Newark Bargain Hunt


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Newark

Antiques challenge. Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits Belton House in Lincolnshire where he finds a piece of furniture that hides a fascinating secret.


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Do you know, students have a certain reputation.

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All that drinking, all that partying, all that borrowing of old road cones.

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But not this lot.

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Oh, no. They're a bunch of swots, because they're getting ready to go bargain hunting!

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Well, bargain hunters, we're at the Newark Showground today

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for one of the six antique fairs

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that happen here every year, and it's particularly parky.

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Loads of people descend on this place from around the world looking for tasty bargains, and let's hope

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that there's some left for our teams today.

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Our students will be given one hour and £300 to find their three items,

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which hopefully will make them a huge profit at auction.

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'After the teams have picked their items, they get taken to auction, where they'll go under the hammer.

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The teams have the assistance of an expert, and whoever makes

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the most profit, or loses the least, wins today's Bargain Hunt.

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So here they are. For the Reds, we've got Susie and Charlotte.

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-And battling for the Blues we've got Graham and Lee. Welcome to Bargain Hunt.

-Hello, Tim.

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-Hi.

-Lovely to see you. Now, you're both in your third year at Sheffield University.

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-How did you first meet?

-We both study the same course, so we met through that.

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-We got on quite well and decided we'd go travelling together. So we went to Thailand and Vietnam.

-As you do!

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We ended up living together after that.

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-You kind of bonded up as a result of that experience.

-It was a bonding experience.

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Charlotte, would you say you drive a hard bargain in foreign parts?

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I do my best, but most of the time I do come back with quite a lot of rubbish.

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Any particular disasters with what you bought?

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We did our best to try and bargain on these glasses which we thought were pretty good, quite beautiful.

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-We got them back as a present for our housemates, have a "welcome home" drink.

-What happened?

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The minute you put liquid in them the paint fell off. Our housemates had paint all over their face.

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A huge joke though.

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-Yep.

-That doesn't bode too well for today, does it?

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-Not really.

-Susie, you're training to be a doctor.

-I am.

-You're BOTH training to be doctors.

-Yep.

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Any particular branch of medicine?

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It's probably a bit too early to tell, but possibly a GP. I'm not too sure.

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We're only in our third year so we've got quite a lot more experience to come.

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Well, we're delighted to have two medical students with us, because it's snowing heavily outside.

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If we get any broken legs or anything, you're up for dealing with our medical problems.

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Which is brilliant. What are you going to be looking out for?

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Possibly something a little bit quirky. We're not really too sure.

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-We don't know anything about antiques, so it's going to be an experience.

-We'll do our best.

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-Anything that looks quality and in good condition.

-Well, good luck.

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-Thank you.

-We hope you have a great time on Bargain Hunt today.

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Now for the Blues, both of whom are at Sheffield Hallam University.

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-Welcome, boys. Now, do you know these girls at all?

-No.

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-I bet you'd like to!

-Oh, yes!

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How did you two meet, Graham?

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We were on our induction to university and we were walking around getting the usual tour.

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And this boy, or man, I'm not sure which, came up and spoke to me.

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And I looked at him a couple of times because there's this broad, broad, broad Yorkshire accent.

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Apparently he's asked me, do I want to go to the pub? But it came out a bit like, "Wanna go t'pub?"

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-What are you studying?

-We're both studying primary school teaching.

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-Second year.

-That's great. Graham, have you got any collections?

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Not what you'd call antiques, but my favourite football team

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is a small football team back in Northern Ireland called Glentoran.

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And I've got all their old shirts, their old programmes.

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They've had a great plug now, thanks! Lee, you and Graham have a bit of a sideline.

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That's right, we're part-time clowns, believe it or not.

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I do believe it.

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We've been on teaching placements at school.

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We did a few activities with the kids like balloon modelling.

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They went home and told their parents and one of the parents

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at the school asked us to come in to do a party for the children.

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Word got around, so we ended up doing two or three.

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-Will you be able to make anything for us today?

-We'll have a go, yeah.

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As if by magic, look what is appearing. Oh, yes.

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OK, so you've got three seconds starting now.

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It's not perfect, but three seconds isn't a lot of time.

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Look, they've finished in unison, how good is that?

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I think a little round of applause. That is fantastic.

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Is that for me? That's very kind, I'm going to pass that over to the Reds.

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That's your lucky mascot for today.

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Good luck. Now, the money moment. Here is your £300.

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Look at their faces lighting up.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go!

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And very, very good luck.

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So which of the teams will be passing their antiques examinations with flying colours?

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And which will be going for retakes?

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Let's hope the men who will assist them in their search today have been revising.

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Brains and beauty...hmm... will be helping the Blues

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in the form of Mark Stacey.

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And tutoring the Reds in the study of antiques is David Harper.

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The hour...starts now.

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-Right, are you ready?

-Yep. Ready.

-Are you sure?

-Sure.

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Let's go, come on.

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Um, I wouldn't go for that, no.

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It's nice but I wouldn't... no, I wouldn't go for that.

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-What kind of things do you like?

-Decorative things.

-Something pretty.

-Pretty-pretty.

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-And shiny.

-No, not pretty and shiny.

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You sound like magpies.

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Oh, it's hideous.

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Don't even look at it. No.

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Move on!

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Are any of these any good? Because they look...

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-I am being a magpie again but they look really shiny.

-No, go on.

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-They're fantastic value for money but they just don't sell.

-All right.

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I like the look of this, guys.

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-What do you think?

-It's lovely.

-It's pretty. Very plain.

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Well, it is very plain but people like that nowadays.

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Ah, now, this is a good sign. Pilkington's Royal Lancastrian.

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Made in England. Now, that's a very good name.

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-What you think of it, Lee?

-I actually like it, yeah.

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I'm not sure what its function is, what it does, but it's nice.

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-Is there any damage?

-Not as far as I can see. I've run my finger

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around the edge and I can't feel any chips or cracks, or around the base.

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What I quite like about it actually is this lovely two-tone effect

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and these lovely stylised heart-shaped flowers

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going round the top.

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The other key thing about this is, you see that funny little mark here?

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That's the monogram of one of most famous designers for Pilkington's, William S Mycock.

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So this is quite a collectible piece, I think.

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So, Mark, what's the number at the bottom?

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That would be a shape number or a pattern number.

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I can't see a price to go on this,

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so shall we ask the gentleman how much he's asking for it?

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Excuse me. We're quite interested in this Pilkington's vase,

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can you tell us the price, please?

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-120.

-120?

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That's not a bad price, guys, because it's nicely made and good quality, as I've told you.

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-Is that your best, sir?

-Very best would probably be a oner.

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-Oner? That's 100 in our language.

-Mark, will it make a profit?

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If I was putting that into sale, I'd certainly put 100-150 on it.

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-Do you like it?

-I do like it.

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-Good.

-I think we should go for it.

-I've got one ally here.

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So, while the Blues have got themselves a possible profit,

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the girls are still on the search for something shiny!

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The problem with these two

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-is that I just don't know whether they've got any age to them.

-I see.

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How about those swans behind them? They're really pretty.

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-I think the wings open up.

-Do they? OK.

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I really like those ones.

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-Oh, they're very lovely.

-A pair as well.

-Swan salts.

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-Girls would like those.

-I think that would be a really nice

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-romantic gift.

-Really?

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Yeah. For a husband to give to a wife. How much are they?

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-37 for the pair.

-I want to buy them.

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-Do you not like them?

-They're not for me.

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They're not for you, as in, they're not going to sell, or...?

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I don't think you'd make any money. Let's go through these quickly.

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A pair of salts. You know what they're for obviously.

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They go on the dinner table, you bung your salt in, and you're posh,

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so you put your spoon in and you sprinkle your salt.

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It's all part of the eating experience.

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Things like this really make eating more pleasurable, don't they?

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-Precisely.

-I agree.

-I don't want to persuade you.

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No, don't persuade me.

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What's the best on the two salts?

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-What's on them?

-37.

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-37 the pair.

-30 quid the pair.

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-We haven't actually bought anything yet.

-Shall we get them?

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Hang on, hang on. Offer him a bit less.

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-Go on, you do it.

-Shall we do 20...

-I think we should start at 20.

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-They're going to charm you here.

-< 25.

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They haven't even said anything and it's working!

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After turning on even more charm, the girls paid £22 for the swans.

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The Blues already had one item in the bag, but it's getting harder to come to a decision.

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What's this here, Mark?

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No, I don't like that. I don't think I like it anyway.

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-Oh, I don't know.

-£65 it's got on it.

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-The top.

-Actually, I think it's quite fun, you know.

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-Where's, erm, the other one?

-Lee.

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-Lee.

-Oh, you've found something.

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It's actually quite nice quality.

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I mean, if you look, you've got a duck here.

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-I hadn't noticed that.

-And it's also stained in colour.

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How old would it be, is it modern?

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I'm just trying to work out if it's modern.

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I don't think it's machine-done, I think this is hand-carved.

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Where would it come from?

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I would have thought the colonies somewhere. What do you think of it?

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-I really like it.

-I do like it. I can see Tim walking with it.

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Is that 165 or 65?

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You see, I like that.

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I think that's a quality object.

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I thought that was a pound sign. 165's an awful lot.

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Is it something we could leave until the final thing?

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We could ask him to hold it for us.

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I'd thought it was a WOMAN'S prerogative to change her mind!

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So the Blues didn't make a decision on the walking stick, leaving them still with two items to buy.

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The Reds are back at their favourite stall, which offers a buffet of shiny treats for the girls.

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-Mother of pearl. What do you think it is?

-Is it a cigar case?

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-No, it's a card case.

-Is it?

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Yes, for your business cards.

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-I like it!

-I like it.

-Isn't it, yes, very nice.

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That is so cool.

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-Can I give you one of my cards?

-Yes, if it comes out of that.

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-Will you ring me?

-Of course.

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That's a cigarette case, or a cigar case. Actually that's very posh.

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-How much is it?

-I must say I prefer that.

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-Is that a good price?

-I don't know.

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What's the absolute death on the cigar case?

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-What's the price on it?

-145.

-It would have to be 110, the death.

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That would represent a small profit.

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-< It's a lovely thing.

-It's very nice.

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Do you think that this would be more popular than a card case?

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Well, personally, yes, I do.

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-How much do you think it would fetch at auction?

-It might make 80-100.

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-Erm, hello.

-Sorry.

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-70 wouldn't buy it?

-It wouldn't. I paid more.

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I actually paid £90 for that.

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And I had to put a couple of new panels on it. I do want the 110.

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-It might touch 100.

-I tell you what you'd do better with.

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Have a look at that book.

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< Now touch the corner.

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-Oh, wow.

-< It's a drinking flask.

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That's very nice.

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-If you look at the title, it's The 19th Hole.

-What's the best on that?

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-95.

-Do you think that would sell, though?

-I do, I do, I do.

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The 19th hole.

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Golf, the 19th hole is the bar.

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I can't honestly say that I've seen that before,

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that particular model or design. It's very novel.

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And it really would be a collector's piece, wouldn't it?

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-Yeah, I quite like that.

-You couldn't do it for 60?

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Again, I paid more. I'll knock another fiver off and do it for 90.

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< I think that's a very fair price.

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-It is...

-What do you mean, "It is"?!

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85 would be fairer.

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-What do you think?

-Erm...

-How much would it get at auction?

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I think it might do 100 quid and a bit, mightn't it?

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In the right sale, you could do 120-140.

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Let's go for it, I'm up for it. I think it's a good idea, yep.

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-All right, we'll have it at that, 90.

-Brilliant.

-I really like that.

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-I'd say we've got something really girlie, and really boy-ie!

-And something really manly!

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They might have all the basics covered, but there's still one item to get with the remaining £188.

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They could afford something decent with all that, but they can't afford to dilly-dally.

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-173.

-What are you up to, you lot?

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-Hello.

-Having a nice time?

-Yes, we are.

-We're having a lovely time.

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We had a bit of a struggle, Tim. We had quite a lot of time

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-actually not buying anything.

-40 minutes actually.

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40 minutes you've spent so far.

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-And then suddenly, wham, two items.

-Yes, you're two down. You've got 20 minutes left.

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-What do you think about that?

-Nice ladle. Is it a candidate?

-Possibly.

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-We're not sure about the price.

-They laugh at everything.

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-20 minutes left, all right?

-Yep.

-No pressure.

-Thank you.

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See you. Well, what do you think?

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-I think it may be a bit too expensive for us.

-OK.

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Guys, I think we need to speed up.

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Because we are going to run out of time.

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-I'm in a bit of a stress at the moment.

-Come on, you two.

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-That's 38, too much for them.

-Hello, how are you?

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-Mark, are these real silver?

-Let's have a look.

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Oh, yes, they are, you know. They're little bonbon dishes.

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A big hallmark in the middle, by...

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Is that Mappin and Webb? I think they are.

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-Yes. >

-Mappin and Webb.

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These are hallmarks for Birmingham with the anchor.

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Looking at the mark, I don't think they're that old. What do you think?

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-You spotted it.

-It's pretty. It's got some weight behind it as well.

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They're for, you can imagine, after dinner.

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You'd put little bonbons, something like that in it,

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and just have them on the table.

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Or if you wanted them on a coffee table it would be rather nice.

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(You could get that for maybe £40.)

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-We could try.

-Do you want to ask her?

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-Do you like them?

-I do like them, yeah.

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-Go on.

-I like the shape.

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The lowest was £45, leaving them £160 for their last item

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but only 10 minutes to get it in.

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Over with the Reds, and David's had enough of looking at bling.

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I always love these toys. Don't you like him?

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How can you not like him?

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That?!

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-He's gorgeous. He's cute.

-He has got orange eyes.

-Oh!

-(Sorry!)

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-Wasn't expecting it to be quite so vigorous.

-Is he electrical?!

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-How much is it?

-12 quid.

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It's not expensive. You cannot fail to love him, can you?

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I'm succeeding.

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Are you really? He's so handsome as well.

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-What, date wise, he's gotta be...

-At least 500 years old!

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I wish he was. This will get you. Ready?

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Look, he jumps around.

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That is honestly one of the most hideous things I've ever seen.

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You can't tell me that doesn't blow your mind?

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Oh, it is quite cute.

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It's a bloody hopping, red-eyed freakish monkey!

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Maybe we should leave him for a different owner.

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We've seen a nice writing desk.

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If I don't like it, will you have him?

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-But it's expensive, it's got faults on it.

-I don't know...

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We've all got faults. Come on.

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You stand your ground, girls, but get a move on. Time is ticking away.

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Doulton ashtray, that's fine.

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We'd best rush, I think.

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-We've got one minute.

-Let's look at one more stall and then we can go back and buy the monkey.

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With only a minute left, the Blues head back to buy the walking stick.

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Listen carefully. Here's how not to negotiate.

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We would really like to buy this stick. It's great. And...yeah.

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I was wondering if there was any chance you would take 130 for it?

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I'm sorry, absolutely no chance at all, 140 is what I need.

0:16:290:16:33

-140 it is, then.

-OK.

0:16:330:16:35

-Brilliant, thank you very much.

-You're welcome.

0:16:370:16:39

See what I mean? The Blues are done, the pressure is on for the Reds.

0:16:390:16:43

With seconds to spare they've decided on their third buy, and, no, it's not the monkey.

0:16:430:16:48

Was the cigar case £80, I can't remember?

0:16:480:16:51

-That's 110.

-Can you meet us halfway, £100?

-Please, it's our last stall.

0:16:510:16:56

-Please.

-I'll do it for 100.

0:16:560:16:58

-That's it, literally to the second.

-To the second?

0:16:580:17:02

-Well done.

-Good work.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:020:17:04

So, has all that brain power and edu-ma-cation paid off

0:17:140:17:18

with some profitable purchases? Let's find out.

0:17:180:17:22

Let's recap on what the Reds bought.

0:17:220:17:24

The blonde magpies fell in love with the £22 swans.

0:17:240:17:28

They do say love is blind, though.

0:17:280:17:30

At £90, will they hit a hole in one at the auction

0:17:300:17:34

with the leather-bound flask?

0:17:340:17:37

The cigar case was a last-minute purchase,

0:17:370:17:40

but is it a good one with £100 paid?

0:17:400:17:44

Girls, it's the end of the day, it's going dark. How was that shopping experience, did you have fun?

0:17:440:17:49

-Yes, we had a brilliant time.

-We really enjoyed it.

0:17:490:17:51

You bought all those blingy, shiny, expensive things. I wish you the best with that lot.

0:17:510:17:57

-Which is your favourite piece, darling?

-The glass and silver swans.

0:17:570:18:00

-The little salt and pepper pot jobs?

-Yes.

-What about you, darling?

0:18:000:18:03

-I like the mother of pearl cigar case.

-Because it's nice and shiny?

-Exactly.

0:18:030:18:08

-Which piece will bring the biggest profit?

-Definitely the swans.

0:18:080:18:11

I think the cigar case, because it's quality.

0:18:110:18:14

I don't know how you got on so well on your foreign travels.

0:18:140:18:17

We didn't!

0:18:170:18:18

£212 you spent.

0:18:180:18:20

I'd like £88 of leftover lolly,

0:18:200:18:23

going to David Harper to find that bonus buy.

0:18:230:18:27

You, I would say, have had a tremendous day.

0:18:270:18:30

My two blonde magpies, have they been good fun or what?

0:18:300:18:33

-Bright and blingy?

-Bright and blingy all right!

0:18:330:18:36

-And that's what they bought!

-I know!

0:18:360:18:39

Does that mean I've got to buy something bright and blingy?

0:18:390:18:42

No! We want you to find something that's going to bring a big profit.

0:18:420:18:46

-OK, can I buy something I really like?

-If it makes a big profit.

0:18:460:18:49

Off you go, David, and good luck. Let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:18:490:18:54

The Pilkington vase wasn't a hit with Graham, but Lee and Mark

0:18:540:18:59

are convinced it will make a solid profit and paid £100.

0:18:590:19:03

Solid silver and a well-known maker, but will that be enough

0:19:030:19:06

to get the bidders interested in the £45 silver bonbon dishes?

0:19:060:19:11

Like the Reds, the Blues had a last-minute decision to make

0:19:110:19:16

and walked off with the Mexican carved stick for £140.

0:19:160:19:20

So, Graham and Lee, that was a bit of a panic, wasn't it?

0:19:200:19:23

-Down to the last couple of minutes for your final item.

-Rushing around.

0:19:230:19:28

Which is your favourite piece, Graham?

0:19:280:19:30

-Definitely the walking stick, it's beautiful.

-What about you, Lee?

0:19:300:19:33

-I'd have to agree with Graham.

-Which piece will bring the biggest profit?

0:19:330:19:36

I think the silver bonbon dishes are sure to pay off some of our student loan.

0:19:360:19:41

Well, if you're reckoning on that...

0:19:410:19:44

-What about you?

-I'll have to go for the pottery.

0:19:440:19:46

OK, the Pilkington pot. OK, fine. Well, you spent a magnificent £285, I'm really chuffed about that.

0:19:460:19:52

£15 of leftover lolly, please. There you go, Mark.

0:19:520:19:55

-Now, what are you gonna do with miserable £15?

-Not an awful lot.

0:19:550:19:58

-No.

-I've seen a burger and chips!

0:19:580:20:00

Have you? Well, it won't be easy for you, but good luck.

0:20:000:20:03

For me, I'm heading off somewhere belting!

0:20:030:20:06

English landed estates, such as Belton House here in Lincolnshire,

0:20:140:20:18

would normally be passed down to the eldest son.

0:20:180:20:22

That's why having a male heir was so incredibly important,

0:20:220:20:26

to ensure that the property remained in the immediate family.

0:20:260:20:31

But the Brownlow and Custs of Belton struggled to produce male heirs,

0:20:310:20:38

and Belton was only passed down to the eldest son on two occasions.

0:20:380:20:42

So nephews, brothers, grandsons and cousins were all beneficiaries

0:20:420:20:47

over the 300 years that the family lived here.

0:20:470:20:50

In the early 20th century, Henry Cust, also known as Harry,

0:20:500:20:56

was due to inherit from Adelbert, his cousin, who was the Third Earl.

0:20:560:21:00

However, things didn't work out to plan,

0:21:000:21:04

because Adelbert outlived Harry by four years.

0:21:040:21:08

This painting depicts Harry's wife, Nina, lying in the library

0:21:080:21:12

of their London home, perhaps dreaming of a room at Belton.

0:21:120:21:16

Do you think it could be this room, the study? I think it is, don't you?

0:21:160:21:20

Almost identical.

0:21:200:21:22

Apple-green painted walls, densely lined with books.

0:21:220:21:27

And, if you look carefully in that watercolour,

0:21:270:21:29

does this end of a piece of furniture remind you of anything?

0:21:290:21:34

You're right.

0:21:350:21:37

This is the self-same cupboard that was in London and has now come back to Belton.

0:21:370:21:43

On the face of it, this looks like a late 18th, early 19th century painted cupboard.

0:21:430:21:48

You can see here where the paint has been rubbed

0:21:480:21:51

and the timber is showing below.

0:21:510:21:53

But beautifully painted, in the Adamesque style,

0:21:530:21:57

with these Angelica Kauffmann-style roundels down below.

0:21:570:22:01

But if I give it a tap,

0:22:010:22:03

you will find out that it is a cabinet, full of secrets.

0:22:030:22:06

That...

0:22:060:22:07

That is not the same as...that.

0:22:070:22:10

Why? Well, for a kick-off, we've got two massive concealed locks.

0:22:100:22:16

Press the secret catch on either side and the key plate is revealed.

0:22:160:22:22

You would insert your key, unlock both doors,

0:22:220:22:25

and reveal...the secret interior.

0:22:250:22:30

Not only secret, but incredibly secure,

0:22:300:22:34

because this middle section of the cabinet is made of solid iron.

0:22:340:22:40

It's a safe -- the ultimate security device for the gentleman

0:22:400:22:44

who wants to keep his precious objects close by him

0:22:440:22:48

in a smart reception room without going to poke about

0:22:480:22:51

in one of those ugly safes underneath the back stairs.

0:22:510:22:55

Actually, this is an extremely rare survival.

0:22:550:22:59

And as such, it is not only practical, but I think drop-dead gorgeous.

0:22:590:23:04

The big question today is of course, are our teams over at the auction going to be safe or sorry?

0:23:040:23:10

Well, it's great to be at Golding Young's saleroom in Grantham, with Colin Young.

0:23:190:23:23

-How nice to see you, Colin. How are you?

-Good morning, Tim.

0:23:230:23:26

-Very well indeed, thanks.

-Feeling strong today?

0:23:260:23:28

-Feeling strong!

-First up for our girls today, Suzie and Charlotte, we've got these little swan vases.

0:23:280:23:33

-Now, what do you make of those, Colin?

-Always popular.

0:23:330:23:36

Asprey's did a version in cut crystal with silver mounts.

0:23:360:23:39

-But...

-They're not.

0:23:390:23:40

-They're not Asprey's, they're not cut glass...

-No.

0:23:400:23:43

They're not silver?

0:23:430:23:44

No, a hat-trick of problems you've got.

0:23:440:23:46

-They're quite fun, aren't they?

-They're quite good fun, just nominal sums.

0:23:460:23:50

-Estimate we've put, 10-20.

-They paid £22.

0:23:500:23:52

So, it's not too far shy.

0:23:520:23:54

-No.

-And you never know. Here in Grantham, you may have swan lovers.

0:23:540:23:58

-Yeah.

-Now, what about this flask?

0:23:580:23:59

I love it, I think it's a brilliant item.

0:23:590:24:02

A quality make as well.

0:24:020:24:04

Something that is a nice, easy, hide and deceive, if you like a tipple or two.

0:24:040:24:08

-What's it worth, though?

-To be honest, I haven't got a clue what it's worth.

0:24:080:24:12

I haven't seen another one.

0:24:120:24:14

I've put a good old guesstimate on it off £40-£60, and just see how we fare with that.

0:24:140:24:18

Right, well, they paid £90.

0:24:180:24:20

And I've never seen one before. I'm quite hopeful for this.

0:24:200:24:23

Couldn't argue with the price, I've not seen another one.

0:24:230:24:27

Exciting. Now, what about this mother-of-pearl cigar box?

0:24:270:24:30

Yeah, good little piece. Nice and clean, all of the panels are still on there.

0:24:300:24:34

Nice combination, abalone shell, and mother-of-pearl.

0:24:340:24:37

Not everybody's favourite smoking items, but dual purpose,

0:24:370:24:40

you could use it as a pen case or something like that.

0:24:400:24:43

-That is a good idea.

-These things are there to be adapted.

0:24:430:24:46

That's a good idea, Colin. Brilliant.

0:24:460:24:48

-What's your estimate on it?

-Well, we've put an estimate of £40-£60.

0:24:480:24:51

-Cor!

-Somebody might not have the imagination.

0:24:510:24:53

They might not! It's a beautifully-made thing.

0:24:530:24:56

Is that a bit of a tease, that £40-£60?

0:24:560:24:58

I will be honest, I think that's probably the sort of money.

0:24:580:25:01

Because you get card cases which are functionable and usable,

0:25:010:25:05

and they make £40-£60 for the average ones, like this.

0:25:050:25:08

That's where I've put the comparison.

0:25:080:25:10

OK, well, our girls will be disappointed, they paid £100.

0:25:100:25:13

£100 they paid. If you're right, Colin Young, that is their dark

0:25:130:25:17

hole that is going to open up, and they're gonna need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:25:170:25:23

Charlotte and Susie, you spent £212, which is magnificent.

0:25:230:25:27

You gave David £88 to spend. Did he blow the lot?

0:25:270:25:32

I'm sorry, girls, I couldn't resist!

0:25:320:25:34

Oh! We knew it!

0:25:340:25:37

I, yep, I guessed that.

0:25:370:25:38

Come on, begin to love him. Look! Look what he does!

0:25:380:25:41

It doesn't look any better than it did last time!

0:25:410:25:44

I think he's absolutely delightful.

0:25:440:25:46

-If I didn't buy him, I would have regretted it for the rest of my life.

-Does he work?

0:25:460:25:51

-Of course he works. Look at him, he's beautifully made.

-Right.

0:25:510:25:54

What is it about this specimen that attracted you exactly?

0:25:540:25:57

-I don't know! But I think I need to have some therapy, don't you?

-Yes!

0:25:570:26:01

-Quite possibly!

-Do you think it will make a profit?

0:26:010:26:04

How much do you think? You know how much, I wanted you to buy him!

0:26:040:26:07

-A tenner.

-Not very much!

-A tenner, OK.

0:26:070:26:09

-I think you're barking up the wrong tree.

-I might be, yes.

0:26:090:26:12

Barking being the operative word.

0:26:120:26:14

Definitely.

0:26:140:26:15

-You either love him or hate him.

-Yeah.

-I love him.

0:26:150:26:18

-How do you feel?

-I can't say I'm loving him at the moment, but maybe my love will develop.

0:26:180:26:22

I'm the same, I'm not sure whether other people might.

0:26:220:26:25

How much would you pay for him in an auction?

0:26:250:26:27

-20, 30?

-Really?

-I really would. Honestly I would, yeah.

0:26:270:26:30

I mean, you've got it honestly from the heart of the monkey...

0:26:300:26:33

I mean, from the man.

0:26:330:26:34

He's predicting double your money, all right?

0:26:340:26:37

-Hold that thought.

-OK. We'll hold that thought.

0:26:370:26:39

For the viewers, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's monkey.

0:26:390:26:43

-What about that little monkey, then?

-Very nice. He's got holes in him, he's got rust on his wires.

0:26:430:26:49

-He's a little bit poorly around his arm as well.

-Yes.

0:26:490:26:52

The positive is, people will love him, so they'll bid for him.

0:26:520:26:55

And David's pleased with it.

0:26:550:26:57

So what's his worth?

0:26:570:26:58

We've put an estimate of £10- £20 on it, that sort of level.

0:26:580:27:02

Great, cos he paid a tenner.

0:27:020:27:03

And I think that's fine, don't you?

0:27:030:27:06

-Yep.

-Anyway, that's it for the Reds. Now, for the Blues - Graham and Lee.

0:27:060:27:10

First up is the Pilkington's pot.

0:27:100:27:12

Great little item. Perfect order, William Mycock, very good artist, started at Pilkington's, 1894...

0:27:120:27:19

-Right.

-..but then seriously got into the design and artistry of the potting about 1906.

0:27:190:27:25

And this piece itself dates from 1932.

0:27:250:27:28

-Does it? It's late in Pilkington terms.

-Mmm.

0:27:280:27:30

-They paid £100, what's your estimate?

-I've put £100-£150.

0:27:300:27:33

I think they stand a good chance of a profit. If they don't, there is no justice.

0:27:330:27:37

That's nice to hear from auctioneer, isn't it?

0:27:370:27:40

Next is the so-called Mexican stick.

0:27:400:27:42

I can't really see it exciting stick collectors, to be honest.

0:27:420:27:46

Just personal opinion. We've put an estimate of £20- £40 on it.

0:27:460:27:51

-How much?

-£20-£40.

-Dear, oh dear! They paid £140!

0:27:510:27:54

£140 for the Mexican stick and you put £20-£40! This is terrible!

0:27:540:28:00

Mmm. Let's just hope I'm wrong. Very wrong!

0:28:000:28:02

-Let's hope you are! To a factor of five, would be nice!

-Yes!

0:28:020:28:06

Next is the kidney-shaped silver dishes. Which are oddball, aren't they?

0:28:060:28:11

They are a bit odd ball. You don't see dishes like that, and they are fairly heavy gauge as well.

0:28:110:28:16

OK, they're not particularly old, 1963.

0:28:160:28:19

But Mappin & Webb, good maker. Silver selling very well at the moment.

0:28:190:28:23

-So, yeah, they should do OK.

-But it's such an odd shape, isn't it?

-It is, really.

0:28:230:28:27

-I suppose estimate-wise, £20-£40, something like that.

-Is that all?

0:28:270:28:31

-Yeah, what did they pay?

-£45.

-Well...

0:28:310:28:33

-£45, I mean, they're nice little dishes.

-They are.

0:28:330:28:36

I can understand retailing at £45.

0:28:360:28:38

Yeah. They might get out of trouble, actually, with those.

0:28:380:28:42

Because they are heavy gauge, so perhaps not the normal buyers will be going for them.

0:28:420:28:46

The scrap weight of silver is right up at the moment, isn't it?

0:28:460:28:49

Mmm. Absolutely.

0:28:490:28:51

All these precious metals are going completely bonkers, so

0:28:510:28:54

that's going in its favour. Anyway, the problem there is this stick.

0:28:540:28:58

-Mmm.

-So, bonus buy, I think they're gonna need it. Let's have a look.

0:28:580:29:03

So, Graham and Lee, you spent £285, you gave £15 to Mark.

0:29:030:29:07

What did he spend it on?

0:29:070:29:10

I did! But I only spent £10 on it. Because I think it's rather fun.

0:29:100:29:16

It's probably from the 1950s. And that could well pour us a profit.

0:29:170:29:22

Graham, I have to ask you, what is it you've got on your head?

0:29:220:29:26

Is it a hat or is it a tea-cosy?

0:29:260:29:28

-It's actually an antique.

-Is it a tea-cosy or is it a hat?

0:29:280:29:31

-Tea-cosy hat!

-Very good. What do you have in front of you?

0:29:310:29:34

An elephant teapot.

0:29:340:29:35

Right. Might your tea cosy go rather nicely on the elephant teapot?

0:29:350:29:39

Let's just see whether it goes.

0:29:390:29:40

So, we've got a hole for the handle.

0:29:400:29:43

Oh, look at that! Perfect. A significant improvement, don't you think? No, no!

0:29:430:29:48

-That's nice. You obviously like it, don't you?

-Yes, a lot.

0:29:490:29:52

It's a good thing, isn't it?

0:29:520:29:53

-For £10.

-Not bad for £10, yes.

0:29:530:29:55

You don't decide right now. You decide later. But for the viewers

0:29:550:29:58

at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Mark's pot.

0:29:580:30:02

-One lump or two?

-Definitely looks like one lump from here.

-.

0:30:020:30:06

-It's been in a few lumps, though, hasn't it?

-It has, unfortunately.

0:30:060:30:09

The first thing that you see on it is there's a little bit of damage there.

0:30:090:30:14

He's had his head chopped off at some stage.

0:30:140:30:16

-What a shame. There you go. A novelty teapot.

0:30:160:30:18

Checking out the prices, because I thought it might have been an exciting lot.

0:30:180:30:23

I just had a feeling that it might have something highly collectible about it.

0:30:230:30:28

I found one that was in perfect order that made £40.

0:30:280:30:31

This one isn't, so our estimate is 20-40.

0:30:310:30:34

I tell you, that Mark Stacey, he won't mind.

0:30:340:30:37

He only paid £10 for it.

0:30:370:30:38

Oh, excellent.

0:30:380:30:41

Brilliant. So overall, some excitement ahead.

0:30:410:30:45

Yes, unless they're going to get a beating with that stick.

0:30:450:30:47

We shall see. Thank you, Colin.

0:30:470:30:50

12 bid. 12.50. 18...

0:30:530:30:55

Now, girls. What do your mates, what do your student friends, think about you coming on Bargain Hunt?

0:30:550:31:01

I think they were positive about it.

0:31:010:31:03

They don't think you're mad or anything?

0:31:030:31:05

Slightly! I think they're quite looking forward to taking the mick out of us.

0:31:050:31:09

Are they? We're on the edge of the auction now.

0:31:090:31:12

-It's exciting, isn't it?

-Very exciting.

0:31:120:31:14

All these people, look at it. OK, the pressed-glass swan salts.

0:31:140:31:19

£22 paid for those.

0:31:190:31:22

£10-£20 is the estimate.

0:31:220:31:25

So that's all right. Quite frankly, within the confines of an estimate, you're not so far off.

0:31:250:31:31

Bang on the money.

0:31:310:31:33

Lot 70 is a pair of clear glass-moulded swans,

0:31:330:31:36

mounted with electroplated neck and folding wings.

0:31:360:31:39

Who's going to start me with a bargain and start me at £36?

0:31:390:31:42

OK, £10 to go. Who's first in? 10 on the internet.

0:31:440:31:47

Any more now at £10 bid? 12.

0:31:490:31:52

The excitement continues.

0:31:520:31:54

15 now, do I see 15? Go on, have another click. 15.

0:31:540:31:57

He's hovering. 15 bid on the net.

0:31:570:32:00

18. Have another bid in the room. 18 next, 18 bid.

0:32:000:32:02

20 now, no, he's had enough. At 18 it's back in the room.

0:32:020:32:06

20 anywhere else now? 20.

0:32:060:32:07

£20 bid. 22 now. Go on, please. £20 in the front row, to anywhere else?

0:32:070:32:11

Then going, all done and finished at £20.

0:32:110:32:14

£20. Minus £2.

0:32:140:32:17

That's not too bad. Now, your flask.

0:32:170:32:19

Lot number 71, quite an interesting lot,

0:32:190:32:22

this, of golfing interest, it's an eight-ounce spirit flask,

0:32:220:32:26

pocketbook form and marked for the 19th hole.

0:32:260:32:28

Who's going to start me at £50? 50.

0:32:280:32:30

30 to go, then, surely. 30? 20 to go then, surely?

0:32:300:32:35

Are you kidding me?

0:32:350:32:36

30 on the net. At 30 already.

0:32:360:32:40

30 bid, 32 anyway, 32 bid, 35, or anywhere else now? 35. 38, 40?

0:32:400:32:45

£40 now.

0:32:450:32:46

It's picking up, it's OK.

0:32:460:32:48

45 bid now? 45. 48, bid 54.

0:32:480:32:51

50, and five.

0:32:510:32:52

55. 60 bid, and five, 65. 70?

0:32:520:32:56

£70 bid. 75, 80 now.

0:32:560:32:59

80 bid, 85, 90, 90.

0:32:590:33:04

100. 100 on the Net now, do I see 100?

0:33:040:33:06

100 bid. 110, 120, 120 bid now, 120, 130, 120 bid.

0:33:060:33:12

30, anywhere else now? Come on. Come on, guys.

0:33:120:33:15

Going, on the internet, at £120.

0:33:150:33:19

That was £120. That's plus 30. Hang on a minute, hang on.

0:33:190:33:25

I'm getting a hug when I can get one.

0:33:250:33:28

Hug while you're ahead.

0:33:280:33:30

Lot 72 is a Victorian mother of pearl and abalone shell cigar case, in very good order.

0:33:300:33:35

Who's going to start me at £50?

0:33:350:33:37

30 to go then, surely, 30, 20, 25 bid, 30, 35 bid, 45, 50...

0:33:370:33:44

It's fast now.

0:33:440:33:46

Don't stop!

0:33:460:33:48

70, 75, 80, 85, no...

0:33:480:33:51

-Come on.

-All done and

0:33:510:33:53

finished, then, all done and finished at £80.

0:33:530:33:57

Oh, blast it.

0:33:570:33:58

£80. You're minus 20 on that, which means you're plus £8.

0:33:580:34:03

You have eight pounds.

0:34:030:34:05

-Awesome.

-How exciting.

0:34:050:34:07

Oh, dear. I can't bear it.

0:34:070:34:09

Anyway, you're £8 up. That's all right, isn't it?

0:34:090:34:11

My heart is just going.

0:34:110:34:13

Ridiculous, isn't it, how it goes up, down, up, down.

0:34:130:34:16

You're ahead at £8. What are you going to do about the monkey, then?

0:34:160:34:19

Gamble.

0:34:190:34:20

-Brilliant.

-We're going to make you happy.

0:34:200:34:24

It seems as if your monkey has won the day.

0:34:240:34:26

-We shall soon find out.

-We're going to go with the bonus buy, we're going with the monkey.

0:34:260:34:30

-Here it comes.

-A 1940s-50s clockwork monkey.

0:34:300:34:35

He's wearing a red hat and playing with his cymbals.

0:34:350:34:38

Who's going to start meet at £20 for him? 20, 10 to go then,

0:34:380:34:42

thank you, 12 anywhere else now?

0:34:420:34:44

10 bid, 12 anywhere else?

0:34:440:34:46

11, then. 11 bid.

0:34:460:34:49

-A pound!

-13, it isn't unlucky, at 12 bid, £13.

0:34:490:34:54

15 now, 15, 16, no, at £15 bid, going,

0:34:540:35:01

all done at £15. 16 bid, 17 bid, 18 bid, on the book, 19 or not now?

0:35:010:35:08

At £18 bid, any more now? 19.

0:35:080:35:11

I have 20, and I've 21 on the book.

0:35:110:35:15

-22 now.

-Go on.

0:35:150:35:17

At £21, we're on the market at 21, 22, back in the room.

0:35:170:35:20

At 22, every pound helps. All done and finished, then, going at £22.

0:35:200:35:27

-Thank you.

-There you go, you've got £12 profit on that, which is brilliant.

0:35:290:35:34

You had eight pounds before, so overall, you're plus 20.

0:35:340:35:36

-How about that?

-Well, I never!

0:35:360:35:38

Well done, you two.

0:35:380:35:40

That's brilliant, isn't it? £20 up.

0:35:420:35:45

This could be a winning score, it could well be a winning score,

0:35:450:35:48

we know how difficult it is to make a profit on this programme, and you've just done it.

0:35:480:35:52

-So, don't tell the Blues a thing, all right?

-We won't.

0:35:520:35:55

-Keep really, really quiet.

-Top secret.

0:35:550:35:56

Don't go out looking so bubbly. Start looking miserable.

0:35:560:35:59

OK, depression.

0:35:590:36:00

Seriously, you've done very well, but don't tell the Blues a thing.

0:36:000:36:04

Thank you!

0:36:040:36:05

52, 55...

0:36:080:36:09

So, Graham and Lee. Do you know how the Reds got on?

0:36:130:36:15

-No idea.

-Hopefully worse than we will.

0:36:150:36:17

We've been hiding you away. We don't want you to know how those girls have done.

0:36:170:36:21

-So, how are you feeling?

-Nervous.

0:36:210:36:24

Confidently nervous.

0:36:240:36:26

That's a mixture of emotions, isn't it? What are you nervous about, Lee?

0:36:260:36:30

The stick. Deeply.

0:36:300:36:32

Well, you did find it, it's true. And you did pay £140 for it.

0:36:320:36:36

A bargain at half the price.

0:36:360:36:38

Actually, according to the auctioneer, he thinks it's a bargain at £20-£40.

0:36:380:36:43

There's a big old hole there.

0:36:430:36:45

But don't despair, because your Pilkington pot, which Mark found for you, you paid £100 for that.

0:36:450:36:51

That's identified as being a Mycock pot, which is a particular maker in Pilkington.

0:36:510:36:56

He's got some buyers lined up for Pilkington, so he's

0:36:560:36:59

quite confident about it, and it's a nice piece, all right?

0:36:590:37:02

Item 95 is a Pilkington's Royal Lancastrian vase

0:37:020:37:06

of inverted ballast form, there we go, it also bears the

0:37:060:37:09

monogram of William Mycock, What shall we say for that,

0:37:090:37:12

who's going to start at 100?

0:37:120:37:14

80 to go, then, 80, 80 bid, 85,

0:37:140:37:16

90, 95, 100, 110, 120, 130, this is cheap at 130, any more bid?

0:37:160:37:22

-Keep going, come on.

-I'll take five as a last call, 135.

0:37:220:37:24

140, down here, is that another bid?

0:37:240:37:27

140, at 140, 145, 150, 145,

0:37:270:37:31

then, the net bidder has it at 145, last call, we're going at £145.

0:37:310:37:37

Well done. Well done, Mark.

0:37:370:37:40

145. You're £45 up.

0:37:400:37:42

Now, the stick.

0:37:420:37:45

The 20th century South American walking stick there,

0:37:450:37:48

possibly Mexican, who's going to start me at £40?

0:37:480:37:51

40, 30 to go, then, £30.

0:37:510:37:56

20, £20, anybody? 10, thank you, 10.

0:37:560:38:00

12, anywhere else, 12, 15, 18, everybody wants it now,

0:38:000:38:05

like a stroll in the park, 20 now, another one. 20, and two. 22.

0:38:050:38:11

25 now, I have 25, fresh blood,

0:38:110:38:15

28 now, have another one.

0:38:150:38:17

No, at 25 it's at the back of the room at 25, and eight now, do I see,

0:38:170:38:20

-28 bid, and 30, 32.

-He's working hard on this.

0:38:200:38:26

Last call then, we're done and we're finished

0:38:260:38:28

and we're selling, all done at £30.

0:38:280:38:30

That's minus £110.

0:38:300:38:33

This isn't so brilliant, this, is it?

0:38:330:38:36

You were £45 up.

0:38:360:38:37

Anyway, next lot up are the bonbon dishes.

0:38:370:38:40

A pair of Mappin and Webb silver pin dishes

0:38:400:38:43

of curvilinear form, Birmingham, 1963.

0:38:430:38:46

Who's going to start me at £50?

0:38:460:38:48

50, 30, 30, 20, 22, 25, 28, 28, 30,

0:38:480:38:54

good, heavy gauge, 32, do I see now?

0:38:540:38:57

At 30 bid, 32, 35, 38, 40, 42,

0:38:570:39:01

45, 48, 48, do I see over there?

0:39:010:39:04

45, third row.

0:39:040:39:06

48 is a last call, 48, fresh bidder.

0:39:060:39:08

At 48, 50, we'll keep the progress going, at 52,

0:39:080:39:11

55 now, 55, don't want to scare you off with high figures!

0:39:110:39:14

-He's a good auctioneer, isn't he?

-58, surely.

0:39:140:39:18

Last call, then, selling at £55.

0:39:180:39:20

Well done, Lee.

0:39:200:39:22

£55, you get a £10 profit on that.

0:39:220:39:25

You were minus 65, you're now only minus £55.

0:39:250:39:29

So what are you going to do about the hefferlump?

0:39:290:39:31

-We're going to go for it.

-You're going to go with the hefferlump?

0:39:310:39:34

So it needs to make £70.

0:39:340:39:37

-No problem.

-Here we go, then, that's confidence for you.

0:39:370:39:40

Here comes the hefferlump.

0:39:400:39:42

The pottery teapot in the form of an Indian elephant

0:39:420:39:46

with a small boy seated upon it.

0:39:460:39:49

Who's going to start me at £10 for it? At 10, bid 12.

0:39:490:39:54

15, 18. 22, 25, 28.

0:39:540:39:56

30, 32, 35, 38, 40. 40 on the net. £40 bid.

0:39:560:40:00

It's on the internet at £40.

0:40:000:40:04

42, front row. Can I see a 45 bid?

0:40:040:40:06

Surely have another click?

0:40:060:40:08

45 bid, 48.

0:40:080:40:10

48 bid. 50? Thank you. 50 bid. 55.

0:40:100:40:14

55, 55. 60 now.

0:40:140:40:16

Come on. Come on.

0:40:160:40:18

-You're hovering.

-You may as well click.

0:40:180:40:22

At £55 bid in the room.

0:40:220:40:24

At 55. Eight is the last call then.

0:40:240:40:26

Going at £55.

0:40:260:40:29

You've sold it for £55!

0:40:290:40:32

How did that make more than the stick?

0:40:320:40:35

That is amazing.

0:40:350:40:37

£55. I can't believe that.

0:40:370:40:39

£55 for a teapot!

0:40:390:40:42

A teapot with a broken finial.

0:40:420:40:45

-Well, I knew it.

-There you go.

0:40:450:40:48

Mark, you must be... He's just a genius, isn't he?

0:40:480:40:51

To convert £10 into £55, via the ether of the internet.

0:40:510:40:57

-We could have done the same with the walking stick.

-That's amazing.

0:40:570:41:00

So you have £45 profit out of that, which is very good.

0:41:000:41:04

You were minus £55 before, so overall you are minus £10.

0:41:040:41:08

-It could have been worse.

-It could have been a lot worse.

0:41:080:41:11

That is absolutely extraordinary.

0:41:110:41:13

Now, this could be a winning score, all right?

0:41:130:41:15

So don't tell the Reds a thing.

0:41:150:41:17

Button up. Thanks, boys.

0:41:170:41:19

10, 12, 15. 20.

0:41:190:41:22

Well, how extraordinary. Have you teams been talking to one another?

0:41:260:41:30

-No. Not at all.

-I can tell you that one team has been extremely

0:41:300:41:34

unlucky today, and the unlucky team is, of course, the Blues.

0:41:340:41:40

I mean, you made a profit of £45 on the first item.

0:41:400:41:45

You made a profit of £10 on the third item.

0:41:450:41:47

You made a bonus buy profit of £45 off that elephant.

0:41:470:41:51

But still, it couldn't wipe out the losses on that stick.

0:41:510:41:54

Minus £110 they were on the stick.

0:41:540:41:58

So overall you are minus £10, which I regard as a very, very unlucky score, all right?

0:41:580:42:03

Bad luck there, boys.

0:42:030:42:06

And stop giggling.

0:42:060:42:08

Just keep off the Mexican sticks in future.

0:42:090:42:11

The victors, of course, are the girls, who actually going to go home with money in their pockets.

0:42:110:42:17

Makes a change.

0:42:170:42:18

That leather-bound flask did all right, didn't it? £30 on that.

0:42:180:42:21

And you got a profit on the wind-up monkey which nobody liked.

0:42:210:42:25

-It just goes to show. Anyway, girls. £20 up.

-Brilliant.

0:42:250:42:29

-How does that feel?

-Fantastic.

0:42:290:42:30

Does it feel good? I'm so pleased. But you've been great teams.

0:42:300:42:33

We've had a wonderful programme.

0:42:330:42:35

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-YES!

0:42:350:42:38

For more information about Bargain Hunt,

0:42:410:42:44

including how the programme was made, visit the website at bbc.co.uk

0:42:440:42:48

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:520:42:54

Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits Belton House in Lincolnshire where he finds a piece of furniture that hides a fascinating secret. There are also some treasures to be found at an antiques fair and experts Mark Stacey and David Harper are on hand to point the teams in the right direction. But will the items they buy make any profit when they are sold at auction?