't know, other than something dreadful.

0:23:310:23:36

In terms of the personal thing of this place,

0:23:360:23:39

one of the veterans that I got to know found this in the crater.

0:23:390:23:45

It's a New Testament and Psalms. Ernest Mitchell.

0:23:450:23:49

It links one straight the way back to young Ernest.

0:23:490:23:53

It says the whole thing is to do with people.

0:23:530:23:57

In buying the crater, Richard saved it from becoming a landfill site.

0:23:570:24:02

Despite 200,000 visitors a year, he refuses to cash in.

0:24:020:24:07

No money will ever be made from this. No personal gain.

0:24:070:24:11

Why won't you say how much you bought it for?

0:24:110:24:14

Because it is the one most asked question I get when I'm here.

0:24:140:24:19

And I say, "Where you're standing, an 18-year-old boy bled to death.

0:24:190:24:23

"Where you're standing, where you're standing.

0:24:230:24:26

"Don't ask me what it cost, ask them."

0:24:260:24:28

By the end of the war,

0:24:280:24:30

more than a million men had been killed or wounded on the Somme.

0:24:300:24:34

For Richard, the crater's now a symbol of reconciliation.

0:24:340:24:38

He's giving us rare access to the epicentre.

0:24:380:24:41

Do you know, I used to race my son down here when he was about 12.

0:24:410:24:45

Yeah? Don't know what's happened in just 40 years(!)

0:24:450:24:49

Were all the bodies recovered,

0:24:490:24:51

or would they still be in this area, do you think?

0:24:510:24:54

There were 1,000 bodies put in here in the week after the battle.

0:24:540:24:58

The problem then is that shells were landing in here

0:24:580:25:01

and people were getting blown apart and buried.

0:25:010:25:04

You know, they're still around.

0:25:040:25:06

If one kid on every coach just thinks, you know,

0:25:060:25:10

live life a little kinder,

0:25:100:25:11

a little more peaceful, a little more understanding,

0:25:110:25:15

and I think all of the men who fell here

0:25:150:25:18

would understand that absolutely.

0:25:180:25:20

Have you ever regretted purchasing this crater?

0:25:200:25:23

Never. People say, "How did you get the crater?" It got me.

0:25:230:25:28

One of the real treasures here at Duxford is this.

0:25:360:25:39

An incredibly rare Mark 1 spitfire.

0:25:390:25:42

Mo Overall, you were in charge of restoring it.

0:25:420:25:45

It was based here, wasn't it, during World War II?

0:25:450:25:47

Yes, it was based here with 19 Squadron,

0:25:470:25:49

actually before the Battle of Britain began,

0:25:490:25:52

and, unfortunately, it was lost on operations

0:25:520:25:54

when it was covering the evacuation of troops from Dunkirk

0:25:540:25:58

and it force-landed and crashed on the beach

0:25:580:26:00

where it remained for the next 40 years.

0:26:000:26:02

On a beach in France? Yes. And it stayed there for 40 years?

0:26:020:26:05

You've actually got bits of the plane that were salvaged?

0:26:050:26:09

Yes. This is an example of some of the parts that we got

0:26:090:26:12

when the project came to us. Wow.

0:26:120:26:14

You can see how badly corroded it was.

0:26:140:26:17

How much of it were you able to save? How much of this is original?

0:26:170:26:20

Well, a lot of the parts, internal, were stainless steel, so we were

0:26:200:26:23

able to recover a lot of those and we acquired many original

0:26:230:26:25

Spitfire parts to incorporate into this build.

0:26:250:26:29

Well, let's put that down now and come round here to the cockpit

0:26:290:26:33

because this plane has actually only just very recently

0:26:330:26:36

been donated to the museum,

0:26:360:26:38

here. It was donated to the museum by its American owner,

0:26:380:26:42

handed over in July this year, and you can see here

0:26:420:26:45

a rather well known name. Prince William, 9th of July 2015.

0:26:450:26:49

And the cockpit is just beautiful, isn't it?

0:26:490:26:52

It's fantastic, have a jump in and have a look. Can I? Yeah, certainly.

0:26:520:26:56

Wow.

0:26:580:27:00

That is amazing. It is beautiful. The smell of it,

0:27:000:27:05

it's fuel, isn't it, it's oil and leather.

0:27:050:27:07

You get a real good mix of all the old castor oils

0:27:070:27:10

and different fluids that we used in there.

0:27:100:27:14

Wow. And you feel very cocooned once you're in here.

0:27:140:27:17

When you get the door shut

0:27:170:27:19

and the canopy closed, you really become part of the machine.

0:27:190:27:22

It's beautifully restored, what an amazing job you've done.

0:27:220:27:25

Thank you.

0:27:250:27:27

Still to come on today's programme.

0:27:270:27:30

Prince Harry unveils a memorial to the fallen in Afghanistan.

0:27:300:27:34

The memorial was a place where anyone could go,

0:27:360:27:40

to reflect and remember their comrades.

0:27:400:27:42

We'll hear that piece of music written in the trenches

0:27:440:27:47

performed in full.

0:27:470:27:49

And courage in Helmand.

0:27:520:27:54

We're joined by a soldier

0:27:540:27:55

given one of the highest awards for bravery.

0:27:550:27:58

Every year, nearly half a million visitors pour through the doors

0:28:070:28:11

of the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, for many different reasons.

0:28:110:28:15

We've been finding out what's brought some of today's visitors here.

0:28:150:28:19

There is literally something for everybody here,

0:28:220:28:25

of all ages. It just can't fail to please people.

0:28:250:28:29

Obviously, the sadness of the world wars, but it's just something that

0:28:290:28:35

everybody should come to.

0:28:350:28:37

It's nice and spacious, plenty of walking around,

0:28:400:28:43

but some of the exhibits are just unbelievable. I didn't expect

0:28:430:28:47

to be that many aeroplanes in there and in such good condition as well.

0:28:470:28:53

Where they were renovating the planes, that was very interesting

0:28:560:28:59

as well. You can actually see people working on them

0:28:590:29:02

and the complexity of the aircraft

0:29:020:29:04

with the bits taken off them, that was quite something.

0:29:040:29:07

I started out as an apprentice aircraft technician

0:29:100:29:14

and I wanted to come here, look round, see if there was an aircraft

0:29:140:29:17

of the type I was engaged in,

0:29:170:29:19

and that was the de Havilland Sea Vixen.

0:29:190:29:23

And there is one on display in one of the hangars over there,

0:29:230:29:26

so I was quite interested to see that.

0:29:260:29:29

When I looked at the age of the plane,

0:29:290:29:31

it made me realise how old I'm getting.

0:29:310:29:33

Well, Angela's still with us.

0:29:410:29:43

We're also joined by Bombardier Gary Prout.

0:29:430:29:45

Now, Angela is here with her father's medals. I know, Gary,

0:29:450:29:49

you are very proud of one you were awarded in 2010. Tell us about that.

0:29:490:29:53

It's called a Conspicuous Gallantry Cross,

0:29:530:29:55

so it's one below the Victoria Cross and one above

0:29:550:29:58

the Military Cross, so it's a very significant award. Huge award.

0:29:580:30:03

And it was for an incident that happened in 2009.

0:30:030:30:06

Yeah. It was 14th March, 2009.

0:30:060:30:09

We were just south of Musa Qala,

0:30:090:30:12

so it's a quite an infamous area of Helmand.

0:30:120:30:15

We were pushing into an enemy stronghold

0:30:150:30:17

that had been well established. They had underground tunnels,

0:30:170:30:21

multiple firing positions, engaging us through cover.

0:30:210:30:24

We broke through, we got in to where we believed the enemy were,

0:30:240:30:28

then, out of the blue, massive explosion went off.

0:30:280:30:31

I didn't know what it was to begin with, and then the call came over

0:30:310:30:35

the radio that we had a casualty. I pushed forward,

0:30:350:30:39

and I was looking for the casualty,

0:30:390:30:42

and it became apparent that he was still out in the actual ambush

0:30:420:30:46

in that area where the enemy were engaging.

0:30:460:30:48

Ran round the corner and I bumped into one of the platoon sergeants,

0:30:480:30:53

Al Higgins, and asked Al where the casualty was

0:30:530:30:57

and he pointed out into the open ground.

0:30:570:30:59

And it was then that I seen one of our guys laid out there.

0:30:590:31:04

So...

0:31:050:31:07

..without really thinking, I thought we need to get to him...

0:31:090:31:14

So, um...

0:31:140:31:16

Still really hard to talk about, isn't it?

0:31:160:31:19

It's a big part of my life.

0:31:190:31:21

So I just moved out into the open ground,

0:31:210:31:25

and...I got to him...

0:31:250:31:28

and I was pulling him, and I heard somebody beside me,

0:31:280:31:32

and Al had got out to me. So Al didn't get any recognition

0:31:320:31:39

but he was with me throughout that whole event. It was quickly apparent

0:31:390:31:44

that we couldn't do anything for the casualty, Chris,

0:31:440:31:48

but what we then had to do was turn our focus to the enemy.

0:31:480:31:51

The enemy were maybe 20, 30 metres away from us

0:31:510:31:54

just over a wall, and we were in a tricky position.

0:31:540:31:59

So, between me and Al,

0:31:590:32:01

we...put up a bit of a fight.

0:32:010:32:04

We got Chris loaded onto the wagon

0:32:040:32:06

and I can remember someone saying we should get in the wagon,

0:32:060:32:11

and extract back but me and Al looked at one another

0:32:110:32:14

and we were like, "No,

0:32:140:32:16

"the rest of the guys are across there,"

0:32:160:32:18

so we ran back through that killing zone again, and...

0:32:180:32:22

All I can say was we had a bubble.

0:32:230:32:25

We had a bubble - something was protecting us on that day.

0:32:250:32:27

I can see how difficult it is for you even just

0:32:270:32:30

to retell that story and how raw it all still is.

0:32:300:32:33

I started talking to new recruits in the armed forces

0:32:330:32:37

and it was one of the platoon commanders that got me

0:32:370:32:40

to talk to them, and the next day we went to the National Arboretum.

0:32:400:32:45

I was stood behind the young guys,

0:32:450:32:47

they didn't know that I was there, and they were looking through

0:32:470:32:50

the list of names and one of them pointed up and goes,

0:32:500:32:52

"There's Chris." And as soon as he said, "There's Chris,"

0:32:520:32:55

I thought this is an important story to tell,

0:32:550:32:58

and that's kind of kicked it off. Um...

0:32:580:33:02

I think sometimes we distance ourselves from the true emotions

0:33:020:33:06

of these kind of things. I think it's important that we deliver it in

0:33:060:33:10

a way that's realistic, and we don't glorify it into something it isn't.

0:33:100:33:15

It's important that we tell the truth.

0:33:150:33:17

On operational tours, you see acts of bravery

0:33:170:33:21

and courage all the time,

0:33:210:33:23

that don't always get recognition.

0:33:230:33:25

That's right. If you go even from the youngest member of that patrol,

0:33:250:33:29

a couple of hours later, he was out

0:33:290:33:31

putting one foot in front of the other going back against the enemy,

0:33:310:33:35

where he had just seen that event happening.

0:33:350:33:38

And, you know, in the heat of the moment, you can justify

0:33:380:33:41

doing those kind of things. Adrenaline kicks in and you go.

0:33:410:33:44

But whenever you come to a couple of hours later,

0:33:440:33:47

and everything's settled in, that takes a great amount of courage

0:33:470:33:51

for you to be able to walk up to that gate and carry on.

0:33:510:33:53

It's a loyalty to your friends

0:33:530:33:55

and that's what it's all about, at the end of the day.

0:33:550:33:58

You just want to do as much as you can for your friends around you.

0:33:580:34:01

And the thing on Remembrance Sunday

0:34:010:34:02

is that it really does unite the generations, doesn't it?

0:34:020:34:05

People who've fought in different conflicts,

0:34:050:34:07

all kinds of different ages. I know that you used to go

0:34:070:34:09

to Remembrance Sunday events with your father.

0:34:090:34:11

I did indeed, and he was still going to memorials well into his 80s,

0:34:110:34:16

and it was terrific because all the young men that were now

0:34:160:34:19

serving in the Royal Marines would be there as well,

0:34:190:34:21

and it's sharing those stories, isn't it, and I think that's

0:34:210:34:24

when perhaps old soldiers, and young soldiers, like you,

0:34:240:34:27

however difficult it was for you to tell that story,

0:34:270:34:30

you find it's easier because you're with people of a like mind,

0:34:300:34:33

and you start from the same foundation, from the same base.

0:34:330:34:37

You can all understand what you did and why you did it, and you can

0:34:370:34:40

share those emotions and they become real for you again, don't they?

0:34:400:34:45

They do, yes. Angela, and Bombardier Gary Prout, thank you both so much

0:34:450:34:48

for telling your story.

0:34:480:34:50

Well, earlier in the programme

0:34:500:34:53

we heard about Lance Corporal Jamie Webb

0:34:530:34:55

who was killed by Taliban insurgents in 2013.

0:34:550:34:59

His name was recorded on a memorial wall

0:34:590:35:02

at the UK's headquarters in Afghanistan.

0:35:020:35:05

To pay tribute to all the men and women who lost their lives,

0:35:050:35:09

that memorial has been recreated here in Britain,

0:35:090:35:12

and Jamie's family are going to its unveiling.

0:35:120:35:14

The National Memorial Arboretum in Staffordshire.

0:35:180:35:22

Today, the Bastion Wall is being rededicated,

0:35:250:35:29

and among those attending the ceremony are the family

0:35:290:35:32

of Lance Corporal Jamie Webb, who was killed in Helmand province in 2013.

0:35:320:35:37

It's important that the sacrifice is remembered of all the fallen.

0:35:370:35:42

And the Camp Bastion memorial is always there for future generations

0:35:420:35:46

and the next generation along.

0:35:460:35:48

When the family arrive, some of the men who served with Jamie

0:35:490:35:52

are on duty for the ceremony.

0:35:520:35:55

Can I shake your hand? Thank you.

0:35:550:35:58

Thank you.

0:35:590:36:01

Nice to meet you.

0:36:010:36:03

I want to thank you all very much,

0:36:060:36:08

I love you all very much.

0:36:080:36:11

I do.

0:36:110:36:13

I just wish Jamie was with you. I know. I do.

0:36:130:36:16

I think you're fantastic,

0:36:160:36:18

all of you, what you went through, very brave.

0:36:180:36:21

He was a soldier that would break down barriers,

0:36:210:36:24

he was the guy who, if a new soldier came along,

0:36:240:36:27

he would be the one to go over and make him feel welcome.

0:36:270:36:29

Oh, there's the wall, look.

0:36:330:36:35

Jamie's name will be one of 453 being rededicated

0:36:400:36:44

on the new Bastion Wall,

0:36:440:36:46

a replica of the one which stood in Afghanistan.

0:36:460:36:49

It will join 300 other memorials in the Arboretum.

0:36:490:36:53

It's the first time Jamie's family have seen his name on it.

0:36:550:37:00

To look at a wall that Jamie would have once seen,

0:37:150:37:19

in Afghanistan on Camp Bastion.

0:37:190:37:21

He must have walked past it and paid his respects to them all,

0:37:220:37:27

because he lost lots of his friends.

0:37:270:37:30

He wouldn't think he'd be added with them.

0:37:300:37:33

Forces families are joined at the rededication ceremony

0:37:370:37:41

by the Prime Minister and Prince Harry,

0:37:410:37:43

who himself saw action in Afghanistan.

0:37:430:37:46

The memorial was a place where anyone could go to reflect

0:37:480:37:53

and remember their comrades,

0:37:530:37:54

whether individually or part of a formal parade.

0:37:540:37:58

This memorial reflects the spirit of the old one,

0:37:580:38:02

containing, as it does, the original brass plaques,

0:38:020:38:06

a large piece of the original stonework,

0:38:060:38:09

the original cross,

0:38:090:38:11

Afghan pebble chippings,

0:38:110:38:13

and the last Union flag to fly over the memorial in Camp Bastion.

0:38:130:38:18

HE PLAYS LAST POST

0:38:200:38:23

At the going down of the sun and in the morning, we will remember them.

0:38:310:38:37

ALL: We will remember them.

0:38:370:38:39

I would like to thank all the people that made this happen.

0:38:550:38:59

It means a lot. To help keep the fallens' memory alive forever.

0:38:590:39:04

Cos it means a lot, and it means a lot for the soldiers as well.

0:39:040:39:07

Yeah. Because of their friends, comrades.

0:39:070:39:11

They were together through thick and thin over there.

0:39:110:39:14

Brothers in arms forever.

0:39:160:39:18

Well, that's nearly it for today's programme but, before we go,

0:39:250:39:30

back to a piece of music written on a scrap of paper

0:39:300:39:33

in the trenches of World War I.

0:39:330:39:35

It was recently discovered in the war time diaries of soldier

0:39:350:39:38

and composer Harry Farrar, and it's been christened

0:39:380:39:41

The Hymn To The Fallen.

0:39:410:39:43

It's performed today on the viola by Levine Andrade.

0:39:430:39:46

MUSIC: "Hymn To The Fallen" by Levine Andrade

0:39:480:39:50

APPLAUSE

0:42:350:42:38

Hymn To The Fallen.

0:42:440:42:46

Well, we've come to the end of our week of The People Remember

0:42:460:42:49

in Duxford. Thank you very much to our special guest Angela Rippon.

0:42:490:42:52

Well, thank you for inviting me.

0:42:520:42:54

I have to say it was particularly moving sitting next to Gary,

0:42:540:42:57

listening to him relive so emotionally that story,

0:42:570:43:01

and I think when we're doing a programme around remembrance

0:43:010:43:05

and Remembrance Sunday, it's really important to have that memory

0:43:050:43:10

of what it was really like for the men and the women who lived through

0:43:100:43:14

all of those really traumatic experiences.

0:43:140:43:17

I found that very poignant. It was incredibly moving

0:43:170:43:20

and you can see highlights from the past five days of The People Remember

0:43:200:43:24

on Remembrance Sunday in a special programme on BBC One.

0:43:240:43:27

But, from all of us here at the Imperial War Museum,

0:43:270:43:30

thanks for watching and goodbye. Goodbye. Goodbye.

0:43:300:43:33

As Remembrance Sunday approaches, Sophie Raworth and former army officer Andy Torbet are joined by broadcaster Angela Rippon to remember the fallen. Angela reveals that she didn't meet her dad properly until she was three years old because he was serving abroad as a royal marine.

Soldier Gary Prout recalls the incredible act of bravery in Afghanistan which led to him being awarded with the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross. A family mourning the loss of their son in Afghanistan attend the unveiling of a memorial to honour all those servicemen and women who lost their lives. Sophie discovers the painstaking work that goes into restoring Spitfires, and there's a world premiere of a piece of music that was written in the trenches of World War I.


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