Derby Bargain Hunt


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Antiques challenge. Experts Kate Bliss and David Harper join Tim Wonnacott at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Derby University, and Tim visits Hatfield House in Hertfordshire.


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Aye, aye! But will our teams have the vision

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to make a profit?

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Let's find out as we go bargain hunting.

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Derby University would not be the first place you'd think of coming to

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to find an antique fair

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but actually, it's like one vast interactive history lesson.

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Our teams today have a lesson which lasts for an hour,

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during which time they have to find three items with their £300

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here at the Jaguar Antiques Fair.

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'On today's show...'

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-Look into these eyes.

-All right.

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'..there are hypnotised dealers.'

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-And what's your best price?

-35. Works every time, you see.

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-'Straight-talking sellers.'

-What can you tell us about it?

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-It's a clock.

-Yeah!

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'And a desperate auctioneer.'

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-One more!

-One more bid, please.

-Do you hear that?

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-£2 more!

-Just £2!

-Go on. One more.

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'But first let's meet the teams.'

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So it's the girls versus the boys today.

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We've got Becky and Suzy versus Dan and James.

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-Welcome, teams.

-Hello.

-Very nice to be here.

-Hello.

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Hiya. Now... Becky. What exactly do you do, darling?

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-I work here at the University of Derby.

-You don't?

-I do.

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-In this very building?

-This very building.

-How lovely!

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-You've not had to come far, have you?

-Not very far at all, no, today.

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-Lovely. And what do you do here?

-I work in the quality department

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for the faculty of art, design and technology.

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So we cover all the courses that go through for our particular area

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and make sure they're up to speed with what's going on in the rest of the university world.

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-So that's where quality comes from?

-Quality, yes.

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-How lovely to be in the quality department.

-Mm-hm.

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-What sort of antiques do you like, Becks?

-I inherited some crockery from my aunt when she moved to Canada,

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which is an Island Worcester sunflower set,

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which I think is made in Jamaica but I really like it.

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It's old and very worn but I use it a lot, you know.

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Yes. And how do you know Suzy?

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We both started here at the university at the same time

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and had to learn everything together, thrown in at the deep end.

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-So you work together?

-We do.

-Suzy, is Becky a good work mate?

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Very good, yeah. We get on really well.

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We pretty much share a desk together, so we have to work well together

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and she's my senior, so she can kind of tell me what to do.

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-Is she your boss, then?

-No.

-No.

-No!

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HE CHUCKLES Now, Suzy, it says here

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-that you have a reputation of being the posh one in the team.

-Apparently so, yes.

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It says here that your father is Lieutenant Commander Peter Poolit Lethbridge Wells.

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-That's not...

-Does that mean that you're a Poolit Lethbridge Wells?

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-I'm not a "Poolit". It's Poulitt.

-I got that wrong.

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-Poulitt Lethbridge Wells.

-Are you a Poulitt Lethbridge Wells?

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-I'm just a Wells.

-Ah!

-That's just his middle names, my dad's middle names.

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-So he's...

-Unusual.

-So it's not triple-barrelled, your name?

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No! That would be posh.

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-I think... I think that's how the reputation started, darling.

-I know.

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I think that's why it is.

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So are you going to be a winning team?

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-Definitely.

-We're definitely a winning team.

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-We've got really good taste.

-Yes.

-And an eye for quality.

-Definitely.

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-I mean, you run the quality department here...

-Yep.

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-You've got to be red hot.

-We are.

-We do run the quality department.

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-Red hot?

-Red hot.

-Yeah? Good.

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That's that sorted out. Now, boys, are you quaking in your boots?

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-Not at all.

-Not at all. You've got some stiff competition here, though.

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-Do you think you can beat them?

-Easily.

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I think we're like salt and pepper, so we're the perfect combination.

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I'm clever, good-looking and funny and Danny's the opposite.

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And modest.

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And you're good friends. That's the first miracle.

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Dan, it's no coincidence that you like a bit of salt and pepper, is it?

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No, I collect salt and pepper pots as my pastime.

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-It started from my mother, so carrying that collection on.

-Lovely.

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But you did have a scare once at auction, didn't you, Dan?

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Yeah, my boss sent me to a property and land auction

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and the... I accidentally bid on a piece of land worth 320,000.

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-Did you buy it?

-Fortunately not, no.

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Someone outbid me at the back of the room, so...

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-Phew! That was a relief.

-Big relief.

-Yeah.

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James, we don't want any mistakes like that. Can you really trust your teammate?

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Er, I think so.

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I think with the help of the specialist and my knowledge

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and Dan's salt and pepper pot knowledge, I think we'll get through.

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-Do you collect anything?

-Erm, not so much myself.

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My Dad, he's got quite a large collection of agricultural tools.

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He was brought up on a farm, so ranging from tractors

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down to smaller things like woodworking planes.

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I would advise on Bargain Hunt that you resist buying a tractor.

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Anyway, this is the money moment. £300 apiece. Here's your £300.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go

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and very, very, very good luck.

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So while the girls and boys go out to play,

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let's meet their experts who'll be tutoring them.

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Swotting it up for the reds it's Kate Bliss

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and at the front of the class for the blues, it's David Harper.

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That's Sir to you.

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Right, boys, have you any idea what to expect here or what?

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-Er, no!

-LAUGHTER

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-Right, we're going.

-Go!

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Both teams have a maximum of one hour to shop

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and with something catching Kate's eye,

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she's wasting no time in taking her team straight to it.

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Lovely. Thank you.

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-It doesn't look the same as...

-Now, have a look.

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It is pottery as opposed to porcelain, of course.

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It's got quite a weight to it.

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And you've got this quite unusual white metal overlay on it.

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Now, as soon as I saw it, I thought Iznik pottery, very Eastern,

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but this in fact could be a later copy, perhaps Moroccan pottery,

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-dating I would think from about 1900, as opposed to the earlier Iznik pottery.

-Right.

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Having said that, it's a really great decorative piece.

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-I like it.

-Yeah. I do. How well do you reckon it'll do?

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Well, I think if it's catalogued properly,

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-I can see that doing 80 to 120.

-OK.

-Maybe on a good day even 150.

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-What do you think then, girls?

-I like it. It's different.

-Yeah.

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I can see it in someone's house,

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it could be a modern house or some people that like antiques,

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so I think it's an all-rounder.

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-Yeah?

-I'd have it my house.

-I would, too.

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-OK, let's find out how much it is.

-OK.

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-Excuse me, sir?

-Yeah?

-How much is your charger here?

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-Well, I've got 95 on it at the moment.

-OK.

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-But I can do a little bit.

-Mm. What's your best?

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Could you do, say, 70 for us?

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Er, it's a little bit low. 75?

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-75, what do you think, girls?

-75 sounds good to me.

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-Yeah.

-Thank you very much.

-No problem.

-All right.

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-Brilliant.

-Thank you.

-Yes?

-Perfect.

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Crikey, Kate, at this rate, you'll have finished your shopping before lunch.

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It looks like the blues are doing a bit more browsing first.

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That's a very decorative Japanese, Oriental, vase and cover.

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-Yeah.

-Now, that shape has been around for centuries,

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going way back into the Ming dynasty from 1300 to 1600,

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-but that, I can tell you, is absolutely brand new.

-OK.

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Nothing wrong with it at all and a great decorator

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but we're going to struggle in auction.

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It's only 23 quid, so if you want it, take it home, fantastic.

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but it's not going to make much more at auction.

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-Keep looking.

-All right.

-Keep looking.

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While the boys keep looking,

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the girls are heading straight for the bling.

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Let's pick it up. Are you horsy people?

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-You are a horsey person.

-I'm a horsey person.

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-Yeah?

-I'm not posh.

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It is really nicely done, isn't it? Really nicely cast.

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What do you think, Becky? Would you wear something like that?

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-Personally, no.

-No.

-No.

-But do I like it? Yes.

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-Erm, I'm not...

-But if Suzy's not that keen.

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70... 78.

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So that's a no, then, but the boys are heading for more bling.

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A silver Victorian brooch with emeralds, diamonds, rubies and sapphires.

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Do you think it might be out of our price range? Yeah!

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-Now, these are set with gem stones.

-Right.

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-And a little pearl in the middle.

-Also very pretty.

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-Do you like pretty?

-I'm not sure about the colours in them.

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They're a bit, I don't know.

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-Costumey.

-Gaudy.

-Yeah.

-A bit too...

-I think so, yeah.

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-You're quite a traditional sort of girl, aren't you?

-I am.

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-She is a traditional sort of girl.

-I am.

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All that glitter has stopped the girls in their tracks

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but remember, it's profit we're looking for, not presents.

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-Is it a mustard pot?

-Yeah, or... Let's have a look.

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-Well, that's lovely, isn't it? A typical George II design.

-Mm-hm?

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-So the design is 1740, 1750.

-That's right.

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With that lovely cabriole foot, there.

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But, you know, that design was created then with the shells

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but it's popular today.

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You can buy things that look like this brand new today.

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But with silver, we know from its markings,

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and from your very professionally labelled ticket here,

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"Mustard pot, Sheffield, 1899."

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Look, boys, it's down to price.

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-The ticket price is £85.

-85.

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Now, this gentleman is a great negotiator,

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I know him of old,

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and he's going to give you the best price in the world.

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Just get prepared to be shocked at the discount this man's going to give you.

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I'll do that at 70.

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-What do you think? Bit too much?

-Oh, I don't know.

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It's a good price, that, at 70.

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What about 65?

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I've got to make something myself.

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-Make it 50, then.

-No!

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That'll be the day.

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No, I think that's a fair price.

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-Dan, what do you think?

-What do you think?

-£70?

-Yeah.

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-Er, could it reach that at auction, then?

-Well, we don't know.

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But we can't be criticised for buying something that isn't good.

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-It's a nice piece, isn't it?

-I think that'll do well.

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You've got to go with you and your instincts.

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-Yeah. It's a nice piece.

-Yeah.

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We can't get you down to 65? Just to give us a bit of luck?

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-Go on, then.

-Good man.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks a lot.

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-OK.

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

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20 minutes gone and the blues have finally caught up with the reds.

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One item each.

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-Oh, isn't it lovely?

-For the horsy set.

-Yes.

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People love, there's a huge market, for horse-related items.

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Studded with a little diamond here

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and then you've got diamonds and black enamel here.

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-I'm not sold on that, to be honest.

-No, I'm not.

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-These girls! Fussy.

-Very picky.

-What do you like, then?

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-I prefer that pearl necklace.

-You prefer that pendant?

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-That's not good, I take it?

-No, well it is, it's lovely.

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It's got a lovely little cultured pearl, there,

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-a really nice, white creamy one.

-Mm.

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And then you've got sapphires all the way round the outside.

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Do you think that would sell well?

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Well, it has got quite a contemporary look about it,

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which a lot of people like.

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-Pendants are very commercial...

-Yeah.

-..as a piece of jewellery.

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What's the price, madam? What can you do for us on that?

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I've got 90 on it, I can do 60 as an absolute rock bottom

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and then that's got to give you at least £10 on that.

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-OK.

-That would be very kind of you...

-I'm a kind person.

-..if you'd be happy to go to 60.

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Well, yes, so I see.

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-Are you happy with 60?

-I'm happy with 60.

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-Is that the sort of thing you would buy?

-I probably would.

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-Suzy?

-Yeah, I'd buy it, too.

-Yeah, that sounds good.

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-I'd definitely go for that.

-Thank you.

-Lovely. Thank you very much.

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At the auction, the teams will have to decide on a bonus buy

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but what exactly is it?

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The bonus buy? No.

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Is that where they buy something and get them to swap it

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for something they've already purchased?

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Would you like to swap this for a mystery thing,

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which could be a bonus and make more money?

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Is it like the third thing they buy or something or...?

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No, no, no, it's not like that at all.

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It's very simple.

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The bonus buy is when any leftover lolly from the shopping

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is given to the expert, who then shops for a fourth item

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which is revealed at the auction.

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If the team takes that object and it makes a profit,

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it's added to their total.

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If it makes a loss, then, frankly, it's deducted

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and that's the gamble.

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Have you got it?

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Now just pay attention at the back, will you?

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-There's some interesting hatpins here.

-Hatpins, yes.

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-Do you like hatpins?

-Er, not for me, exactly.

-Not for personal use.

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No, but they look quite interesting.

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After a flying start, are the reds starting to struggle?

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Clocks, clocks, clocks.

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Lovely, thank you. What can you tell us about it?

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-It's a clock.

-Yeah...

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I just noticed this item here.

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And what is that, then, boys? What do you think it is?

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-It's certainly interesting.

-A sword and a ladder?

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-OK.

-Some axes.

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Yeah, it looks like a prisoner of war piece of art, doesn't it?

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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-So it's tools in a bottle.

-As opposed to like a ship.

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As opposed to a ship or a message in a bottle.

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It's the kind of thing that prisoners of war during the First World War, '14 to '18,

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erm, would, you know, create to pass the time.

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-Does it do anything for you?

-I think it's...

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It's something really different, isn't it? I've never seen anything like this before.

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-I'd definitely be interested.

-What about you, Dan?

-It'd catch a few eyes at the auction.

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-It would, it would.

-That's good.

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And where would you find another one? I've seen them before with tools in

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-but every single one is going to be unique.

-It's unique.

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Now, priced at 45. It doesn't sound bad.

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Erm, who's the best negotiator?

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-I think Dan might be. He's the one that usually buys...

-Buys stuff.

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Well, here's the chap. Dan, I'm going to give you the bottle.

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Look at that man and ask him what the absolute death is on that bottle.

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-What's it gonna be?

-Well, you've been quoted 45, I believe.

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-45 on it, yeah.

-45 on it.

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A straight 40 would be the best.

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-40.

-It's a good price already, so...

-Yeah, yeah.

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Look into these eyes. Are you ready? I'm gonna do it now.

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-What's the best price?

-35.

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LAUGHTER Works every time, you see.

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I'm not sure hypnosis is allowed under the Bargain Hunt rules, David.

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I'll have to look that one up.

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Both teams now have one last item to find

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and with just ten minutes left, it's decision time.

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-So what do you like, Suzy?

-Erm, I'm quite drawn to these little bowls.

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-And I do like that one as well.

-That one there?

-Yeah.

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-That's a bit different.

-It is a bit different, actually.

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The decoration's a lot more sparse on this one.

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This is actually really interesting.

0:15:560:15:58

What you've got here is a French-style decoration on English Worcester

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and just to confuse you, you've got a mark on the back

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which isn't the Worcester mark,

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it's actually the French factory called Chantilly.

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So the fact that they're pretending to be French,

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that won't put anything against it?

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Not at all. That's quite a good selling point because it's unusual.

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OK. I think it's really sweet and really delicate.

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How much do you think it would go for in auction?

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Well, the price on it is 88.

0:16:250:16:28

I mean, typically, little Worcester saucers like this at auction

0:16:280:16:32

would fetch anything from 40, I suppose, for a very common one,

0:16:320:16:36

up to 60, 70, maybe £80, for something unusual.

0:16:360:16:40

So I think it depends what price the stallholder can do for us.

0:16:400:16:45

'While the girls think about the plate, the boys may have found their last item.'

0:16:450:16:49

It's from the RAF No. 40 Squadron from Gosport in Hampshire.

0:16:510:16:56

So that's interesting. And what's the scene here?

0:16:560:16:58

It's got what looks like a Krakatoa or something, a volcano going off.

0:16:580:17:03

Yes.

0:17:030:17:04

So it's obviously foreign lands, a lake,

0:17:040:17:07

but there's the squadron insignia.

0:17:070:17:09

Now, that makes it interesting.

0:17:090:17:11

As an ordinary cigarette box, it's not very interesting

0:17:110:17:13

but because it's Second World War, RAF, then it IS interesting.

0:17:130:17:17

-You can imagine, sat on the airfields...

-That's right.

-..hot summer's day,

0:17:170:17:21

waiting for the siren, waiting to go. My goodness me.

0:17:210:17:24

-Cigarettes, matchbox.

-And it's in great condition.

0:17:240:17:27

-How much have you got on this?

-What does it say on the side?

0:17:270:17:30

-£4.50.

-35 quid if you want it.

0:17:300:17:34

-What do you think?

-Can you not go to 25?

0:17:380:17:43

I won't. You want it for nowt?

0:17:430:17:45

-35 quid.

-35.

0:17:450:17:48

He's hard work, this one, I assure you.

0:17:480:17:51

It could make 100 quid, that.

0:17:510:17:53

-It might make a tenner, as well.

-Yeah, exactly.

0:17:530:17:56

But it's... it's mechanical as well, isn't it?

0:17:560:17:58

It shoves the fags at you.

0:17:580:18:00

-Shoves the fags at you!

-It does.

0:18:000:18:02

-Can you meet us halfway at 30?

-Yes.

-Yes?

-Please.

-Good man.

0:18:020:18:07

-OK. Are you happy, boys?

-Thank you.

0:18:070:18:09

-Yeah?

-OK.

-Thank you.

0:18:090:18:11

-Good luck with it.

-Thank you.

0:18:110:18:13

Yeah, good luck with it. Right, brilliant, we are done.

0:18:130:18:16

'They're finished but the reds only have a few minutes left.'

0:18:160:18:21

These saucers and tea bowls, would they do well?

0:18:210:18:25

-I quite like the fact that they've got a set.

-They would do well.

0:18:250:18:28

That's a nice one, with the birds in branches.

0:18:280:18:31

-I'd estimate that at 80 to 120 in my auction house.

-OK.

0:18:310:18:35

So which one do you think would go better at auction, sir?

0:18:350:18:38

Erm, I think probably the Chantilly piece is the better auction piece,

0:18:380:18:42

with it being more unusual.

0:18:420:18:43

So what sort of price can you do for us?

0:18:430:18:45

The best price I can do on that one is 70.

0:18:450:18:48

OK.

0:18:480:18:49

The Chantilly has the chance, because it's unusual,

0:18:490:18:53

of two people thinking, "I'd like that in my collection,"

0:18:530:18:56

and it making more than it might do otherwise.

0:18:560:18:59

-OK.

-I think that's swung it.

-We should go for it.

0:18:590:19:01

-Take a risk with that one.

-I really do like it.

0:19:010:19:04

-It's not going to make you a flying profit but it might make you a little bit.

-OK.

-OK.

0:19:040:19:08

-Yeah?

-Scary! Yeah.

-OK.

0:19:080:19:10

We've got a chance with another one in there.

0:19:100:19:12

And I think, I have to say, you are pretty much out of time.

0:19:120:19:15

-OK, we'll go for that.

-OK. We'll take that one, then, please. Lovely.

0:19:150:19:19

No time for lunch, after all.

0:19:190:19:21

With all the items in the bag and the whole hour used up,

0:19:210:19:25

let's remind ourselves what the reds bought.

0:19:250:19:27

Kate Bliss nabbed this Iznik-style charger for £75.

0:19:280:19:32

Then the girls took their time over the bling,

0:19:330:19:35

settling on this 1940s pendant.

0:19:350:19:37

And an 18th century Worcester saucer made it into the bag

0:19:380:19:42

in the dying minutes.

0:19:420:19:44

Now, girls, you are very cool, calm and collected, aren't you?

0:19:440:19:48

-Yes.

-Yes.

-In your posh, quality shopping.

-Mm.

0:19:480:19:51

-Was it good fun?

-It was loads of fun, yes.

0:19:510:19:53

-Which is your favourite piece, Becks?

-It would be the big charger plate.

0:19:530:19:58

-Suzy, your favourite?

-The Worcester dish.

0:19:580:20:01

-Oh, very posh, that.

-Mm-hm.

0:20:010:20:03

-Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

-The charger plate.

0:20:030:20:07

-Yeah, I agree.

-You had to agree with that?

-Yeah.

-Had to agree with the boss.

-Mm.

0:20:070:20:11

-But she's not my boss.

-I'm not!

-OK, fine.

0:20:110:20:13

£205, you spent, which is quite magnificent.

0:20:130:20:17

And that gives me £95 of leftover lolly going to Kate Bliss.

0:20:170:20:21

-Thank you very much.

-So was it good fun with these girls?

-It was great.

0:20:210:20:24

And they really were very cool and collected

0:20:240:20:27

-in what they considered.

-Yes.

0:20:270:20:29

-Well, they're proper birds, you see.

-They are.

0:20:290:20:32

-I didn't get the frantic run-around I get with the blokes.

-Hopeless, men contestants.

0:20:320:20:37

Absolutely.

0:20:370:20:38

-What are you going to do with the 95, sweetie?

-I don't know.

0:20:380:20:41

I just know that it's got to be quite classy, really, for those two.

0:20:410:20:45

Quite. Classy and quality, that's what they are.

0:20:450:20:47

Writ all over them.

0:20:470:20:48

Now, let's remind ourselves what the blues bought.

0:20:480:20:52

The salt and pepper blues couldn't resist a good condiment,

0:20:520:20:56

so they bought this silver mustard pot.

0:20:560:20:58

This unusual tools in a bottle one-off caught the lads' attention

0:20:580:21:03

for £35.

0:21:030:21:05

And it may shove the fags at you, but will it shove them a profit?

0:21:060:21:09

This RAF cigarette box could ignite the saleroom at £30.

0:21:090:21:14

Well, you boys were certainly attracted to the unusual, weren't you?

0:21:140:21:18

-That's correct.

-Absolutely.

0:21:180:21:19

So tell me, James, which is your favourite item?

0:21:190:21:22

I think it's got to be the tool in a bottle. It's certainly different.

0:21:220:21:26

Tool in a bottle. OK, fine.

0:21:260:21:29

And what about yours, Dan?

0:21:290:21:31

I like the silver mustard pot that we bought.

0:21:310:21:34

-That's definitely a nice piece.

-He goes for the condiments.

0:21:340:21:37

-What's your prediction as to which piece will bring the biggest profit?

-The tool in a bottle.

0:21:370:21:42

Hopefully it'll go well. It's just so unusual.

0:21:420:21:45

-OK, do you agree with that?

-I'd agree with that.

-Very sensible.

0:21:450:21:48

You spent £130, which is pas mal,

0:21:480:21:51

and I'll have £170 of leftover lolly for David for the bonus buy.

0:21:510:21:56

-Thank you, Tim.

-Has it been a good day for you?

-We've had great fun, haven't we, boys?

0:21:560:22:00

-Definitely.

-It's been brilliant.

0:22:000:22:01

And what have you got in mind to spend all that cash on?

0:22:010:22:04

A few things in mind. Again, something out of the ordinary

0:22:040:22:08

because what we've been doing is buying unusual items,

0:22:080:22:11

so another unusual item is called for.

0:22:110:22:13

Well, you're the past master at the unusual and the unexpected...

0:22:130:22:17

-Thank you.

-..so good luck with that.

0:22:170:22:19

For me, I'm heading off somewhere absolutely spiffing.

0:22:190:22:22

Actually, 120 miles down the M1 from Derby to Hatfield House.

0:22:230:22:29

The original Hatfield Palace was built around 1485

0:22:310:22:35

by John Morton, Bishop of Ely.

0:22:350:22:37

Then in 1607,

0:22:370:22:40

the first Earl of Salisbury started to build Hatfield House.

0:22:400:22:45

To this day, their descendants use it as a family home.

0:22:470:22:50

All families have some colourful characters

0:22:500:22:53

and Hatfield is no exception.

0:22:530:22:55

It was one of these family members, the first Marchioness of Salisbury,

0:22:570:23:01

who left a great impression on the place.

0:23:010:23:04

The first marquis married Emily Mary Hill,

0:23:040:23:08

who was described as domineering, striking

0:23:080:23:11

and somewhat eccentric.

0:23:110:23:14

She would, indeed, distribute golden coins

0:23:140:23:17

from a velvet purse that she carried

0:23:170:23:20

and literally throw them at the poor.

0:23:200:23:22

She gambled deep into the night

0:23:220:23:25

and was riding to hounds even in her eighties.

0:23:250:23:28

She also had the rare distinction

0:23:280:23:30

of burning down the west wing here at Hatfield,

0:23:300:23:33

which apparently happened in 1835, when she was 85,

0:23:330:23:38

when her vast, tall coiffure caught alight on a stray candle

0:23:380:23:45

and she burnt the west wing down.

0:23:450:23:48

Ever since then, the family have taken fire precautions rather more carefully.

0:23:480:23:53

Which is why we've got that socking great handle

0:23:530:23:56

on the right-hand side of the grate

0:23:560:23:59

because they installed a series of drop-down shutters

0:23:590:24:03

which appear when you wind the handle.

0:24:030:24:06

So that effectively, when nobody's in the room,

0:24:060:24:08

the fire can be shut down and a spark won't appear to burn down this wing.

0:24:080:24:14

This set of 14 dining chairs is a further reminder

0:24:150:24:19

of the first Marchioness.

0:24:190:24:21

If you go to pick them up, you find that they're incredibly heavy.

0:24:210:24:24

That's because they're made of a Chinese hardwood

0:24:240:24:28

called hua huang li.

0:24:280:24:30

But there's something curious about the dating.

0:24:300:24:34

Because on the back of this chair,

0:24:340:24:36

it says in an oval reserve,

0:24:360:24:38

"EMS", which are the First Marchioness's initials.

0:24:380:24:44

And it says T. LeBlanc LLD.

0:24:440:24:47

And Mr LeBlanc apparently was a lawyer and neighbour

0:24:470:24:52

and he presented these chairs to Lady Salisbury,

0:24:520:24:57

as it says here, in 1819.

0:24:570:25:00

So he has presented to the first Marchioness this set of chairs

0:25:000:25:04

but if you look at the style of the chair,

0:25:040:25:08

with this pierced splat back,

0:25:080:25:10

these incredibly old-fashioned cabriole legs,

0:25:100:25:13

the style of the chair is more like 1740.

0:25:130:25:17

So it's a mystery.

0:25:170:25:20

There's another mystery to solve, of course, today

0:25:200:25:22

and that is exactly how much profit are our teams going to make

0:25:220:25:27

over at the auction?

0:25:270:25:28

Well, it's grand to be on the outskirts of Derby

0:25:420:25:45

at Bamfords saleroom with James Lewis.

0:25:450:25:48

-James.

-Great to have you.

-Very nice to be here.

0:25:480:25:50

Now, your first job is to tell us what you think

0:25:500:25:53

about this socking great metal overlaid bowl

0:25:530:25:57

-which our team bought.

-Mm.

0:25:570:26:00

-Is it good?

-Yeah, I think it's got a good interior designer's look.

0:26:000:26:05

You can imagine it in homes and antiques magazine or something like that,

0:26:050:26:09

-sitting on the sofa with a pile of carpet bowls in it.

-Yes.

0:26:090:26:12

-Or oranges.

-Yeah.

-Yeah. No, it's a good-looking thing.

0:26:120:26:16

-How old do you think it is?

-Not very old.

0:26:160:26:18

Mid-20th century, I should think.

0:26:180:26:20

-So, how much?

-Erm, £40-60.

-Cos they paid £75.

0:26:200:26:26

Where do you think we stand with this?

0:26:260:26:28

-You'd be lucky if you get £50?

-40 to 60.

0:26:280:26:32

-He really means 40 to 60.

-I think it's worth 40 to 60.

0:26:320:26:35

-OK, fine. Next is the little pendant.

-Yeah.

0:26:350:26:38

Apparently, tiny chips of sapphire and a pearl.

0:26:380:26:42

Erm, how's that going to go?

0:26:420:26:44

It's pretty,

0:26:440:26:46

it's the sort of thing that a private little lady might go for.

0:26:460:26:51

-Not a big lady?

-No, it's a little necklace.

-Oh, I see, yes.

0:26:510:26:54

-£40-£60, I think.

-OK, they paid £60.

-OK.

0:26:540:26:58

-So they'll be lucky if they make a profit on that.

-Yeah.

0:26:580:27:00

What about this saucer dish, this Worcester saucer dish?

0:27:000:27:03

I hadn't got a clue, I have to say.

0:27:030:27:05

I had to ask Annabel in our ceramics department

0:27:050:27:08

and she said, "It's clearly Worcester, it's got the Chantilly fake mark

0:27:080:27:12

"and it's blah, blah, blah," and told me all about it.

0:27:120:27:15

And she says it's worth £40-50.

0:27:150:27:17

-They paid 70.

-Ooh!

0:27:170:27:20

-So there's some difficulty, I would see, here...

-Yeah.

-..in making a splendido profit,

0:27:200:27:25

in which case they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look.

0:27:250:27:29

-Now, Becky, Suzy, you gave Kate £95, yes?

-Mm-hm.

-Yes.

0:27:290:27:34

And she's going to show you what she spent it on, aren't you?

0:27:340:27:37

Here we go.

0:27:370:27:39

In my hot little hand...

0:27:390:27:41

-Now, I know you girls like your jewellery.

-Yes, we do.

0:27:410:27:44

-So I have bought you...

-Ah!

0:27:440:27:46

-Those look a little bit familiar.

-Yes, we did look at these.

-We did.

-We did.

0:27:460:27:51

But they are, of course, in the Victorian style.

0:27:510:27:54

They are pearl cluster earrings in gold, 18 carat,

0:27:540:27:58

and with these little pearls set in, very much in the Victorian style.

0:27:580:28:03

The Victorians loved their pearls.

0:28:030:28:05

But these are modern, which for some people makes them more desirable.

0:28:050:28:09

Some women don't like to buy period jewellery or jewellery that's been worn,

0:28:090:28:13

so in actual fact, that would be a good selling point

0:28:130:28:17

-for some buyers at auction.

-Yeah.

-There we are. Have a look.

0:28:170:28:20

-How much did you get them for?

-£60.

0:28:200:28:24

-£60.

-What do you think they'll make?

0:28:240:28:26

Well, I think that they have a chance of making a small profit.

0:28:260:28:29

I'm not saying they're going to absolutely fly away but they could make a small one.

0:28:290:28:34

-OK.

-So...

-We'll have a think.

0:28:340:28:37

-Why don't you like them, Suze?

-I do like them

0:28:370:28:41

but I just... I don't know.

0:28:410:28:43

-You wouldn't buy them for yourself.

-I wouldn't.

-Right.

0:28:430:28:46

And I know that they're modern and I like a bit more older...

0:28:460:28:52

-You like a bit of age.

-I do.

-Quite right, too.

0:28:520:28:55

-I do.

-You hold that thought, girls,

0:28:560:28:58

but let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about the earrings.

0:28:580:29:02

So, James, there we go.

0:29:030:29:04

-Now, you haven't got pierced ears, so they're no good for you.

-Used to have.

0:29:040:29:09

-Oh, really?

-Yeah, up here somewhere.

0:29:090:29:11

-Oh, right. Top pierced rather than bottom pierced.

-Yeah.

0:29:110:29:14

So what do you think they're worth, these?

0:29:140:29:17

-Around £30-50.

-Do you?

-Something like that.

0:29:170:29:20

They're pretty but they are brand, spanking new.

0:29:200:29:24

Kate paid 60, so she may well be lucky to get a profit on that.

0:29:240:29:28

-Kate's probably better than I am, so we'll see.

-We'll see.

0:29:280:29:32

Well, what happens happens, doesn't it, frankly?

0:29:320:29:35

That's it for the reds. Now for the blues.

0:29:350:29:37

And first up for Dan and James is the mustard pot.

0:29:370:29:40

Yep, a standard thing, a standard model.

0:29:400:29:43

It would've been in a little leather-covered box

0:29:430:29:46

with a pepperette and an open salt.

0:29:460:29:49

-It's lost its friends.

-Yes, it has.

-And it's lost its case.

0:29:490:29:52

You can get a Georgian one for £80,

0:29:520:29:54

so for a reproduction style, Georgian style,

0:29:540:29:57

-I'm going to say 30 to 40.

-Which is quite generous.

0:29:570:30:01

-£65 was paid.

-Ooh, blimey, that's a lot.

0:30:010:30:03

-So that's cantering on, isn't it?

-Yes, it is.

0:30:030:30:05

Yes, next, James, is the ship in the bottle,

0:30:050:30:08

except it's not a ship, it's some weird collection of wooden tools.

0:30:080:30:13

I've never, ever seen anything quite like it. It's really odd.

0:30:130:30:16

-I'd much rather have a ship...

-So would I.

-..than that heap of woodwork in there.

0:30:160:30:21

-I can't imagine many people wanting it.

-No.

0:30:210:30:23

-What's your estimate?

-£15-25.

-£35 paid.

0:30:230:30:26

-Oh. Loss, I think.

-Yes, loss on that.

-Yeah.

0:30:260:30:29

-Now, the World War 2 cigarette box.

-Yeah.

0:30:290:30:33

Little marquetry box. Just happens to have 40 Squadron on it,

0:30:330:30:38

which is nice because it pitches it at the RAF quite neatly

0:30:380:30:42

-and people do collect RAF-related memorabilia, don't they?

-They do.

0:30:420:30:46

It's a strange box, I think,

0:30:460:30:48

because it's got sample wood, it's almost like olive wood,

0:30:480:30:51

Yes. I mean, you feel it's been foreign made.

0:30:510:30:54

-Yeah.

-Far East.

-Japanese, something like that.

-Yes.

0:30:540:30:58

It's quite a nice little box

0:30:580:31:00

but I don't know how you feel about the value, here?

0:31:000:31:03

Oh, I should think £20-£30.

0:31:030:31:06

-£20-£30.

-Yeah.

-Brilliant.

0:31:060:31:08

They paid £30, so they might just get close enough.

0:31:080:31:11

But overall, there's some problems here

0:31:110:31:14

and they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:31:140:31:18

Now, James and Dan, this is your bonus buy moment.

0:31:180:31:22

You gave David Harper £170 of leftover lolly.

0:31:220:31:26

-Did he blow the lot?

-Did he not.

0:31:260:31:28

-Gosh.

-Have you any idea what that might be?

0:31:300:31:33

I've got no idea what that is.

0:31:340:31:36

Well, it's a cup, a late 19th century,

0:31:360:31:38

Chinese famille rose - that's the decoration - cup.

0:31:380:31:42

We've got painted on the outside a group of immortals.

0:31:420:31:46

We have an immortal figure on the inside

0:31:460:31:48

and it would be used to drink rice wine.

0:31:480:31:50

But there's something else going on here.

0:31:500:31:53

If you look inside, there's a hole, a cheeky little hole.

0:31:530:31:56

So it's a Chinese joke cup.

0:31:560:32:00

So I would welcome you to my home, I'd give you this cup,

0:32:000:32:03

ask if you'd like some rice wine.

0:32:030:32:04

You'd accept, of course.

0:32:040:32:06

I'd pour you some rice wine and you'd take a sip and the rice wine will pour down you.

0:32:060:32:10

So what a great trick. Wouldn't you want to do that?

0:32:100:32:13

-I always do that to my mates.

-LAUGHTER

0:32:130:32:16

-How much did you pay for it?

-Well, I had 170 left.

0:32:170:32:20

-I spent the 70.

-OK.

0:32:200:32:22

So, James, what do you think about this joke pot?

0:32:220:32:25

It's certainly unusual. I've never seen anything like it before.

0:32:250:32:29

-What do you think, Dan?

-I still think he's underwhelmed.

0:32:300:32:34

Well, it's certainly very unusual, David, and full marks for that.

0:32:350:32:39

Hold the thought. Let's find out whether the auctioneer gets the joke.

0:32:400:32:45

James, you've got a great sense of humour. Tell me where the joke is in this joke cup.

0:32:470:32:52

Other than having a funny little Chinaman sitting in your cup...

0:32:530:32:57

-In your sake.

-He's got a hole under his skirt, hasn't he?

-Yes.

0:32:570:33:01

-And a hole there.

-And a hole in the bottom.

0:33:020:33:04

-Funny little fellow, isn't he?

-He is.

-But quite amusing.

0:33:040:33:07

I just don't see where the joke is.

0:33:070:33:09

If you fill it and it lets out fluid all over your friend's kimono,

0:33:090:33:13

I suppose that's a huge Oriental joke.

0:33:130:33:16

I can imagine that would be slightly amusing.

0:33:160:33:19

But that's the top and bottom of it.

0:33:190:33:21

And what do you think it would make in the auction?

0:33:210:33:24

-£30-40?

-You must be joking?

0:33:240:33:26

-No!

-He paid 70.

-Oh - that's the joke.

0:33:270:33:30

That's the joke!

0:33:300:33:32

Very good, Lewis.

0:33:320:33:34

-We'll leave all the joking to you on the rostrum. Good luck.

-Thank you.

0:33:340:33:38

-Now, Becks and Suze, this is exciting, isn't it?

-Very exciting.

0:33:510:33:55

-You really want to win today, don't you?

-Yes.

-Really want to win.

0:33:550:33:59

You want to beat those boys into the ground.

0:33:590:34:01

Anyway, first lot up is Iznik bowl and here it comes.

0:34:010:34:05

There we are. Great lot.

0:34:050:34:07

Good interior decorator's piece, a pewter overlay with it

0:34:070:34:11

and I can start the bidding at £45 and 50, now.

0:34:110:34:14

50 standing, sir. Five. 60.

0:34:140:34:17

Five, 70, five.

0:34:170:34:18

80 beats it. At £80. Has anyone five now?

0:34:180:34:21

At £80, with you in the red.

0:34:210:34:23

At 80 and five now.

0:34:230:34:25

At £80. Any advance?

0:34:250:34:27

At 80. Anybody else in the room?

0:34:270:34:29

At £80. It's a nice lot, this one.

0:34:290:34:31

-At 80...

-£80. That's brilliant. £5 profit, straight up.

0:34:310:34:37

Lot number 701, the 1940s pendant with the cultured pearl

0:34:370:34:42

surrounded by little pretty sapphires

0:34:420:34:45

and £42 is the underbid and so £45 starts it.

0:34:450:34:48

At 45. 48, now. At 45, 48 anywhere?

0:34:480:34:52

48, 50.

0:34:520:34:54

Five? No, at 50 with me. And five now.

0:34:540:34:57

-At £50. Do I see five?

-Come on, come one.

0:34:570:34:59

-55.

-55.

-Yes!

-60.

0:34:590:35:02

Five? It's against you.

0:35:020:35:04

At £60. One more?

0:35:040:35:06

-One more!

-Come one.

-At £60. No.

0:35:060:35:10

At 60. 65 anywhere?

0:35:100:35:11

At 60. With me at £60...

0:35:110:35:15

-Oh!

-Wiped its face.

-Yeah.

-£60.

-Not bad.

0:35:150:35:17

-No profit, no loss.

-We've got ourselves a fiver.

0:35:170:35:20

Lot number 702 is the 18th century Worcester saucer.

0:35:200:35:25

I have one bid at £40 and one higher, so 45. 50 anywhere?

0:35:250:35:31

50 do I see? At £45. And 50, now.

0:35:310:35:35

At 45, 50 anywhere?

0:35:350:35:37

At 45... Is that all?

0:35:370:35:40

At 45...

0:35:400:35:41

-Ow!

-£45.

-Ouch.

0:35:420:35:44

That's five off 50, that's minus 25, so overall, you're minus 20.

0:35:440:35:49

You are minus £20. The big question is, the bonus buy, the earrings.

0:35:490:35:53

Are you going to go with the bonus buy or not?

0:35:530:35:56

-I think we should.

-You want to go with the bonus buy?

-I think so.

0:35:560:35:59

-Quickly, are you going to go with the bonus buy?

-Kate?

-Your decision.

0:35:590:36:03

-Quickly!

-Yes!

-Yes!

-You're going with the bonus buy.

0:36:030:36:05

-Are you sure?

-They're going with the bonus buy.

0:36:050:36:08

-Maybe we should go no.

-No. Wait.

0:36:080:36:10

-These are pearl earrings.

-Are you going with it or not?

0:36:100:36:13

-No!

-Yes.

0:36:130:36:15

-Look, we have to...

-Yes!

-Yes!

0:36:150:36:17

You are going with them. They're going with the bonus buy and they're selling them! Strewth!

0:36:170:36:22

At 32, 35 now.

0:36:220:36:24

At £32. And five.

0:36:240:36:26

35, anywhere? At 32.

0:36:260:36:29

35, 38. And 40 anywhere?

0:36:290:36:32

-40 by the door. 42?

-Come on, come on.

0:36:320:36:34

45.

0:36:350:36:36

48. And 50.

0:36:360:36:38

And two. 55.

0:36:380:36:41

58.

0:36:410:36:43

Now, at £58. It's against you.

0:36:430:36:45

At £58. 60, anywhere?

0:36:450:36:48

-One more!

-One more bid, please.

0:36:480:36:50

-Do you hear that?

-£2 more!

0:36:500:36:53

-Just £2!

-60, go on.

0:36:530:36:55

One more. No?

0:36:550:36:57

-Blank expression.

-Oh!

0:36:570:36:59

I know, I'm sorry.

0:36:590:37:01

-Go on. They think you're mean.

-LAUGHTER

0:37:010:37:03

-You have agreement.

-CHEERING

0:37:030:37:06

There we are. At £58. Are you sure? Are we all done?

0:37:070:37:11

£58. You're minus £2 on that, which means overall you're minus 22.

0:37:110:37:17

But seriously, minus £22 could be a winning score

0:37:170:37:22

cos they may not do so brilliantly, those boys,

0:37:220:37:25

-so you could still be winning with minus £22, so don't tell them anything.

-We won't.

0:37:250:37:30

-Don't say a word.

-Poker face. Poker face.

-Yes.

-Poker face.

0:37:300:37:33

So, chaps, have you been chatting to those red chicks?

0:37:380:37:41

-No?

-No.

-You've not been talking about the score? We won't go into scoring with the girls,

0:37:410:37:46

that's not going to be a healthy development.

0:37:460:37:48

Anyway, first up, then, is your mustard pot, and here it comes.

0:37:480:37:52

Lot 725, the mustard.

0:37:520:37:55

And I can start the bidding here at £25.

0:37:550:37:59

At 25, the silver mustard. 30, sir.

0:37:590:38:01

35, 40. 40 to the right. And 45?

0:38:010:38:05

-45 do I see? At 40 to the right.

-Come on.

-Come on.

0:38:050:38:09

-£40.

-Solid silver little mustard in George II style.

0:38:090:38:12

At £40. Any advance?

0:38:120:38:15

At 40...

0:38:150:38:17

-Oh!

-£40 only, that's minus £25.

-Not so brilliant, that.

0:38:170:38:21

-Now...

-Not good.

0:38:210:38:22

Lot 726, is the World War, prisoner of war, tools in a bottle.

0:38:220:38:29

There we are. And I can start the bidding at £18.

0:38:290:38:32

20 starts it, 22 now.

0:38:320:38:34

22? At 20. And two.

0:38:340:38:37

22 in the third row. 25.

0:38:370:38:38

28. And 30. 32?

0:38:380:38:41

-35 and 38 for you.

-Yes!

-It's going.

-38 in the third row.

0:38:410:38:44

40 do I see? At £38 here and 40, now.

0:38:440:38:48

At £38. Any advance?

0:38:480:38:50

At 38...

0:38:500:38:51

-£38 is brilliant. Plus £3.

-Whoo-hoo!

0:38:520:38:56

Which means you are only minus £22. Everything to go for, boys.

0:38:560:39:00

This is exciting.

0:39:000:39:01

Lot 727 is the World War Two,

0:39:010:39:04

rectangular walnut and olive wood cigarette box.

0:39:040:39:08

Nicely inlaid on the top and I can start the bidding here at £18.

0:39:080:39:12

At 18 and 20. 20 do I see?

0:39:120:39:15

-At £18.

-It's worth more than that.

-20.

0:39:150:39:17

Two, 25. 28 in the red?

0:39:170:39:20

-28 and 30? 32.

-Yes!

-It's worth it.

-Come on, look at this.

-Go on.

0:39:200:39:26

31, then. Thank you. 31.

0:39:260:39:28

32! 32. 33.

0:39:280:39:31

-People want it.

-33 standing. 34.

0:39:310:39:34

35. 36.

0:39:340:39:36

38. And 40.

0:39:360:39:38

39, then.

0:39:380:39:40

-Go on, one more.

-Go on!

0:39:400:39:43

At £38 in the white.

0:39:430:39:44

At 38. 39?

0:39:440:39:46

-Whoo!

-40, 42.

-Yes!

-He's smashing it now.

0:39:460:39:48

42, yes? 42.

0:39:480:39:50

45. 45 for you?

0:39:500:39:52

Do you want 43, then?

0:39:530:39:56

-Yes?

-He's squeezing them.

-No. At £42, that was definite.

0:39:560:40:00

At 42. Any advance?

0:40:000:40:02

At £42. Are we all sure?

0:40:020:40:04

Well done. We're plus £12 on that,

0:40:050:40:07

which means overall, you are minus £10.

0:40:070:40:10

-Minus £10.

-Wow.

-This is so exciting, isn't it?

0:40:100:40:13

Now, what are you going to do? Are you going to go with the joke cup for £70 or bank your £10.

0:40:130:40:18

I think it's a bit too specialist for the auction today.

0:40:180:40:21

-Do you agree with that?

-I'd agree with that.

0:40:210:40:23

-I think it'll be not the right audience.

-Too specialist, he said.

0:40:230:40:27

I am offended. No, I'm not really. I do understand.

0:40:270:40:31

You've got to make this decision and it's vital.

0:40:310:40:33

We'll go with it. We'll go with it.

0:40:330:40:35

You're going to go with it? Quickly! You're changing your mind?

0:40:350:40:38

-We're going to do it. Are you happy with that, Dan?

-Yeah.

0:40:380:40:42

-OK, here it comes.

-Oh, no!

0:40:420:40:44

Lot number 731. The famille rose joke cup.

0:40:440:40:49

This is a fun little thing with a little Chinaman

0:40:490:40:53

sitting in the centre.

0:40:530:40:55

If you think that's fun, let's have a go at £30.

0:40:550:40:58

30 anywhere? Give it to somebody you don't like.

0:40:580:41:01

£30, 35, £40.

0:41:010:41:03

45, 50, five. 60.

0:41:030:41:06

Five. 62? At 60.

0:41:060:41:09

-62 do I see?

-Come on!

0:41:090:41:11

At £60. And two, now. Are we all done? At 60...

0:41:110:41:14

-Bad luck, David.

-It could've been worse.

0:41:150:41:17

-It could.

-It could've been a lot worse.

0:41:170:41:20

That was an amazing last-minute decision, there.

0:41:200:41:22

I was certain you weren't going with it, then you did go with it.

0:41:220:41:26

-Doubled our loss.

-You got in there.

0:41:260:41:28

Anyway, overall, then... Bad luck. You're minus £10 on that.

0:41:280:41:31

Overall you're minus 20.

0:41:310:41:32

-I do not want you to talk to the reds, all right?

-OK.

0:41:320:41:35

Go out looking very miserable, if that's possible.

0:41:350:41:39

-All right?

-All right.

0:41:390:41:40

Congratulations, though. Well done. See you later.

0:41:400:41:43

Well, there's been considerable rivalry between the teams today, I have to tell you.

0:41:470:41:52

Battle of the sexes or what?

0:41:520:41:55

And it is as close as a bit of gnat's whatnot between these two teams.

0:41:550:42:00

Actually only £2. GASPS

0:42:000:42:03

-£2!

-Just a question of the scale of the losses...

-No!

0:42:030:42:06

And the team that's marginally behind...

0:42:060:42:08

is the reds. GROANING AND CHEERING

0:42:080:42:10

Sorry, girls.

0:42:100:42:13

You're minus £22, that's all it is, and the boys are minus 20.

0:42:130:42:18

How, how rough is that?

0:42:180:42:20

-That's tough to take.

-That is tough to take.

0:42:200:42:22

-Have you enjoyed the programme?

-Yeah.

-It's been great.

0:42:220:42:26

We've loved having you on board, all three of you.

0:42:260:42:29

-Now, boys...

-Yes!

0:42:290:42:31

-You'll be pleased about this.

-Very.

0:42:310:42:33

Coming ahead, marginally, by only losing £20.

0:42:330:42:36

Of course, you went with the bonus buy and scored another tenner on that.

0:42:360:42:41

One moment, you were minus 10 but, anyway, there it is.

0:42:410:42:44

-It was a joke, wasn't it?

-It was a bit of a joke.

0:42:440:42:47

You've been brilliant, all three of you.

0:42:470:42:49

-You had a good time?

-Brilliant.

-Brilliant.

0:42:490:42:52

We've loved having you.

0:42:520:42:53

Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

0:42:530:42:56

Yes!

0:42:560:42:57

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:090:43:11

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:110:43:12

Kate Bliss and David Harper are the experts joining Tim Wonnacott at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Derby University. With only an hour to find three items to sell for a profit at auction, both teams need to have their wits about them to win.

Meanwhile, Tim visits Hatfield House in Hertfordshire, which has been in the same family for thirteen generations.