London Bargain Hunt


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London

Antiques challenge. A team of publishers take on managers of a theatre company at Alexandra Palace. They are helped in their quest by David Barby and Philip Serrell.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Ah, welcome, fellow agents.

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My informants tell me that we've got a couple of teams inside here.

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Good men and women, young sporty types.

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I'll sniff 'em out and give you the lowdown.

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Hello and welcome to Alexandra Palace.

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Somewhere out there in this throng of people are our teams,

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longing to grab their fistful of cash.

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Their task is to spend £300 in an hour,

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finding three objects which they'll then cart off to auction

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and the team that makes the most profit wins.

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Now that sounds quite straightforward, doesn't it?

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Well, you ain't seen nothing yet.

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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Today for your delectation and entertainment

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what better thing to get the old ticker racing than an old fashioned battle between the sexes?

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For the Reds, we've got David and Matthew

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and for the Blues we've got Michelle and Zena.

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Welcome.

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Strictly speaking, boys, it should be ladies first

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so are you going to be gentlemanly and let the ladies win today?

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We're going to very politely let them lose.

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Ah, a very well-considered answer, if you don't mind my saying so.

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So how did you two get to know each other?

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We've known each other since we were children. We went to school together.

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-Did you?

-And now we work together.

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-Working at what?

-We write children's books.

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We write a series of children's books, just happen to have a couple here.

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That was a very smooth move there, I must say.

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-About a naughty boy called Yuck.

-Yes.

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-And...

-We wrote another series.

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-We write lots of books.

-You do write lots of books.

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-Well, that's amazing. Here we've got Yuck's Amazing Underpants.

-Yeah.

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What was your inspiration for Yuck?

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Well, I used to like doing some yucky things when I was a child.

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I once had an experiment to see just how yucky

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I could make my socks, so I wore them for six weeks

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-and by the end of it they were a little bit crusty and smelly.

-Bit of gorgonzola.

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-Bit of gorgonzola, bit of camembert.

-Oh, yeah. Now, David,

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-what do you collect?

-I collect books, first edition books.

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I kind of fell into it by finding out that I owned a book that was worth quite a bit of money.

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It was a first edition Harry Potter.

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-Gosh.

-That was worth £12,000.

-Never?

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-Is that what one's worth?

-Yeah.

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And I sort of did a bit more wheeling and dealing thereafter with different editions.

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Apart from writing books, collecting books, talking all about books,

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what do you like to get up to in your spare time?

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If I'm not writing, I like to get as far away from it as possible and go fly fishing.

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You also have a fondness for maggots, don't you?

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Yeah, this is on the yucky theme, when I was a yucky boy.

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-Yes.

-And I went fishing.

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For a dare, I basically ate the bait which ended up as a maggot sandwich.

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Hope our lunchtime viewers today are enjoying that little piece, as you've upset half the nation.

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Thank you, boys. Now, girls, so what's the connection and how do you two know each other?

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We met nine years ago when we worked together at the Edinburgh Festival

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and we enjoyed that so much that we decided to set up our own company

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and for the last five years, we've been running the smallest theatre in London.

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-You never have.

-We have.

-And where is this theatre?

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-It's in Camden.

-Now tell me about starting up with 1p.

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We started our business with 1p and we opened a business bank account with that

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and we decided that we would never get into debt and that we would always be thrifty...

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-Mmm-hmm.

-Which has meant that we've been more successful than many High Street banks...

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-Most of the international banks.

-And many popular businesses.

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So Michelle, have you got any weaknesses, darling?

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Yeah, I like anything blue and anything with a bird on it

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and I'm also partial to copies of Catch 22, which is my favourite book and I'm aiming to collect 22 copies.

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So far, I've got eight. I'm hoping for a first edition, like David.

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Yes. Well, we all hope for one like that. Zena, what do you collect?

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I like '50s - '70s teapot collections and...

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-Mixing bowls?

-Yes, mixing bowls.

-Sugar bowls?

-Yes.

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Lovely. Pyrex?

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-Yes. Oh, I love Pyrex.

-I love Pyrex.

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Good, well I think we're going to have a very interesting programme today. This is now the money moment.

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There's your £300.

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-Thank you.

-You know the rules, your experts await and off you go, and very, very, very good luck.

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Quite like a maggot sandwich myself.

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Time to meet our men on the inside.

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Heading the Reds with fabulous form and an eye for detail, it's Philip Serrell.

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Smooth and sweet talking, the Blues benefit from the eyes and ears of David Barby.

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Things like that, that copper pot.

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Oh, here's a nice bit of treen.

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Is the same sort of deal where it's all modern stuff.

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What are you particularly interested in yourselves?

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I quite like 1950s style.

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-We want something a bit ridiculous.

-You want something a bit ridiculous?

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-Well, something that people will remember.

-You got me.

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-You like animals, don't you?

-Yes.

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Well, come on, Michelle, let me show you this.

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Right, it's this gentleman here.

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Now is there anything here that really takes your fancy?

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-This is what I...

-An owl!

-Exactly. Now what do you think?

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-Oh, I do like an owl.

-Right in the middle there.

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-What's it for?

-Well, this is to put papers in.

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If you were a lady of quality you would have put your papers in here and letters that you'd written

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and letters that you wanted to write or possibly half written and it would be contained in here.

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-Does one of you want to handle it?

-I've never seen anything like it before so that might be a good thing.

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The only thing is, if you went round a stately home you might

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have seen something like this on a dressing or writing table.

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Would the Queen use something like that?

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I think it's of her quality, yes.

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-Every single section of silver, you see the mark there?

-Has a hallmark.

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Each piece is in lovely condition and every piece is hallmarked.

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It's up to you. Don't feel obliged just because it's an object that I like.

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I recognise him from television and I hope he's going to buy it.

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My main consideration is that it looks so bright and shiny.

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Both of you like it. I know you like it because of the owl.

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Try and negotiate. If you can get it for £90 I shall be delighted.

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-It's certainly got to come down lower than the £145.

-Oh, yeah.

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-All right. Start low.

-Start low.

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Would you do this for a monkey?

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-I'd do it for a 100.

-80?

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No. That is the best, love, sorry.

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-100 is the best?

-£100, yeah.

-Ooh.

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-Try for 95.

-95?

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Go on, then. 95, then.

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-Thank you very much.

-OK. Thank you.

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A monkey, Zena? We're not at London Zoo.

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-£95 it is.

-Oh, brilliant.

-That's yours.

-Thank you very much.

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That little toast rack there.

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-Oh, yeah.

-Come on, let's go and have a look then.

-Nice.

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It's over there behind a ladder.

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Have you got more of these?

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-I've got a set in a box.

-Can I have a look please?

-How many in a set?

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-Thank you. When you're holding silver...

-Yeah.

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Right, just take that in your hand.

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Go on. Just flex the rim.

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-Silver's a very soft metal.

-Yeah.

-Yes, very.

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-Can you feel how soft that is?

-Yeah.

-How thin a gauge that is?

-Yeah.

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Is that silver plated or silver?

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No, this is silver. If you look just there, you can see a hallmark.

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These were assayed, it's Birmingham, 1905. £145.

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-I think at auction they're going to make £60 to £90, OK?

-OK.

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-Ask him if he can help us on price. Are you happy to do that?

-Yep.

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-Yeah.

-Excuse me, what's the very best you can do on this for us?

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-You've got them for 145.

-I can do 'em for 90.

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-£90?

-Yeah.

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For me that's the top end of our estimate but I still think you know... .

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At an auction we might find someone.

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Auctions are just bizarre things and I think they're quite nice quality.

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-So do you want to buy them?

-We, we're going to go for them.

-Right.

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First purchase for the Reds and they spent a healthy £90.

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So it's plastic.

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-Yeah.

-Genuine.

-It's nice. It looks quite Ikea-ish, but,

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do you know what I mean? You could see it in a modern house.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah. What do you think?

-Well, if it was £2, for example, we could make a profit on that.

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-I think so.

-This stand here is all predominantly 1950s and it's all very good quality.

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-It's style, you're not going to get that for £2.

-No.

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I think we should continue looking.

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OK, yes. We can bear it in mind.

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Quite right, David, a firm hand there with those Blues.

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-That's lovely.

-Yeah.

-That's horrible.

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Yeah.

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Now are you standing by for a visual treat?

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Well, if you are, you have to put your spectacles on because it's quite small.

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What do you think about that?

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Well, it is what you call an acquired taste.

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Technically it's a brooch.

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On the back of the pin bar, you can just make out a tiny little mark

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and the triangular mark is a Paris discharge mark, next door to that is another

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little mark which I can't decipher which should be the maker's mark.

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It's got two little nuts on the back

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and those two nuts on the back secure this solid gold cast bust

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which is actually sitting, rather eccentrically, inside a frame made out of pieces of bamboo.

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But the central figure itself is cast in, stands in, relief.

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She's wearing a pointy cap and if you look carefully again,

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you can see that she's got a mask over her face.

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I reckon she's a harlequin, some kind of street player.

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In fact, she might be connected with the world of the music hall.

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But I guess her most endearing feature is her arm, held up

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like this she's just hanging, dangling, a freshwater pearl.

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This could be yours for £320.

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Is that expensive?

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I don't think so.

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-Um, it's this, here.

-Oh.

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It would tie in with our writing book.

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So this would be on a desk and it would give you all the elements that you need for writing.

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So you have the stamps, you rest the pens on there

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and then you've got red and then you've got blue ink.

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So it's a nice little piece, almost architectural.

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Almost like room furnishings with these two pillar drawers here.

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-HE WHISTLES

-Do you like that?

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-No?

-No, I'm not convinced.

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You probably wanted to look for something a bit more decorative?

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-Something a bit cheaper and a bit more decorative, I think.

-OK.

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-Can we bear that in mind?

-Certainly.

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-Yeah.

-Because we may come back to this and say right,

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there's nothing else we can find, shall we go for that?

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-OK.

-All right?

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You've got your work cut out for you there David.

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Still, keep looking. £205 and 40 minutes left to play with.

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-Chaps, you are book boys, aren't you?

-Yes, we are.

-Oh, that's nice.

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Operative Printers Assistants Society. Look at that, look.

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A piece of stained glass.

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-Do you think it's nice?

-Yeah, it is.

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Someone's got a little panel to fill or a space to...

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What you'd really want is two authors who would buy this and put it in their own home, wouldn't you?

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-Do you know any authors?

-We might do.

-Fancy that!

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Excuse me my dear, what's the best you can do on that for us?

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I'd do 50 on that.

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This is where this job gets really difficult. I think that's lovely...

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-You two think it's lovely. We'd all like to own it.

-Yeah.

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We'd give 50 quid for it, right.

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I think it might make £30 to £50 in the auction.

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So not withstanding we all like it and love it, which is the one big issue,

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the other issue's price.

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And on the price issue you could buy it and lose 20 quid.

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Yeah. So we have to buy it cheap.

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Yeah, but you've still got to buy what you like, don't you?

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-Very much so.

-And hope that other people like it as well.

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Spot on. Could you hang onto it for about 30 minutes?

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Can't guarantee we'll have it but would you mind doing that for us?

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-No problem.

-You're an absolute angel.

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-Thank you very, very much.

-You're welcome.

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That's a tentative hold for the Reds. With £210 to spare, they can afford to be choosy.

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I like this cigar cutter... before the capstan.

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-Oh, isn't that good?

-It's a very slim cigar.

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Well, you have those little panatellas, don't you?

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Oh, and that's the end where bits come out the bottom.

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-Should we be promoting smoking?

-Probably not.

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This is a collector's item, it's not promoting smoking.

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-Do you like that?

-It's not bad.

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-You like a ship don't you?

-I like nautical things.

-Yeah.

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The young lady might be interested in that, sir, but not at that price.

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- No. I'll go for 75. - What do you reckon Zena?

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-I quite like it. Would you do it for 60?

-No.

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Maybe 65?

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Oh, they don't want much, do they?

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The ladies are going to have to start deciding very soon.

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I might just see if I can help them along a little.

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How are you getting on, have you bought three items?

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We've bought one item so far.

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What? You've only bought one item?!

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Zene, what are you doing here, girl?

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-We've got a few things in the pipeline.

-Oh, yes.

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-How many things in the pipeline? Half a dozen?

-Hang on a minute.

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-You've had 45 minutes.

-Oh.

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-You've only got another quarter of an hour.

-We can go back.

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We're making this stall-holder sweat.

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Think about your expert. You want to get moving!

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I think it's called exasperation.

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I think it's called making your mind up time.

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-Anyway, good luck.

-Thank you.

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Are you new to Bargain Hunt?

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A little bit tender, unsure about what's going on?

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Well, don't worry, stick with me, I'll explain everything.

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You see, I'm a presenter.

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Ah, there you are.

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We've given our teams £300 apiece

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but they mustn't spend the whole lot.

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We want them to leave some leftover lolly for our distinguished experts

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to go and find that bonus buy which hopefully will boost their profits at auction. There you are.

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Not that complicated, is it?

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What do you think of him?

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Come on then. Onward, onward, onward.

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-I'm going backwards.

-I think you better buck up.

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Someone's buckling under pressure.

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One item bought, two to find and 20 minutes to go.

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-We need to do what Phil said and find a mixed stall.

-Yeah.

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Ah, this looks like a decision.

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-How did you get on?

-We got it for 45.

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Oh, that's brilliant. Come on, we better go and get something else.

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Are the girls any closer to making their minds up?

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-It's OK, he's there.

-He's still here.

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-Hello.

-We're back.

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So did you say you could do this one for 60?

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- 65. - Oh, it was worth a try.

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Might as well have a go, hey?

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Have a try. Do you like it?

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-Yes, please.

-Let's take it.

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-Thanks. OK.

-Well done, girls.

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£65 for the novelty cigar cutter.

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-What have you found, Phil?

-Well, I'm trying to work out in my own mind whether I like that or not.

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-Do you like it?

-It's all right. What is it made of?

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I like it.

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It's kind of got a little bit of character.

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-I can't work out if it's cheap.

-Well, it's brass, right, and it's arts and crafts,

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which is sort of the in vogue thing at the minute.

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I'm just trying to work out in my own mind whether it's 20 quid or 80 quid.

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Maybe we could buy it for 20 quid.

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-I don't know whose stall it is. Is this you, sir?

-It is, yes.

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What's the very best you could do on this?

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-The best on it would be 45.

-45?

-Yes.

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What do you think it is? Is it by anybody?

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I think it's arts and crafts,

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about 1900, and these are pomegranates.

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Would 40 quid be any good?

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Ah, it's really nice. How much money have we spent, Phil?

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You've spent £135 but, I mean, money's not issue.

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-We've got no time left so, yes or no?

-Let's get it, let's get it.

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At last, decisive action.

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One brass tray for £40.

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Gloves. A glove holder.

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What's special about it?

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Do you know anything about the Art Nouveau movement in Scotland?

0:18:050:18:08

-Rennie Mackintosh.

-Exactly.

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So we're looking at the end of the 19th, beginning of the 20th Century.

0:18:100:18:14

Now if you look at that,

0:18:140:18:16

it's all done by hand and it's in that style of elongated flower heads,

0:18:160:18:21

it's very similar to the designs you would have seen in Miss Cranston's Tearooms.

0:18:210:18:25

-You're not just buying a glove holder, you're buying a work of art.

-Yes.

0:18:250:18:30

Just something a little bit unusual.

0:18:300:18:33

It's nice and there's something quite modern about it as well in that it looks quite organic and quite crafty.

0:18:330:18:39

That's right. I think somebody's going to actually mount this and put it on the wall as a picture.

0:18:390:18:44

If you're interested in textiles. It's unusual to have textiles to come up in the show

0:18:440:18:48

and if we can get it at a reasonable price, I would advise you to go for it.

0:18:480:18:53

I quite like a bit of textile.

0:18:530:18:55

-You do.

-Zena's got a sewing machine, I've got knitting needles.

0:18:550:18:58

Right, well there we are. Look, it's £50.

0:18:580:19:00

-I will have a word with the dealer to see if I can get it down slightly.

-OK.

-OK.

0:19:000:19:04

-Meantime, have a chat.

-Thank you.

0:19:040:19:07

-What do you reckon then?

-I don't like it.

0:19:070:19:10

What don't you like? Do you think you could make it?

0:19:100:19:12

Um, yeah.

0:19:120:19:14

On a sewing machine or by hand?

0:19:140:19:16

-By hand.

-What would you pay for it,

0:19:160:19:18

if he can get the price down, certainly not 50...

0:19:180:19:22

Right, come on girls, guess what?

0:19:220:19:24

-How much?

-I got it down to £25.

0:19:240:19:26

-Half price.

-Now do we go for it?

0:19:260:19:29

I like it. Zena's the one who needs to decide, I think.

0:19:290:19:32

I'm not so keen but I'm happy to go with it. I think if you got it down to half price...

0:19:320:19:36

Right. You either go for this or you go for the ink stand which is very, very pricey.

0:19:360:19:42

This.

0:19:420:19:43

OK. Oh, hallelujah!

0:19:430:19:46

Hallelujah, indeed!

0:19:460:19:48

And just in the nick, as time is up.

0:19:480:19:52

Let's recap on what the Reds bought.

0:19:520:19:54

The Reds picked up the Birmingham silver gilt goblets

0:19:540:19:57

for a nice round £90.

0:19:570:20:00

£45 bought the stained glass lead panel

0:20:000:20:04

and finally, for £40, the brass tray.

0:20:040:20:08

-Matthew and David, did you have a good time shopping?

-Very good.

0:20:120:20:16

-Which is your favourite piece, Matthew?

-The stained glass.

0:20:160:20:19

-What about you David?

-The silver goblets.

-Silver goblets favourites.

0:20:190:20:23

-Which will make most profit?

-Stained glass.

-You're obsessed.

0:20:230:20:27

Probably will be the stained glass.

0:20:270:20:29

Will it? Well, you spent a perfectly respectable £175.

0:20:290:20:33

-I'd like £125 of leftover lolly. There you go, Philip Serrell.

-Yeah.

0:20:330:20:37

You've had fun with these guys?

0:20:370:20:39

Having spent all day with them, I'm going to buy a lighthouse or a ladder.

0:20:390:20:43

-I've been talking to them like that all day long.

-What are you going to do with your 125?

0:20:430:20:48

It's either a ladder or a lighthouse to get me up there with them.

0:20:480:20:51

Well, good luck with that, Phil.

0:20:510:20:53

Lot's of clues there. Let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:20:530:20:56

The ladies kicked the day off with the silver and oak

0:20:580:21:01

desk folder and despite offering a monkey, they handed over £95.

0:21:010:21:06

Next up they took a while to decide, but for £65

0:21:060:21:10

the Blue team acquired one novelty cigar cutter.

0:21:100:21:14

And finally, for £25, a beautifully embroidered

0:21:140:21:18

linen Glaswegian glove pocket.

0:21:180:21:21

Just what you need.

0:21:210:21:23

-So girls, did you have a good time?

-Really good.

0:21:250:21:28

-With the shopping?

-Fantastic, thank you.

0:21:280:21:30

Which is your favourite, Zene?

0:21:300:21:32

-I like the nautical-themed cigar cutter.

-That's your favourite?

0:21:320:21:37

-Yeah.

-Michelle, what's your favourite, darling?

0:21:370:21:40

I'm quite keen on the gloves case, the nice bit of handmade, beautiful craft.

0:21:400:21:45

Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

0:21:450:21:48

Possibly the silver folder.

0:21:480:21:51

If it doesn't, we'll melt it down.

0:21:510:21:53

-But you're agreed that the silver folder is your prediction for the biggest profit?

-Probably.

0:21:530:21:59

That's confident, I love it(!)

0:21:590:22:00

Anyway, you spent £185, I'd like £115 of leftover lolly, please.

0:22:000:22:05

-Thank you very much. David.

-Thank you, sir.

0:22:050:22:07

-There, that's what you like to do.

-Lot of money, isn't it?

-You like to grab it.

0:22:070:22:12

Big old fair out there, rather good fun, I thought.

0:22:120:22:14

Yes, but two contestants with such diverse interests,

0:22:140:22:19

it was difficult to pinpoint any particular piece.

0:22:190:22:21

-But they were quite determined.

-Were they? Well, that's good.

0:22:210:22:25

-Now to find an excellent bonus buy with which to boost their profits

-They're very keen on names.

0:22:250:22:30

-Are they?

-Very keen on names, so I'm going after a big name item.

0:22:300:22:35

All right. Well, good luck.

0:22:350:22:38

Well, after the cut and thrust of all this buying,

0:22:380:22:41

I'm going to head off somewhere incredibly refined.

0:22:410:22:45

If you want to fill your cultural boots,

0:22:470:22:50

where better to head than upmarket South Kensington, London?

0:22:500:22:55

Lined with some of London's most prestigious museums,

0:22:550:22:59

a casual stroll down Exhibition Road

0:22:590:23:02

leads you inevitably to the Victoria and Albert Museum,

0:23:020:23:05

which is where I'm heading today.

0:23:050:23:07

The V&A welcomes over 2 million visitors a year through its doors

0:23:080:23:14

and is arguably the world's greatest museum of art and design.

0:23:140:23:19

It houses over 17,500 sculptures and 10,500 oil paintings.

0:23:190:23:26

The museum has been in existence since 1852

0:23:260:23:31

and at its present location since 1857.

0:23:310:23:34

There are 7 miles of galleries covering 3 acres of land.

0:23:340:23:40

The question is, how do you fill all these corridors with all these exhibits?

0:23:430:23:48

The answer is, with generous bequests,

0:23:480:23:52

in part, from benefactors like Constantine Alexander Ionides.

0:23:520:23:57

This legacy, comprising 1,158 pictures, drawings,

0:23:580:24:04

prints and old masters, came to the museum in 1901,

0:24:040:24:09

and is it the collection of one wealthy Anglo-Greek art-loving shipping family.

0:24:090:24:16

The Constantine Alexander Ionides collection is named after the man who, for the benefit of the nation,

0:24:160:24:23

bequeathed his entire collection to the museum.

0:24:230:24:26

And what a stunning collection it is.

0:24:300:24:33

Ionides was specific as to how his bequest was to be treated.

0:24:330:24:38

He wanted it to stay all together, he didn't want any pieces to go out on loan and he would have

0:24:380:24:43

particularly liked this two tier arrangement of hanging the paintings

0:24:430:24:48

because it was just like it would have looked in his home.

0:24:480:24:52

He also wanted these pictures to be enjoyed and available to students

0:24:520:24:58

and at the time, this picture was cutting edge British contemporary art.

0:24:580:25:03

This masterpiece is by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and, interestingly,

0:25:030:25:08

Ionides knew all four of the figures that you see in the picture.

0:25:080:25:13

In fact, his cousin, Mary, this girl on the left,

0:25:130:25:18

was having a passionate affair with Burne-Jones at the time

0:25:180:25:21

that the picture was painted.

0:25:210:25:23

It's a pre-Raphaelite picture, but what do you like about it?

0:25:230:25:27

Well, the composition is fascinating, isn't it?

0:25:270:25:30

It oozes medievalism which is what the pre-Raphaelites were steeped in,

0:25:300:25:35

but what I rather like is the rather geometric forms of this mill building in the background.

0:25:350:25:40

Just look at the outline of those buildings.

0:25:400:25:43

That could be Corbusier in the early part of the 20th Century.

0:25:430:25:48

The focal point of the picture are, of course, these women.

0:25:480:25:51

They're gorgeous, they're clad in exotic flowing robes,

0:25:510:25:57

which give the picture such textural and tonal quality.

0:25:570:26:01

But Burne-Jones didn't just do paintings, he was truly a polymath of the applied arts, too.

0:26:010:26:08

He designed jewellery, he designed ceramics, he designed textiles,

0:26:080:26:12

including tapestries and, believe it or not, he was responsible for the decoration on this grand piano.

0:26:120:26:20

Amazing, isn't it?

0:26:200:26:22

You've got that salon, which is what the Ionides family had,

0:26:220:26:26

and they wanted just the decorated object to fit in.

0:26:260:26:30

And this is it.

0:26:300:26:32

The big question today is, what is going to be IT for our teams over at the auction?

0:26:320:26:38

I've come to Bellmans Auctioneers and Valuers in West Sussex

0:26:400:26:44

to meet our auctioneer for today, Jonathan Pratt.

0:26:440:26:48

-Morning, Tim.

-Morning. Our Red team, Matthew, David and Philip Serrell,

0:26:500:26:54

their first item are these six little jokers in a case.

0:26:540:26:58

Hallmarked silver, 1905 by the Adie brothers.

0:26:580:27:01

Quite nicely presented with gilt bowls, what can you say more than that, really?

0:27:010:27:05

-For the cure, presumably.

-Absolutely.

0:27:050:27:07

-A saleable item I guess.

-They're nicely presented and there are six.

0:27:070:27:11

-£70 to £100.

-Brilliant. £90 paid.

0:27:110:27:13

Next is rather an unusual object, isn't it, this stained glass panel?

0:27:130:27:17

Well, I mean, I quite like this sort of decorative glasswork.

0:27:170:27:20

Obviously it's got a limited appeal but there's a lot of work that goes

0:27:200:27:25

into it and you don't get that sort of thing today really.

0:27:250:27:28

Certainly not just in your office, would you?

0:27:280:27:31

No. And it's a sort of arts and craftsy look, too, isn't it, really?

0:27:310:27:35

I think it's rather a handsome panel.

0:27:350:27:37

Philip Serrell found it, £45 he paid, what's your estimate?

0:27:370:27:40

-Probably between £20 and £40 for it.

-Difficult to value, though, frankly.

0:27:400:27:44

Now, the rectangular arts and crafts tray.

0:27:440:27:46

Limited appeal, I suppose, in some respects,

0:27:460:27:49

people don't want to clean it but it's decorative and functional.

0:27:490:27:53

You could have your tea in front of the telly on it I suppose.

0:27:530:27:57

£50 to £80.

0:27:570:27:58

Very good. £40 paid.

0:27:580:27:59

So Philip's been quite smart with finding that and in case they don't do well,

0:27:590:28:03

they're going to need the bonus buy so let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:030:28:07

Well, chaps, you feeling fit?

0:28:080:28:10

-Very good.

-Yeah.

0:28:100:28:12

Now you gave Philip Serrell £125, yes? You spent £175.

0:28:120:28:17

-Has he spent all of your £125?

-Don't look at me like that. No, he has not.

0:28:170:28:21

-Look at that.

-Gosh.

0:28:210:28:24

-Wow.

-It's a serpentine lighthouse,

0:28:240:28:27

which I thought resembled you two, really.

0:28:270:28:30

-What, David being particularly lofty?

-Yeah.

-Yes.

0:28:300:28:33

-How much did you pay for it?

-£45.

-£45.

-That's not bad.

0:28:330:28:36

What made you buy it?

0:28:360:28:38

Do you know what chiefly made me buy it?

0:28:380:28:40

I had one of these three days before we did the filming

0:28:400:28:44

that was that bad that made £850 and I thought if that made £850 and this was 45 quid I, you know.

0:28:440:28:51

But they are quite collectable.

0:28:510:28:53

-Yeah, that's true.

-It's all about colour and the rest of it but

0:28:530:28:57

I think that's going to make £40 to £60.

0:28:570:29:00

-You know how much he paid now, right? £45.

-Yeah.

0:29:000:29:02

In his opinion, there's a prediction of profit,

0:29:020:29:05

some of these things, the bigger ones, make big amounts of money.

0:29:050:29:09

There is some profit in this in your opinion?

0:29:090:29:11

-I honestly think there's profit.

-Just stay with that thought, boys.

0:29:110:29:15

Because for the viewers at home, we're going to show this lamp to the auctioneer

0:29:150:29:19

and see what he thinks.

0:29:190:29:20

So is this a beacon for you?

0:29:200:29:24

-Beacon of hope?

-Yes.

0:29:240:29:26

Well, we have sold quite a lot of this sort of thing in the last

0:29:260:29:29

couple of years. We had a good collection of it.

0:29:290:29:31

-Relatively speaking, I think it's reasonably modern, made in the last 50 years.

-Yes.

0:29:310:29:37

This bit of chicken wire was possibly not intentionally there,

0:29:370:29:41

it's just there to prop the little hat up.

0:29:410:29:44

So what do you think was there?

0:29:440:29:45

You would have had a glass sleeve that sat in there,

0:29:450:29:48

replacing that and then that would have perched on top nicely and then you wouldn't have had this sort of...

0:29:480:29:54

-Yes.

-..bit of metal grille in there.

0:29:540:29:57

That could quite easily be replaced, couldn't it?

0:29:570:29:59

If you're dedicated enough to do it, absolutely.

0:29:590:30:02

It's an incredibly well-made object.

0:30:020:30:06

-Oh, absolutely.

-And I think rather fun.

0:30:060:30:09

-Absolutely, yes.

-What's your estimate?

-£30 to £50.

0:30:090:30:12

Brilliant, £45 paid.

0:30:120:30:14

That's it for the Reds, now for the Blues, Zena and Michelle.

0:30:140:30:20

The silver and oak encrusted blotter.

0:30:200:30:24

Really sort of captures the sort of style of the late 19th century, early 20th century.

0:30:240:30:28

-I like that quite a lot, actually.

-Good. How much do you like it?

0:30:280:30:32

I've said £80 to £120.

0:30:320:30:35

Well, that's brilliant. £95 they paid so that stands a real chance.

0:30:350:30:39

-What about the cigar cutter?

-Well, it's a German one, brass and tin.

0:30:390:30:43

It's modelled on a ship's engine room telegraph,

0:30:430:30:46

-so you'd pull the little knob back there.

-Full steam ahead.

0:30:460:30:49

-Exactly.

-Yeah. But actually it's used for cutting cheroots.

0:30:490:30:53

-It is really quite a novelty, I suppose.

-Yes.

0:30:530:30:56

How much do you think it's worth?

0:30:560:30:58

-I think between £30 and £50 for it.

-Is that all?

-Mmm.

-£65, they paid.

0:30:580:31:03

The last item's bit of needlework.

0:31:030:31:05

Quite nice stylised flower heads.

0:31:050:31:08

Exactly. The style you can see is typical Scottish-inspired Charles Rennie Mackintosh sort of thing.

0:31:080:31:13

Nobody would use it for gloves, they might frame it.

0:31:130:31:16

-It's just a small collectable item, it doesn't really have any great function.

-Mmm.

0:31:160:31:21

-I think it's going to be limited in its appeal for that reason.

-What's your estimate?

0:31:210:31:26

-£20 to £40.

-Brilliant. £25 they paid so that stands a good chance too.

0:31:260:31:30

I mean, I think that's quite an intelligently bought trio,

0:31:300:31:34

-they've all got something about them which is a bit different.

-Yeah, I agree.

0:31:340:31:39

It's not your standard object for Bargain Hunt.

0:31:390:31:41

They've gone out there and they've looked quite carefully

0:31:410:31:45

and they've got some fun items so I'm feeling pretty bullish about what's going to happen here.

0:31:450:31:50

On the other hand, I could be wrong and they'll need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:31:500:31:56

Zena and Michelle, this is the bonus buy moment.

0:31:570:32:01

-OK.

-You gave David £115 of leftover lolly. Did he spend the lot?

0:32:010:32:05

Well, Tim...

0:32:050:32:07

-Well.

-These are very keen on named things, branded goods and people, personalities,

0:32:070:32:14

so I had to find something that fitted that bill

0:32:140:32:17

so I have an Archibald Knox designed piece of pewter for Liberty.

0:32:170:32:23

So you've got two very good names there, Archibald Knox and Liberty.

0:32:230:32:27

Do you want to hold it? Don't drop it, it's a soft metal.

0:32:270:32:31

-How much did you pay for it?

-£100.

0:32:310:32:33

-£100.

-It's been said before.

0:32:330:32:35

I want to ask you, Zena, what do you think about this thing yourself personally?

0:32:350:32:40

How does it get you in the tummy?

0:32:400:32:42

-Um, £100 gets me in the tummy.

-Do you think it's too much?

-What you've bought is quality.

0:32:420:32:47

It's got a nice weight to it.

0:32:470:32:49

Michelle's more positive, I feel.

0:32:490:32:51

I'm very practical. Look at this from its art point of view.

0:32:510:32:55

-Yes.

-And its style.

0:32:550:32:56

So it is quite posh, then?

0:32:560:32:58

Oh, yes, posh, yes.

0:32:580:33:00

-You've got it, you've hit it in one. Poshe. Poshe.

-I like posh.

0:33:000:33:03

But you don't have to decide right now, you'll decide later.

0:33:030:33:06

But for the viewers at home let's find out what the auctioneer thinks of David's dish.

0:33:060:33:11

-There's a stellar object.

-Yeah, that's superb.

0:33:120:33:15

Something to get your teeth into.

0:33:150:33:17

Pewter cake tray, I'd like to call it, or a cake basket, I suppose.

0:33:170:33:22

With honesty leaves, which are very much in the style of the period,

0:33:220:33:25

late 19th Century.

0:33:250:33:28

-Sort of signature of old Knox?

-Absolutely. I think it would do quite well.

0:33:280:33:32

-I've got high hopes for it.

-What's your estimate on it?

0:33:320:33:35

-£100 - £150.

-Well, Barby will be delighted.

0:33:350:33:37

£100 he paid for that so that stands a really good chance of making money for the bonus buy.

0:33:370:33:43

The big question is, will the team go with this bonus buy?

0:33:430:33:46

We'll find out later. Are you taking the auction?

0:33:460:33:49

-I will be, yeah.

-Ah, we're in safe hands.

0:33:490:33:51

-So how are you feeling, chaps?

-Good.

-Pretty good, yes.

0:34:010:34:03

Is it rather like a book launch for you, chaps,

0:34:030:34:06

-a new publication coming out, you're full of confidence...

-Yeah.

0:34:060:34:09

-This is going really well.

-Of course.

0:34:090:34:11

-Is that the moment? Is that what it's like?

-Yeah.

-That's the moment.

0:34:110:34:15

-Yes.

-We're waiting, we're ready.

0:34:150:34:17

And this is the trouble. It's the agony of waiting, the days to come

0:34:170:34:20

to the auction from the shopping, you don't know what's coming up.

0:34:200:34:24

-Just can't sleep.

-Can't sleep.

0:34:240:34:27

You know, you're giving the missus gyp.

0:34:270:34:29

Do you have a prediction?

0:34:290:34:30

-Do you feel confident?

-We're hopeful.

-We don't think we're going to do badly.

0:34:300:34:34

You don't think you're going to do badly.

0:34:340:34:36

That's a good way of starting out.

0:34:360:34:38

First lot up is your goblets and here they come.

0:34:380:34:41

Lot 1530a, a set of six silver spirit goblets by Adie Bros,

0:34:410:34:46

Birmingham 1905 and I've got on the book £25 bid.

0:34:460:34:50

-Ouch.

-35, 40, 45, 50, 55. £55 against you.

0:34:500:34:58

60, back of the room now. 65?

0:34:580:35:01

70, 75.

0:35:010:35:03

£70 by the flowers then, at £70.

0:35:030:35:05

Do I see 5 anywhere else?

0:35:050:35:07

Last chance. At £70...

0:35:070:35:10

That's not, that's not too bad.

0:35:100:35:13

That's minus 20 but disappointing.

0:35:130:35:16

Anyway, here come the leaded glass.

0:35:160:35:18

1531a, stained and leaded glass panel depicting

0:35:180:35:22

Operative Printers Assistants Society, 1899.

0:35:220:35:27

I've got to start at £60, with me at £60.

0:35:270:35:30

-Yes.

-Hey, we're back even.

0:35:300:35:32

£60, 65 and 70. £70. 5 and 80.

0:35:320:35:35

5 and 90.

0:35:350:35:38

-5, 100.

-Hey, boys.

0:35:380:35:39

£100 with me, still with me at £100.

0:35:390:35:41

Do you want to bid 10? £100 with me on the book, still at £100.

0:35:410:35:44

With me at £100, any further interest on £100. I'll sell at 100.

0:35:440:35:48

All done, last chance, £100...

0:35:480:35:52

-Hey.

-I like that.

0:35:520:35:54

£55 worth of profit, Serrell, that's good.

0:35:540:35:56

Now, the brass tray.

0:35:560:35:58

So moving on to lot 1532a, an arts and crafts galleried tray.

0:35:580:36:03

£35 bid with me, at £35, give me 40 now.

0:36:030:36:06

38, 40, 45, 50. £50. 5, anyone?

0:36:060:36:13

£50 against you then, at £50.

0:36:130:36:15

At £50 then, at £50.

0:36:150:36:17

-Yeah.

-Any further interest at £50? I'll sell. Last chance. £50.

0:36:170:36:21

Done. That's another tenner, Phil, on your personal score.

0:36:210:36:24

Well, that's £45.

0:36:240:36:26

Now, I don't think I need to ask you whether you're going

0:36:260:36:29

with the lighthouse or not, I think we should ask Phil if we should.

0:36:290:36:32

I think we'll deaf that. I never liked that expert.

0:36:320:36:35

Now what are you going to do then?

0:36:350:36:37

Are you going to go with the lighthouse? I mean, you're £45 up, that's very fair.

0:36:370:36:41

You can bank the money or you can risk £45 on the granite lighthouse.

0:36:410:36:46

What's it to be?

0:36:460:36:48

I don't know. Maybe we do gamble.

0:36:480:36:51

Chop-chop, then, are we going to go? Yes, or no?

0:36:510:36:54

-No.

-All right. We're not going with the bonus buy but here it comes.

0:36:540:36:58

Moving on to lot 1535a, a turned serpentine lighthouse lamp.

0:36:580:37:03

£20 to start me for the lighthouse lamp? At £20? £20, the lamp?

0:37:030:37:08

Tenner then?

0:37:080:37:09

10 is bid, thank you, at 10. At 10 pounds, looking for 12 now.

0:37:090:37:12

At £10, by the wine at 10.

0:37:120:37:14

12 with the lady. 15, sir?

0:37:140:37:17

Shaking his head. At £12, with the lady behind, 15, he's gone,

0:37:170:37:21

-15. £15...

-Wise call boys.

0:37:210:37:25

18, new face. Do you want 20, sir?

0:37:250:37:28

No, he doesn't. £18 it is then. Still £18.

0:37:280:37:31

At £18 it is then, selling at £18.

0:37:310:37:34

Minus £27. Bad luck, Phil.

0:37:340:37:36

That was a run of luck that just couldn't go on.

0:37:360:37:38

-It had to end somewhere.

-So, you deserved your profits.

0:37:380:37:41

It was a good shout not going for it. You are £45 up, which is fab.

0:37:410:37:45

Just don't tell the Blues a thing, all right?

0:37:450:37:47

-Right you are.

-Mum.

0:37:470:37:49

-So, you two naughties, have you been talking to those Reds?

-No.

0:38:030:38:06

You don't know how they got on?

0:38:060:38:08

Super. You've not been talking to anybody?

0:38:080:38:10

-I who know nothing.

-First up is the blotter.

0:38:100:38:13

Lot 1550a, an Edwardian oak and silver mounted desk folder

0:38:130:38:18

of arts and crafts design.

0:38:180:38:21

£60 I'm bid, at £60.

0:38:210:38:23

At £60, I'll take 5 though.

0:38:230:38:25

-£60. 65 waving at the back, by the flowers and 70. 75...

-Come on.

0:38:250:38:31

80, 85. He's got it now at £85, looking for 90. 90, anywhere else?

0:38:310:38:35

At £85, it's going at £85.

0:38:350:38:37

Oh, David, I'm disappointed at that.

0:38:370:38:40

-Yes.

-It's minus £10, but don't despair.

0:38:400:38:42

Lot 1551a, early 20th Century German brass and tin cigar cutter.

0:38:420:38:47

£50 with me, straight in at £50.

0:38:470:38:50

Looking for 5 now. £50, 55 and 60.

0:38:500:38:53

-65 and 70. 75 and 80. 85 and 90.

-Yes.

0:38:530:38:58

£90 against you still, at £90.

0:38:580:39:00

£90, are you still bidding?

0:39:000:39:02

No. With £90. 5 anywhere else?

0:39:020:39:05

£90 then, all done at £90.

0:39:050:39:06

Last chance. £90.

0:39:060:39:09

Achtung!

0:39:100:39:12

That's £25 on that, you are plus 15.

0:39:120:39:15

Now girls, the glove packet.

0:39:150:39:19

1552a, Glasgow School embroidered glove pocket

0:39:190:39:22

after Charles Rennie Mackintosh and again, 25 is bid with me. At £25.

0:39:220:39:28

At £25, I'll take 28.

0:39:280:39:31

28 and 30, 32 and 35.

0:39:310:39:34

35 against you then. On the book at £35, commission bid at £35.

0:39:340:39:39

Do I see 38? At £35 then and selling.

0:39:390:39:42

All done, last chance, at £35.

0:39:420:39:45

£35 there, another £10 profit, David, well done.

0:39:450:39:48

You are £25 up.

0:39:480:39:51

-It's amazing.

-OK, £25 up.

0:39:510:39:52

-Is this man a genius or is he a genius?

-He's very good.

0:39:520:39:55

-He's a genius, isn't he?

-Astonishing.

0:39:550:39:57

-She's very surprised.

-Doubted me...

0:39:570:39:59

Just a slight mishap on the blotter, which could have done much better.

0:39:590:40:03

-Yeah. Disappointing.

-But not bad.

0:40:030:40:05

Two out of three profits, girls.

0:40:050:40:06

So what are you going to do about this old basket?

0:40:060:40:09

-This Knox Tudric basket?

-I think we should go for it.

0:40:090:40:12

-Do you fancy it?

-I think we should go for it.

0:40:120:40:14

-Yeah? No pressure.

-It's cracking, yeah.

-Yeah.

0:40:140:40:16

We're going with the bonus buy, we're going with Mr Knox,

0:40:160:40:19

and Mr Barby, here it comes.

0:40:190:40:21

Lot 1555a, we have a Liberty & Co Tudric pewter cake basket.

0:40:210:40:28

I've got £90 on the book, at £90, with me at £90. Looking for 5 now.

0:40:280:40:32

£90 with me, at £90.

0:40:320:40:35

95. 100, I'll take 5 if you like.

0:40:350:40:37

And 10. 15 sir? £110 against you then, at £110.

0:40:370:40:42

£110 and all done at £110.

0:40:420:40:45

So, that is a £10 profit, David,

0:40:450:40:48

well done on that, and overall you are plus £35.

0:40:480:40:51

The big trick here is to not tell those great big Red boys anything at all. OK?

0:40:510:40:55

-So don't tell the Reds a thing, right?

-OK.

0:40:550:40:58

Well, how exciting was that?

0:41:070:41:09

It was absolutely brilliant today.

0:41:090:41:11

I mean, smiles all round. This is unbelievable.

0:41:110:41:14

Two teams of winners on Bargain Hunt today, it's just a question of scale

0:41:140:41:19

of profit and the team with marginally less profits today

0:41:190:41:25

are, of course, the Blues.

0:41:250:41:28

Those boys faces, it's a wicked tease, I know.

0:41:290:41:33

But you've done so well, girls.

0:41:330:41:35

£35 of profits you girls made, which is super.

0:41:350:41:39

You got £25 out of the programme and another tenner out of David's Knox egg basket.

0:41:390:41:46

I thought you'd like that. £35, how do you feel about this, Zena,

0:41:480:41:51

you were a bit nervy before the off weren't you, darling?

0:41:510:41:54

I wasn't convinced about any of it, really.

0:41:540:41:57

-No. Quite. But are you converted now?

-Yes.

0:41:570:41:59

-Are you a fan of Bargain Hunting?

-Yes.

0:41:590:42:01

You are really. What about you Michelle?

0:42:010:42:03

I'm going to come to lots of auctions now.

0:42:030:42:06

And well done David for your excellent contribution.

0:42:060:42:08

-Now, £35. What are you going to do with that?

-Spend it on gin, probably.

0:42:080:42:13

Spend it on gin. Fair enough.

0:42:130:42:15

-Well, have a good time. Now, the victors.

-Yes.

-Nearly got you there, didn't I?

0:42:150:42:19

-Just a little bit worried, yeah.

-You were pretty cocky that you had

0:42:190:42:23

won today. You have won, which is brilliant.

0:42:230:42:25

You won in part by rejecting the bonus buy...

0:42:250:42:29

-Yeah.

-But on the other hand, you can't be crabby with Philip because he did contribute £55 worth...

0:42:290:42:34

-He's brilliant.

-..of profits off the stained glass panel which is jolly good. So you are £45 up, right?

0:42:340:42:40

-Brilliant.

-Thank you very much.

0:42:400:42:42

What are you going to spend it on?

0:42:420:42:44

If they're going to spend it on gin, we'll spend it on beer.

0:42:440:42:48

-Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:480:42:51

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:560:42:59

E-mail [email protected]

0:42:590:43:03

A team of publishers take on managers of a theatre company at splendid Alexandra Palace. They are helped in their quest by experts David Barby and Philip Serrell, but will the teams take any notice of the advice being given?

Meanwhile, presenter Tim Wonnacott takes time out to gaze around the V&A and wonder how they fill seven miles of corridors and three acres of exhibition space.