Scotland Bargain Hunt


Scotland

Antiques challenge. Presenter Tim Wonnacott heads north to Garrion Bridges in Glasgow, where experts Paul Laidlaw and Keith Baker are set loose with their teams.


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Transcript


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Hi there. I'm in Scotland just outside Glasgow. My gosh, we've got a busy day ahead of us!

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-Where are you going, mate?

-I'm going bargain hunting.

-Hop in.

-That's my language!

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'Coming up today, the Reds blow the whistle on their shopping.'

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BLOWS WHISTLE Welcome aboard, sir!

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-'The Blues start to feel the pressure.'

-Crisis stage.

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'It's a belter of an auction for the Reds.' I don't believe this!

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'And love is in the air for the Blues.'

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Welcome to The Garrion Bridges Art And Antiques Centre.

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Our teams today have certainly got drive,

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but will they be able to put their foot down at this antiques-buying lark?

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They each get £300 and an hour to shop.

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They then hitch a ride across to the auction where they hope to make a profit

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and the team that accelerates ahead with the most profits wins.

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So let's go and meet the Reds and Blues.

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For the Red Team, we've got Betty and Phil, and for the Blues, we've got Beverley and Nigel.

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-Hi, guys.

-Hello.

-Phil, what do you do for a living?

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-I'm a taxi driver.

-And how long have you done that for?

-33 years.

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-Have you got any famous stories about passengers?

-I reckon probably Billy Connolly is the most famous.

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-Is he as amusing as he comes across?

-He was with someone, so I never got a chance to talk to him.

-Oh, dear!

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Betty, you used to be a train guard.

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That's right. I retired just a year ago.

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-How many years did you do that for?

-20 years.

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It says here that you consider that the train guard is more important than the driver.

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Well, we're the ones that are facing all the passengers.

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You certainly are. That's quite a brave job cos some of these people can be pretty peculiar.

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-Maybe it's brave or maybe it's stupidity!

-You're also an incredible daredevil.

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-A wee bit of one.

-So what have you been up to, you naughty girl?

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Not so many years ago, I abseiled from the top of the Hilton Hotel in Glasgow.

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-And how tall is the Hilton Hotel in Glasgow?

-20 storeys.

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20 storeys? And you abseiled?

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-I abseiled down. It was for a charity.

-It needs to be!

-Yeah.

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-You seem to have the perfect balance in your team and you should do well today.

-We'll try.

-Very good luck.

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Now for the Blues... So you two love birds, how did you meet?

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Nigel and I met on a blind date.

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-Did you? With Cilla Black?

-No.

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-Not on the show?

-No. We were introduced through a mutual friend

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who thought we would have a lot in common.

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So was it then just like "caramba", you met and you thought, "Oh, gosh"?

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We met and we hit it off. I thought, "Quite a nice chap," and he thought, "She's really quiet(!)"

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It just shows what you can cover up at the initial meeting!

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Only joking. Nigel, you've got an interesting means of transportation.

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-Yes, we arrived today in my taxi called Marilyn.

-Which is a very comfortable machine.

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Yes, I bought her online at a well-known auction house.

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You bought yourself a black cab - why?

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I've always been interested in vintage vehicles and she appealed.

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That's great fun. Anyway, now our money moment.

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£300 apiece. You know the rules. Your experts await and off you go. And very, very good luck.

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So, if our teams today need a breakdown service,

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they've always got their experts to give them a kick-start.

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For the Red Team, Paul Laidlaw who would never blow a gasket.

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And for the Blues, Keith Baker

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who likes a good finish on his glassware.

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This'll be the quickest hour in your life.

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-Only 60 minutes left. Let's go. Come on.

-OK.

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They may have only just met, but Paul already knows the way to Betty's heart.

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-Did you work on the trains?

-Yes. The railway.

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Well, not far from trains, if you worked on a boat, you might have used a boatswain's pipe.

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So that's the call that you would pipe the communications round the vessel or the commander on board.

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That alleges to be a silver one.

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It's faithful to what it should be.

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-I'll be dead frank with you.

-Can I see it?

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I suspect that has no great age.

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If you wanted to play the game, you could buy that and I reckon you'd make a profit.

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-Uh-huh.

-But it ain't an antique in my opinion.

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What I would do if I were you... Only if you're at all interested.

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I would ask them what the death is on it, price-wise,

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because, off the record, that didn't cost a great deal.

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-Right.

-OK, retail. Or wholesale, I should say.

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I wouldn't rush to buy it, but I would use that as a banker.

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If you've got five minutes to go, and we've used ten minutes already of our precious hour,

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that's when you could fall back on it.

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Why don't you give it a wee blow?

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BLOWS WHISTLE Welcome aboard, sir!

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As the Red Ship sets sail and they tactically put the pipe aside,

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the Blues only have one thing on their mind.

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What do you think of the coffee set?

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I like coffee sets. I'm not so sure about that one. It's not me. It's too heavy.

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It's very modern, but I think it's...

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Let's have a look. It's very iconic, very stylish. Portmeirion.

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-It's a good collector's area.

-It wouldn't be me, but what do you think?

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-I prefer something a bit more delicate than that.

-Something prettier?

-Yeah.

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So the Blues seem to have their strategy in place - just look for a coffee set, what?

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Another coffee set.

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They're quite common. These are quite nice little coffee cans, individual ones.

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£10 the pair.

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Just from a social history point of view, they're absolutely amazing things for a fiver each.

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The teams are on a mission to seal their first deal,

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but Betty seems a bit cautious about the Reds' next find.

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Betty, come and see this.

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-Let me see.

-You put a candle in there.

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-You walk around the corridor with a candle in it.

-I'd be a wee bit worried about a candle in that.

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-There's not much to hold it there.

-Ignoring the health and safety aspects, can I have a wee shufty?

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I've certainly not seen anything quite like that.

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So we know we have a chamberstick.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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And clearly it is commemorate of Ile de St Helene,

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or St Helena,

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which is where Napoleon was exiled.

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-Exiled, yeah.

-For the second time.

-He died on St Helena?

-Yeah.

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But the lobes of the socket are all faced by imperial eagles.

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So you've got that continuity there. What a quirky little thing!

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-I think we'll get that. I really like that.

-What's the price on that?

-£24.

-It's not a lot of money.

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-Is that worth £20, £30 at auction on a bad day?

-I think it would be.

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-I think you need to try and just get that price down...

-Half the price.

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-I like the way you think!

-You start off there.

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Betty doesn't shy away from danger, so whilst the Reds get a price on the hazardous candlestick,

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the Blues have found just what they're looking for.

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We've got the Wedgwood mark on the bottom, as it says on the label.

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Moselle is the pattern. Whether it's anything similar like to the Moselle wine and everything,

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but this has got a vine leaf look.

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I see that it was 120. They've reduced it to 65.

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That would probably indicate that it's been here a little while,

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so it might not be the most popular thing in the antiques centre,

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but at £65, if someone wants it,

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I don't think you could go into any china shop today and buy it new for £65.

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-I think it would be a good buy.

-I think so.

-It might do well.

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-There's always the risk at auction that you'll find someone that wants it. Shall we have a go?

-Yes.

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We'll see what we can get on that.

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A writing chest...

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-Your chamberstick - would you be happy at 20?

-20?

-Aye, I think so.

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-Would you be happier at 18?

-18 would be better.

-That's what you could get it for.

-Smashing.

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-Sold.

-Excellent. Well done.

-It was just a wee bit over.

-We did all right there.

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The Reds have made their first purchase, so that's one up on the Blues.

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But Keith has news for his team.

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-I've just been to check on the Wedgwood coffee set.

-Oh, yeah.

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Even though it's been reduced by half anyway, they're gonna knock another fiver off, so that's £60.

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-I think it's a good buy at that.

-I think so.

-Are you both sure?

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-Yes.

-Number one purchase.

-The three of us are in agreement. OK, let's go and have a look.

-Sounds good.

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So the Blues have their first purchase. 20 minutes down and it's one-all.

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-Betty, tell us if there's any damage.

-I'll let you have a wee look first since you picked it out.

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-There's no damage.

-Nothing the matter with that?

-Not a mark.

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No cracks, nothing.

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-How old would that be?

-In truth, it's a 20th century piece, but it's nice.

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-I like the shamrocks. That would appeal to a lot of people.

-It is what it is.

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This is what they do. It cries out, this really fine porcelain.

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-Yeah.

-It is...

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-all of £45.

-Hmm.

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We need to get a big chunk off that, but I'm happy to give it a go for you.

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-See if you can find another bargain.

-Do your best.

-See you in a mo.

-Right, see you shortly.

-OK.

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The Reds could be racing ahead, but have the Blues struck lucky with a fishy find?

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"Deep-sea fishing reel, mahogany and brass-fitted Bakelite..."

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-I like the brass reels. That's...

-That gavel's actually quite a nice object.

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-How much is that?

-£45.

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-Excuse me. Could we have a look in here?

-Yeah, sure.

-We'd like to look at that reel and perhaps the gavel.

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-Do you want a look?

-I would like to see the reel, yeah.

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It's in good condition. It doesn't look as though it's been restored.

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That's where the rod would obviously slot in there.

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And you would screw on either side to hold it on.

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The Bakelite would put it in the '30s.

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-It's the sort of thing you'd get on door handles.

-That's right.

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So though it's not one of my specialities, it does have a charm.

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I think if we could knock him down £10, get it for 25, that would be...

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-Is there a possibility of getting that for 25?

-Yeah, I'll try. >

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-Shall we have a look at the gavel while we're here?

-Yes.

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I thought with the little stand, obviously it's a...

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-That's nice when you see it.

-It is nice with the ivory.

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-That's inlaid, yeah.

-It's nice wood, nicely made.

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It is the sort of thing that's a niche.

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If there was someone that had just been in auctioneering for 50 years or something,

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-that's a little present to celebrate...

-A retirement gift.

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-Yeah.

-Or a special birthday.

-It'd be lovely.

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-It's quite in keeping with the programme as well.

-Yeah.

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It was £65. It's been reduced to 45.

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-I think that sounds fairly reasonable.

-Nigel likes a bargain.

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-If we can get a little bit more off it...

-Anything will be helpful.

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But I think £45 doesn't sound a murderous amount for it.

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-Let's see what we can get.

-I think it's nice. Shall we have a go?

-Yes.

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Let's see if we can get it down a bit, but I think it could be an interesting buy.

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At this rate, the Blues could finish their shopping before the hour is up.

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The Reds are so engrossed with their shopping, they've forgotten that Paul's there!

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-Right then, guys...

-That's quite nice.

-Here's the news.

-Sorry?

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-Here's the news.

-Is it good news or bad news?

-Well, it's there or thereabouts.

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At the moment, and I think I'm almost as low as I'll get the price, it's down to £25.

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-Right.

-Look, if it makes 20, you've no' lost a great deal.

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-Aye, that's true.

-If it makes 35, great stuff.

-You're a tenner up.

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It ain't gonna transform your fortunes one way or another,

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-but I've really pulled out the stops.

-It's in with a chance.

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I reckon if I go back... Going back, you always get another pound or two and I'm always keen to take that.

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-If I can maybe make that 22, 23, do we do it?

-Yeah.

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-You're up for that?

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-OK, leave it with me.

-22 sounds good to me.

-It's a deal.

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And Paul managed to get the price down to £22.

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With the Reds' second purchase in the bag, the Blues need to get prices on the reel and gavel.

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-Hi.

-I found out the prices.

-Good news or bad news?

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-Very good news. He can do the fishing reel for 20.

-20?

-Yeah. And the gavel for 40.

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That's great. What do you think? Shall we...?

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I like them both. Let's just have a wee look round some of the other things.

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-You don't want to...?

-Can you hold them both for us? Yeah, sure, no worries.

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-Are you OK with that, Beverley?

-Yeah. Thank you.

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'Another tactical move, this time from the Blues.

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'Now I'll check to see if things are going to plan for the Reds.'

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-How are you getting on?

-Fine, thanks.

-We're doing not too bad.

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-We've got a couple of things.

-Two definites. One more thing to find.

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-How much time have you got?

-We've still got half an hour.

-Feeling quite confident?

-Yeah.

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-Hopefully.

-Hopefully. How have they been for you, Paul?

-Great. Good eye. Good eye.

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Phil, in particular. Dark horse, that one.

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OK, the dark horse, eh?

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-Good luck, guys.

-Thanks, Tim. Bye.

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'You certainly wouldn't take Phil for a ride.

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'Halfway through and the teams seem in pretty good shape.'

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If the teams want to boost their profits, they've got the bonus buy.

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That's the bit where the expert takes any leftover lolly and buys a mystery item,

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which is revealed to the teams at the auction,

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and if they choose to go with it and it makes a profit, they get to keep the profit.

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If they go with it and it makes a loss, they keep the loss too.

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The teams still have a bit of time left and they're determined to keep sniffing out those bargains.

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We need something really sexy, don't we?

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-£18?

-Yeah.

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I always feel I miss out.

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What do you think about this?

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-No?

-Honestly? LAUGHTER

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I quite like that.

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-What do you think?

-No.

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I think it's desperately out of fashion.

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Is it? I think it's lovely as well.

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Maybe that's me. I'm out of fashion!

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That's £120. "French mantel clock, circa 1880."

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Paul was in search of something sexy and this little number seems to be giving Betty a thrill.

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-First impressions?

-Beautiful.

-That looks great.

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And it has a lovely feel to it.

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-Is that rosewood?

-Yes. Our dark veining tells us that.

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Silver-plated mounts crying out quality.

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-What do you think it is?

-Age-wise?

-No.

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We'll get to that. What do you think it's for?

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I don't know, but I think my earrings would go in it.

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In my opinion, this could be a humidor perhaps for cigars or smoking paraphernalia.

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-But label that up as a cigar cabinet and watch the buyers run to the horizon.

-They don't want to know.

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-Label it up as a jewellery box, ta-da!

-Aye.

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-That is £198 and I think...

-Which is expensive, but...

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Expensive for us bargain-hunters.

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My estimate at auction, that's worth £100 to £150.

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-I'll keep looking.

-It's quite heavy, isn't it?

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-Feel the quality.

-I'll go and find out what I can get at the best price.

-Good luck.

-I'll do my best.

0:17:280:17:35

The hour's nearly up. Have they found anything to make big bucks?

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And has Betty charmed some money off that jewellery box?

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Well, boys, not a great deal of luck there.

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-£178.

-It's too much.

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-It's still too dear.

-Still too much.

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-You're not gonna try...?

-I don't know. We'll maybe have another try.

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Or send the big guns in. We'll send Paul in!

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-178's too much.

-Far too much.

-You couldn't make anything on that, could you?

-No, no.

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-With minutes left, our teams need to make some crucial decisions.

-Crisis stage.

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-Right then, folks, three minutes.

-Right.

-Right.

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We've still not made up our minds on the reel or the gavel.

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-Snaffle that boatswain's pipe.

-I'm keen on the gavel.

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-I'm quite taken with that.

-Three minutes, let's go.

-Let's go.

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-Let's go and tell them that we'll have the reel and the gavel and we'll have a good go at it.

-Great.

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Phew! Thank goodness for that!

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-Are we going for it?

-I think it's smashing.

-I'll go and say yes then.

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-Yeah.

-See you in a mo.

0:18:440:18:46

Let's remind ourselves what the Reds bought.

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Betty thought it was dangerous,

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but they plumped for the silver-plated chamberstick.

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Phil was taken with the Belleek porcelain jug.

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And it took them back to where they started -

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the silver Royal Navy whistle called a boatswain's pipe.

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-So, you two, you struggled to find something valuable.

-Yeah, well...

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-And completely failed by only spending £60.

-Yeah, I know.

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Anyway, £60 only spent.

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£240 later...

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How can you go out shopping for an hour and only spend 60 quid?

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It's not strategic, I hasten to add.

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Off you go. Good luck. Let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought.

0:19:300:19:34

They were keen to get a coffee set

0:19:340:19:37

and the Wedgwood Moselle bone china one was the winner.

0:19:370:19:41

Nigel was hooked on the fishing reel with brass and Bakelite fittings.

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And it would set any auctioneer's heart alight -

0:19:470:19:51

the ebony and ivory gavel.

0:19:510:19:53

-Bev, which is your favourite piece?

-My favourite piece is the gavel.

0:19:530:19:58

-What about you, Nige?

-Fishing reel.

-The fishing reel is your favourite.

0:19:580:20:02

You spent £120 which is not so much money.

0:20:020:20:05

You're gonna give me 180 of leftover lolly

0:20:050:20:08

for Keith to go off and find something brilliant that's gonna churn out tons of profit.

0:20:080:20:14

-I hope so.

-Good luck.

-See you later.

-Lovely.

0:20:140:20:17

I'm off to explore the amazing city of Glasgow.

0:20:170:20:21

In the 1980s and 1990s, Glasgow underwent a cultural renaissance

0:20:260:20:32

and in 1990 was named European City of Culture.

0:20:320:20:36

This shouldn't have come as a big surprise

0:20:360:20:40

as Scotland has long been known for producing adventurous artists and designers.

0:20:400:20:45

For over 100 years, the Kelvingrove Museum and Art Gallery has stood here

0:20:450:20:51

as a showcase for art and culture

0:20:510:20:54

and the products of all that Scottish talent.

0:20:540:20:59

25 of these talented individuals came together in the 1880s

0:21:000:21:04

with the sole aim of transforming Scottish art.

0:21:040:21:08

Known as the Glasgow Boys,

0:21:080:21:10

this group of young men were rebelling against sentimental Victorian art like this

0:21:100:21:17

and attempting to capture the character and characters of Scotland

0:21:170:21:24

in a more fresh and realistic way.

0:21:240:21:26

And there's surely no more outdoor scene than this.

0:21:300:21:34

Painted at Cockburnspath, Berwickshire,

0:21:340:21:38

it shows the artist hard at work,

0:21:380:21:41

doing his painting underneath the umbrella.

0:21:410:21:44

This is James Guthrie who painted this picture in 1883.

0:21:440:21:50

He would have had to cart his canvas and the paints and all his equipment to this particular spot

0:21:500:21:56

and you can see his satchel here in the foreground.

0:21:560:22:00

He would have painted this very quickly.

0:22:000:22:03

He only had that day perhaps out with the sun in this particular way

0:22:030:22:07

and you can see these incredibly immediate, vibrant, broad brushstrokes,

0:22:070:22:13

literally scraped through the impasto paint.

0:22:130:22:17

In the harsher winter months, the Glasgow Boys would meet up in each other's studios

0:22:180:22:23

to discuss their progress.

0:22:230:22:25

All their experiences influenced each other

0:22:250:22:28

and the group's focus shifted and evolved to other subjects and styles.

0:22:280:22:33

In this painting, we've moved right away from the bright and breezy, fresh countryside

0:22:330:22:39

into an urban environment.

0:22:390:22:42

It was painted by Sir John Lavery in 1888 at the time of the Glasgow Exhibition

0:22:420:22:48

which was an extraordinary event for Glasgow.

0:22:480:22:52

These structures were temporary. They were built here at Kelvingrove.

0:22:520:22:56

And Lavery took it upon himself to paint a whole series of scenes relating to the Exhibition,

0:22:560:23:03

50 in total.

0:23:030:23:05

What we've got here is a large middle-class audience.

0:23:050:23:09

Each of the people in this picture could potentially be a purchaser of a Lavery painting

0:23:090:23:16

of that moment in their exhibition.

0:23:160:23:19

In short, Lavery was becoming much more commercial.

0:23:190:23:23

Nothing the matter with that because he's not betraying his principles.

0:23:230:23:28

He's still painting out of doors, he's painting in a free and imprecise way.

0:23:280:23:34

What I love about this picture is the way the illuminations are just coming on at dusk

0:23:340:23:40

with these blobs of pink paint that are arranged over the surface

0:23:400:23:45

as if they're Chinese lanterns.

0:23:450:23:48

In the late 1880s, the Glasgow Boys started moving away

0:23:480:23:52

from their much-loved, realistic scenes of everyday life

0:23:520:23:56

and into more symbolic subjects.

0:23:560:23:58

By 1890, the Glasgow Boys had reached the pinnacle

0:23:590:24:04

of their creativity and inventiveness as a group.

0:24:040:24:08

And that's evidenced in this picture

0:24:080:24:11

which is entitled The Druids Bringing In The Mistletoe.

0:24:110:24:16

It was painted by two Glasgow Boys in tandem,

0:24:160:24:20

one Henry and one Hornel.

0:24:200:24:23

And what they've created here is a homage to their Celtic roots,

0:24:230:24:28

their interest in archaeology and all things Scottish.

0:24:280:24:33

And by this period, the Glasgow Boys are particularly interested in patterns.

0:24:330:24:38

Separate out from the picture the shape of each of the leaves relating to the mistletoe

0:24:390:24:46

and they form perfect crescents.

0:24:460:24:49

Look at the individual segments of these elaborate costumes

0:24:490:24:53

and they're stuffed with patterns throughout.

0:24:530:24:57

This painting created the international reputation of the Glasgow Boys.

0:24:570:25:03

It was a sensation when exhibited in Munich in 1890

0:25:030:25:08

and indeed some people would say

0:25:080:25:10

that this picture would fit most exactly in a Secessionist Schloss.

0:25:100:25:16

The big question is,

0:25:160:25:18

are our teams today going to get well and truly "sloshed" over at the auction?

0:25:180:25:24

We've come in from Garrion Bridge to the centre of Glasgow to Great Western Auctions

0:25:420:25:48

-to be with our great auctioneer, Anita Manning.

-Lovely to have you here, Tim.

0:25:480:25:53

Very nice to be here. We've got Phil and Betty with Paul Laidlaw.

0:25:530:25:58

Their first item is a little chamber candlestick.

0:25:580:26:01

-I suppose "chamber candlestick" because you put your wee candle in there and take it up to bed.

-Yes.

0:26:010:26:08

But its association, I think, with Napoleon is essentially a tourist market thing, don't you?

0:26:080:26:14

Yes, I think it's been made as a souvenir for the tourist market in the 20th century,

0:26:140:26:19

late, mid-20th century.

0:26:190:26:22

Yes, so they paid £18.

0:26:220:26:25

-Do you think you can turn them a profit on that?

-I think so.

0:26:250:26:29

Anything Napoleon-related is popular, especially with men.

0:26:290:26:33

Oh, yeah?

0:26:330:26:35

-I've estimated 20 to 30.

-OK, brilliant. That's lovely.

0:26:350:26:39

The Belleek porcelain jug looks just as if it may have come from Fermanagh in 1880.

0:26:390:26:45

-But when was this one made?

-Probably late '50s, early '60s.

0:26:450:26:49

-Right.

-It's not an early one.

-So how much then, do you think?

0:26:490:26:54

As it's not an early one, I haven't estimated it high, but it should do between £20 and £30.

0:26:540:27:00

Great. They paid £22 which is not a lot of money. We've got two potential winners so far.

0:27:000:27:05

Before we blow the whistle on this, what do you think about the boatswain's whistle?

0:27:050:27:12

I think they're wonderful. My old dad was in the Royal Navy, so I have a leaning towards there.

0:27:120:27:18

-What do you think it might bring?

-I've estimated 20 to 30.

0:27:180:27:22

-£20 is all they paid.

-I may have been a wee bit conservative there.

0:27:220:27:26

So maybe we can watch out for some sparks there.

0:27:260:27:30

-On your estimates versus what the team paid, they seem to be on a winning street here.

-Yeah.

0:27:300:27:36

But just in case, we'll have a look at their bonus buy. Here it comes.

0:27:360:27:40

So, Phil and Betty, you gave Paul a massive £240. What did you spend it on?

0:27:400:27:47

-Well, have a look at that.

-What is it?

0:27:470:27:50

Let me tell you. That is a Georgian silver dish stand.

0:27:500:27:55

-Right.

-Very simple and elegant, but I'll tell you what lifts it for me.

0:27:550:27:59

It's this lovely little plaque here bearing an armorial crest.

0:27:590:28:05

-Right, yeah.

-That was the crest of a fine family, their own disc.

0:28:050:28:10

-Good piece. About 200 years ago.

-What family?

0:28:100:28:13

That would've really put the icing on this cake

0:28:130:28:16

and that's where your speculator today will hope perhaps to enhance the value of this

0:28:160:28:22

when they give us a tidy profit.

0:28:220:28:24

-Very good.

-Right then...

0:28:240:28:27

The big question is, how much?

0:28:270:28:29

I paid £58 for that.

0:28:310:28:33

-Right.

-A 200-year-old piece of silver.

-Jeez...

-All right?

0:28:330:28:38

I'll stick my neck out here. On a good day, I think that could make £80 to £120.

0:28:380:28:43

It's unusual. It's very interesting and I like the coat of arms.

0:28:430:28:48

That really makes it a bit special.

0:28:480:28:51

That's the thing I like about it, the coat of arms.

0:28:510:28:55

Everybody seems to like it. You don't have to choose right now.

0:28:550:28:59

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about it.

0:28:590:29:04

Anita, what do you make of that fellow?

0:29:040:29:07

Well, it's a wonderful antique item.

0:29:070:29:11

Early 19th century.

0:29:110:29:13

The twist or rope work is beautifully done.

0:29:130:29:18

Lovely, Anita. How much?

0:29:180:29:20

50 to 70.

0:29:200:29:23

£50 to £70? Laidlaw paid £58.

0:29:230:29:26

-So your cunning compatriot...

-Maybe I was a wee bit mean.

0:29:260:29:30

Oh, surely not, Anita!

0:29:300:29:32

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues. We're gonna start off with the coffee set which is complete.

0:29:320:29:38

When do you think it was made, Anita?

0:29:380:29:41

Probably 1970s. The Moselle pattern, um, 1970s...

0:29:410:29:46

It would have been the height of style at that time.

0:29:460:29:50

-And today, what are you likely to get at auction?

-The estimate on this, £50 to £70.

0:29:500:29:56

-That's, as they say, "nae so bad" because £60 was paid.

-Right.

-So they stand a chance of making a profit.

0:29:560:30:03

Next is this large reel.

0:30:030:30:06

Now, this looks like a bit of a rough old dude to me.

0:30:060:30:10

-Doesn't it you?

-Fishermen love anything to do with the equipment that they use.

0:30:100:30:16

-Yes.

-This would obviously have been used to catch very big fish.

0:30:160:30:21

And that's about as much as I can say about it!

0:30:210:30:25

-What's your estimate?

-25 to 40.

-They'll be delighted.

0:30:250:30:29

They only paid £20 for it which is very good.

0:30:290:30:33

Now, the auctioneer's gavel. This is a pretty heavyweight gavel, isn't it?

0:30:330:30:39

-Yeah.

-Does it suit you?

-Uh-huh. I quite like the gavel.

-Good. How much?

0:30:390:30:45

-50 to 70.

-£40 paid.

-Oh, well, that's not too bad.

-There we go.

0:30:450:30:49

Depending on the fishermen, the junior league auctioneers

0:30:490:30:54

-and the young punters of Glasgow, we've got some interest here.

-Some variety.

-Some variety.

0:30:540:31:00

They may need their bonus buy, so let's look at it.

0:31:000:31:04

So, team, you spent £120. You gave Keith £180. Let's see what he spent it on.

0:31:040:31:09

All is revealed.

0:31:090:31:12

-A-ha.

-Oh.

0:31:120:31:14

Obviously, it's a box.

0:31:140:31:17

The decoration is embossed pewter sheets,

0:31:170:31:20

so date-wise, about 1900.

0:31:200:31:22

-Yeah.

-I suppose it's sort of a cross between Arts and Crafts and Art Nouveau in design.

0:31:220:31:29

I thought it would appeal to a Glasgow audience. What do you think?

0:31:290:31:33

-Sounds good. What's it like inside?

-What would it be used for?

-Whatever you like.

0:31:330:31:38

Trinkets of sorts. It's not lined like a jewellery box, but you could keep whatever you like in it.

0:31:380:31:44

-I'm pleasantly surprised.

-It cost £78 which I don't think is bad.

0:31:440:31:50

-It's nicely done. I like it, yeah.

-I like it.

0:31:500:31:54

-Good choice.

-Good.

0:31:540:31:56

Well done, Keith. You don't choose right now, you choose later,

0:31:560:32:00

but for the audience at home, let's find out what Anita thinks about it.

0:32:000:32:04

So, Anita, this should be meat and drink to you.

0:32:040:32:08

Glasgow School of Art held classes for metalwork in the 1930s and 1940s,

0:32:080:32:15

so we see a lot of this type of thing and the Glasgow people like it, they enjoy it.

0:32:150:32:21

-How much do you think it will bring?

-I estimated 60 to 90.

0:32:210:32:25

-OK, £78 he paid, so slightly edgy, isn't it?

-Yeah.

0:32:250:32:29

-I'll have to give it a push.

-You'll have to give it a push. No better at doing that than you!

0:32:290:32:35

-Now, Phil and Betty, how are you feeling?

-A bit nervous.

0:32:460:32:49

-Are you?

-Yeah.

-Why's that?

-Very nervous.

0:32:490:32:52

-You were very cocky in the shopping.

-Well, not so cocky now!

0:32:520:32:56

First up is the candlestick.

0:32:560:32:58

Lot 94, ladies and gentlemen, a charming little object.

0:32:580:33:02

It's a silver-plated chamberstick.

0:33:020:33:04

Can we say £50?

0:33:040:33:06

50? 40? Start me at 20 for the Napoleon chamberstick?

0:33:060:33:11

20 bid. With the lady at 20.

0:33:110:33:14

Any advance...? 30.

0:33:140:33:16

40. I'll catch you in a wee minute. 40. The lady at 40.

0:33:160:33:20

The lady at £40.

0:33:200:33:23

Any advance on 40?

0:33:230:33:26

-£40!

-Any advance on 40 on Napoleon's chamberstick?

0:33:260:33:30

Any advance on £40? All done at £40? £40...

0:33:300:33:35

-£40 is plus £22. That is brilliant.

-That's great.

-Smashing.

0:33:350:33:39

-What a great start!

-Brilliant.

0:33:390:33:42

-All down to you.

-Here comes the Belleek.

0:33:420:33:45

Ireland's finest porcelain, ladies and gentlemen.

0:33:460:33:49

Belleek, always a delight to handle.

0:33:490:33:53

Here we have the three-strand basketweave jug,

0:33:530:33:56

decorated with shamrocks, and this wonderful bark handle.

0:33:560:34:01

£50?

0:34:010:34:03

£50 for the Belleek?

0:34:030:34:05

50? 40? Start me at £20?

0:34:050:34:08

20 bid. 20 bid.

0:34:080:34:11

Any advance on 20?

0:34:110:34:13

30. Catch you in a minute. 40. 40 with the lady.

0:34:130:34:18

With you, madam, at £40. Any advance on 40?

0:34:180:34:21

50. Fresh bidder at £50.

0:34:210:34:24

We're doing well.

0:34:240:34:26

Any advance on 50? 55. I'll take 5. 55.

0:34:260:34:30

Yes?

0:34:300:34:32

-60.

-£60!

0:34:320:34:35

£60. With the lady at £60. Any advance on £60?

0:34:350:34:39

All done at £60. £60...

0:34:390:34:42

-£60? That is unbelievable, isn't it?

-I know.

0:34:420:34:46

That's another £38.

0:34:460:34:49

Lot 96 is the boatswain's whistle.

0:34:490:34:53

Again a charming object and again in perfect working condition,

0:34:550:35:00

ladies and gentlemen.

0:35:000:35:02

It has the Royal Navy insignia

0:35:020:35:05

and it is marked for silver.

0:35:050:35:07

Can we say £80 for the boatswain's whistle?

0:35:070:35:10

£80? 80? 60? Start me at 20 for the silver...

0:35:100:35:15

20 bid. 20 bid.

0:35:150:35:17

30. 40. 50.

0:35:170:35:20

£50. With you, sir, at 50 for the boatswain's whistle.

0:35:200:35:25

£50. Any advance on £50? All done at £50?

0:35:250:35:29

£50...

0:35:290:35:31

That's another £30. I don't believe this!

0:35:310:35:34

That's £30, £68, £88...

0:35:340:35:38

That is £90. You are £90 up.

0:35:380:35:41

Are you gonna twist or stick?

0:35:410:35:44

-What do you think? Go?

-You want to go?

-Yeah, we'll go for it.

0:35:440:35:48

-You don't have to go.

-No, we have confidence in Paul.

-Paul's stood us in good stead so far.

0:35:480:35:53

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-We'll go with the bonus buy.

-No' quite sure, but we're going with Paul.

0:35:530:35:59

Lot 100, ladies and gentlemen,

0:35:590:36:03

is this superb Georgian, silver dish stand.

0:36:030:36:06

-Can we say £200?

-No.

-200?

-That would be nice!

0:36:060:36:12

Can we say £50? 50?

0:36:120:36:15

30. 30 bid. 40.

0:36:150:36:18

50. 60? £60?

0:36:180:36:21

60 for the Georgian stand?

0:36:220:36:25

60. Any advance on 60?

0:36:260:36:29

-It's a profit.

-Any advance on £60? All done at £60. £60...

0:36:290:36:33

A profit is a profit. There's nothing the matter with that.

0:36:330:36:37

-It's exciting, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:36:370:36:39

Plus £2 on that which is nothing to be sniffed at.

0:36:390:36:43

-You are plus £92 overall.

-That's a good day.

0:36:430:36:47

You have made a profit between the three of you on every single item. I think that's phenomenal.

0:36:470:36:53

-So, Nige, Bev, how are you feeling?

-Good.

-Excited.

0:36:570:37:01

-Have you been talking to the Reds?

-No.

-Not at all.

0:37:010:37:05

-So you have no idea how they've got on?

-None whatsoever.

0:37:050:37:09

First up is the coffee service and here it comes.

0:37:090:37:12

And it is Wedgwood.

0:37:120:37:15

Can we say £150?

0:37:150:37:18

150 for the Moselle Wedgwood? 150?

0:37:180:37:22

100? Start me at £50?

0:37:220:37:25

Start me at £50?

0:37:250:37:27

Start me at 50? 30 then? 30 bid. Any advance on 30?

0:37:270:37:32

Any advance on 30? 40.

0:37:320:37:34

50.

0:37:340:37:37

60 on the phone. 70.

0:37:370:37:39

-Good, good, good.

-Look out, girl! You're in profit.

0:37:390:37:44

-£70.

-More, more!

-Any advance on 70 for the Wedgwood Moselle?

0:37:440:37:49

-75!

-Don't bid yourself!

0:37:490:37:52

-Any advance on £70?

-We want more than 70.

0:37:520:37:55

-£70 - 4555.

-£70 is what you've got, girl.

0:37:550:37:58

That's a genuine bid for £70. You've made £10 profit. Perfect.

0:37:580:38:02

-It's on the right side of it.

-The fishing tackle, here we go.

0:38:020:38:06

Every home should have one.

0:38:060:38:09

It's a large, mahogany, deep-sea fishing reel

0:38:090:38:12

with brass and Bakelite fittings.

0:38:120:38:15

And it's circa 1930s.

0:38:150:38:18

-A "reel" bargain, yeah.

-Reel them in, reel them in.

0:38:180:38:22

And there's a fisherman nodding his head there.

0:38:220:38:26

Can we say £50? £50 for the fishing reel? £50?

0:38:260:38:31

-50? 40?

-It's a steal.

-Start me at £20?

0:38:310:38:35

Start me at £20? £10 then?

0:38:350:38:38

10 bid. Any advance on 10?

0:38:380:38:41

15. Any advance on 15?

0:38:410:38:44

20. £20.

0:38:440:38:47

-Any advance on £20?

-We're level.

0:38:470:38:50

-25.

-Yes!

-Good.

-You're in profit.

0:38:500:38:53

-You're getting a bargain.

-Come on!

0:38:530:38:55

Any advance on 25? 25...

0:38:550:38:58

-1907...

-£25, that's plus £5. No shame in that. Now the gavel.

0:39:000:39:04

We have this turned ebony and ivory auctioneer's gavel

0:39:040:39:08

on an ivory string inlaid rosewood base.

0:39:080:39:11

Nice gavel, ladies and gentlemen.

0:39:110:39:14

Nice Victorian gavel.

0:39:140:39:16

Can we say £100? £100 for the gavel? 100?

0:39:160:39:20

80? 60?

0:39:200:39:23

Start me at £60? Start me at 60?

0:39:230:39:26

40...? 50. 50 bid. 50 bid. 60.

0:39:260:39:31

70. 80.

0:39:310:39:33

90. 100.

0:39:330:39:35

-110.

-Keith!

0:39:350:39:38

£110.

0:39:380:39:41

110. With you, sir, at 110.

0:39:410:39:43

Any advance on 110? All done...

0:39:430:39:46

120.

0:39:460:39:48

Fresh bidder at £120. No?

0:39:480:39:52

-120.

-That's fantastic.

0:39:520:39:55

With you, sir, at 120. Any advance on 120? All done at 120?

0:39:550:39:59

120...

0:39:590:40:01

-Wow!

-£120, you're plus £80 on that,

0:40:010:40:04

-which is nothing short of miraculous.

-It is. Wow!

0:40:040:40:07

So, £95, you're up £95.

0:40:070:40:10

-Are we gonna go with the bonus buy?

-Yeah.

-Here it comes. Just in time!

0:40:100:40:16

Lot 122 is this Glasgow style,

0:40:160:40:18

Art Nouveau, beaten covered box.

0:40:180:40:21

It's a risky job, isn't it? This is a risky moment. Dear, oh, dear.

0:40:210:40:25

With the cabochon glass beads.

0:40:250:40:29

A nice piece of Glasgow Art Nouveau, ladies and gentlemen.

0:40:290:40:34

£150? 150?

0:40:340:40:36

100? Start me at £50?

0:40:360:40:39

-Start me at 50? 50 bid.

-Yes, 50.

0:40:390:40:42

Any advance on 50?

0:40:420:40:44

-I'd like to have 60!

-60. 70.

0:40:440:40:46

-80.

-80!

-£80.

0:40:460:40:49

-£80. With you, sir, at £80.

-You're in profit.

0:40:500:40:54

-Do we have somebody at 90?

-Any advance on £80?

0:40:540:40:58

All done at £80...

0:40:580:41:00

-Well done.

-Well done, Keith. £80 is a couple of pounds' profit.

0:41:000:41:04

-I thought it would've gone for a bit more.

-A profit in the bag.

0:41:040:41:08

You are plus £97.

0:41:080:41:11

-Oh, wow!

-This gets really exciting now, so we don't want you saying anything to those Reds.

0:41:110:41:17

-No.

-Mum?

-My lips are sealed.

-Mum is the word.

0:41:170:41:21

What a fantastically successful day we have had today!

0:41:260:41:30

-This is unbelievable. You've been chatting?

-No.

-No.

0:41:300:41:34

So nobody knows exactly where the scorecard lies. Yes?

0:41:340:41:39

-But the audience know that there has been phenomenal profit-making today by both teams.

-Oh, good.

0:41:390:41:47

And if they've done the maths, they'll know that there is only a £5 note

0:41:470:41:54

between the phenomenal profits that our teams have made today

0:41:540:41:59

which on Bargain Hunt is a rare event.

0:41:590:42:02

And sadly, the runners-up, because we don't have losers today, happen to be the Reds.

0:42:020:42:07

-Oh, no!

-Unlucky.

0:42:070:42:11

You are runners-up by making just £92-worth of profits.

0:42:110:42:15

-That'll do nicely.

-How do you feel about the £92 coming over, darling?

0:42:150:42:19

Great. I'll have the 90, Phil'll have the 2.

0:42:190:42:22

We can see who wears the trousers in your household.

0:42:220:42:26

Anyway, congratulations. You've done enormously well.

0:42:260:42:29

-But not quite well enough when it comes to the Blues.

-Well done.

0:42:290:42:34

£97 the Blues have achieved.

0:42:340:42:37

-Sounds good.

-There it comes, Nige.

-I'm getting it? Thank you.

0:42:370:42:42

What you do with it later...

0:42:420:42:44

-The Good Lord gives with one hand and no doubt Beverley will take with the other!

-I'll have them as well.

0:42:440:42:50

-And there's £1 left over.

-You can have that, darling.

0:42:500:42:54

-Have you had a good time?

-Fabulous.

-We've loved having you on the show.

0:42:540:42:58

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

-Yes!

0:42:580:43:02

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2009

0:43:160:43:20

Email [email protected]

0:43:200:43:23

Presenter Tim Wonnacott heads north to Garrion Bridges in Glasgow, where experts Paul Laidlaw and Keith Baker are set loose with their teams. Tim ventures into the city to take a look at some art by the Glasgow Boys.


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