London Bargain Hunt


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Transcript


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Thank you so much for joining us.

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One of me, two teams, £300 apiece, two experts.

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It must be Bargain Hunt.

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Welcome to Portobello Road market.

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Famous worldwide for its market,

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it's actually a living movie set,

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with an incredible range of collectibles and stalls.

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I've detected a slightly artistic and rebellious streak in our teams today.

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Before they all get heady with excitement, let's remind ourselves of the rules.

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They each get £300 and an hour to find three items.

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They then take their items to auction and sell them off to the highest bidder.

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The team that makes the most money wins. Hurrah!

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Today we've got two teams of manly men, pumped up, full of testosterone and ready for the contest.

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For the Reds, we've Mark and Tom.

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For the Blues, we've Mark and Andrew. Welcome to Bargain Hunt.

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You're best friends, and you agree on everything?

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-We agree on nothing pretty much.

-Not really. We agreed to come on the show today

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and that we're going to try and find as many good things as possible.

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-For Bargain Hunt?

-Exactly.

-That's a relief!

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-Do you collect anything?

-I collect horror film memorabilia.

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Really? What's it with you and horror?

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-I'm just a big horror fan.

-Since you were a kid?

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-I used to always watch them on TV and love them.

-Snuggle up with your teddy?

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Not a ted any more, but I still watch them.

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Have you ever made money from selling collectibles?

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I always go to car boot sales, and scavenge around trying to find things.

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I picked up an original photograph of Sid Vicious from the Sex Pistols.

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I bought it for about a fiver and put it on an online auction and got bid up to £400.

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-What was special about the picture?

-It was an original press photograph. It was after he was arrested.

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-Sex Pistols collectors just wanted it.

-That's the business.

-I'm not complaining.

-Congratulations.

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-Tom, you're a salesman.

-That's right.

-Are those skills going to stand you in good stead?

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I hope so. I think I know a few tricks of the trade to look out for.

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-Like what?

-Some of the leading questions, and what have you. Put a twist on it.

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Hopefully, I'll get a few bargains.

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Tom, what out of your experience arms you better than Mark?

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I used to go to the auction house with my grandad when I was younger.

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-I know what sort of things sell and what don't.

-What sort of things will you be looking out for?

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-Something a bit different.

-Wacky?

-Bit out there, yeah.

-"Out there."

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I'm getting the message! There could be trouble here.

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-This isn't frightening you boys, is it?

-No!

-Not at all.

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You don't look as if you scare easily. You're often mistaken for a policeman.

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-Why do you think that is?

-It's my shiny shoes.

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A little bird tells me that you hate musicals

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but the absolutely adore opera, in particular, Carmen?

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I love Carmen. What a tramp! I like sassy women.

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-What, sassy big fat women?

-Something like that.

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-Does that go for you, Andrew? Are you fond of big, fat, sassy woman?

-I see a trend emerging!

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I do love the opera. I'm not dragged there, I like it a lot. We go often.

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What's the story about you going off to the south of France with a nightie and a pair of wellies?

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I did a dreadful deed to my brother. I was sharing a flat with him at the time and we fell out.

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-We didn't speak for months.

-What sort of a dreadful deed was it?

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-It was a dreadful deed involving his girlfriend and myself.

-Oh, my!

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I got stopped late at work, when I was going on holiday,

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and had to ring him and ask him to pack me a suitcase quickly.

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We then flew off to Nice. I arrived at the villa,

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-opened the suitcase and discovered two pairs of wellies and nightie.

-LAUGHTER

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-How sweet is revenge?! No bathers?

-No bathers.

-No Hawaii Five-O shirts?

-No.

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Very funny. Well, that will teach you a lesson.

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What's about you wanting to become Paul Simon?

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My father is a musician and he lent money to struggling musicians

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and they would leave their instruments as security.

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We had lots of instruments to play with as children.

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I stuck with the guitar. I play classical guitar.

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-I wanted to be as good as Paul Simon.

-That's a reasonable ambition.

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I hope today you finish up with diamonds on your soles! Now, the money moment. £300 apiece.

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You know the rules, your experts await.

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Off you go!

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Don't forget, they've only got one hour to find their three items.

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Undeniably attractive, seductively informed and effortlessly cool -

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that's enough about me.

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Let's meet the experts on hand today.

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For the Reds, he's not feral, it's just the look of him.

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It's Philip Serrell.

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A beast!

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And for the Blues, adored by many,

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revered by even more, it's the delectable David Barby.

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It's a big throng of the market and with so many items on display,

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our manly team should really get going with their buys.

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There are a couple down there.

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Guys, what do you think?

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I thought the stallholder was just a little bit harsh, because he said there was sort of a...

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I can see it, actually.

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Better looking, Phil!

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What is it?

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It's the dog's...inkwell.

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It's a boxer dog. It's got its collar round it. I think it's really wicked.

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You open him up by the ears, and I just think that's really lovely.

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I'd think it dates to about 1880. Two problems with it.

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In that that ear, has just been chipped and perhaps flattened off a bit there.

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It's been in a fight or something! It may have had glass eyes at one point in time.

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The thing I love about it is its colour.

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I just think he's lovely.

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-Collectible?

-Hugely so -

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to people who collect dog-related stuff,

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hugely to people who collect inkwells.

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I'd love to own it.

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I like it. Do you like it?

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-It would appeal to different markets.

-How much is it?

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That's the acid test. It's £120. If you can have a nice chat with the dealer, see if he'll...

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If you can get that for anything under £100,

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I hope we've got a result.

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If it goes into the auction, it could make £40 or 50.

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But if the auctioneers will put it on the internet

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and you've got collectors there, there's £100 to £200 worth there.

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-It's a gamble.

-I'm up for it.

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It's the dog's...!

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-Go on.

-I'll give it a go.

-Cheers, Phil.

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The boys paid £90 for the Philip lookalike,

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I mean, the boxer inkwell!

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-Well, that's very indulgent. Biscuits, what sort are they?

-They're cookies.

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-I've been shopping. What do you think of this?

-It's lovely. Is it a biscuit barrel?

-No, it's not.

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I think, in fact, it is for cigars. I look at this and I think of the workmanship, first of all.

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We've got these lovely sections here, brass-banded.

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I can't help but think that this could have been an apprentice piece by a young cooper.

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-You know, barrel makers.

-We live in Cooper's Lodge.

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That's absolutely brilliant. It's divine intervention.

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I think this is so good. This is a little lock here, which is Victorian.

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If you look carefully at the little flap that goes over the keyhole, it's VR, Victoria Regina.

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In the interior, there's nothing exciting. If it was a biscuit barrel, it would be lined.

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This could have been made as a gift, for let's say, the mother of the cooper,

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and she could have kept her cottons in here or something. It's a lovely little box.

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What's the price?

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-It's 150.

-That's a lot of money.

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Handle it first. You'll notice that these bands of brass,

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-they're a bit slack.

-How does that happen?

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The wood shrinks. So, a little bit of glue, I think would work wonders on that.

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-Do you think we'd be able to get it down to 100?

-We might be able to.

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-I can smile nicely. Would that help?

-I think you'd be best trying to get that off.

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Go and smile nicely and see what you can do.

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I mustn't lose that key.

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It's beautiful, isn't it?

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-Did you like that?

-I do.

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-I think it's quite good, being from Cooper's Lodge.

-Yes.

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David's impeccable manners brought the goodies home for £100.

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That makes the math easy, £200 to go.

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A lot of people don't realise that here in Portobello Road,

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there's a lot more than just a lot of stalls outside on the street.

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There are some serious specialist dealers.

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These carpets look magical because they're beautifully displayed on the walls.

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In particular, I want to show you this example which is an unusual thing.

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If you feel it, it's incredibly smooth and thin.

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The one next door is much thicker and bulkier.

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This is an knotted carpet.

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Each of the warps and wefts have been put together with loops of wool and knotted,

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and then cut, which is what makes a bit of pile.

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This rug has no pile at all because it's been woven.

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This particular rug is called a kilim, or pileless rug.

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It was made in north-west Persia in a town called Senna, around about 1880.

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What's unusual about it is its brilliant condition.

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The overall design is called Harati,

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with these scattered flower heads.

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If I take the lower edge and try to roll it,

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just look how flexible the rug is.

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That's its original purpose.

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This very portable type of mat or rug would have gone with a rich person to a communal bath-house.

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No plumbing in houses, you went to a communal place to have your bath.

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If you were rich, you'd not want to just step on the cold stone floor.

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You'd take your own roll-up rug with you.

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Amusing, isn't it?

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What would a good quality kilim rug from Senna cost today?

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For an old one like this,

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it could be yours for £3,800.

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Now, that's a magic carpet for you!

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I want the Reds to win today.

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It's got to be the Blue team.

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-Definitely.

-Go the Blue team!

-Blue team all the way.

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-What's he gone to do?

-I don't know. Where has he gone?

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He's around here somewhere. I presume he's out scouring for bargains.

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I hope so. There he is.

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-I found a nice little silver object.

-How do you know it's silver?

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-I'm guessing it's silver. It ain't gold!

-It ain't gold.

-I ain't the expert!

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-How do you know it's silver?

-Because of the hallmark.

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The boy is cute, isn't he? What does the hallmark tell you?

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Age, where it's from,

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-and that's about it.

-He's good, isn't he?

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This indeed has got a hallmark, just in here.

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Assayed in Birmingham. The lion pattern says it's silver.

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There's a little E there, I'd think this is early 20th century.

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We've got a little silver hooky thing here.

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-We don't actually know what it does, do we?

-Is it a clip of some sort?

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-How much is it?

-She wants £45 for it.

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-What do you think it's worth?

-Hopefully a lot more than that, but...

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-What do you reckon at auction?

-You're asking me what it's going to make at auction

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-but you don't know what it is.

-It's nice.

-It's nice but we don't know what it is. What is it?

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You're going to have to tell us.

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-Perhaps it was for doing your trousers up? No?

-I don't know about that.

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-It's a napkin clip.

-Oh, right.

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So, just when you're about to sit down to your eight-course meal,

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you slide your napkin in there and pull the clip down and hook it into your collar just there.

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It just holds your napkin.

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-Now you know what that is, does it make you feel better?

-I like to know what it is.

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-So you're happy you want to buy it?

-I like it.

-I'm happy.

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-You're both convinced that you can get a profit on that?

-It'll go well.

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-If we get it down a tenner or even more?

-If you can do it.

-Even more.

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-I'll try.

-Give it your best. Good luck, mate.

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-How do you think he'll get on?

-He's not a bad negotiator.

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I hope he is, for your sake!

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That's faith for you!

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Mark picked up the napkin holders for £35, leaving the Reds £175 still to spend.

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What do you think?

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-He looks so sad.

-Rather poignant. I had these puppets as a kid and the auction house wanted toys.

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-So what do you think?

-Are the strings and everything there?

-Yes.

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-What do you think of this?

-I think that's a better bet than this thing.

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Look at that. It's like a spy plane.

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Yes. What date do you think it is?

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-1950s?

-1940s, 1950s. It makes me think of all of those B-movies.

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It's got some Art-Deco step features coming off down here.

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That's right.

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I think it's sort of super-sonic, streamline imagination in the '50s of how the future might be.

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Look, the lighter comes out here.

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I thought it was an ejector seat!

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I thought to myself, "My God, he's broken it!"

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You've got the flint going in there and I guess the gas goes in there.

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-That's right.

-It fits quite snugly.

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So, the whole thing has been made as one particular unit.

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-So what kind of money are we talking about?

-I think they wanted £75?

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It's quite a lot of money, isn't it, even for a collector's piece?

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I've seen them make terrific prices.

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-Have you?

-But they have to be named Dunhill, or something like that.

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This one, is it named? It's not.

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There's no brand name there, you see. I think you ought to get it down to about 60, maybe £50.

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-Than sort of price range.

-We should go for it.

-I like it.

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-I like it very much.

-As long as you don't play with it!

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At £52, let's hope it soars at auction.

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You might well be sitting at home, shouting at the telly, saying, "Spend all the money!"

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I don't blame you. I'd like to do the same thing myself.

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But if the teams do have anything left over from their £300, they give it to their expert.

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Once the experts have got their hot little mitts on the leftover lolly,

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they'll go and find an additional item, which is offered to the teams at the auction.

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They can gamble and go with it, and if it bombs, then that acts against any profit they may have.

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If they go with it and it makes a profit, it's all win, win, win!

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What on earth is that?

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-He's got something.

-Flying saucer!

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Here's Tom.

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-What do you think, guys?

-Let's have a look at it.

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I quite like it, it's an advertising tray for a well-known whisky brand.

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-People collect this.

-That's what I thought.

-Do you like it?

-I do.

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What's it made of?

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-Copper.

-Top shout. How old is it?

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Not sure. That's where I was hoping you would come in.

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-How old are you?

-28.

-Is it older than you?

-Yes.

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I'm hoping!

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-Here's the acid test. Is it older than me?

-I wouldn't like to say!

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Get out of here! I would think it is probably 1950s, '60s.

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-How much is it?

-It's on for 25 quid.

-What would you pay for this?

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Would we turn a profit on 15 quid, d'you reckon?

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-Get a tenner off it?

-Who is going to pay that for it?

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-People who collect.

-People that have pubs, might like old drink memorabilia, country pubs.

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You always see things like that adorning the walls.

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So you spend a lot of time in pubs? Spotting these things?

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-Occasionally!

-You're absolutely right, this has got two markets, really,

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one is to decorate a pub.

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The other is there are people who collect alcohol-related items.

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Personally I'd just rather have the alcohol, but still.

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It's £25, and you're gonna get it down.

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Get a tenner off, 15 quid.

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You won't lose a lot, will you? Might make a bit.

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See what you can do. Whatever you can get knocked off,

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go and spend it on three large brandies for us.

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OK, will do. Cheers!

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-He's enthusiastic, isn't he?

-Anything to do with alcohol, yeah.

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That enthusiasm must have rubbed off. Tom's purchase, £15.

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Hang on, guys, what do you think of this?

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I know why you like that.

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It's an elephant and a monkey, what's not to like?

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That's nice. It's got its original glass as well.

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What d'you think of that?

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Again, it's one of these quirky objects. And it makes me think of Queen Victoria.

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The British Empire, yeah.

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Originally, it would have been all silver plate, you can see, and that has worn off.

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We've got a base metal which I think is spelter.

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-But it's beautifully carved.

-It is.

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-I love this trunk here.

-I do like this very much, yeah.

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I'm wondering whether the tusks there, the trunk, whether that would form the rest for the pen.

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So you could put your pen across there and you've got your ink in there.

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So that is rather a nice example.

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What's the price, the label's there?

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The price is scary, the price is 250.

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-Oh!

-That's way, way too much.

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-Far too much.

-A tiny dent there.

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I don't think it's anything to worry about considering its age.

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I'd date that around 1860, 1870.

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OK. I'm going to leave you two to negotiate, but you've got to get it down considerably, almost by half.

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-You won't do that.

-I've never paid full price for anything.

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-I don't want to know about your personal life. Do your very best.

-I will!

0:18:200:18:24

Andrew didn't shy away from David's challenge, getting the inkwell for £120.

0:18:240:18:31

5, 4, 3, 2, whoops, 1.

0:18:310:18:37

That's it, the time is up.

0:18:370:18:39

Let's recap on what the Reds bought.

0:18:390:18:42

Philip's convinced that someone, somewhere, will want the inkwell in the form of a boxer dog.

0:18:420:18:48

Let's hope so. £90 paid.

0:18:480:18:50

Mark's natty little napkin-holder only set him back £35.

0:18:500:18:56

So thrifty.

0:18:560:18:58

And the Reds' final item, something tipple-inspired,

0:18:580:19:02

Tom whisked up a deal on the tray and paid £15.

0:19:020:19:08

-Boys, did you have a good time shopping?

-Wicked time.

0:19:080:19:11

-"Wicked time"?

-Wicked time!

0:19:110:19:13

-Which is your favourite piece?

-I like the piece that I found, the silver serviette clip.

0:19:130:19:19

-Oh, yes. What about you?

-The dog head, the inkwell, I like that.

0:19:190:19:24

-Which will bring the biggest profit?

-I reckon the dog head.

-Probably.

0:19:240:19:28

-You agree?

-We got the most off that.

0:19:280:19:30

The dog's going to make the most, that's your prediction.

0:19:300:19:33

You spent a pretty mean £140.

0:19:330:19:36

So I'll take 160 off you. Thank you.

0:19:360:19:38

Now, Philip, your challenge, to go and find that bonus buy with that cash, how are you going to get on?

0:19:380:19:44

I'm going to box clever and come up something that might just do a turn.

0:19:440:19:48

-Would this "box clever" be a bit of a hint?

-Couldn't say.

0:19:480:19:51

Couldn't possibly say, could you?

0:19:510:19:53

Let's remind ourselves of what the Blues bought.

0:19:530:19:56

Only time will tell

0:19:560:19:58

whether there was a whiff of a profit with the £100 cigar box.

0:19:580:20:04

A soaring silver sensation,

0:20:040:20:06

the cigarette plane lighter swooped in at £52.

0:20:060:20:11

And what price for a piece of Victoriana?

0:20:110:20:14

£120 brought the Blues a novelty elephant's head inkwell.

0:20:140:20:20

Unforgettable!

0:20:200:20:21

So, you two boys, did you enjoy the shopping?

0:20:210:20:24

-Absolutely. A fantastic time.

-It was very good. Lovely time.

0:20:240:20:28

-Spending somebody else's money.

-Always the best kind.

0:20:280:20:33

-Which is your favourite piece, Mark?

-The chrome lighter.

0:20:330:20:36

-What about you, Andrew?

-My favourite piece is the Indian elephant ink pot, which I liked very much.

0:20:360:20:42

-Good. Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

-I reckon the aircraft.

0:20:420:20:46

I think the aircraft possibly, yes.

0:20:460:20:49

-Ah, you're agreed!

-On something, at last!

0:20:490:20:53

You spent a magnificent £272.

0:20:530:20:55

So proud of that. We'd like £28 to go across to David.

0:20:550:21:00

Not an awful lot, is it?

0:21:000:21:02

No, but you've made all sorts of wonderful profits out of small value items.

0:21:020:21:06

Well, that's true.

0:21:060:21:08

I want something small, quirky and emblematic of Andrew's interest.

0:21:080:21:14

-Oh, Lord!

-Better not elaborate on that.

0:21:140:21:18

-Later, perhaps!

-OK.

0:21:180:21:20

Well, it's that time of day again.

0:21:200:21:23

And I think I'm going to take a saunter up Cromwell Road.

0:21:230:21:27

In London, in 1851, Hyde Park bore witness to the grand opening of the first ever international exhibition,

0:21:300:21:38

enthusiastically championed by Prince Albert.

0:21:380:21:42

The Great Exhibition of the Works of Industry of All Nations in 1851, to give it its full title,

0:21:420:21:48

was designed to appeal to all classes,

0:21:480:21:51

to be of educational benefit to the entire nation,

0:21:510:21:55

and was the first exhibition of its type designed to illustrate industrial effort.

0:21:550:22:01

The building that arose to accommodate the exhibition was as grandiloquent as its intent.

0:22:010:22:10

The Crystal Palace, which provided 770,000 square feet of exhibition space,

0:22:100:22:17

and covered some 19 acres.

0:22:170:22:20

That grand structure is no longer in existence, so what then brings me to the V&A?

0:22:200:22:26

The exhibition was such a huge success that at the finish,

0:22:260:22:30

the organisers found that they'd got a profit of £186,000,

0:22:300:22:36

largely made up by 4.5 million people investing in one shilling tickets.

0:22:360:22:42

And it was with the profit that Prince Albert was ultimately able to fund what became this place,

0:22:420:22:49

the Victoria and Albert Museum.

0:22:490:22:52

Here we are in the National Art Library, at the V&A,

0:23:000:23:04

who've got the complete set of the original exhibition catalogue,

0:23:040:23:09

100,000 odd objects.

0:23:090:23:11

The exhibits were recorded, and this is just one volume out of that massive set.

0:23:110:23:19

What was so special about the objects in the Great Exhibition?

0:23:190:23:22

Let's find out.

0:23:220:23:24

Do you recognise that gilt and white baby at the back? You're right.

0:23:260:23:31

It's the steel engraving from the book in the library.

0:23:310:23:33

And it's a seriously wacky combination of birds and bulrushes

0:23:330:23:38

making up that exotic stem for a circular table.

0:23:380:23:43

Down below, we've got a much more traditional shaped piece of Victorian furniture,

0:23:430:23:47

a gentleman's easy armchair, that would've settled in any parlour in the Victorian period.

0:23:470:23:55

It was made by a firm in Bath, and whilst it's got a spectacularly carved frame -

0:23:550:24:03

we've got thistles, roses, oak leaves, and a whole multitude of foliage,

0:24:030:24:11

what's really wacky about it is the centre splat is a solid piece of porcelain

0:24:110:24:15

from the Chamberlain's Worcester factory.

0:24:150:24:18

No more patriotic an exhibition than to have in the Great Exhibition of 1851,

0:24:180:24:23

except, of course, that it's entirely impractical.

0:24:230:24:27

If you sat in that chair and leaned back against a porcelain splat, it would last precisely two minutes.

0:24:270:24:34

Because the cabinet makers and the porcelain manufacturers

0:24:340:24:38

only made this piece specifically for show, not for any practical purpose.

0:24:380:24:44

However, some of the exhibits were made for mass manufacture.

0:24:440:24:48

40 countries were exhibiting, in addition to the United Kingdom, in the Great Exhibition,

0:24:480:24:53

including a German firm who came up with this novel idea for a rocking armchair.

0:24:530:24:59

We've got some central-heating pipe here,

0:24:590:25:02

that's been bent into this shaped rocker form,

0:25:020:25:07

then all joined-up with an upholstered section,

0:25:070:25:10

which is extremely comfortable, and this went into mass production.

0:25:100:25:15

Funnily enough, I've got one at home, and they work.

0:25:150:25:18

The big question is, will our teams come up with anything that's going to be popular with the masses?

0:25:180:25:24

Ooh, I do hope so!

0:25:250:25:27

Auction time. Let's get started.

0:25:270:25:30

Well, we've staggered down from London to West Sussex, to Wisborough Green, Bellman's Saleroom,

0:25:320:25:39

to be with Jonathan at our auction.

0:25:390:25:41

-Good morning.

-Good morning.

0:25:410:25:44

Tom and Mark, their first item is this little inkwell - do you rate that?

0:25:440:25:48

It's nicely carved. These novelties are quite good fun. He's a little bit incomplete.

0:25:480:25:53

-His ears have been chewed away.

-Got no eyes.

-No.

-So it's a blind mastiff, really.

0:25:540:25:58

So he's a little bit play-worn, to say the least.

0:25:580:26:01

Yes. That's a pity, because some of these things do make big sums of money, particularly the larger ones.

0:26:010:26:07

-It's just condition, really.

-Absolutely.

-What's your estimate?

0:26:070:26:10

-£50 to £70.

-Oh, dear, £90 they paid.

0:26:100:26:13

-So we're really going to need a mastiff fancier or two on board today.

-Otherwise it's a dog.

0:26:130:26:20

A dead dog.

0:26:200:26:22

Great. Now, the hallmarked silver little napkin-holder.

0:26:220:26:27

Are you fond of a big French dinner?

0:26:270:26:30

Well, you know, un oeuf is un oeuf.

0:26:300:26:32

Yes, quite. But for the big Frenchman,

0:26:320:26:35

traditionally, he'd have a socking great damask napkin and he'd pin it up with that, which is handy,

0:26:350:26:41

except we're in West Sussex, not France.

0:26:410:26:44

-It's an English hallmark.

-Oh, it is.

-In that respect, I think we could say it's a bib holder.

0:26:440:26:49

-It's like a christening present almost.

-For toddlers to dribble into?

0:26:490:26:53

-Exactly.

-Well, that is a novel one. That's a good idea. What's your estimate on it?

0:26:530:27:00

£15 to £20.

0:27:000:27:02

Oh, right. So it's not that brilliant an idea, then?

0:27:020:27:06

-No.

-£35 they paid, you see.

0:27:060:27:08

And lastly is the Johnnie Walker's copper tray.

0:27:080:27:12

No well-dressed pub would be without one of these in the '20s and '30s.

0:27:120:27:16

I remember as a nipper, they had these behind the bar,

0:27:160:27:19

and they looked very jolly in the Devon pubs. It's a bit of breweriana.

0:27:190:27:24

I think people are less likely to be wanting to clean these things today.

0:27:240:27:29

You're not displaying them at home.

0:27:290:27:31

-So I find that a bit of a tough one.

-What's the estimate?

0:27:310:27:35

I've still said £20 - £30.

0:27:350:27:37

Oh, that's great, they paid 15.

0:27:370:27:39

So there is some hope with one of these objects, but two of them

0:27:390:27:42

seem to be decidedly on outer limits, let's put it like that.

0:27:420:27:46

So I think they're going to need their bonus buy.

0:27:460:27:50

Let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:500:27:52

So, tell me, Mark - you spent £140, you gave Philip £160, what did he spend it on?

0:27:520:27:58

Isn't that lovely?

0:27:580:28:02

It's a snuff box, French, probably about 1820.

0:28:020:28:05

It's elm.

0:28:050:28:07

And you've a tortoiseshell interior to keep your snuff dry.

0:28:070:28:10

I just think that's lovely. I paid £65 for that.

0:28:100:28:13

-What'll it make at auction?

-What d'you reckon?

0:28:130:28:16

I'd put an estimate on that of £60-£90. I wouldn't be surprised if it topped £100.

0:28:160:28:20

-It's all right, isn't it?

-I can see enthusiasm welling over here(!)

0:28:200:28:24

No, it's not really my thing, but I can see why someone would like it.

0:28:240:28:28

I'm not looking for you to buy it!

0:28:280:28:30

-That's it. What do you reckon?

-If there's enough snuff collectors out there

0:28:300:28:34

that come to the auction, then yeah.

0:28:340:28:36

-You can see them running away...

-I don't know!

0:28:360:28:39

You don't have to decide to take it right now.

0:28:390:28:43

You may not even take it after the sale of your first three items!

0:28:430:28:49

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Philip's little snuffbox.

0:28:490:28:54

-That's rather fun, Jonathan, isn't it?

-Absolutely. Nice snuffbox there.

0:28:550:28:59

French one. I know it's French, because it says "la pie voleuse"!

0:28:590:29:03

-Sounds painful.

-You can get tablets for that, can't you?

-Yes.

0:29:030:29:06

It's something to do with the magpie nicking something.

0:29:060:29:10

Absolutely. There's our magpie there, he's got a spoon in his beak.

0:29:100:29:13

The relevance of our chap here, who's got his lady down on one knee.

0:29:130:29:20

I don't know why she's so distraught,

0:29:200:29:22

-and has to apologise for this bird's misbehaviour.

-Nicely made, though.

0:29:220:29:26

-Absolutely, it's listed as elm, but you think it's something else?

-I don't know.

0:29:260:29:31

That's pressed, so it's a manufactured box that's come out of a steel dye, squashing the wood.

0:29:310:29:37

They're collectible things.

0:29:370:29:39

It's going to be something which in that respect is going to be a rarity as such.

0:29:390:29:43

-You might get £40 to £60.

-Philip Serrell paid £65, and he's hopeful.

0:29:430:29:47

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues - Mark and Andrew.

0:29:470:29:51

-Their first item is this coopered cigar box.

-Yeah. "Cigar box" is a good marketing term for this.

0:29:510:29:58

I like the contrasting woods, gives it that extra definition.

0:29:580:30:02

It is made in the way you'd expect a barrel to be coopered.

0:30:020:30:05

-Yeah.

-It's got a lovely lock on the front here which is stamped VR

0:30:050:30:08

for Victoria's cipher, which is a nice period feature as well.

0:30:080:30:12

The top looks a little bit later, perhaps,

0:30:120:30:14

the colour of this wood to the rest of it and the patination...

0:30:140:30:17

You think it's over-polished? Or even later?

0:30:170:30:20

Possibly. To me, it doesn't look contemporary to it.

0:30:200:30:23

Everything else about it is very good.

0:30:230:30:25

Wooden bits like this do quite well.

0:30:250:30:27

We'll get between £40 and £60 for it.

0:30:270:30:30

Ah. David Barby will be distrait.

0:30:300:30:32

£100 paid. So, we'll have to see about that.

0:30:320:30:35

How are you on spy planes?

0:30:350:30:37

I know nothing about spy planes.

0:30:370:30:39

-I know a little bit about decorative lighters.

-This is a popular theme, isn't it?

0:30:390:30:44

You get different periods, different planes, contemporary aeroplanes modelled as table lighters.

0:30:440:30:50

-Absolutely.

-They're not ever an accurate model of the actual planes

0:30:500:30:54

or "stylised, relatively easily and quickly cast and then chromium-plated" vision

0:30:540:31:00

of what a plane looks like.

0:31:000:31:02

I mean, it's down as a spy plane, cos I suppose it looks like the U2

0:31:020:31:05

which crashed over Russia when the Cuban Missile Crisis was going on.

0:31:050:31:09

The novelty element, the fact it is a plane and it's a lighter,

0:31:090:31:12

and certainly the fact you've got this sort of stylised Deco feel to it, it's late-'40s styling on it.

0:31:120:31:20

We are looking at about £20 or £30 for it.

0:31:200:31:22

Is that all? £52 paid. But they're a pretty bizarre trio - aren't they? -

0:31:220:31:27

what with the coopered cigar box, the chromium-plated 1960s U2 spy lighter,

0:31:270:31:32

and now we've got a heffalump down the end, with a monkey on its head playing a flute,

0:31:320:31:38

which is a bit bizarre!

0:31:380:31:40

Again, novelty inkwells, your market is the gentleman, the desk.

0:31:400:31:45

Of course there is a strong market for that sort of thing.

0:31:450:31:48

It's made of Britannia metal which is the better of the imitations of bronze.

0:31:480:31:53

You'd really like to see that in bronze, wouldn't you?

0:31:530:31:56

We would like to see that in bronze, yes.

0:31:560:31:58

But it looks to me rather kind of grey and dull. I don't know.

0:31:580:32:02

It's more like an elephant's skin now than when it was plated.

0:32:020:32:05

-So it's a bit of a novelty desk item more than anything else.

-Quite.

0:32:050:32:09

-And what we will get for that? Well, crikey. £30 to £50, I would say.

-Crikey.

0:32:090:32:13

£120 they paid.

0:32:130:32:15

One thing's for certain here, they are going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:32:150:32:20

Mark and Andrew, you spent £272, quite magnificent,

0:32:210:32:24

leaving David with a miserable £28 to go and try and find something.

0:32:240:32:29

-David, what did you find?

-Well, I like it.

0:32:290:32:31

-Oh.

-"Oh"!

-TIM LAUGHS

0:32:310:32:35

-It's something you put your nuts in, you see?

-I quite like the glass.

0:32:350:32:39

And you're a cat lover, aren't you?

0:32:390:32:41

Well, it died.

0:32:410:32:43

But, yeah, I WAS a cat lover till it died.

0:32:440:32:47

Poor thing. This is ideal for ashes!

0:32:470:32:49

-It's very sweet. How much was it?

-£15.

-That's a bargain.

0:32:500:32:56

-It's a bargain.

-How much do you reckon people would pay for that?

0:32:560:33:00

Well, it's the stylised cat, I think it's quite attractive.

0:33:000:33:03

-Probably round about £20, £25.

-I think that will go.

-Me too.

0:33:030:33:08

It's very tactile, it's chunky.

0:33:080:33:10

It is. I like it.

0:33:100:33:12

-Let the man have a handle.

-I like that actually, yeah.

0:33:120:33:15

It's obviously a major decision in your gameplay(!)

0:33:150:33:19

Cos you're relying on David to find you something for £15 that's going to get you out of trouble.

0:33:190:33:25

-I like it, yeah.

-You've done the right thing there, David, obviously.

0:33:250:33:30

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's little cat.

0:33:300:33:33

-Right then. There you go.

-OK.

-You a cat lover yourself?

0:33:340:33:39

I've got two dogs.

0:33:390:33:40

-Then you're the right man to ask about this(!)

-Exactly.

0:33:400:33:44

Whether it's '70s, I don't know.

0:33:440:33:47

Moulded glass, cats. Whatever it might be,

0:33:470:33:49

I suppose you could grow watercress in it and give it a trim!

0:33:490:33:52

What are you going to do with it?

0:33:520:33:54

-Well, absolutely.

-I mean, it's in good condition, but it's only very cheaply made, isn't it?

0:33:540:33:59

There's no markings on it. Even at the very least, you'd like it to say Waterford or something like that.

0:33:590:34:05

-It could have been made yesterday.

-Yeah.

0:34:050:34:08

So, Barby's bought it as his bonus buy.

0:34:080:34:10

He only paid £15 for it.

0:34:100:34:12

Might he just... might he get a profit on it?

0:34:120:34:14

-I think probably there's about a fiver's loss in this one.

-And that's being optimistic, is it?

0:34:140:34:20

I've put £10 to £15 on it, and that's probably fair.

0:34:200:34:23

It'll be interesting to see what happens in the auction. Thank you, Jonathan.

0:34:230:34:27

-Tom and Mark, are you feeling cool?

-Pretty cool.

-Relaxed.

0:34:320:34:36

-Come on, there must be a bit of nerves.

-I'm feeling it now.

0:34:360:34:42

I'm feeling it a bit now. Holding it together.

0:34:420:34:45

-It is nervous process, isn't it? You know about auctions. What about you, Mark?

-I've never been.

0:34:450:34:51

Just online auctions, which is a lot more relaxed.

0:34:510:34:53

-Not full of people.

-Nothing like this?

-No.

0:34:530:34:56

The treen inkwell.

0:34:560:34:57

Philip found it.

0:34:570:34:58

£90 paid.

0:34:580:35:00

The auctioneer has estimated £50 to £70.

0:35:000:35:03

That's not a bad estimate.

0:35:030:35:06

-It's got a chance.

-It's all right, isn't it, Phil?

-Yeah.

0:35:060:35:09

And here it comes.

0:35:090:35:10

Inkwell modelled as a boxer dog's head.

0:35:100:35:13

I've got a lot of interest in this, and I can start straight in at £70.

0:35:130:35:18

Bid with me at 70. Looking for 75. It's £70. 75, and 80?

0:35:180:35:22

85, and 90? 95, 100?

0:35:220:35:26

£100 against you, sir, at £100.

0:35:260:35:28

110 if you like. 110, standing close to commission now at £110.

0:35:280:35:32

120, anyone? £110 then, in the tartan at £110, and selling, 120 behind.

0:35:320:35:37

Look, he's going on.

0:35:370:35:38

-130.

-Yes!

-140.

0:35:380:35:42

Look at our man here!

0:35:420:35:44

150. 160.

0:35:440:35:47

£160, behind then still at 160.

0:35:470:35:50

Last chance and selling for £160. GAVEL BANGS

0:35:500:35:53

160, plus £70. Well done, boys.

0:35:530:35:57

We have a silver baby's bib clip,

0:35:570:35:59

a nice, interesting lot, this. And I have to start at £20.

0:35:590:36:03

It's bid with me at £20.

0:36:030:36:04

I'll take 22. 22, 25. 28, and 30.

0:36:040:36:07

£30, against you then at £30.

0:36:070:36:10

Do I see 32? Commission bid at £30.

0:36:100:36:12

£30 and I'll sell at 30. At £30 it is, then.

0:36:120:36:16

I need further interest at £30.

0:36:160:36:18

On the book and against you all at £30, last chance at 30.

0:36:180:36:21

£30, bad luck, that's minus £5. You're still plus 65. Here we go.

0:36:210:36:27

We have the embossed copper advertising tray, collector's item.

0:36:270:36:31

£10, to start me at 10. 10 is bid.

0:36:310:36:33

Thank you, sir. At 10. Do I see 12?

0:36:330:36:36

£10, seated right. £10. 12, anyone?

0:36:360:36:38

At £10, surely worth more than a tenner? I'll sell at £10.

0:36:380:36:42

Maiden bid at £10.

0:36:420:36:43

Blast it. £10, minus 5 on that.

0:36:450:36:48

You are still plus £60. £60 up, thanks to you-know-who.

0:36:480:36:53

-Amazing.

-It's pretty good, isn't it?

0:36:530:36:55

What are we going to do then? Are we going to risk anything for this bonus buy?

0:36:550:36:59

-I think we should stick, mate.

-Stick, yeah.

-No offence, Phil.

0:36:590:37:03

-Are you going with the bonus buy option? It's just going now.

-No.

0:37:030:37:06

-You're not going with it?

-No.

-No bonus buy.

0:37:060:37:08

They are determined, these boys. We're going to sell it anyway. Here it comes.

0:37:080:37:12

A carved elm circular snuffbox.

0:37:120:37:15

Early 19th century,

0:37:150:37:16

with this interesting scene. Magpie flying away with a spoon there.

0:37:160:37:20

And I've got bids to start me in at £45.

0:37:200:37:24

Is bid at £45, looking for 50, now. And 50, and 55. 60, and 65.

0:37:240:37:29

70, and 75. 80, and 85.

0:37:290:37:31

£85 commission against you at £85.

0:37:310:37:34

Do I see 90 now? At £85, and I'll sell at £85.

0:37:340:37:37

Last chance, £85.

0:37:370:37:40

Well done. You made your decision, you're £60 up.

0:37:410:37:44

You deserved your £60.

0:37:440:37:45

-It's very good, isn't it?

-We are happy about that.

0:37:450:37:48

To make a profit on Bargain Hunt is an achievement.

0:37:480:37:51

The thing now is not to tell the Blues anything. Don't say a word.

0:37:510:37:54

-In fact, go out looking miserable.

-OK.

-It's not hard.

0:37:540:37:58

Rubbish. You've done well. And well done, Phil.

0:37:580:38:01

-Yeah, thank you.

-Cheers, Phil.

0:38:010:38:03

So, Mark and Andrew, do you know how the Reds got on?

0:38:110:38:14

-No. No idea at all.

-That's good.

0:38:140:38:16

Cos we don't want you to. How are you rating your little cigar box?

0:38:160:38:22

Do you still think that's a good choice of David's?

0:38:220:38:25

-I think so, yeah.

-Very confident.

0:38:250:38:27

Well, £100 was paid for that. It is a really sweet, unusual item.

0:38:270:38:33

Anybody who likes a novelty would pay £100 straight up for that.

0:38:330:38:37

Whether it's actually for cigars, or whatever comfort you might be locking away

0:38:370:38:43

in a little box like that.

0:38:430:38:45

You could use it for anything, not just smoking.

0:38:450:38:48

But it's a nice thing.

0:38:480:38:50

Anyway, the auctioneer has only put £40 to £60 on it, which I think is pretty miserable, actually.

0:38:500:38:55

-Yes, so do I.

-We all rate it.

0:38:550:38:57

It's a nice crowded room. Here it comes.

0:38:570:39:00

We have a Victorian brass coopered tobacco cigar box

0:39:000:39:03

with this nice Victorian stamped lock.

0:39:030:39:06

And I've got a flurry of bids, and I'll start at 45, 55,

0:39:060:39:13

£60 on the book with me, at £60, I'm bid at £60.

0:39:130:39:17

£60, looking for 65. At £60, 65, anyone?

0:39:170:39:21

On the book against you all at £60.

0:39:210:39:23

65. And 70. £70 it is then.

0:39:230:39:26

Against you all at £70. At 70, I'll sell then.

0:39:260:39:28

£70, last chance, at 70?

0:39:280:39:31

-Bad luck. Minus 30 on that.

-It's not looking good.

0:39:310:39:36

Maybe not. Here comes the plane.

0:39:360:39:38

A chromium plated table lighter in the form of a spy plane.

0:39:380:39:41

Mid-20th century example, this. Where can I start?

0:39:410:39:45

-I've got £50, I've got £60.

-Yes!

0:39:450:39:48

Looking for 65, now. 65, and 70.

0:39:480:39:52

£70 and stopping straightaway at £70. 5 anywhere else?

0:39:520:39:56

At £70, I'll sell. All done at 70.

0:39:560:39:59

Well, that makes you £18.

0:39:590:40:01

-It's not all doom and gloom.

-All is not lost.

-The inkwell.

0:40:010:40:06

Victorian spelter novelty inkwell modelled as an elephant's head

0:40:060:40:09

with this little monkey sitting on the top.

0:40:090:40:12

And I've got bids to start me in at £30, £35, £40 is bid.

0:40:120:40:17

At £40, 45. 50, 55,

0:40:170:40:20

-60, 65, 70, £70 against you. 75, anyone?

-Come on!

0:40:200:40:26

£70 against you all at 70. I'll sell at £70.

0:40:260:40:29

Last chance at £70. All done? No more. £70.

0:40:290:40:33

That is minus 50 quid on that.

0:40:370:40:39

-You're minus £62.

-Dear, oh, dear.

-Minus £62.

0:40:390:40:45

What are you going to do about the cat?

0:40:450:40:47

-Let's just go for it.

-Definitely going to go for it.

0:40:470:40:50

What's the worst that could happen?

0:40:500:40:52

-Let's go for it.

-Are you going to do it?

0:40:520:40:58

-Yes, definitely.

-You're determined.

0:40:580:41:00

Absolutely, yes. Let's do it.

0:41:000:41:04

We have a decision. We're going with the pussycat.

0:41:040:41:08

We have this wonderful moulded clear glass bowl modelled as a cat,

0:41:080:41:12

and I have a bid to start me at £12.

0:41:120:41:15

£12 is bid. £12, I'll take 15 if you wish to bid.

0:41:150:41:20

15 standing at the back waving now.

0:41:200:41:21

Left on commission at 15. Looking for 18.

0:41:210:41:26

At £15, with the lady, dead ahead at £15 and selling.

0:41:260:41:28

Last chance, £15.

0:41:280:41:31

£15. Wiped its face.

0:41:320:41:37

Well, chaps. What a roller coaster, eh?

0:41:370:41:41

-Dear oh dear.

-Well done for the plane, anyway.

0:41:410:41:44

That was really super. I'll tell you what, Mum's the word.

0:41:440:41:47

We'll reveal all in a minute.

0:41:470:41:50

Isn't it funny on Bargain Hunt how it turns out?

0:41:590:42:02

Two teams, such poles apart.

0:42:020:42:04

Shopping in the same place, shopping at the same time.

0:42:040:42:09

Well, there you go.

0:42:090:42:10

The runners up today are today, I'm afraid, the Blues.

0:42:100:42:13

Bad luck, boys. You were very unlucky there, actually.

0:42:130:42:16

You went with the bonus buy, but that sadly didn't make a profit

0:42:160:42:20

and didn't make a loss, so no shame in that, David.

0:42:200:42:23

Overall I'm afraid, of course, you finish up at minus 62.

0:42:230:42:27

On the other hand, for the Reds, you went shopping at the same place, they finish up with a profit

0:42:270:42:32

of £60. Minus 62, and we have plus 60.

0:42:320:42:39

congratulations on that. Been so much better if you'd gone with the bonus buy.

0:42:390:42:44

If you'd trusted Philip you'd have been plus 80, actually,

0:42:440:42:47

cos it was a nice profit out of the bonus buy.

0:42:470:42:49

But nevertheless, you ring-fenced your profits. Here's you £60.

0:42:490:42:54

-Thank you.

-Congratulations on that. I hope you've all had a great time.

0:42:540:42:57

We've loved having you on the programme.

0:42:570:43:00

-Join us soon for more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:000:43:02

For more information about Bargain Hunt, including how the programme was made,

0:43:020:43:07

visit the website at bbc.co.uk/lifestyle

0:43:070:43:10

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:100:43:12

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:120:43:14

The bargain hunters do battle at Portobello Market, where antique experts David Barby and Philip Serrell attempt to guide their two all-male teams through the maze of delectables on offer. Both teams are confident, but will their items crash and burn or fly over at the auction? Presenter Tim Wonnacott takes a stroll over to the V&A museum, and discovers gems of Royal London's history amongst its many corridors.


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