South Bargain Hunt


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South

Antiques challenge. Naval epaulettes and a catapult are among the items bought by bargain hunters shopping in Marlborough, guided by experts Mark Stacey and Phillip Allwood.


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We're visiting Wiltshire today, famous for its pre-historic sites.

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Now, I doubt our teams today will find anything quite that old

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but antiques is the name of our game so let's go Bargain Hunting!

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Our teams will be Bargain Hunting today here in the market town of Marlborough.

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In 1653 there was the Great Fire Of Marlborough

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that practically burnt the whole place down.

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And when they re-built it, the High Street became known as the widest in England.

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And it certainly is wide.

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Today we've come to the Marlborough Parade Antiques Centre

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where our Bargain Hunters will have £300 and one hour to find three items.

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Let's hope they know what they're doing when they splash the cash

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as the three items will then be sold at auction.

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The pair that makes the most or loses the least will be crowned the winners.

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Five, seventy...

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all done.

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We have a plethora of globe trotters on Bargain Hunt today.

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Welcome, teams.

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Very nice to see you. We've got Chris and Glyn for the Blues

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and Diane and Carol for the Reds.

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Now, you girls. How do you know each other?

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I was invited to a barbecue by my cousin and she was already a friend of Carol's.

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-So I met Carol, and we've been friends ever since.

-How many years ago is that?

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-About 12 years.

-That's pretty good...

-Not bad!

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Not bad! Now you've recently been away haven't you, Diane?

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Yes. I came back about three weeks ago from a Caribbean Cruise for two weeks, which was very nice.

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-Very good.

-Back to this cold weather!

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Yes. And what about your favourite hobby? What is that?

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Um, horse riding. Horses in general.

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-And what do you collect?

-Beswick horses!

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Inevitable, isn't it! And how many have you got?

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-I did have over 200.

-Did you really?

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But I wheeled and dealed a few a few years ago and I'm down to about 80 now.

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Did you do all right with your dealing?

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Yes, it paid for a holiday one year with the profits.

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Pretty good then. Excellent.

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-Now, Carol, you're an Administrative Assistant for Metric?

-That's right.

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You used to sell houses.

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-Do you think that's going to help you today?

-I think so.

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With my negotiating skills...yes.

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-You're going to make a great deal or two then. Is that right?

-I hope so.

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-Now, you haven't always lived in Britain, have you?

-No. In '89 to '93 I lived in The Far East.

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-A year in Hong Kong and three in Singapore.

-Was that good fun?

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Lovely. It was with my husband's company

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-but missed the family so I wanted to come home.

-You had to come home.

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I had to come back, yes.

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-Did you do a lot of buying and selling when you were out East?

-Used to do a bit of dealing, yes.

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Used to go down the back streets and get little trinkets.

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Um, in Singapore we used to go to a pottery.

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-And we used to go to little barrow stalls and elephants.

-That's handy isn't it?

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It was. But the thing is now, you can get them in any do-it-yourself store just as cheap!

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-That's what's changed though over the years.

-I know.

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You girls want to do a bit of unzipping before we move over to the Blues, don't you?

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-We do.

-OK then. Show us your chests.

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Ah! Ha ha ha!

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Is that a hint as to which expert you'd like today, I ask myself?

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Anyway, now for the Blues.

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-Chris and Glyn, how long have you been married for?

-35 years in August.

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Have you? And how did you meet?

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I'm from Liverpool. Glyn went to college in Liverpool

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and was actually in digs in my mum's best friend's house.

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-Right.

-So, that was quite handy!

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-Yes, new students in town!

-Yes.

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-So you were down there like...

-No, I just happened to be at my friend's.

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And you popped in, and you met.

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-And that was it?

-That's right.

-Yeah.

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And you married shortly thereafter?

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Yes, so that I could go to sea with Glyn, because you had to be married.

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I went to sea with Glyn for two years.

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-Did you really? That was romantic, isn't it?

-It was fabulous.

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-Sharing the same bunk and everything.

-Absolutely!

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-Brilliant. Now Glyn, you're retired now, but you worked for the same company for 32 years?

-That's right.

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-What did you do with them?

-I was selling marine lubricants.

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And do you collect anything?

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I've been collecting marathon medals and trophies...

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-Because you're a runner?

-I've run a 193 marathons.

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-You're fit as a flea then!

-No, I was fit. I don't think I'm so fit now!

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And what sort of things will you have your eye out for today then?

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Well, we like Japanese ware.

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So we're going to, have our eye out to see if we can find something in the Japanese theme.

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Well, that's the spirit of the true Bargain Hunter to go out there and discover some treasure.

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Now, the money moment. £300 a piece.

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-Thank you.

-You know the rules. Your experts await.

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And off you go and very, very, very good luck.

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The Red Team got their wish,

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joining his globetrotting girls today is Mark Stacey.

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And keeping his feet firmly on dry land,

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Philip Allwood is helping the Blues.

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But with so many items on offer here, what will our teams find?

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Now look. This looks rather fun.

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A little pen. Let's call Carol in. Carol.

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Now look what we've got here, a sort of scarf holder.

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You thread your scarf through here and secure it. We're going to a country zone.

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I think that's got quite a strong marking for the sort of country pursuits angle.

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-And, of course, the fox is quite a good symbol for that isn't it?

-Yes.

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What sort of age do you think it is?

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Well, it's gold plated or base metal plated with gold and then

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we've got this little roundel here which is probably transfer printed and just painted over.

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So I would say that it's probably 1900, 1920s something like that.

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So it's got a bit of age to it.

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-Yes. What price are they asking for it, Mark?

-That's a bit of a worry.

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It's marked at £48. We need to get that down a bit, don't we?

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-To £8.

-To £8? I don't think you'll get it down to eight.

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But we'll certainly get a bit off it if we can, if we ask them nicely.

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Would you get a scarf through there?

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-Yes, of course you would.

-Because nowadays they wear thick ones.

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Is it more for silk?

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Well, you'd have to wear a thin one!

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-Right. Well, we'll see what we can do. We'll ask the dealer to get some off the price.

-Yeah.

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-And I think it's also one of those little objects that's quite nice in a little collector's cabinet.

-Yes.

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-It's quite a decorative little piece as well, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-OK.

-OK. Let's go and talk to them and we'll see what we can do there.

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The cheeky Reds didn't negotiate the scarf ring down to £8

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but they did get £8 off the price and bagged it for £40.

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Philip, could you come and have a look at this?

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Well, that's pretty smart isn't it?

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Looks very Minton and Charles Rennie Mackintosh design, doesn't it?

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But, wrong country.

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Eichwald, so German.

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-What sort of age do you think it is?

-I think it dates to around 1900ish.

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So a little bit after the Rennie Mackintosh period, but it's a...

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And there's a little bit of damage on the...

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There is, quite a lot.

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But it's still a very nice piece and somebody might like it to sit on a sideboard.

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£22. If you can get a bit off you might be able to attract a buyer that's not worried too much about

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the condition and wants to put it on the shelf to have that look.

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So if I go and talk to the man nicely, and mention the chips and bashes?

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Make a big thing of the chips and bashes, yeah.

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You might get away with it. It's got a nice look.

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The condition is going to be the only sticking point, really.

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It's very pretty. And for the right price,

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we could have a runaway success!

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You may or may not have a runaway success with that damage.

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If someone particularly wants it.

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If you've got a flower arranger that's spotted...

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For putting flowers in?

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No, but for a competition they've got in mind...

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-Yes, that's imaginative and that could work.

-It could work!

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So you want a whole room full of flower arrangers

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needing a green and pink floral decorated vase to put the flowers in.

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-That could work!

-Definitely could work!

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I like it. I'm going to ask him what we can have off it. Anything off it.

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Get as much as you can off it.

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Might have a tenner in it maybe?

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I think you'll struggle with the damage.

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We'll go with the gods and hope for it. Thank you.

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Which god is she praying to?

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I don't know!

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Let's hope it's an all powerful one!

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They could indeed be in need of divine intervention

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after buying that vase for £18.

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I have found for you the most gorgeous pair of spoons.

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What do you think about these? Great, aren't they?

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What's so special about them?

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Well, for a kick off, they were hallmarked in Dublin in 1805.

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And Irish silver is extremely desirable.

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Simply because there's not so much of it knocking about.

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You can always tell a bit of Irish silver

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because there are often peculiarities in the shape.

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This particular type of shape of spoon is called fiddle back

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where it is slender in the middle and then swells out to this tablet on the end.

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But the tablet on the end on these Irish spoons is unnaturally long,

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which is an interesting feature.

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If I pick it up, you can see it's of massive scale

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that's because this spoon is called either a basting or stuffing spoon.

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You've got to imagine an enormous turkey on the dish.

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You take this basting spoon and scoop up some of that delicious gravy and

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fat and dribble that over the top of the fowl to keep it nice and moist.

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That's the purpose of the spoon.

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The other spoon is really unusual.

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Here we've got a matching fiddle back Irish spoon but with this one it's got a bridge running over

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the top of the bowl and underneath the bridge are a series of apertures.

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The purpose of this spoon is simply to strain the gravy.

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How much then for this pair of Irish spoons? Stand by.

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They could be yours for £950.

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Now THAT is a lot of gravy!

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Over with the Reds, Carol's found something she's rather keen on.

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-Mark!

-Yes?

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I want that.

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-Well, what attracts you about it?

-Because it's Copenhagen.

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It's Copenhagen, yes. Well, we've got the marks for Copenhagen here.

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It's 20th century, around 1930, I guess. What do you think?

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Yea, I like it. It's a nice size.

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-But...

-It depends what price it is really.

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£54.

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-You need to get that down.

-To?

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Well, as low as possible. £45, something like that?

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-OK.

-Um, but it's quite a nice, clean winter landscape, isn't it

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with the autumnal leaves on the front there.

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It looks in very good condition which is important.

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And yes, it might just appeal to a younger buyer as well, so you never know.

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Got it right this time then?

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Well, I... As I say, you never know.

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Mark didn't look too impressed there.

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But with £45 paid, Carol's not a lady to be messed with.

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Ooh, Philip. This is something quite tactile.

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Ooh, yeah.

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-Might be interesting.

-What do you think of that?

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Is it for taking your boots off?

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-Girls!

-It's a catapult!

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Oh!

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Catapult.

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It says here, early 19th century Ivory Coast carving.

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I believe that.

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-That's West Africa then?

-Yeah, yeah.

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-Nice thing.

-It hasn't got the "toom" bit.

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No, you could soon put that on there.

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How old it is difficult to tell.

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It could have just been made in the past 50 years.

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That said...

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They've called early 19th century.

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I believe that, but it's very difficult to date.

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-Um...

-And price?

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Well, they've got £95 on there.

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So if we can buy that for a sensible price?

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£70... £80. You might have some mileage in that.

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We might do very well.

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I like that. That's quite interesting, isn't it?

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And unusual, so.

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-Definitely unusual.

-And dual purpose.

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Dual purpose... boots, catapult...

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brilliant!

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Something for everybody there!

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Hm, a versatile piece... at £69 for the catapult,

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we'll see what the buyers think.

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They've got £213 though left to spend.

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Right, you lot.

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Listen very carefully, because I'm going to tell you about the bonus buy.

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When the shopping's over, any leftover lolly is given to

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the expert to find that bonus buy which can boost the team's profits later at auction.

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As they expert's lot comes up, the teams have only seconds to decide.

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So, no pressure then!

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So, here's Diane. What have you found, Diane?

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Um, a pair of epaulettes. But I don't know much more about them.

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Well, I think we can say they're naval epaulettes,

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because we've got the anchor here.

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And when we turn them over, oh, look, wonderful,

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we've got Goode's Officers Stores Portsmouth Naval Outfitters.

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And there will be people out there who like this sort of thing.

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They'd look fantastic on the shoulders?

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-No. Don't like them.

-You don't like them?

-No.

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-They're naff.

-Oh, they're not naff!

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-I think they're wonderful.

-I don't like them.

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-I think they're lovely. Do you like them?

-Yeah, I do like them.

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They're very over the top, with very rich braid.

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But what else could we use them for, I wonder?

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I think they'd be an interior designer's piece.

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On curtains Carol, for tie backs?

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-Not in my house!

-Swags.

-No?

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No, well you're quite firm about it.

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I don't like them. I think they're awful.

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Well, I think they're fantastic actually.

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-I think they're fab.

-What would you do with them?

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Well, actually, I live in Brighton, and I'd have them on an outfit.

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-What, fancy dress?

-All the nice girls love a sailor.

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(Don't like them.)

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But how much are they?

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Well, they're a 125 Mark.

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-Oh, that's a bit much.

-I thought you said a hundred and what?

-25.

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Pence. No.

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-You're not impressed are you?

-No.

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It's for the pair, Carol.

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I don't think Carol likes them.

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But I do, and you do, and we are running out of time here.

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-So I think we've got to go for it really, haven't we?

-Yeah.

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-OK. On your head be it!

-Or shoulders!

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Still don't like them.

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Don't like the joke either!

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£95. That's a lot of weight to carry on your shoulders, Mark.

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I don't like 'em.

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Oh, hello.

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I've just found these two skewers. I don't know if you're...

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What are we saying here? Pair of silver game skewers.

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French, circa 1820. Quite possibly.

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So you think, poke your partner type game do you?

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Could be. And then there'd be a grouse wouldn't there?

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Oh, very good. You're probably very close with that one.

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Doing spatch cocking and pinning these things down. Nice slender ones.

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So it's not going to be for

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anything like a ham or anything like that, is it?

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These are dainty little things.

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You can see the hallmarks on there which are certainly French hallmarks.

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1820s... don't know.

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-I'd have to do a bit more checking up on that. They certainly look to be of that sort of period.

-Silver.

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Certainly, they're silver, yes.

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They'll be quite possibly a lower content silver than English silver.

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So they might be 80% silver as opposed to 95, 92.5%

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which it has to be in England.

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They seem a bit thin, but they are hallmark silver, as you say.

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But £95. What do you think we need to get them for to make any money on the day?

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I don't think that £95 is a huge amount.

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They are quite fun things, aren't they?

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So, maybe popular with a sportsman.

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Well, they could appeal to the huntin', shootin', fishin' crowd.

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So for the right price we should give it a go? Third item.

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-I think it's got some mileage in there.

-Good.

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Nice things.

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Or you could just have some fun with them.

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But I'll grouse all day!

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Again! He does that all the time anyway, doesn't he?

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Don't you think? It's what you were telling me earlier on!

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£84.50 paid.

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Philip's idea of how to use the skewers doesn't seem like a lot of fun to me.

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Time please, ladies and gentlemen. Thank you very much.

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Well, it's time for him and it's time's up for our teams.

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Let's recap on what the Reds bought. Cheers.

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The foxy ladies' first buy was the scarf ring at £40.

0:17:560:18:00

Next, going against the look of disgust on the expert's face,

0:18:030:18:08

Carol stood her ground and paid £45 for the Copenhagen vase.

0:18:080:18:12

And home decorating tips aside,

0:18:120:18:14

the epaulettes marched into the Red's bag for £95.

0:18:140:18:19

-So you girls, did you have a good time shopping?

-We did.

0:18:190:18:22

I bet you did. What's your favourite piece, Diane?

0:18:220:18:25

I think the fox scarf ring.

0:18:250:18:27

-Right. That's your favourite. What about you, Carol.

-The vase.

0:18:270:18:30

-And which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

-The vase.

0:18:300:18:34

And I think the vase as well actually.

0:18:340:18:36

Well, you've spent a magnificent £180 which is super and I'd like £120 of leftover lolly which is hot.

0:18:360:18:42

That's for you. Now, Mark, what are you going to do with that?

0:18:420:18:45

Well, I'm confused of Marlborough because I simply don't know.

0:18:450:18:48

I've got so many things in my mind, so many cabinets to look at. I can't decide what I'm going to buy!

0:18:480:18:53

But you're normally Mr Decisive.

0:18:530:18:55

I normally go for something right at the morning...

0:18:550:18:58

and I think, "I need enough money to buy that."

0:18:580:19:01

Today, I can't find a thing.

0:19:010:19:03

So I'm going to have to leave it right till the last minute.

0:19:030:19:06

We're excited for you and very good luck.

0:19:060:19:08

Meanwhile, let's remind ourselves of what the Blues bought.

0:19:080:19:11

Glyn thinks an auction room full of flower arrangers

0:19:110:19:15

could be the answer for the £18 vase.

0:19:150:19:17

At £69, the Blues are hoping the catapult

0:19:190:19:22

will launch them into profit.

0:19:220:19:24

Their final item is the pair of £84.50 French silver game skewers.

0:19:240:19:30

I hope they don't get stuck on these at the auction.

0:19:300:19:33

So Glyn and Chris, did you have a good time shopping? Was it good?

0:19:330:19:36

-Absolutely super.

-Which is your favourite piece?

0:19:360:19:39

-The vase.

-The vase. What about you, Glyn?

0:19:390:19:41

-I think maybe the catapult.

-It's your favourite?

-Yes.

0:19:410:19:44

Well, that's decisive for you. Which piece is going to make the biggest profit?

0:19:440:19:48

I think the boys' toys... the catapult.

0:19:480:19:50

The catapult.

0:19:500:19:52

Well, you've spend a £171.50, jolly clever of you and I'd like £128.50

0:19:520:19:57

of leftover lolly which goes straight to Philip Allwood.

0:19:570:20:01

Now Phil, hm, how did you get on with these characters today?

0:20:010:20:04

-Have they been difficult?

-Completely mad!

0:20:040:20:06

-Completely mad!

-Oh, that's good then, isn't it?

0:20:060:20:09

-In a nice way.

-In a nice way?

-I think.

0:20:090:20:10

-But just mildly barmy?

-Yes. Not mildly.

-Not mildly.

0:20:100:20:14

No mild about it!

0:20:140:20:16

What are you going to do with all that cash now?

0:20:160:20:18

It's more than enough for what I've got in mind.

0:20:180:20:21

-Oh, yes?

-Yes.

-What would that be?

0:20:210:20:23

-I couldn't tell you. Well, I could, but I'd have to shoot you!

-Yes, all right then.

0:20:230:20:27

-There could be a hint in that actually. You never know!

-There isn't.

0:20:270:20:30

-You've very enigmatic.

-I've led you down the garden path.

0:20:300:20:33

-Have you?

-Yeah.

-Won't be the first time. Anyway, very good luck, Philip.

0:20:330:20:37

Right then, they've bought their items.

0:20:370:20:39

We're heading off to auction with them where they hope they will make a profit.

0:20:390:20:43

For me, I'm now off somewhere very, very nice.

0:20:430:20:47

Welcome to Salisbury in Wiltshire.

0:20:480:20:51

Home, of course, to the world famous Salisbury Cathedral.

0:20:510:20:55

And also standing just over the Chorister's Green

0:21:000:21:04

is the beautiful Mompesson House.

0:21:040:21:07

In the late 17th century, Sir Thomas Mompesson,

0:21:110:21:15

local Salisbury MP,

0:21:150:21:18

leased the building where Mompesson House stands today

0:21:180:21:22

from the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral.

0:21:220:21:25

What we see today was completed in 1701

0:21:250:21:28

and has hardly changed in the meanwhile.

0:21:280:21:32

After a rich and illustrious history, Mompesson was bequeathed

0:21:320:21:37

by the last owner, Denis Martineau to the National Trust in 1975.

0:21:370:21:43

But it was only the empty house that was given over to the Trust

0:21:430:21:47

as all the furnishings were left to his family.

0:21:470:21:51

This was customary at Mompesson because this had always been

0:21:560:22:00

a leasehold townhouse rather than an ancient ancestral seat.

0:22:000:22:06

So the absence of inherited furniture was not that unusual.

0:22:060:22:11

Over the last three decades the Trust has refurnished the house,

0:22:110:22:15

emulating its former Georgian splendour.

0:22:150:22:18

But it isn't just a question of finding a whole lot of furniture to bring into a house like this.

0:22:210:22:28

Often, it's the objects that bring the place to life.

0:22:280:22:32

In 1990, the Trust were bequeathed a wonderful collection of English

0:22:320:22:38

18th century porcelain by a Mrs Adam Smith who was a descendent

0:22:380:22:44

of the Wright-Bessemer family who, of course made their money in steel.

0:22:440:22:50

I've made a selection, albeit a very small selection,

0:22:500:22:53

from the 150 pieces which are fun to look at.

0:22:530:22:56

What do you think about these?

0:22:560:22:58

This is a pair of figures which are called en bocage

0:22:580:23:02

which means they're sitting in a wooded, leafy glade.

0:23:020:23:09

Each figure sits with a tree effectively behind it.

0:23:090:23:13

These figures are emblematic of different themes.

0:23:130:23:18

She is emblematic of marriage as she sits with her birdcage on her knee.

0:23:180:23:24

He is emblematic of freedom with a bird he's about to release.

0:23:240:23:30

It's interesting, the use of birdcages

0:23:300:23:32

in 17th and 18th century art.

0:23:320:23:35

A girl shown with a birdcage with its door shut

0:23:350:23:39

would indicate that her virtue is still intact.

0:23:390:23:43

Were the door open on the birdcage,

0:23:430:23:46

it would indicate that her virtue was not intact.

0:23:460:23:50

In other words, she was no longer a virgin.

0:23:500:23:52

These were produced in the Bow factory, a factory established

0:23:520:23:57

in the 1740s and who were the first to introduce literally ground up

0:23:570:24:04

bone into the paste, the ceramic body that they used

0:24:040:24:09

and modelled into figures such as these.

0:24:090:24:13

It gives an extra plasticity to the clay.

0:24:130:24:17

It enables it to be modelled in considerable detail

0:24:170:24:21

and you have to admit that these lovely, vibrant

0:24:210:24:25

floral sprays and the green individual leaves

0:24:250:24:29

really are dramatic.

0:24:290:24:31

Next door, we have an example from the Derby factory.

0:24:310:24:35

Equally elaborate but slightly later in date,

0:24:350:24:39

probably dating from around 1760.

0:24:390:24:42

And here we've got Neptune, standing above a dolphin and out of

0:24:420:24:47

the dolphin's mouth spews some water which tumbles over a boulder.

0:24:470:24:53

A boulder which is encrusted in greenish seaweed,

0:24:530:24:57

all rather crisply modelled.

0:24:570:24:59

And then the whole of that surface, the whole of the boulder

0:24:590:25:02

has been applied with these polychrome shells.

0:25:020:25:06

But it wasn't all about decorative objects

0:25:060:25:10

in 18th century English ceramics.

0:25:100:25:12

Sometimes, things were functional, like this little pot.

0:25:120:25:16

Looks like a bit of cauliflower, doesn't it?

0:25:160:25:19

Well, that's not accidental.

0:25:190:25:21

Because in the 18th century, a whole dining table would be laid up

0:25:210:25:24

with Worcester pots like this,

0:25:240:25:27

which open, either to contain nicely cooked bits of cauliflower

0:25:270:25:33

or asparagus, or whatever,

0:25:330:25:35

or perhaps the sauces that you drizzled on the top.

0:25:350:25:39

Do you like a nice cheesy sauce? So do I.

0:25:390:25:43

I wonder whether our teams are going to be similarly cheesy today

0:25:430:25:48

over at the auction.

0:25:480:25:51

We're off to Crewkerne for our auction today.

0:25:510:25:54

And our Blue team have a solid start...

0:25:540:25:56

That's not too bad, girls.

0:25:580:26:01

Stand by for the catapult.

0:26:010:26:02

-..while the Reds are settling old scores.

-They don't like it, Carol.

0:26:020:26:06

They don't like your vase!

0:26:060:26:09

Last time at 22.

0:26:090:26:11

Well, it's great to be in the heart of the West Country down in Somerset

0:26:110:26:15

in Crewkerne at Lawrence's sale room with Richard Kay, our auctioneer today.

0:26:150:26:19

-Richard, great to see you.

-And you Tim. Lovely to welcome you back.

0:26:190:26:22

Now, for our Reds, Diane and Carol, their first item is this scarf ring.

0:26:220:26:27

With the lovely little foxy mount. Do you like that?

0:26:270:26:30

I do like it. And I think it's ideal for the sort of sales we have here.

0:26:300:26:33

Plenty of people in this hunting county who might rather like that.

0:26:330:26:37

And nothing more desirable on a piece of hunting attire

0:26:370:26:41

than the mask of a fox.

0:26:410:26:42

That's encouraging. That's our first item.

0:26:420:26:45

That's with it, Richard. What's the estimate?

0:26:450:26:47

I think that could make £30 to £40 without too much difficulty.

0:26:470:26:51

-Well, they paid £40 so that's right...

-OK.

0:26:510:26:53

-By the time you've got two or three people whipped up anything could happen.

-Anything.

0:26:530:26:57

Now, Copenhagen. Does this stuff sell well down here?

0:26:570:27:01

I don't think that's got tremendous appeal.

0:27:010:27:03

-I think it's rather a dull and uninteresting design on it to be honest.

-High quality though it is...

0:27:030:27:09

-Beautifully made...

-Good stuff, but probably not that easy to sell.

0:27:090:27:12

So if you gird yourself up to your full height,

0:27:120:27:15

what's your best estimate?

0:27:150:27:17

My very best is only £20 to £30.

0:27:170:27:19

Yeah. £45 paid you see.

0:27:190:27:21

I think they're going to be a bit light on that.

0:27:210:27:23

But, we've got glitz and bling to finish with.

0:27:230:27:27

With our lovely officer's epaulettes.

0:27:270:27:29

I'm not sure an officer would want to think that's glitz and bling

0:27:290:27:32

but I take your point.

0:27:320:27:33

Shame they're lacking their painted metal tin that they would have been in originally.

0:27:330:27:38

Yeah. You've got kiddywinks haven't you?

0:27:380:27:40

Do you have a dressing up box at home?

0:27:400:27:41

I wouldn't put them in a dressing up box. They're too good.

0:27:410:27:44

But I do think they will appeal to the kind of people

0:27:440:27:47

that like to buy items of naval history.

0:27:470:27:49

They're absolutely perfect for that sort of collector.

0:27:490:27:52

-OK. So, estimate-wise?

-£40 to £60 I would hope.

0:27:520:27:55

OK. £95 paid. I think they paid £95 very speculatively for these and it is a bit of a punt.

0:27:550:28:02

It is a bit of a punt and it is the sort of thing that could make a surprising price.

0:28:020:28:05

Yeah, well, we'll keep our eye out for Captain Hornblower.

0:28:050:28:09

-Let's hope so.

-Well, depending on how the epaulettes do, they could well need their bonus buy.

0:28:090:28:13

So let's trot off and have a look at it.

0:28:130:28:16

So, girls, you did rather well.

0:28:170:28:19

£180 you spent, £120 went to Mark Stacey. What did he spend it on?

0:28:190:28:26

Oh, very delicate this.

0:28:260:28:28

I spent it on this little writing box.

0:28:280:28:31

It's a Victorian or Edwardian about 1900-ish.

0:28:310:28:34

But what I particularly like about it - it's so small.

0:28:340:28:38

Does need a little bit of work.

0:28:380:28:39

-It's not in pristine condition as you say.

-Look at that.

0:28:390:28:43

Little bit of work, eh?

0:28:430:28:45

Where's the key?

0:28:450:28:47

Well, you don't often find keys with this.

0:28:470:28:49

-I think you're being too picky.

-No, you might want to lock it up.

0:28:490:28:52

You might. I'm sure you could get a key.

0:28:520:28:54

But I rather like this little drawer

0:28:540:28:56

with this flush brass handle.

0:28:560:28:58

It's in mahogany and I think it's rather sweet actually. It's so small.

0:28:580:29:02

And it only cost me £25.

0:29:020:29:06

-How much?

-Ah! 25.

-£25?

0:29:060:29:08

-£25.

-You were ripped off.

-I don't think I was you know.

0:29:080:29:11

I think on a good day that might make £40.

0:29:110:29:16

You reckon?

0:29:160:29:17

Carol has this doubting manner about her.

0:29:170:29:20

I don't know if you've noticed this? Is this usual?

0:29:200:29:26

-You haven't at all?

-Yes!

0:29:260:29:29

What's this? It's broke!

0:29:290:29:32

Oh, Mark, come on... it's broke!

0:29:320:29:36

-Try and rise above that, Carol.

-Now, Diane, do you like this?

0:29:360:29:40

-From the outside.

-You do.

-Yes.

-So it's a bit rough round the edges.

0:29:400:29:43

This is the message we're getting from Mark.

0:29:430:29:45

He reckons he paid £25 which is very reasonable.

0:29:450:29:48

All right, very reasonable means...?

0:29:480:29:50

-There's a scope there.

-Ten pounds. Are we talking £20?

0:29:500:29:53

I'd like to see it make £40 actually.

0:29:530:29:55

To 50. There's potentially 50.

0:29:550:29:57

Right. It doesn't really matter if you girls like it or not.

0:29:570:30:00

Is there a profit in it? He says there is.

0:30:000:30:02

Remember that. You don't decide now. You decide later.

0:30:020:30:05

Right now, for the viewers at home let's find out what the auctioneer thinks of Mark's little box.

0:30:050:30:10

So Richard, this is a nice small size isn't it?

0:30:110:30:14

It is a nice small size and it appears to be quite well made from the outside.

0:30:140:30:17

It's got a nice brass fittings

0:30:170:30:18

and the little brass drawer at the bottom. It's quite promising.

0:30:180:30:22

Let's have a look and see what it's like inside, cos that's the critical thing.

0:30:220:30:26

Ah well, sadly,

0:30:260:30:27

inside, it's seen better days and I don't know whether many people

0:30:270:30:32

are going want to spend a lot of money on doing that up.

0:30:320:30:35

So I think it might well affect what it will make.

0:30:350:30:39

So, as a sort of tempting "come and buy me" estimate, what would you say?

0:30:390:30:43

I think a tempting "come and buy me" estimate is £15 to £20.

0:30:430:30:46

-Fair enough.

-But it could make a little more if somebody feels

0:30:460:30:49

-like taking it on and spending some time doing it up.

-Yes, quite.

0:30:490:30:53

Loving, at home, restoration.

0:30:530:30:55

-Tender, loving care.

-That's it.

0:30:550:30:57

Mark Stacey paid £25. He's hopeful. I've a funny feeling he will turn a small profit...

0:30:570:31:01

I think there will be a profit in that.

0:31:010:31:03

Which is absolutely lovely.

0:31:030:31:04

Anyway, that is it for the Reds.

0:31:040:31:06

And now for the Blues.

0:31:060:31:08

This is a seriously wacky mixture

0:31:080:31:10

of objects don't you think...

0:31:100:31:12

for Glyn and Chris?

0:31:120:31:13

Very strange selection of objects.

0:31:130:31:15

Very different from each other.

0:31:150:31:17

First up is the vase which looks a bit lonely to me.

0:31:170:31:19

The vase is certainly lonely.

0:31:190:31:21

It would have had at least a partner

0:31:210:31:22

and possibly been one of a garniture at some time

0:31:220:31:25

with a clock that would have stood between it and its mate.

0:31:250:31:29

But more critically, it's not in great condition.

0:31:290:31:32

And that will put people off a little.

0:31:320:31:34

I think as a lonesome item on its own

0:31:340:31:37

it might struggle to make more than £10.

0:31:370:31:39

-So £18 as a purchase price is on the rich side.

-A little bit.

0:31:390:31:44

OK. The next item is this really intriguing wee fellow.

0:31:440:31:49

That's come from somewhere really quite far away from here I'm sure.

0:31:490:31:52

Quite where, I don't know.

0:31:520:31:54

-No.

-It looks rather African.

0:31:540:31:56

-I think its £15 to £20.

-Is that all?

0:31:560:31:59

With a speculative scratch of the chin!

0:31:590:32:01

Right. Well, we'll scratch fairly hard then for this because they paid £69.

0:32:010:32:06

I think that would be a strong price.

0:32:060:32:08

It's a good old crack that, isn't it?

0:32:080:32:10

And their last item is I think equally unusual.

0:32:100:32:13

Because I can't remember the last time I saw French game skewers.

0:32:130:32:17

-No.

-Nothing to stop the French having game, of course.

0:32:170:32:20

Nothing to stop them having skewers.

0:32:200:32:22

Silver, French game skewers pitching up. That's quite unusual isn't it?

0:32:220:32:25

It is. I don't think people will buy these to use as skewers any more.

0:32:250:32:28

They might have done in the early 20th century.

0:32:280:32:31

But nowadays they make stylish letter openers.

0:32:310:32:34

-I can't see more than £20 in them to be honest.

-Oh dear.

0:32:340:32:37

There's going to be deep depression on the Blue team. They paid £84.50.

0:32:370:32:42

-I think that seems like plenty.

-It does.

0:32:420:32:44

It's a lot of money isn't it?

0:32:440:32:46

Even I have to admit that's quite a lot for two French game skewers.

0:32:460:32:49

Still, there we are.

0:32:490:32:51

There's no predicting as they say, and we can't tell whether they're going to need their bonus buy

0:32:510:32:56

so let's have a look at it anyway.

0:32:560:32:58

So Chris, Glyn, you spent an eccentric £171.50.

0:32:580:33:03

You gave £128.50 to P Allwood.

0:33:030:33:06

Philip, what did you spend it on?

0:33:060:33:08

It's interesting you use the word eccentric because there we have it,

0:33:080:33:13

a nice little snuff box made out of a hoof.

0:33:130:33:17

Open it up and bung your snuff in there.

0:33:170:33:19

And when you're out riding your horse...

0:33:190:33:21

it's got to be country-ish hasn't it? I thought it was a lovely thing - lovely quality.

0:33:210:33:27

And you spent how much on it?

0:33:270:33:29

£50. But I think, actually, in a right sort of, sporty sort of sale you'd get a profit on that.

0:33:290:33:36

I think it's a nice little piece.

0:33:360:33:38

-Excellent.

-I think for the snuff box collectors...

0:33:380:33:40

-Yes, that's the point isn't it? There are a lot of snuff box collectors.

-Yeah.

0:33:400:33:44

It's a great little collectable. In a small house, small flat,

0:33:440:33:47

you can have two to three hundred of these little snuff boxes, no trouble at all.

0:33:470:33:51

-Easily.

-It's much easier than paintings or pieces of furniture.

0:33:510:33:55

They're forever looking for variety.

0:33:550:33:57

Just slip it away. Yeah, good.

0:33:570:33:59

-It's gone.

-Slip it back. thank you very much!

0:33:590:34:02

Anyway, you don't decide now.

0:34:020:34:04

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Philip Allwood's little box.

0:34:040:34:09

-Well, well, well.

-Isn't that sweet?

0:34:100:34:12

That is delightful. It's a beautifully made little thing.

0:34:120:34:14

In fact it's nature made of course because it is half of a hoof,

0:34:140:34:19

of a split hoof.

0:34:190:34:21

And it opens to hold snuff perhaps,

0:34:210:34:23

or something similar anyway.

0:34:230:34:26

Yes. So, what do you think for this little delight?

0:34:260:34:28

I think that's a bit of fun and it could make £30 to £50.

0:34:280:34:31

Brilliant. Philip Allwood paid £50.

0:34:310:34:33

If you get somebody stirred up he could easily make it couldn't he.

0:34:330:34:36

I think he could trot off very nicely.

0:34:360:34:38

Oh, ho! So trite!

0:34:380:34:41

..For the last time at 80. All done.

0:34:450:34:49

-All right girls?

-Yes.

0:34:490:34:50

-This is fun isn't it?

-It is.

0:34:500:34:52

Have you ever seen so many people jammed into one room?

0:34:520:34:55

-No.

-It's good isn't it?

0:34:550:34:57

-Even you're impressed aren't you, Carol?

-Yes.

-That's lovely!

0:34:570:35:00

Anyway, first up is the scarf ring.

0:35:000:35:02

Mark's item and here it comes.

0:35:020:35:04

Lot 145 is the Edwardian fox mask scarf ring.

0:35:040:35:08

Start me on this one if you will at £30. £30 for it?

0:35:080:35:13

£30, £30 I see, £35, are you bidding, sir?

0:35:130:35:17

£40? £40 near the camera.

0:35:170:35:20

£40 and I'm selling.

0:35:200:35:22

At £40, last time at 40. Any more?

0:35:220:35:25

At £40, all done.

0:35:250:35:27

-Bad luck.

-What did we pay?

0:35:270:35:28

-£40.

-Even, then.

0:35:280:35:30

Quite right. here comes Copenhagen.

0:35:300:35:32

Lot 146 is a Copenhagen vase.

0:35:320:35:35

Shall we say £20 for that?

0:35:350:35:37

£20 for it? 15 if it helps.

0:35:370:35:39

£15 anywhere?

0:35:390:35:41

They don't like it, Carol.

0:35:410:35:44

They don't like your vase!

0:35:440:35:45

At £10. Thank you. £10.

0:35:450:35:47

I'm selling now at £10.

0:35:470:35:49

Maiden bid at 10 only.

0:35:490:35:50

Last time at £10 and I'm selling.

0:35:500:35:52

Last time.

0:35:520:35:54

Oh, dear! Minus 35 on that, Carol.

0:35:540:35:57

-Now the epaulettes.

-Here we go.

0:35:570:36:00

OK. Come on!

0:36:000:36:02

Lot 147 is a pair of Edwardian naval officer's epaulettes.

0:36:020:36:07

And start me here at £30 for these.

0:36:070:36:10

£30 for them. At £30. 20 if it helps.

0:36:100:36:14

-£20.

-No!

-At £20.

0:36:140:36:17

10 if you wish.

0:36:170:36:19

At £10. A spoken bid at 10. I can sell at £10 only.

0:36:190:36:23

Will anyone say 12? £10 only.

0:36:230:36:25

Last time then at £10 only.

0:36:250:36:28

£10 all done.

0:36:280:36:30

£10 is minus 85.

0:36:300:36:33

10, 11, that is minus £120 overall, girls.

0:36:340:36:39

-We're doing well then!

-You spent 180 and you're minus 120.

0:36:390:36:42

This is not a great start to the night. What are you going to do about the cabinet?

0:36:420:36:46

-We'll go with it.

-We'll go with it. We're going to go...

0:36:460:36:49

-We've got to go...

-You've got to go...

0:36:490:36:50

-We've got to!

-Broken cabinet with no key.

0:36:500:36:52

You're going to go with it.

0:36:520:36:54

-Yes.

-I think that's a wise move.

0:36:540:36:56

We're going with the bonus buy.

0:36:560:36:58

The estimate is £15 to £20.

0:36:580:37:01

Mark paid £25.

0:37:010:37:03

But I've a funny feeling it's going to do quite well. Here it comes.

0:37:030:37:06

Lot 151 is the mahogany stationery cabinet.

0:37:060:37:10

And start me here at £15 for it.

0:37:100:37:13

£15. £15 I see. 18 now. 20.

0:37:130:37:18

No, £22, bid at £22, 25, 28.

0:37:180:37:23

Are you bidding sir? No, 28. Are you bidding madam? 30.

0:37:230:37:27

£30. It's in front of me at 30.

0:37:270:37:30

I'm selling now at £30. £30 and I'm selling.

0:37:300:37:33

Last time at 30.

0:37:330:37:35

-Well, done, Mark. £30.

-That's a little something...

0:37:350:37:37

That's £5 on that which means overall you are minus £115.

0:37:370:37:44

Minus 115. Yeah.

0:37:440:37:46

-Yeah.

-Well, if you're going to do it...

-We'll still win!

0:37:460:37:50

Well, you never know, girls. That could be a winning score if it goes really bad for the Blues!

0:37:500:37:55

-It could be. Don't tell the Blues a thing!

-No.

-Let's not put them out of their agony.

0:37:550:37:59

Now Glyn, Chris, do you know how the Reds did?

0:38:070:38:09

-No idea.

-You don't know how they did.

0:38:090:38:11

That's just as well. Good.

0:38:110:38:13

First up is your vase Chris, and here it comes.

0:38:130:38:16

Lot 166 is an Eichwald vase, of art nouveau design.

0:38:160:38:20

And shall we say £8 for that.

0:38:200:38:23

£8 for it? £8 if you will. £5 then.

0:38:230:38:27

£5. £8 now? Are you bidding sir? 10, 12, £12 to my right at 12.

0:38:270:38:33

Selling at 12. All done at £12 only.

0:38:330:38:36

Last time at 12.

0:38:360:38:38

Minus £6. That's not too bad.

0:38:380:38:42

Sand by for the catapult.

0:38:420:38:44

Lot 167.

0:38:440:38:47

This is an unusual 19th century Ivory Coast catapult

0:38:470:38:51

with native mask decoration.

0:38:510:38:53

£20 is bid on it. £20 I have. It's on commission at 20.

0:38:530:38:57

25? 30, 5, at £35. At £35 and I'm selling it in the room now at £35.

0:38:570:39:05

All done then. The last time at £35.

0:39:050:39:08

Marvellous. That is 29 + 5 back.

0:39:080:39:10

That is £34 down the toilet!

0:39:100:39:13

-That's a loss!

-Next, the skewers.

0:39:130:39:16

Lot 168

0:39:160:39:19

is two late 19th century French silver game skewers.

0:39:190:39:23

And bids - start me here at £25.

0:39:230:39:26

Can I say 30 for them? It's at £25 on commission.

0:39:260:39:29

At 25, and I'm selling now at £25.

0:39:290:39:33

At £25 for the last time.

0:39:330:39:35

All done then at 25.

0:39:350:39:37

£25. Bad luck! That's minus £59.50.

0:39:370:39:42

Which means that overall you're minus £99.50!

0:39:420:39:46

So what are you going to do about the bonus buy?

0:39:460:39:48

If we're going to crash and burn, we've got to crash and burn.

0:39:480:39:52

You're going to go with it.

0:39:520:39:55

-You paid £50.

-£50...did I?

0:39:550:39:58

Yes.

0:39:580:39:59

And they're going with the bonus buy.

0:39:590:40:01

I think it's a good decision this going with the bonus buy.

0:40:010:40:04

I've a funny feeling about this one.

0:40:040:40:06

Lot 172. Horn snuff box with a horseshoe motif.

0:40:060:40:11

Lot 172.

0:40:110:40:13

And £25 for this. £25 for it.

0:40:130:40:16

30 now, 35, 40, 45, 50, 5.

0:40:160:40:22

55, gentleman seated at 55.

0:40:220:40:25

And I'm selling now at £55. All done at 55.

0:40:250:40:28

-We're in profit! £55!

-Marvellous!

0:40:280:40:33

£5 profit. Very good.

0:40:330:40:37

Which means overall you're minus £94.50.

0:40:370:40:40

-That could be a winning score.

-It could.

0:40:400:40:43

-It could.

-Yes, we'll find out in a minute.

0:40:430:40:46

Well, we have had a spectacular day today haven't we!

0:40:540:40:58

Thumping great losses all round.

0:40:580:41:01

I mean, unbelievable!

0:41:010:41:02

We've got teams here who managed to lose at least half if not more of the original money they spent!

0:41:020:41:08

What's going on? What do you mean, it's always like this?

0:41:080:41:11

It's not at all!

0:41:110:41:12

Anyway, now to reveal the team that has the largest losses today and they are the Reds.

0:41:120:41:18

Oh, no!

0:41:180:41:22

-Yeah. You spend £180 and you lost £115.

-Oh, no!

0:41:220:41:27

You lost on every single item or you wiped your face with the exception of the bonus buy.

0:41:280:41:35

Now, you're members of the Mark Stacey appreciation society.

0:41:350:41:39

-Is this a society, I ask myself, that's going to grow?

-No!

0:41:390:41:43

Not after today!

0:41:430:41:45

Now, you can't blame the old boy for everything.

0:41:450:41:49

You were just unlucky in the auction. Unlucky big time!

0:41:490:41:53

But you're being great sports, girls and thank you very much for joining us. It's been wonderful.

0:41:530:41:58

But the victors, who only managed to lose £94.50.

0:41:580:42:02

You only spent £171.50, you managed to lose £94.50.

0:42:020:42:08

You're pleased about this aren't you?

0:42:080:42:10

You did however get a profit.

0:42:100:42:12

Allwood made a profit of a 5 pound note on the horn snuffbox.

0:42:120:42:14

You'd have been very upset if that hadn't made a profit wouldn't you?

0:42:140:42:17

-I would.

-What you don't know about snuff boxes is nobody's business.

0:42:170:42:21

-Absolutely nobody's business! Anyway, had a good time?

-Fabulous!

-Lovely to see you on the show.

0:42:210:42:26

Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

0:42:260:42:28

ALL: Yes!

0:42:280:42:30

For more information about Bargain Hunt,

0:42:300:42:32

including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:42:320:42:36

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:380:42:40

E-mail [email protected]

0:42:400:42:43

Naval epaulettes and a catapult are among the items bought by bargain hunters shopping in the market town of Marlborough, guided by experts Mark Stacey and Phillip Allwood.

Meanwhile, presenter Tim Wonnacott visits Mompesson House to learn how it has been returned to its former Georgian splendour.