Tin Dancing Shoes It's My Shout: Short Films from Wales


Tin Dancing Shoes

Tin Dancing Shoes: Series of short films. A young soldier seeks to impress his love at the local village dance before he is mobilised for war.


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Transcript


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-WOMAN:

-Hi, love.

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Catrin.

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Yes, Stanley?

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I saved you this, if you'd like some.

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Erm, we could go together.

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If you like.

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Before I leave.

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-I'd like that.

-SHE LAUGHS

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If you're sure you can get your feet in order.

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SHE LAUGHS

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MAN LAUGHS

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You have picked a hell of a partner for your final dance.

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Mm-hm.

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Hey, there's a foreigner advertising dancing lessons

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at the end of my street, if you're interested.

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A foreigner? No.

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Fine, mess up in front of Catrin and the whole village, then.

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HE LAUGHS

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Dancing lessons from a foreigner?

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-What are you thinking?

-I'm not thrilled about it either.

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People will talk, Stanley.

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Look, it's for the best, Mum.

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Don't you think it's a bit of an insult to your father?

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What would he say?

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He's not here, is he?

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Well, if you feel that strongly, take the lessons.

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But why go to all this trouble and money

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when you're just going to leave anyway?

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Good evening.

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Erm, I've heard you're advertising dancing lessons.

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For girls.

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I only give lessons to girls.

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How much are they?

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I told you.

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Please.

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So, the key to the waltz are three steps.

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One,

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two, three.

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One, two, three.

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One, two, three. One, two, three.

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One, two, three.

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One, two, three. You understand?

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-Erm...

-Good. You try.

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One...

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two, three.

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One, two, three.

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One, two, three.

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One, two... Uh.

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-Sorry.

-Silly boy.

-Sorry, sorry.

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No wonder you need my help. You are all feet.

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And again.

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One...

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So why are you in this dump?

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I mean, nothing ever happens.

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It's stifling. It's just the same maddening routine.

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But it's safe.

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That's important, surely.

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Can't we dance to something more modern?

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My son played this for our anniversary.

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Such a talented boy.

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Just like his father.

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Oh, Dietrich.

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Hold on, that's a German name.

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-You're German, aren't you?

-Stanley, it's not that simple.

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I think it's time we finish early, don't you?

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Let me explain.

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Nah, you've done all the explaining, Jerry.

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Bad enough you're getting lessons from a foreigner, but a Jerry?

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-People are gossiping already.

-I know it looks bad.

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You're joining up to fight them,

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not getting dancing tips from them.

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Do you know the trouble you're getting into?

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Just calm down.

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I will not be made a pariah by association, Stanley.

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Drop her or drop me.

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My husband got this for our engagement.

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Before the regime change.

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Before they crushed us for being different.

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We were able to escape.

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They got my family.

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And this...

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This reminds me they are always with me.

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Those are your father's shoes.

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You're not wearing them.

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You'll ruin them.

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Stop treating Dad like he's a ghost!

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They're all I've got left of him, Stanley!

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Dad was right to join up.

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Just like I am.

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There's another woman living a few streets away, just like you.

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Obsessed with keepsakes of loved ones.

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I wouldn't talk to one of those people.

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People your father fought against!

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If you understood,

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that's why I've got to fight THOSE people.

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I'm going to do the right thing tonight.

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UPBEAT MUSIC PLAYS

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PEOPLE LAUGH AND TALK

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APPLAUSE

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SLOW MUSIC PLAYS

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TALKING AND LAUGHTER STOPS

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PEOPLE RESUME TALKING

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Tin Dancing Shoes is unusual in having been shot in 1940s style,

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utilising the historical village of Laugharne, west Wales.

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Authenticity is key to the film,

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especially when it comes to period detail.

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Hi, I'm the director for Tin Dancing Shoes,

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which is It's My Shout's first-ever film set in the Second World War.

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When I applied to be a director for It's My Shout this year,

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there was a particular script that jumped out at me,

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which was Tin Dancing Shoes.

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And the first reason was because it was set in the 1940s

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and I've always had a weird gravitation towards that era.

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Erm, I think because I'm really interested in

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the genealogy of my family and their connection to World War II.

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Mess up in front of Catrin and the whole village, then.

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Cut there, thank you.

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The instant thing that jumped out to me of the script was

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this lovely, homely feel of everything feeling quite rural,

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quite small, close-knit kind of community,

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as opposed to a, kind of, big cityscape

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or a big Hollywood '40s film.

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I wanted it to feel a lot more low-key,

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just so they could really concentrate on the relationships.

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Homely is a fair description of the set

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chosen for the final dance scene,

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Laugharne's very own museum of '40s memorabilia,

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known as the Tin Shed.

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Seimon Pugh-Jones at the Tin Shed Museum is

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a long-term family friend of ours

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and when I started studying film many moons ago,

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erm, I knew that he would be really helpful

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because he's worked in the industry himself

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and he's also got this same love of this era.

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Also, because we're very passionate

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about film-making, and theatre, and music,

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we found that the Tin Shed, as a location,

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has worked really well for quite a few productions.

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We're not setting it in a place which is particularly affluent.

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It's a village which is, you know, very make-do-and-mend,

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and no-one's got a lot of money rolling about

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so it's all, kind of, you wear one dress over and over again

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and you wear, you know, one tie over and over again.

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Everything's worn to the hilt.

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It was a lot more uniform.

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Everybody wore the same kind of style.

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Whereas nowadays,

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you can wear anything, literally.

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Trying to find original vintage clothing is quite hard.

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It's quite hard to find good original stuff

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that's in the condition where it can be worn for actors.

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So you had these lovely tea dresses that were all very dull colours,

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your hair was always shoved up in a headscarf or whatever

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cos you needed it out of your face

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if you're going to be working in ammunitions.

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So there were so many little touches like that

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that me and the art department

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and the costume department have had to keep a really close communication

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because I'm a real stickler for authenticity

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and I'll be really upset if I notice something's wrong.

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SHE LAUGH

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Here we are on the set of the final scene of the film.

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It's the village barn dance

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and we're very fortunate in the fact that we've got this location,

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which is absolutely ideal.

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The sort of thing's we've had to do, though, is take out of vision

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any 21st-century stuff.

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And in creating an authentic feel for the scene,

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Ellen was able to draw on

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the memories of people who lived in Laugharne in the '40s

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and remembered the wartime dances.

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That was the part of the week, of the year,

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or however often they'd have a village dance,

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that everyone would come together

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and everyone would just have a real moment of happiness.

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And in those times, as well, especially in the Second World War,

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you know, people didn't know what was going to happen

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-the next day, did they?

-No, no, no.

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As I said, dancing, that's all we had.

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-We had to go to church, as well, on a Sunday, mind you.

-Yeah.

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But...

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..there was nothing else to do.

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-You know, phoning boys in the kiosk.

-SHE LAUGHS

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Music and dancing and a bit of romancing.

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-Oh, yeah, yeah.

-HE LAUGHS

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-Good days.

-Good days, happy times.

-Yeah.

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-Cut!

-Wonderful.

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-Thank you.

-We loved it.

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Give yourselves a round of applause.

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-Thank you, everyone, so much.

-That's a wrap.

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CHEERING AND APPLAUSE

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Filmed in Laugharne and set in the 1940s, Tin Dancing Shoes is about a young soldier seeking to impress his love at the local village dance before he is mobilised for war. But the waltz is not the only thing that Stanley has to learn.

Followed by a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the film which is part of the It's My Shout production training scheme.


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