Wetherby 22 Bargain Hunt


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Wetherby 22

The Bargain Hunt teams, led by Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson, head to the Wetherby Racecourse antiques fair. Tim Wonnacott discovers a collection of chamber pots.


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Oi, wake up, you lot.

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I've got the time, I've got the money, I've got the contestants, I just haven't got the bargains yet.

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So let's go bargain hunting, eh?

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Welcome to the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Weatherfield Race Course.

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So let's saddle up, adjust the jodhpurs, enjoy the ride,

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because here's a flavour of what's coming up.

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It's Ladies Day today.

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In red, mates Nicola and Lauren can't see the wood for the trees.

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How much is that? I like that.

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I like that thing, I like that, and I like these.

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You two have got to choose something.

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In blue, sisters in law Emma and Claire

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give their expert the runaround.

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Wait for me.

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Crikey, I didn't realise you were so quick.

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And nothing's ever predictable at the auctions.

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-Oh, no.

-I told you, I told you!

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So, if that's got you going, let's meet them, proper like.

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Now you two are a couple of fitties, it says here.

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Well, you certainly look good and fit to me.

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Why would you describe yourself as a fittie, then?

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Oh, I do quite a bit of outdoor activities, me and my boyfriend.

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-Oh.

-Canoeing, we've tried surfing, we do a lot of cycling,

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abseiling, climbing, things like that.

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It says pole dancing... Oh, no, line dancing.

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-That would be Nicki.

-That's me.

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Yeehaw!, isn't it, and all that kind of stuff?

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-We don't do a lot of yeehaw-ing, no.

-Oh, don't you?

-No.

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-How did you two girls meet?

-We worked in a shop together, didn't we?

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Yes. It was kind of a mutual dislike of the job that we were working in that brought us together.

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-You hated the job?

-We did, yes.

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We bonded over that, didn't we?

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-Lauren, what do you do now?

-I'm doing a Masters degree in Historical Studies at the University of Hull.

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It's supposed to be based on the English Civil War, but I also do a little bit of

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Latin and palaeography, which is the study of old handwriting.

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-Gosh that's quite a package.

-It keeps me very busy.

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I bet it does, because really that's three subjects wrapped into one.

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How lovely. What about you, Nicola, what are you up to?

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I'm currently working as a teaching assistant

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in a school for special educational needs children.

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It's fantastic, I really enjoy myself. It's good fun.

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-And quite a challenge too, I guess.

-Yes, it is.

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Some days are quite hard, it is quite difficult, and it can be quite exhausting, but it's well worth it.

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Are you going to be any good on Bargain Hunt today, do you think?

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-I should think so.

-Yes.

-Yes?

-We've got a lot in common.

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-We tend to agree on things.

-Yes, we do.

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Because most of our contestants fall out immediately.

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Anyway, good luck.

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-Now the Blues, who are mates and sisters in law.

-Yes.

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-You get on well together.

-Very well.

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So what do you get up to? Do you go shopping?

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-We're big shoppers.

-Oh, yes, big bargain hunters, but we keep the bargains, we don't resell them.

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Well, that's fair enough?

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So, Emma, have you got a good eye for a bargain, do you reckon?

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Erm... I know what I like and that's not necessarily the same, so I do my best.

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Yes. You're a bit of a fan of the old painting or two, aren't you?

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Yes. I do have a secret passion for paintings by Yorkshire artists, particularly the Staithes School.

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Yes. Now tell us about this Staithes School because it rivals the Newlyn School, doesn't it?

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Yes, they were contemporaries of the Newlyn School.

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They're rather expensive now, but I can still pick up a few at auction.

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But I don't want to come over as some expert because I'm not.

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Yes. This is the modesty of the woman, marvellous, isn't it?

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-Now, Claire, you're a close family, aren't you?

-Yes, we are, very close.

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And you're a partner in the business?

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Yes, I am. There's a complex and there are quite a few little businesses on site.

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I have four children and each child has a business, which they run themselves and are independent.

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-And which bit do you run, Claire?

-Well, I work in the nursery, my husband's a rose grower nurseryman

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and I work in the nursery, plus I have a little card business on site.

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Lovely. Now, the money moment, here we go £300 apiece. Yes, £300, are you ready for this?

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-Yes.

-There's your £300.

-Thank you.

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£300. You know the rules, your expert awaits, and off you go!

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Very, very, very good luck.

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Aren't they gorgeous?

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So, they'll need a handsome expert. It's youth versus experience today.

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The young Philip Serrell is advising the Reds,

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and the old boy, Charles Hanson, is with the Blues.

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-After you.

-OK.

-Ready to go?

-Yep.

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So, girls, you've got a plan?

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-Erm...

-Erm?

-Yeah, I think we're going to go for something practical.

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-Quality.

-Quality, yes, and something a bit quirky.

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Something nice.

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-You've got the wrong bloke.

-Ah.

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Well, I think you're nice, Philip. But what you all need is bargains!

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So while they get their bearings, a quick reminder of the rules.

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Each team get an hour to buy three objects with £300, but then you know that already, right?

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-Right.

-Right!

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How much is the nut, please, sir?

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I don't want to know if it's damaged.

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-It is damaged. You're looking at problems on it.

-What's it for?

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These are 19th century, it's coquilla nut, which is

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a Brazilian nut, and it's carved.

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Sometimes these were used for putting thimbles in, sometimes

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-pomander or whatever. I think that's quite nice, do you?

-Even though it's damaged?

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The thing is, anything that's turned on a lathe, anything that's circular,

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as it dries out you're going to get a split in it because as it shrinks, it shrinks at different rates...

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now you're laughing at me now. I don't like it when people laugh at me.

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-She is, she's laughing at me.

-I'm not sure about it.

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Yes, just the fact that it is slightly a bit damaged.

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Meany.

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Look at the rich gilding.

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Yes, but it's £150.

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1880s, Persian influence.

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-Too much, no, no.

-I love it.

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But they don't.

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I think we're better inside.

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-Yeah.

-Inside?

-OK, fair enough.

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-Let's go in then.

-There's some very elegant items here.

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They're not listening.

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Sophisticated, yes?

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-And this is a teething ring is it, my dear?

-Oh, is that what it is?

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-You've got a cricket bat.

-Is it a hammer?

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You've got a fork, a pair of scissors, and a pair of pliers.

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Good thing for a small child, he can put an axe in his mouth.

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-I like Moorcroft.

-Moorcroft, it's so boring.

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No, I don't think I'd want to pay 150 for that.

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-It's an unusual thing, heavy as well.

-Yes, but still.

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I quite like it, but I wonder how old it is.

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I would have thought it's probably more 1880 in date.

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Not a bad price at £85, what's it worth in a good auction house?

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-Think of Harrogate, girl.

-30 to 50.

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-Right. Yeah?

-It is, it is!

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I would say it's a good thing, I would say we're not far off.

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I would see it making between £60 and £90.

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-If you don't like it, we'll move on.

-No.

-No?

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-Not 60 to 90.

-What do you think, Claire?

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Claire doesn't like it.

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It's not my sort of thing, I have to say.

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Cor, the redhead's quite fiery.

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-How much is your caddie?

-450.

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-That's shot us straight in the foot.

-That's right out of budget.

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Right, OK.

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-40 minutes to go.

-No, more.

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Right, 45 minutes. We're OK.

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You say that, Charles, there's been lots of looking and no buying.

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Come on, buck up!

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-It's got something about it.

-So how much is that, please?

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-£50 is the best.

-What do you think, girls?

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-I think that's a little bit dear.

-You do?

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I do like it though, I think it's quite pretty.

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-We can bear it in mind.

-I like that.

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Gorgeous. Look at this nice miniature. Tell me about it, what do you think of it?

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I think it's lovely. I don't know what it's painted on, it's not ivory, it's not bone.

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I think it's a mezzotint maybe.

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-I think maybe it's a hand-tinted little mezzotint.

-Could be, but we don't know.

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You've got a lovely lady, elegant, sophisticated like yourself, Emma.

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-Really.

-Well, if you saw her without looking, what's it worth?

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-What would I pay for that?

-Yes.

-90.

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-I was going to say 95 anyway, so you were close.

-There you go, it's £95.

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But to make a profit, we need to buy it at 60.

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-I think it's hand tinted.

-I don't do half price even for my mother.

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Emma's not that old.

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-That one is the best by a country mile, right?

-Yes.

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-Because it's shaped, it's engraved.

-Yes, it is, it's quite nice that.

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At last somebody likes something.

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Does it matter if it has initials?

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I don't think it makes much difference. You don't like these?

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Well, let's discount those anyway. You've got 48, can you do it for...

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38.

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35 any good?

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-Do you like that one?

-I really like it.

-I do.

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I think at auction, that's probably £30 to £40 worth.

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OK, so you run the risk of losing a bit of money.

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But if it's already 38.

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-It's up to you.

-I'm put off my the initials.

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Ah, but sometimes in this game you do have to take a risk.

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Well, it's priced at 215 and we've got to speculate to accumulate, right?

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What else can we buy with that?

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Three bags of crisps and a cup of coffee.

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Poor old Charles.

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No, Charles. Please, no, I'm going to cry.

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Copper plates, these have been out of some,

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presumably, book illustrations?

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I would say so, yes.

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-They're not copper, are they?

-They're wood.

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They're going to date to about 1900, are they?

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I would say so. Look at the seal.

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-The print that was made from these would probably cost more than this has cost.

-Than the actual.

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-Yes.

-Which is a nonsense, isn't it?

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-It's proper craftsmanship though, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-Yes, it's beautifully done.

-There's a lot of work gone into that.

-Yes.

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-£8.50.

-And how much is that one?

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-That one I think... Oh, it's fallen off.

-It's free.

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-Yaay!

-It's free, it's free.

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-Excellent.

-Today.

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-Any other day would be a tenner on that.

-Right. Shall we buy two?

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Yes, I think so. So we'd have two as one item, you mean?

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Yes. So did you say two for 10?

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-Two for 15, I said.

-Did you hear him?

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-What do you think he said?

-I'm sure he said two for 10, yes.

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How can you turn down pretty girls like that?

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12 did you say? Was that 12? Go on.

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12, go on.

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You're a gentleman.

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At last, one in the bag for Lauren and Nicola.

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Have you got two the same size?

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May we handle this, do you mind? Thanks. Look at that.

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-I like it.

-I do.

-Emma, we're agreeing.

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You and all, so thrilled.

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It's in the Art Deco style.

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Yes, it would look nice in a cloakroom, but it's got to come down in price.

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-It's lovely quality, it's interesting.

-Is it 50?

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-It's 55.

-30? No.

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Take it, feel the money.

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-This man is being very fair giving you £20 off.

-OK.

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Well, we like it. Yes, we like that.

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Wow, decisive. Emma slashes the price,

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Claire nips in with the cash, could this be a winning strategy?

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Have you got a sense of humour?

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-Interesting.

-No, it's a sample, look.

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It's a sample bog.

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A sample porcelain toilet.

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Yes, and it's £145.

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For a sample porcelain toilet.

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£145, but look at it. It's all stamped up round here.

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-It's a toilet.

-Doulton.

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It's a toilet.

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-You're being horrible to me.

-Put it down and walk away.

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OK, fine. I think I've got the hint.

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Another idea down the pan?

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Instead, take a look at this.

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Isn't that sweet?

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Have you ever seen such a little one?

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Actually, look carefully, it's something that's most beautifully made.

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Look up that back spine and you can see two slivers of gold,

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sitting on top of the gold is tortoiseshell, and then we've got three studs on either side.

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They're the rivets that hold the tortoiseshell to the gold case.

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I open it up,

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the greatest miracle of all is that the small, extremely sharp, steel blade is in perfect condition,

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because this wafer thin piece of steel could break incredibly easily but it hasn't.

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This wee knife was probably made round about 1820 to 1850, and a little knife like

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this would have been used to sharpen up your quill pen.

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What's it worth? Well, these things are desirable.

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They're desirable to collectors, particularly in Sheffield.

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Over the centuries, of course, Sheffield made some

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special knives, including penknives, and not surprisingly these things were bought and sold avidly.

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What's this one worth? Well, in one of those specialist sales

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I'd estimate perhaps £100 to £125, and what might it cost you in a fair here in Yorkshire?

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Well, £25 actually.

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Go on, sharpen up your pencil.

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Straight to the point then, flying solo are the Blues.

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What do you suppose they've done with Charles?

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Could we have a look at the gold

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brooch with the seed pearls round it?

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-What do you know about that?

-It's Victorian.

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-£75 on that one.

-Nice, isn't it?

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-Yes.

-It's got love hearts round it.

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-Oh, yes.

-That's pretty, but I think we'd have to get it for 40.

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I think we should offer 50, 45 is too low.

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No! Start low and then you move up.

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You can't move down once you've offered something.

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I think it's too much of a drastic drop because she already said 75 is what she would take.

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So I think 50 and just say that's it.

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Well, get your notes out, Claire, and put the money in her hand.

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Well, that's told her, and they're friends.

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-There's money out here.

-Yes.

-How are you getting on?

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We're going to make an offer and see what the lady says.

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Look, it's got hearts round the edge, it's unusual.

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9 carat gold.

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Seed pearl, what 1890 in date, 1900?

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Very nice. What's it worth?

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50 - 80.

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I like it, OK. Well, you do what you can do.

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They will anyway, Charles.

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Excuse me? I've got £50 in my hand here, will you take that?

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-OK then.

-Thank you very much.

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-Crikey, that was easy.

-It's because you've got the money in the hand.

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Clever tactic. So that's two for the Blues and only one for the Reds with 15 minutes left.

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-I'm not keen on pots.

-Right, that's that sorted.

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I'm trying to work out what we do like here.

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We want a nice little piece of silver.

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-You want a piece of silver?

-Yes.

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-I also like wooden boxes.

-Wooden boxes and silver.

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I like writing desks, tea caddies, that kind of thing.

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We want something big, bold.

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-Is it an inkstand?

-That's neither big nor bold.

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Nuh-huh.

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Isn't he nice, a little inkstand, he's quite nice you know.

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Charles, you said speculate to accumulate.

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-Quite right.

-You're not going to accumulate with that, are you?

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'Lift going up.'

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Well, we'd get something bigger outside, wouldn't we? Come on, quick, quick.

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We're going to get stuck in here and we're never seen again.

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Wait for me.

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Crikey, I didn't realise you were so quick.

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The youth of today.

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That's rickety, isn't it?

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That looks like something we'd keep in our garage.

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-Big and bold.

-Big, bold, that little car.

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-I wonder how much it is. 525.

-Ooh.

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-I just cant get excited about pots.

-You don't like pots full stop.

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I do, I do.

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-There are some more stalls in here.

-10 minutes.

-Oh... 10 minutes?

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-10 minutes.

-Oh, please.

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You two can't seem to agree on much, can you?

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-Usually we do.

-Is it like this when you go shopping normally?

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-Yeah, we usually agree on everything.

-Really?

0:16:100:16:13

Well, 10 minutes, two items, so hurry up and get agreeing.

0:16:130:16:16

Look, we have got to buy something from this room.

0:16:180:16:21

A dragon, I would have said.

0:16:210:16:23

-We have an issue here.

-Oops.

0:16:230:16:24

-What's that?

-You've got 10 minutes.

0:16:240:16:26

-Yes.

-Two items.

-Yes, no problem.

0:16:260:16:28

So that's five minutes an item.

0:16:280:16:30

I just said that. No-one listens to me.

0:16:300:16:34

Do you like that?

0:16:380:16:39

I quite like it actually, yes.

0:16:390:16:41

-It is signed.

-It's by Raymond Rushton.

0:16:410:16:44

It's a little piece of Worcester and it was made in about 1937.

0:16:440:16:47

I like the scene, it's really nice.

0:16:470:16:49

The only thing that concerns me is I can't see in this light, is whether it's been restored.

0:16:490:16:53

The thing is it's nice enough anyway.

0:16:540:16:57

This is the deal - £75, it's by Raymond Rushton.

0:16:570:17:00

Do you think it will sell quite well, then?

0:17:000:17:02

The issue is whether it's been restored or not,

0:17:020:17:05

it may just have been done round there although...

0:17:050:17:08

£60 any good?

0:17:080:17:10

-It doesn't look like it has.

-£70?

0:17:100:17:14

-OK.

-Yes, I quite like that.

0:17:140:17:16

I think we should go for that, yes.

0:17:160:17:18

You buy that.

0:17:180:17:20

-OK.

-If it's perfect, right?

0:17:200:17:23

-Yes.

-I think we're going to get between £150 and £300 for it, if it's perfect.

0:17:230:17:29

-Now you've said that!

-I like it.

0:17:290:17:30

That's what I would get for it.

0:17:300:17:33

How money talks, eh?

0:17:330:17:34

It's big and bold.

0:17:340:17:36

How's that for a statement, hey?

0:17:360:17:38

-Isn't it?

-Yes.

0:17:380:17:41

110.

0:17:410:17:43

Is it good condition?

0:17:430:17:45

There you've got Poole Pottery.

0:17:450:17:46

-It's lovely.

-How old would this one be, Simon, probably what, 1990s?

0:17:460:17:50

-1990?

-Yes, not very old.

0:17:500:17:52

Is that a scratch?

0:17:520:17:54

A small scratch, yes. Very stylish, it's what we are looking at today as being the antique of the future.

0:17:540:18:00

-Hello, hello, hello.

-Hello!

0:18:000:18:01

-How are we, all right?

-What do you think, Tim?

0:18:010:18:04

Oh, don't ask me about that, that's Poole isn't it?

0:18:040:18:07

Are you not a fan?

0:18:070:18:08

Don't count my personal predilections, a lot of people love Poole, it makes lots of money at

0:18:080:18:13

auction, it's a highly collectible pottery, just not what I'd put my hand in my pocket for.

0:18:130:18:18

-But on the other hand, you have only got six minutes left.

-Oh, gosh.

0:18:180:18:21

You've got the man here, I mustn't distract you any more. I'm off.

0:18:210:18:25

Six minutes!

0:18:250:18:27

-What would the pair be?

-I was going to say what are the pair going to be.

0:18:270:18:30

Could we have the pair for £100?

0:18:300:18:32

Not a chance.

0:18:320:18:34

-I've got 150 in mind.

-For the pair?

0:18:350:18:38

I've got 150 for the pair.

0:18:380:18:40

I've got £150 in my pocket.

0:18:400:18:43

-Yes.

-Yes?

0:18:430:18:45

Done? OK. Thank you.

0:18:450:18:48

Thank you very much.

0:18:480:18:49

Poor Charles, sidelined again, eh?

0:18:490:18:51

-Charles doesn't have to be happy.

-We don't hang around.

0:18:510:18:55

No, I've noticed.

0:18:550:18:57

You wanted a vesta case and here's the Rolls Royce of vesta cases.

0:19:010:19:04

You've got that little...

0:19:040:19:07

-Extra touch.

-Yes.

0:19:070:19:09

It's priced up at £98.

0:19:090:19:12

Ouch.

0:19:120:19:14

If that came into my saleroom, I'd estimate it at £40 to £60.

0:19:140:19:18

OK.

0:19:180:19:20

What's the best you can do that for, sir?

0:19:200:19:22

75.

0:19:220:19:24

-Is that your absolute best price?

-Yes.

0:19:240:19:26

-You are gambling there, you've now got...

-Is there anything else here that we'd like?

0:19:260:19:30

You've now got three minutes left.

0:19:300:19:32

When he says you've finished, you've finished.

0:19:320:19:35

I know, but... I quite like a lot of these things,

0:19:350:19:38

can we still have a look at what these things are?

0:19:380:19:40

I like that. How much is that? I like that thing there.

0:19:400:19:43

Hold your horses, Lauren. I can't keep up.

0:19:430:19:45

You two have got to choose something.

0:19:450:19:47

-Yes, we've only got two minutes.

-Could that not be repaired?

0:19:470:19:50

But that's going to add to the cost.

0:19:500:19:53

Which one do you think we're more likely to make a profit on?

0:19:530:19:57

-Probably that one.

-Right, we'll go and buy that one then.

-You're sure?

0:19:570:20:01

Ahh, so we've come full circle.

0:20:010:20:03

Remember right back at the beginning?

0:20:030:20:05

I think at auction that's probably £30 to £40 worth. It's up to you.

0:20:050:20:09

I'm put off by the initials.

0:20:090:20:12

-It really doesn't bother you which one you buy?

-This one in the case.

0:20:120:20:16

-I think we should go with it.

-Which one?

0:20:160:20:18

-I prefer the other one.

-You want to buy the other one?

0:20:180:20:21

-I do prefer the other one.

-I prefer this one.

0:20:210:20:23

Oh, it's a rollercoaster this, isn't it?

0:20:230:20:25

Help.

0:20:250:20:26

I think we should go with this. because of the damage.

0:20:260:20:29

-You've only got a minute.

-But that's got initials on it.

0:20:290:20:32

You can get rid of that easily.

0:20:320:20:33

It'll cost less to get rid of initials than it damage.

0:20:330:20:36

-Buy whichever one you want.

-OK, we'll go for it. Yes, that's cool.

0:20:360:20:40

-As long as you're happy.

-Yes, definitely.

0:20:400:20:42

-I prefer the other one but...

-Can we take this?

-..that seems to be the decision.

0:20:420:20:46

I'm glad they always agree.

0:20:460:20:47

-I'd really rather have the other one.

-Phew.

0:20:470:20:50

Ah well, looks like the shopping's over then.

0:20:500:20:53

It's now over to the experts to sniff out a bonus buy with the leftover lolly,

0:20:530:21:00

but before we find out how much they have to play with here's a quick reminder of what the Reds bought.

0:21:000:21:05

First up, Lauren and Nicola hope to print a mint with the wooden blocks.

0:21:050:21:11

Next, the most expensive item was the £70 Royal Worcester bowl.

0:21:110:21:17

And finally after a bit of toing and froing,

0:21:180:21:21

-£38 was paid for the silver vesta case.

0:21:210:21:24

59 minutes and 59 seconds.

0:21:250:21:27

-Tense, isn't it?

-Yes.

-Did you get tense at the end?

0:21:270:21:30

-Very, very tense.

-Very, yes.

0:21:300:21:33

And you're close mates, right?

0:21:330:21:34

We used to be.

0:21:340:21:37

Aw, it won't be as bad as all of that.

0:21:370:21:39

-Yes, we are, we are.

-So you've spent how much?

0:21:390:21:42

-£120.

-I would quite like £180 of leftover lolly please.

0:21:420:21:46

-Yes, got it for you.

-£180.

0:21:460:21:49

Now what I really want to know is which is your favourite piece?

0:21:490:21:52

-Got to be the bowl.

-The bowl is your favourite.

0:21:520:21:56

And you, Nic, what's your favourite?

0:21:560:21:58

Probably the same, but I do like the little wooden plaques.

0:21:580:22:02

-The wood plaques, yes.

-They're nice as well.

0:22:020:22:04

So we have a consensus.

0:22:040:22:06

You're going to kiss and make up and I'll give you £180, Philip Serrell,

0:22:060:22:11

which is a lot of money for a fellow like you to go and spend.

0:22:110:22:14

-Spend it wisely.

-I'm going to find a dark room.

0:22:140:22:16

I bet he only spends a tenner on the bonus buy.

0:22:160:22:18

Anyway, why don't we remind ourselves what the Blues bought?

0:22:180:22:22

Emma and Claire lit up when they saw the Art Deco lightshade.

0:22:220:22:27

Next they took a shine to the Victorian brooch for £50.

0:22:270:22:32

And finally they well and truly splashed out,

0:22:320:22:36

paying 150 smackers for a pair of Poole plates.

0:22:360:22:39

Bargain price, buy one get one free nearly.

0:22:410:22:44

Yes, I'm not surprised. Anyway that's good, that's a decision made.

0:22:440:22:48

Now how much did you spend all round?

0:22:480:22:49

-£235.

-£235, I can tell you're a businesswoman, Claire. Lovely.

0:22:490:22:55

65 notes please of leftover lolly.

0:22:550:22:57

-There's some in notes and there's a few in £1 coins.

-Right. OK, fine.

0:22:570:23:00

Well, I'll trust you, no need to count all that lot out.

0:23:000:23:05

-No.

-Now, Ems, which was your favourite piece, baby?

0:23:050:23:08

The light fitting, unusual, an acquired taste,

0:23:080:23:11

but I think it will sell well.

0:23:110:23:13

-Yes, quite sparky, right?

-I like it.

0:23:130:23:15

Yes, that's electricity for you.

0:23:150:23:17

-Anyway, we know that you love the Poole.

-I love the Poole, yes.

0:23:170:23:20

So that's OK, super. The die is cast, Charles.

0:23:200:23:22

-Thank you, Tim.

-Here's your moment in your Beatle mania suit.

0:23:220:23:26

-Thank you very much.

-Anyway, there you go, boy.

0:23:260:23:28

You've got £65 on you, don't go buying another suit with it,

0:23:280:23:32

and off you go and very, very, very good luck, girls.

0:23:320:23:35

Now our next mission is to go to Newby Hall where you are going to have a treat beyond compare.

0:23:350:23:42

This stately home in North Yorkshire has a lot to shout about.

0:23:500:23:55

It's simply busting with remarkable and unique treasures,

0:23:550:24:01

including a world-class collection of chamber pots.

0:24:010:24:06

In fact, the collection of chamber pots at Newby Hall

0:24:060:24:10

has to be one of the most extensive and important in Great Britain.

0:24:100:24:16

But why would anybody set out to collect such an obscure subject as chamber pots?

0:24:160:24:21

Well, actually they can be most amusing objects.

0:24:210:24:25

If we take this one from the collection, at first sight

0:24:250:24:29

this is the most boring gazunder, jerry, po, peepee pot

0:24:290:24:36

that you have ever seen, completely plain,

0:24:360:24:39

made in Staffordshire by the million,

0:24:390:24:42

but if I turn it towards you, you see that it's got a transfer print.

0:24:420:24:47

No ordinary geezer this, this is W. E. Gladstone,

0:24:470:24:51

oft Prime Minister of Britain,

0:24:510:24:54

and for every person who loved Gladstone there would be

0:24:540:24:58

another who hated him, and on that basis using this

0:24:580:25:02

every time you had a call of nature would give you an intense amusement.

0:25:020:25:08

This one is made in Sunderland in the Northeast,

0:25:080:25:13

and it's got a motto on the outside.

0:25:130:25:16

It says "To the wife, dear lovely wife,

0:25:160:25:20

"we'll laugh and wizz-wizz and then to bed."

0:25:200:25:26

Isn't that ridiculous?

0:25:260:25:29

Well, it doesn't stop there because when I turn it over, look at that!

0:25:290:25:34

That brown lump on the side is not what you think it might be,

0:25:340:25:38

it's actually a modelled frog.

0:25:380:25:40

And just as the Staffordshire and northeastern potters produced tankards and mugs with frogs

0:25:400:25:48

nestling in the bottom of them, to cause some shock horror,

0:25:480:25:51

so they did with some of these jerries.

0:25:510:25:54

But how would this work in polite society?

0:25:540:25:58

Well, we've got a dining table laid out as it would look in 1820

0:25:580:26:02

or 1840, if you had a call of nature for a bloke

0:26:020:26:05

you'd simply get up from the dining table,

0:26:050:26:07

you'd shuffle off into the corner of the room

0:26:070:26:10

where there normally would be a screen.

0:26:100:26:13

Behind the screen would be a table with half a dozen of these things,

0:26:130:26:16

you'd just go round the corner and...

0:26:160:26:19

WHISTLES

0:26:190:26:20

..the job's done. It's marvellous, isn't it?

0:26:200:26:23

However, things were slightly differently ordered for the women folk,

0:26:230:26:28

they had the opportunity of using one of these things.

0:26:280:26:33

Now, it looks rather like a bit of dinnerware, doesn't it?

0:26:330:26:36

It looks like the sort of thing you'd have your gravy in.

0:26:360:26:40

In fact, this is called a Bourdaloue,

0:26:400:26:43

so named after a preacher who preached such boring sermons

0:26:430:26:48

to the likes of Louis XIV, that when the women felt the call of nature,

0:26:480:26:53

they couldn't leave church and they called for one of these, the Bourdaloue.

0:26:530:26:59

In our dining room, for example, the lady sitting here,

0:26:590:27:02

if she felt that she simply couldn't contain herself any longer,

0:27:020:27:06

she'd say to the footman, "Excuse me, I could do with a Bourdaloue,"

0:27:060:27:11

he'd trot off and get one of these.

0:27:110:27:13

She would, while sitting at the table, do the business,

0:27:130:27:17

put a little cloth on the top

0:27:170:27:19

and hand it back to the footman to cart off.

0:27:190:27:22

Of course, the big question today is,

0:27:220:27:24

will our teams over at the auction be going potty?

0:27:240:27:28

We're in Leyburn with auctioneer Rodney Tennant,

0:27:300:27:33

nothing potty about him, where our teams have everything crossed for a good sale.

0:27:330:27:37

But remember I sent our experts off to fish out a bonus buy,

0:27:370:27:42

well let's discover what Philip landed for the Reds.

0:27:420:27:45

Well, girls, you spent £120, you gave 180 smackers to the old boy, what did he buy?

0:27:450:27:53

Well, I normally only spent a fiver, but I went sort of...

0:27:530:27:57

I bought that. There's a face of continuing disapproval, isn't it?

0:27:570:28:01

An occasional table.

0:28:010:28:04

-Yes, occasional table or etagere.

-Yes.

0:28:040:28:06

I wasn't sure of the wood. I thought it was maple, would you agree?

0:28:060:28:10

It's that bird's-eye maple, isn't it?

0:28:100:28:12

It's all there, unlike a lot of us who appear on this programme,

0:28:120:28:16

but it's a bit wobbly-dobbly and it needs gluing up and tightening up.

0:28:160:28:21

I paid £95 for that, it's probably, I would think, around 1900,

0:28:210:28:28

something like that, but I don't think that's dear.

0:28:280:28:31

Now she's laughing at me again.

0:28:310:28:33

Nicola, stop laughing at him. He hates being laughed at.

0:28:330:28:36

Once it's been polished up and tidied up, I can see that at hopefully three figures.

0:28:360:28:41

-Hmm.

-Are you convinced, Nic?

0:28:410:28:44

I actually quite like it, I'm just concerned that it is a bit...

0:28:440:28:47

-Wibbly-wobbly?

-Yes, but I do actually quite like it.

0:28:470:28:50

-What about you, Lauren?

-I'll have a think about it.

0:28:500:28:54

That's a no, then.

0:28:540:28:56

Well, that's the whole point, you don't have to pick right now,

0:28:560:28:59

your choice will come after the sale of your first three items.

0:28:590:29:02

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about the wibbly-wobbly etagere.

0:29:020:29:09

Hello, Tim, it's always nice to welcome you.

0:29:100:29:12

It's a treat to be here, I can't tell you.

0:29:120:29:14

Now, first up for out Red team, as if by magic, our two-tier etagere.

0:29:140:29:21

That's the bonus buy, Rodney, what do you think?

0:29:210:29:23

Not a lot, in three words.

0:29:230:29:25

I think the tiers, the trays themselves, are period.

0:29:250:29:30

-Those are old?

-Yes, they're old,

0:29:300:29:32

but it's been cobbled together

0:29:320:29:34

with new supports, new legs, in my opinion.

0:29:340:29:38

Well, they do look rather weedy in colour, I have to say.

0:29:380:29:41

I think it's been cobbled together.

0:29:410:29:43

I'm getting a bad feeling about Philip Serrell's

0:29:430:29:46

bonus buy. I thought it was quite nice till you pointed that out.

0:29:460:29:49

What's your estimate?

0:29:490:29:50

-30 to 40.

-£95 paid, and he reckons he's going to make money on £95.

0:29:500:29:55

Now, we've got these two printing blocks,

0:29:550:29:58

Incredible care and skill and craftsmanship

0:29:580:30:02

have been lavished on these blocks for the purpose of printing,

0:30:020:30:06

but what do you do with them now?

0:30:060:30:08

One is initialled. If anybody could identify the engraver,

0:30:080:30:12

then it's a different kettle of fish, but I think,

0:30:120:30:15

if you can't do that, they're dead in the water - £10 to £20?

0:30:150:30:19

Is that all? Well, our team will be delighted with that,

0:30:190:30:22

because they only paid £12.

0:30:220:30:24

-Oh, well, that's good.

-Anything more than 12, we're on a winner there.

0:30:240:30:28

They're worth that as paperweights if nothing else.

0:30:280:30:30

Next is the Royal Worcester little comport, signed,

0:30:300:30:35

and I quite like the speckled green and all that. How do you rate it?

0:30:350:30:39

That's a typical thing you'd see in tea services of the period.

0:30:390:30:42

It's a bit unusual, really, to get a small tart dish that's hand-painted as well by Rushton.

0:30:420:30:48

It could make over 100, but we would tend to err on the £60 to £80 side.

0:30:480:30:53

Fair enough, £70 paid.

0:30:530:30:54

Yes, well bought, I think.

0:30:540:30:57

Well bought. And their last item is the little vesta case,

0:30:570:31:00

-and so many of those are just plain boring rectangular jobs.

-They are.

0:31:000:31:04

-This is a bit special.

-Better shape.

0:31:040:31:06

Sometimes when things have got initials on,

0:31:060:31:09

it detracts from the value, but that doesn't in that case.

0:31:090:31:12

-How much?

-It'd make £15 to £25.

0:31:140:31:16

OK, £38 they paid.

0:31:160:31:18

But apart from going slightly overboard on the vesta case perhaps,

0:31:180:31:22

they've done pretty well.

0:31:220:31:25

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues,

0:31:250:31:27

and what a wacky collection of stuff they've got.

0:31:270:31:30

For a kick-off we've got this Chinese restaurant lantern.

0:31:300:31:35

I have to say I think I'm quite partial to this,

0:31:350:31:37

I think it's good fun.

0:31:370:31:39

You used to see a lot of them in the houses in the '30s, '40s.

0:31:390:31:42

They wouldn't fit into your modern house in any way, shape, or form.

0:31:420:31:46

I think it's going to be of limited value.

0:31:460:31:50

I would have thought it's in the £35 to £45 bracket.

0:31:500:31:54

-Brilliant, £35 they paid.

-They should be all right.

0:31:540:31:57

Next is the Victorian oval and seed pearl-encrusted brooch.

0:31:570:32:02

The whole thing's very good quality, but it's embellished

0:32:020:32:06

with these gold hearts all the way around,

0:32:060:32:08

which takes it into a different market, I think.

0:32:080:32:12

-It's romantic.

-Well, that's the word, I think you're right. It is.

0:32:120:32:15

So with all that romance all wrapped into this better quality object...?

0:32:150:32:19

-Still only £40 to £60.

-Really?

0:32:190:32:21

Oh, blast. Anyway, no, they paid 50, so they'll be delighted with that.

0:32:210:32:25

-Right, bang on.

-Lastly, the two Poole chargers.

0:32:250:32:29

Now, Poole is not my most favourite pottery,

0:32:290:32:32

but I'd love to know what you think.

0:32:320:32:34

Well, sadly at the moment, it's trends, isn't it?

0:32:340:32:37

And at the moment, it doesn't seem to be anybody's favourite pottery.

0:32:370:32:41

It really has hit a bit of a low,

0:32:410:32:44

and if I owned any, I would hang onto it,

0:32:440:32:47

because I'm sure it will come back. But a pair of those now,

0:32:470:32:51

whereas I wouldn't have hesitated in saying 150 to 200,

0:32:510:32:54

I would halve that now and say 70 to 100.

0:32:540:32:58

-£70 to £100.

-Just being on the conservative side.

0:32:580:33:01

Yes, well they paid 150.

0:33:010:33:02

That's what they're worth, but what they make at auction is a different thing.

0:33:020:33:07

On that happy note, they're definitely going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:33:070:33:12

Now, Ems and Claire, you spent a magnificent £235,

0:33:140:33:18

you gave £65 to Carlos, what did he spend your cash on?

0:33:180:33:21

I spent almost all of it, I spent £55 on a petite, pretty, shiny, and attractive, like you two...

0:33:210:33:29

Well, not petite.

0:33:290:33:32

Six very, very fine silver embossed buttons, Edwardian, they're 1901.

0:33:320:33:37

They're beautifully embossed with Reynolds' angels and cherubs' heads

0:33:370:33:41

and the hallmark of Birmingham.

0:33:410:33:44

-And how much did you pay for them?

-£55.

0:33:440:33:47

-On a good day, I can see them making £70 or £80.

-Oh, wow.

0:33:470:33:51

But look at the case, it's worn, it's tired.

0:33:510:33:55

-Just like us.

-We're going back to the great

0:33:550:33:57

Edwardian period of extravagance and quality, and they are nice.

0:33:570:34:02

They are very pretty, it's just a case of are there going to be two

0:34:020:34:07

people at auction today who are going to fight for them, and I'm unsure.

0:34:070:34:12

You're going to do so well in the auction.

0:34:120:34:15

-It's nearly £10 a button, isn't it?

-£10 a button.

-Well, £9.

0:34:150:34:18

You could get a blazer for that these days.

0:34:180:34:21

£9 a button, but you don't have to decide now, you decide later.

0:34:210:34:27

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Charles's little buttons.

0:34:270:34:34

So, Rodney, you've heard of the expression to be born with a silver spoon in your mouth,

0:34:340:34:38

I'm not sure what you were if you were born with these silver buttons on your blouse.

0:34:380:34:43

They're rather smart. Could prove to be a bargain if they're only £40 to £60.

0:34:430:34:47

Is that your estimate?

0:34:470:34:49

They should make more than that, £40 to £60.

0:34:490:34:52

You feel that, it's cast, isn't it?

0:34:520:34:54

Yes, it is. They're very, very good quality.

0:34:540:34:57

£55 was paid by Charles Hanson.

0:34:570:34:59

Oh, that's fine. Textiles and fashion as a whole, and clothing, is increasing in value all the time.

0:34:590:35:07

You're obviously in a very bullish mood, Rodney.

0:35:070:35:10

I am, I am. Let's just see what happens very shortly.

0:35:100:35:13

Very shortly. Thank you very much.

0:35:130:35:15

-Excited, girls?

-Yes.

-Yes, very.

0:35:190:35:21

On the scale of excitement, would you say you're up around the ten?

0:35:210:35:26

-I'd say 11 or 12.

-Definitely, yes.

0:35:260:35:28

We could have a certain amount of frenzy in a minute.

0:35:280:35:31

Good. First up are your engraving blocks, and here they come.

0:35:310:35:36

£50? £20.

0:35:360:35:39

20 bid on my right, £20, interesting items.

0:35:390:35:44

30, 40, 50, 60.

0:35:440:35:46

£60, still on my right at 60.

0:35:460:35:50

On my right, one of them's initialled.

0:35:500:35:52

£60 on my right, anybody else?

0:35:520:35:55

All done this time at £60. Going, going...

0:35:550:35:59

-Well done! £60, you've made 48 on your first item.

-That's excellent.

0:35:590:36:03

I can't bear it!

0:36:030:36:05

Royal Worcester hand-painted there by Rushton, start me at £50,

0:36:060:36:10

hand-painted Royal Worcester.

0:36:100:36:12

50 bid right down here, £50.

0:36:120:36:16

60, 70, 80, 90.

0:36:160:36:18

Down here at 90, anyone else?

0:36:180:36:20

Are you all done? For the last time at £90.

0:36:200:36:23

£90 is plus 20, inexpensive or not, it's still plus 20.

0:36:250:36:28

Rather a nice vesta case here. £30.

0:36:280:36:31

30 bid, thank you, sir, at £30.

0:36:310:36:34

40 where? At £30 only bid...

0:36:340:36:36

all done at 30.

0:36:360:36:38

-40. £40 on the aisle.

-You're in profit on that.

0:36:380:36:41

Lady's bid this time on the aisle at 40.

0:36:410:36:44

We're out over there and down here. All done.

0:36:440:36:47

-I can't believe that.

-That's plus £2. You've got £70, girls.

0:36:480:36:51

You spent £120 and you've made £70.

0:36:510:36:55

You are up £70.

0:36:550:36:57

Now the wibbly-wobbly table comes in at a cost of £95, you have £70.

0:36:570:37:03

You could ring-fence that profit and stop worrying about it.

0:37:030:37:07

Are you feeling confident?

0:37:070:37:09

I can't give you any help at all.

0:37:090:37:11

I think we should keep what we've got and stick with that, no offense.

0:37:110:37:15

I'm with you all the way, girls, I'm with you all the way.

0:37:150:37:18

-You've done us well so far, but...

-You're not going to go with it?

0:37:180:37:21

-I'm happy with that.

-Not going to go with it.

-We'll leave it.

0:37:210:37:24

Now I can tell you that the auctioneer's estimate is £30 to £40.

0:37:240:37:30

Now, this could be wrong, right, and Phil could be well in there,

0:37:300:37:33

and this could make a substantial profit,

0:37:330:37:36

but whatever happens, we're going to sell it anyway.

0:37:360:37:39

Burr maple, two-tier etagere £20.

0:37:390:37:42

Anybody at 20?

0:37:420:37:44

20 bid right at the very back at £20. At 20.

0:37:440:37:47

30 where? Are you all done this time at £20...

0:37:470:37:51

30, 40. Anyone else, are you all done this time at £40?

0:37:510:37:56

Good decision, girls.

0:37:560:37:57

That's excellent.

0:37:590:38:00

£40, that is minus £55, I'm afraid, on the bonus buy.

0:38:000:38:07

-So just as well you didn't go with it.

-Good call.

0:38:070:38:10

Good call, you are plus 70.

0:38:100:38:12

Now, that could well be a winning score, all right,

0:38:120:38:15

-so don't say a word to the Blues.

-Fingers crossed.

0:38:150:38:18

No need to ruin their day, eh?

0:38:180:38:19

So, Emma and Claire, what is this Mini-Me doing here?

0:38:260:38:30

-It's my youngest child.

-Who's called?

0:38:300:38:33

-Freddie.

-Hi, Freddie. How are you doing, all right?

0:38:330:38:36

-Yes.

-That is a smashing bow tie, I have to say.

0:38:360:38:40

Now, you've brought Freddie with you why?

0:38:400:38:43

-He's our good-luck mascot.

-Oh, is he?

-Yes.

-Well, he's extremely smart.

0:38:430:38:48

-Thank you.

-I hope he does bring you luck today.

0:38:480:38:50

-Thank you.

-We might need it.

0:38:500:38:52

Here comes your Moorish lamp.

0:38:520:38:54

50. £50 bid thank you, £50 bid...

0:38:540:38:58

60, 70, 80, at £80 on the aisle. At £80.

0:38:580:39:04

80, a lady's bid. 90, 100.

0:39:040:39:07

£100. Still on the aisle at £100.

0:39:070:39:11

I say, £65 up. Oh, your luck's in. Now the brooch.

0:39:110:39:19

Seed pearl and gold with the hearts on it, £100. 50, 20 bid.

0:39:190:39:23

£20 only bid, at £20.

0:39:230:39:25

-Oh, no.

-No.

0:39:250:39:27

At £20. 30, 40.

0:39:270:39:29

50, £50 on my right. Your bid at £50, all done?

0:39:290:39:35

The bid is on my right at £50.

0:39:350:39:38

-Oh, no.

-Once more, for the last time.

0:39:380:39:40

That is a shame.

0:39:400:39:42

£50, no shame.

0:39:420:39:44

It should have gone for more.

0:39:440:39:46

-Two fingers crossed, Freddie.

-I'm crossing my legs and my fingers.

0:39:460:39:51

Here we go.

0:39:510:39:53

Designed by Alan Clarke

0:39:530:39:54

at Poole down in Dorset,

0:39:540:39:58

start me where you will, £150 for the pair, £100. £50, then.

0:39:580:40:02

-Come on.

-50 bid, thank you.

0:40:020:40:04

£50 bid for the pair of them.

0:40:040:40:06

-Surely.

-£50. 60 where?

-Come on.

-60.

0:40:060:40:09

70, 80. At £80 to my left.

0:40:090:40:13

-Come on, more.

-At £80 the pair, they might be unfashionable at the moment

0:40:130:40:18

but they will come back. At £80 on the left. 90.

0:40:180:40:22

-Come on!

-Are you all done?

0:40:220:40:24

-No, a bit more please.

-For the very last time at £100, all done.

0:40:240:40:29

£100, that's minus £50 on that, you are £15 up.

0:40:300:40:34

-Go for it.

-No.

-Go for it.

-No.

0:40:340:40:35

Well done, Freddie, keep the cross going.

0:40:350:40:38

-Go for it.

-No, we'll stick.

0:40:380:40:40

They're really buoyant.

0:40:400:40:42

They're not that buoyant, are they?

0:40:420:40:44

-You think they're worth it?

-No, Claire.

0:40:440:40:46

The brooch, which is nicer than the buttons, went for 50.

0:40:460:40:50

-Are you sure? Come on.

-No.

0:40:500:40:51

We could lose our £15 profit, wiped out.

0:40:510:40:55

-Life's too short, eh, Freddie?

-That's £7.50 for the NSPCC. We'll stay.

0:40:550:40:59

-They're nice.

-They're not that nice.

0:40:590:41:01

You want to shake, rattle and roll a bit, don't you?

0:41:010:41:04

No, thanks.

0:41:040:41:07

Well, thanks for inviting me.

0:41:070:41:09

Glad you could come for the ride.

0:41:090:41:11

No bonus buy, we're going to sell it anyway.

0:41:110:41:14

Cased set, the original case, £50.

0:41:140:41:17

Bid at £50, any bid, at £60.

0:41:170:41:19

70.

0:41:190:41:21

80, 90.

0:41:210:41:24

-100.

-Oh, Charles.

0:41:240:41:25

-100.

-I told you, I told you!

0:41:250:41:27

100. £100, at £100. Are you all done this time?

0:41:270:41:33

£100.

0:41:350:41:36

-That is plus £45.

-Well done, Charles.

0:41:360:41:39

If they'd listened to me, hey Freddie.

0:41:390:41:41

-Don't tell the Reds a thing.

-No.

-All will be revealed in a moment.

0:41:410:41:45

-Right.

-All right. Thank you.

0:41:450:41:46

-You did great.

-I'm sorry.

0:41:460:41:48

It doesn't matter.

0:41:480:41:50

It's lovely to be handing out cash to both teams, it's just a question of scale.

0:41:550:42:01

And as it has today, this sometimes boils down to whether

0:42:010:42:04

you go with the bonus buy or not,

0:42:040:42:07

and I'm sorry to reveal that the runners-up today are the Blues.

0:42:070:42:11

Who are going to go home with £15.

0:42:130:42:16

Freddie, I'm going to hand that to you.

0:42:160:42:18

You can sort out how you split it between your relations.

0:42:180:42:22

But it's a tragedy, because Charles did incredibly well with the bonus buy.

0:42:220:42:26

-He did, he did.

-Actually, as far as the maths is concerned, it wouldn't have put you in a winning position.

0:42:260:42:32

-Really?

-But the victors, yes, who are going to go home with £70.

0:42:320:42:40

70 smackers, there you go, look. There's your 70.

0:42:400:42:43

Look, that's folding money, isn't it?

0:42:430:42:45

-Are you pleased about that?

-Yes.

0:42:450:42:47

-What about you, Lauren?

-Ecstatic. I can't believe it.

0:42:470:42:50

-It's a serious amount of dosh, isn't it?

-Yes, thanks to our expert.

0:42:500:42:54

Well, that's very noble of you, isn't it?

0:42:540:42:56

-It's a team effort, though.

-Absolutely.

0:42:560:42:59

Anyway, we've had a fab show,

0:42:590:43:00

-join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:000:43:04

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:160:43:20

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:200:43:24

It's ladies day at the Wetherby Racecourse antiques fair. Eager to be first past the post, our teams saddle up with experts Philip Serrell and Charles Hanson!

Presenter Tim Wonnacott finds relief from the days proceedings when he discovers a collection of chamber pots at Newby Hall in Yorkshire.