Scotland 12 Bargain Hunt


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Scotland 12

The Bargain Hunt teams, led by Thomas Plant and David Barby, head to the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh where they pit their wits against the clock.


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Hello and welcome to Bargain Hunt.

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This is the show where two teams have 300 smackers and one hour to find

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those items which they later hope will make a profit at auction.

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So, let's wish both teams, very, very good luck

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and let's go bargain...

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Oi, you, this is my job, let's go bargain hunting.

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What a cheek.

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We've got bargains galore for you today here

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at the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh.

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Look at what treats we've got coming up for you.

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-Shall we just go?

-We'll just go.

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Paul keeps a close eye on mother and daughter, Ruth and Laura.

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I just like what it says.

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-No.

-You're like, that's so wrong.

-I don't want to touch it. He's like...

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Look, it's all in the eye of the beholder.

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And behold, the auction reveals all.

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Kate had a job persuading father and son, Paul and Chris, to part with their cash.

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He said £60 to me, which I think is...

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-A lot.

-I don't think that's too bad.

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-Really?

-No.

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Let's hope they see a profit at auction.

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There's so much to fit in today's show, so we'd better crack on

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and meet today's eager beaver bargain hunters.

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Now you two look like a formidable pair.

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-Yes, we are, Tim.

-We are, yes.

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-Do you have high hopes of winning today?

-Absolutely.

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We're going to thrash the opposition.

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-I don't know about that.

-The boys are looking scared.

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Is this because you're so similar? I mean, how does it work?

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Basically, I say I'm the accelerator and Mum's the brake,

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when it comes to buying and selling with antiques.

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Ruth, you've a few unusual interests.

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-Yes, I love spaghetti westerns, Clint Eastwood style.

-Do you?

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It's the clothes they wear.

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-The tight jeans?

-Yes, the tight jeans and the leather chaps.

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-And the hat.

-Do you ride at all?

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I do ride a horse, occasionally.

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I don't have one, but maybe one day.

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Suffer from saddle sores?

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Um, not yet, no.

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Ever shot a rattlesnake?

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-No.

-Ah, you're really into this western stuff, aren't you?

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-I'm a rookie.

-You have a strong creative streak, don't you?

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Yes, I've always loved art and drawing since I was a little girl.

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I went to Glasgow School of Art.

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Did my BA Honours in textile design and screen printing.

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She's being very modest here.

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You don't get into that place with just a bag of sweets, do you?

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-You must have been good.

-It was very hard work.

-You must be very proud.

-I am.

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But how are you going to get on at Bargain Hunt?

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That's what we want to know. Now to the boys, father and son duo.

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How do you think you'll get on in Bargain Hunt today?

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I think we'll do really well.

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It's a battle of the sexes today, and the males will prevail.

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That's fighting talk, Paul.

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I wouldn't have expected you to come up with anything but that.

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For a person who otherwise goes around as an impersonator,

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I think it's a disgraceful process.

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Anyway. Chris, you're really into sport, aren't you?

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Yes. I used to play football, five-a-side and things.

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I play golf with my dad.

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I go to watch Hearts, the local team, every weekend when I can

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when they're at home. I go to the pub before or after.

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-That's called training, is it?

-Weightlifting.

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-Particularly for the right arm.

-I'm going to the gym as well.

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Paul, you've had one or two brushes with royalty I'm told?

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One brush with royalty which I remember vividly.

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I was 13 or 14.

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I was selling programmes before our rugby international at Murrayfield,

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when this large black limousine came down the lane and ran over my foot.

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-Did it?

-Absolutely. It was extremely painful.

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I've two memories of the incident. One was the pain and the second

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was of the waving gloved hand and forearm

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out from the window as the limousine passed by.

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-Who was it, actually?

-It was HRH.

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-Was it? So the Queen ran over your foot.

-Absolutely.

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Now the money moment.

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Here is your £300 apiece.

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300 smackeroos, you girls.

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You know the rules. Your experts await.

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Off you go and very, very, very good luck

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and may the best bargain hunters win.

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As ever there's help on hand from our experts.

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For the Reds, picturesque Paul Laidlaw

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and for the Blues, enigmatic Kate Bliss.

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So, how do you think that two teams,

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each with £300 and 60 minutes are going to cope? Let's find out.

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And they're off.

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Has Paul spotted a wise old buy already?

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A Goebel owl, 1978.

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I've not seen Goebel working in this medium before.

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You think of the figures, don't you?

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-I collect owls.

-No, you don't, do you?

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I do, I love owls.

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That was so strange that was the first thing you picked up.

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It's an omen.

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And it's a glass owl, it's beautiful.

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-It's marked.

-You've got to say, it's Lalique-like.

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We know it's an aesthetic that works, this frosted glass.

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It's not badly executed and it does what it says on the tin, there.

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I mean, there's no tremendous age to it.

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-Copy written in 1978.

-He's lovely.

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He's in lovely condition. There's not a thing wrong with him.

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-Do you want to go for it?

-We need to get it down.

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He's on the money at the moment.

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Hi there, how are you doing, are you all right?

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Over to you, girls.

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Your little owl, we're just wondering what would be your best price on him?

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-What price do we have on him?

-£25?

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-£20?

-Could you do £18?

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-Yes.

-OK, thank you very much.

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-Have you done a deal?

-We have.

-Not beating about the bush, are you?

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-We've done a deal.

-The price is?

-£18.

-Fair enough.

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You can't go wrong with that.

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-I'm happy with that.

-You've got 59½ minutes left.

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-That's brilliant.

-And £282. Well, we'd better go.

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A storming start for the ladies in red.

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You'd better look lively, boys.

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That's nice, it's in what's known as a rub-over setting.

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Instead of the stone being held in a claw,

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there's a band of metal which slightly overlaps the stone to hold it in place.

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I quite like the pendant.

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Coloured stones are very often priced

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in how much colour saturation is in the stone.

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Aquamarine gets its name from water.

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This is typical, that very marine blue, if you like.

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What sort of age do you think this dates from?

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It's Edwardian period.

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Very early 20th century.

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The little gold bar here,

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which suspends the pendant is what's known as a knife edge.

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You can see it's very, very thin if you look at it straight on.

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But, of course, it has to be strong enough to support the stone at the bottom.

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So if you look at it sideways on, it's quite thick,

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just like a knife edge.

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But it's typical of that early 20th-century period.

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Remind me of price again?

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That, we could come down, I could take down...to say £90 for that one and £95 for the ring.

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Which do you think is the more commercial?

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Which do you think would do best?

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That's a nicer stone, but possibly the pendent is more commercial.

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-There's always a demand for the pendant.

-What do you think?

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I like the chain, the necklace.

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-And that's £90?

-Boys, you've good taste.

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Could you take another £10 off?

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That's probably getting close to what I paid, but say another £5.

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So, £85, what do you think?

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I think we should go for it. I really like that.

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Great. Let's do a deal.

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You're in touch with your feminine side, boys.

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We're walking down the middle of the aisle - where we're going to see

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nothing - rather than in front of the stalls.

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With 20 minutes gone, Laidlaw's taking the lead.

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Well, I'll tell you what I like in that cabinet

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and it's traditional and yet I think contemporary.

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I love the pendant with the peridot and sea pearl.

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Can we have a look at it?

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I'd like to have a little look at it.

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-That's fine.

-Perfect condition.

-It's lovely condition.

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-That's beautiful.

-I love the chain.

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-It's very delicate.

-I've priced that at £160 because it is so absolutely perfect, but...

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You have a look at it, Laura, and tell me what you think.

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-It's very, very delicate.

-It's beautiful.

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-Look at that.

-What does daughter say? "I'm keen on this."

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I thought she'd have liked that, I'm surprised. What is it?

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I go for things I would personally wear

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and I wouldn't personally wear that.

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My auction estimate, folks, and this is important,

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bearing in mind an auctioneer would be prudently cautious, is £80 to £120 on that.

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I would definitely wear it.

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-I have to be honest.

-Well, look, put it down.

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-Will we come back?

-I think I might want to come back.

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- That's no problem, though. - We certainly tried.

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You did try, Paul,

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but Laura's not easy to please. What does she like?

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I just like what it says.

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No. He's like, he doesn't even want it touch it.

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He's like...

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Look, it's all in the eye of the beholder.

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I can see the Red Team.

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And it's pretty traditional. We've a hollow-knopped baluster stem.

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That's £165.

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That's the problem.

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That's a great price.

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-A really great price.

-Funny you should say that. There's one over there.

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This lady has a living to make, it's a really good price.

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Somebody would pay £200 for that.

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-Easily. More.

-You've a flare for this, girls.

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Get ye behind me, Satan!

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A little less laughing and a bit more buying wouldn't go amiss, bargain hunters.

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At least I'm on the ball.

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They say that coursing through the veins of every true Brit

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is a fair amount of salt water.

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Our connection with our maritime past is extensive and is often

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reflected in collectables that you can pick up in these fairs.

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This object is called a diorama, which is a term that's used

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for a model that's normally frozen behind a sheet of glass, that shows an activity.

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In this case, a splendid three-masted,

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fully-rigged sailing vessel.

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The vessel is named, the Poseidon. These things are very often crafted

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by the sailor who sailed on the vessel

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and you've even got the ocean rushing by underneath,

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which is made of papier-mache, mashed up paper, and coloured to make it look like the real ocean.

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Except there's a problem.

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Just ahead of the bow, is a socking great iceberg.

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Not made of ice, of course, but made of moulded wax.

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How would you date this vessel?

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Well, I think it's relatively late

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and I'd put it at around 1870 to 1890. What's it worth?

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If it was cleaned up a bit, I'd have thought that in a marine sale,

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a specialist auction, the thing would be worth about £1,200.

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What could you buy it for?

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Well, here, on a stall, it's £220.

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Now that's what I call a Poseidon adventure.

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How are the crews weathering the stormy Bargain Hunt seas?

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You know what, I think we need to go back to that necklace now.

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Now you want the necklace?!

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I'm coming around to it.

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-Now she wants the necklace.

-Oh, I just saw somebody buy it.

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-You're kidding?

-Yeah.

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Yeah, I'm kidding!

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HE LAUGHS

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With just 25 minutes to go, Laura's changed her tune.

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Amazing how panic can focus the mind, eh?

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-I've talked her into it.

-I'm trusting Mum.

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She knows her stuff.

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-Exactly.

-She knows her stuff and it's beautiful.

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So, can I ask you what your best price on that would be?

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We're going to go at £100 and that's the bargain of the day.

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I'm going to say, I think you've got to

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draw a line somewhere. That's the price,

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don't go any further. If you want it, pay the lady.

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Yes, we want it.

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-Well done, then, we got there.

-Thank you.

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Two down and spent what? £118.

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-Yes.

-We've still got a budget.

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But we've only got about 20 minutes.

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OK, thank you very much.

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Thank you very much. I really appreciate it.

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That's a horrible looking thing, but...

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..will it make us money?

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Come on, Blues. We need some decisive action now.

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What do you think? Are you sporting people?

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-Yes, we like football and boxing.

-A nice trophy. A few boxing matches.

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Is it a trophy?

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It could be a trophy, couldn't it?

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But I think he's quite nicely modelled, his physique is quite good, he's all in proportion.

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I think he's probably lightweight rather than heavyweight.

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I could knock him over, anyway!

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What would that base be made of, Kate, is it Bakelite?

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No, I think it's just...

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I think it's just a wooden base, actually, that's been what's known as ebonised.

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It's made to look like ebony but it's just got a black coating on it.

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-We have got a mark just down there, do you see that?

-Yes.

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Oh, yes, it is WMF.

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-Have you heard of WMF?

-It's a German factory, isn't it?

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Exactly right, Paul, yes. Known for making all sorts of things,

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useful items, utilitarian items like tea services and decorative items.

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But I have to say, I wouldn't associate a sporting trophy

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with the factory, so this is something a little bit different.

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I like it, yeah.

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How much are they looking for, for it?

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-He said £60 to me, which I think is...

-A lot.

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I'm sure we could use some Edinburgh charm.

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We'll try and haggle it down.

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What do you think we could get at auction?

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Well, I don't think that's too bad?

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-Really?

-I think it's quite nicely modelled.

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-OK.

-Yes, it is.

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Do you want to have a word and see what you can do?

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Let's see what he can do.

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What's the really best you can do on that?

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I can do it for £55.

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What about a nice round 50?

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I like that, for £50. I think that stands a chance.

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-What do you think, Chris?

-Yeah, I think we should.

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Done. Thank you very much, £50.

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-Great. Number two.

-Second item.

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Onwards and upwards.

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I think he stands a fighting chance!

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Oh, the Blues are battling back.

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Quite a nice little chair.

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Shall I take it over there?

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Single chairs are about the last thing you should be looking at

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in the antiques game at the moment.

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What drew you to that?

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Charm. It's strangely aesthetic.

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What unusual turning there, with that square section stretcher and it's really unusual.

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Rush seated. It's been tidied up.

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This is from the second half of the 19th century.

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Tiny bit of insect damage but I'm not worried about that.

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-What kind of wood is it?

-There's mahogany to it, a lot of mahogany. A bit of walnut.

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So it's a mixture?

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I have an instinct. I have this feeling.

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People love that Scandinavian influence now, don't they?

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-They love all that.

-What's your best on that?

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It was £25, you can have it for £20.

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-That's great.

-Is that sold to you?

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-Yes, thank you.

-Thank you very much.

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-Just wrap it, yeah?!

-I will do!

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Oh, it's smiles all round for the Red Team who finish their hunt on a high.

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But Kate's team are looking, well, a bit blue.

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-Hi. OK, thank you. A bit under pressure.

-Yes, we are.

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Come on, cheer up, boys.

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Five minutes! My goodness, what can you do us a good deal on, we've five minutes left?

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Oh, panic!

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A nice box there, can we see that?

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That's quite nice.

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-You like your boxes, don't you?

-Yeah.

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There's £55 on that.

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A silver cigarette case, Birmingham, 1910. Nicely engraved.

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-Do cigarette items sell nowadays?

-What's your best?

-£45.

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-That's lovely.

-How much could you do on that?

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That'll be £60. You'd have to talk to Keith on that one.

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That's gold plated as opposed to gold.

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-You like that?

-Very elegant. I love the bright white face.

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The Lever is what it's known as, a Manchester maker.

0:18:190:18:22

A really good-looking thing. What did you say, £65?

0:18:240:18:27

£60, I think.

0:18:270:18:30

Can you do £50 just at a push for us?

0:18:300:18:33

I'll do £55 and cry!

0:18:330:18:36

£55 and cry. I'll lend you the handkerchief.

0:18:360:18:38

You can ring me and I'll tell you the time.

0:18:380:18:40

-I think that's a better bet than the cigarette case.

-It is.

0:18:400:18:43

-Are you happy with that?

-Yes, I'm happy with that.

0:18:430:18:46

-55?

-Yes.

0:18:460:18:48

-We'll take it, please.

-Thank you very much.

0:18:480:18:50

-Get lucky with it.

-Oh, he's looked after you there.

0:18:500:18:53

-Thank you very much.

-It's a pleasure.

-Kate, wonderful.

0:18:530:18:57

I'm stopping the shopping. Time is up.

0:19:000:19:03

They haven't done too badly but will they need or even indeed like

0:19:030:19:08

the fourth item bought with the leftover lolly, known as the bonus buy?

0:19:080:19:13

More of that later, but let's find out what the Reds splashed their cash on.

0:19:130:19:17

Within minutes, Ruth's bird-spotting paid off

0:19:170:19:21

and the Reds bagged an owl for £18, dead.

0:19:210:19:25

Laura took some persuading, but finally,

0:19:250:19:29

gave in to the charms of an Edwardian necklace.

0:19:290:19:32

And they all agreed, £20 for this Fruitwood chair was a bargain.

0:19:320:19:37

-That good, yeah?

-Amazing, really good.

0:19:380:19:42

I suppose you're feeling smug, you lot, right? Did you get the chair?

0:19:420:19:46

-We got the chair.

-How much did you spend for it?

0:19:460:19:48

£20.

0:19:480:19:50

Even you're laughing with embarrassment at that, right, Laura, yes?

0:19:500:19:54

No, I'm not laughing with embarrassment.

0:19:540:19:56

-Are you laughing with joy?

-Utter joy, yes.

-£20.

0:19:560:20:00

I don't know.

0:20:000:20:02

Anyway, what did you spend overall?

0:20:020:20:05

£138.

0:20:050:20:07

That's 2 shy of £40. I want £162 of leftover lolly, please.

0:20:070:20:13

-You can have that.

-There you go.

0:20:130:20:16

Have you had the most fab experience with Paul Laidlaw?

0:20:160:20:19

He's been amazing.

0:20:190:20:21

Keeping us on our toes.

0:20:210:20:23

Are you not endlessly impressed with where he leads you?

0:20:230:20:25

Yes.

0:20:250:20:27

You're a genius, man. There you go, another £162.

0:20:270:20:30

That's your wages.

0:20:300:20:33

What are you going to find to buy?

0:20:330:20:34

I've no idea at this juncture.

0:20:340:20:37

I've a budget and no idea.

0:20:370:20:38

These girls don't like spending much. That's for a fact.

0:20:380:20:42

We're on a shoestring budget.

0:20:420:20:45

So, you know, you just do your best, don't you?

0:20:450:20:47

All right, well have a great time, you girls, see you later.

0:20:470:20:50

For us, why don't we remind ourselves what the Blues bought?

0:20:500:20:54

The boys found a nine carat gold pendant for £85. Mmm.

0:20:540:21:00

Kate thought £50 was rather a good price for a half-naked WMF wrestler.

0:21:000:21:06

With just seconds to go, the Blues pocketed

0:21:060:21:09

a 1920s gold-plated watch and time was up.

0:21:090:21:12

-What are you doing, having a group hug?

-Yes!

0:21:140:21:17

I love it when our teams get so close and personal.

0:21:170:21:21

It's all right for you, you're father and son. How has it all gone, Kate?

0:21:210:21:24

-Swimmingly.

-Swimmingly?

0:21:240:21:26

It did. We got slightly panicked towards the end and then

0:21:260:21:28

found something which I think is really nice, right at the end.

0:21:280:21:32

I haven't seen that, but overall how much have you spent?

0:21:320:21:36

We've spent £180.

0:21:360:21:38

-£180?

-£190.

0:21:380:21:40

You're undershaving this aren't you? £190. Please may

0:21:400:21:45

I have £110 leftover lolly, coming from the boy.

0:21:450:21:50

I won't count it because I trust you.

0:21:500:21:52

A nice Scottish tenner there.

0:21:520:21:54

-There's a bit of a task for you now, Kate.

-It is, the trouble is...

0:21:540:21:58

Do you like finding the bonus buys, or do you find it a bore?

0:21:580:22:02

No, I love it. I can go in my own time.

0:22:020:22:05

The trouble is, all the nice things I've found, we've bought already!

0:22:050:22:10

-So I'd better start now.

-And you're up against that cunning Laidlaw.

0:22:110:22:15

-He's very cunning. He knows how to shop around the edges.

-Does he ever?

0:22:150:22:20

If you see that Paul Laidlaw, scratch his eyes out.

0:22:200:22:24

Good luck, lads. For us, we're heading off to a town

0:22:240:22:27

in Scotland where I'm going to p-p-p-pick up a Paisley.

0:22:270:22:31

Paisley, for many of us this iconic, twisted, teardrop pattern had its heyday in the Swinging Sixties, man.

0:22:330:22:40

It could be found everywhere from crockery to clothing.

0:22:400:22:44

Although the pattern is synonymous with the Scottish town of Paisley,

0:22:440:22:49

the design originates in India and the Middle East.

0:22:490:22:54

So how is it that the Scottish town has inherited this design?

0:22:540:22:59

By the late 18th century, Indian hand-made shawls like this

0:22:590:23:04

were the must-have accessory for the fashion conscious.

0:23:040:23:07

And by golly, those imported shawls weren't half expensive.

0:23:070:23:12

£200-300 apiece, which in today's money is over £10,000,

0:23:120:23:17

so it is no wonder that the entrepreneurial

0:23:170:23:21

weavers of Scotland stood up to the block, or should I say the loom.

0:23:210:23:26

By the early 1800s, local weavers had cornered the market, manufacturing shawls

0:23:260:23:32

and selling them at a tenth of the price of the luxury imports.

0:23:320:23:36

This put Paisley well and truly on the map.

0:23:360:23:39

This is unusual, isn't it?

0:23:390:23:41

A map of Paisley in 1839 inset into the linoleum

0:23:410:23:46

on the floor of the town's museum.

0:23:460:23:50

The interesting thing is that all these paint blobs

0:23:500:23:54

on the map on the floor, in 1839, represent weavers' cottages.

0:23:540:24:00

And each of those cottages would typically have a Jacquard loom in them

0:24:000:24:05

that looks like this.

0:24:050:24:08

In fact, they had to excavate the floors a bit to get the structure into the front room.

0:24:080:24:13

The joy of the Jacquard loom was it allowed a form of mass production.

0:24:130:24:19

Instead of having all that handwork,

0:24:190:24:22

effectively, a type of computer card, each of the holes determining

0:24:220:24:28

the mix of coloured threads and, of course, the design.

0:24:280:24:32

The reason for the Jacquard loom is that you could make the Paisley shawls so much less expensively.

0:24:320:24:39

One woman in Paisley who knows her weave from her weft is curator of textiles, Valerie Reilly.

0:24:390:24:47

Val, you have been looking after the Paisley shawls here at the Paisley Museum for how long?

0:24:470:24:51

-34 years.

-34 years?

0:24:510:24:55

So what you don't know about Paisley shawls defies description.

0:24:550:24:59

For a kick-off, is that a genuine Paisley shawl? It belongs to me.

0:24:590:25:04

Yes, this is absolutely, definitely a genuine Paisley shawl.

0:25:040:25:08

For the audience at home, how did they determine at a glance

0:25:080:25:14

what is a Jacquard loom-made Paisley shawl?

0:25:140:25:17

You have to look at the back of the material, where you will see on the back,

0:25:170:25:22

there are all these hairy bits going in the same direction.

0:25:220:25:25

If it was an Indian shawl as opposed to a European shawl, it would look different again on the back.

0:25:250:25:31

It would have lines where the different colours met each other.

0:25:310:25:36

And how do you rate it as a shawl?

0:25:360:25:38

Medium to good quality. It's not the best but it's certainly not the worst.

0:25:380:25:42

Music to my ears. Thank you so much, Val. I'm off to the auction.

0:25:420:25:47

It's always lovely to be in Scotland but even lovelier

0:25:530:25:56

to be in Glasgow at Anita Manning's sale room. Anita, good morning.

0:25:560:25:59

Good morning. Lovely to have you here.

0:25:590:26:01

It is grand, I have to say.

0:26:010:26:03

Laura and Ruth, their first item

0:26:030:26:05

is this frosted glass Lalique-lookalike owl.

0:26:050:26:09

It's a paperweight and it's a charming owl.

0:26:090:26:14

Like every other wise old owl, I suppose it's got its price?

0:26:140:26:17

-I have estimated this at 30 to £40.

-Have you really?

-Yeah.

0:26:170:26:22

Next is the peridot pearl gold necklace.

0:26:220:26:27

Typical Edwardian piece of kit this.

0:26:270:26:29

I love their delicacy and their beauty and this one is in very good condition.

0:26:290:26:35

Lovely quality. How much do you think it is worth?

0:26:350:26:38

I would estimate that between 120 and 160.

0:26:380:26:43

£100 they paid. They may get away with that.

0:26:430:26:46

Perfect.

0:26:460:26:48

Their last item is this Biedermeier-y chair.

0:26:480:26:51

Is it something that appeals to you much, or not?

0:26:510:26:55

This is a country Biedermeier type of thing.

0:26:550:26:58

They paid £20.

0:26:580:27:00

I can't believe you could buy a seated chair. It is rush seated.

0:27:000:27:05

If you go and replace a rush seat like that, that will cost you

0:27:050:27:08

£60 of anybody's money, just for the seat. And it's all complete.

0:27:080:27:13

£20 I think is what they call a snip.

0:27:130:27:16

-What are you estimating on this?

-20 to 30.

0:27:160:27:18

That has pricked my bubble!

0:27:180:27:21

Thank you very much(!) On that basis, they might need the bonus buy so let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:210:27:27

-Ruth and Laura, you spent £138, yes?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:27:270:27:31

You gave £142 to Paul Laidlaw to go off and find you something fab.

0:27:310:27:35

What has he found?

0:27:350:27:36

Watch me scatter this all over the deck.

0:27:360:27:40

What do you think of that little charmer?

0:27:400:27:43

-Really like it.

-That is lovely.

0:27:430:27:46

The medium - silver, the theme - golfing

0:27:460:27:49

and this absolutely delightful little lady's manicure set.

0:27:490:27:55

Golf club terminals, all slips into that little case there.

0:27:550:28:01

Find me another one of those. Isn't that a wee belter?

0:28:010:28:05

-But what did you pay for it?

-What do you think I paid for it?

0:28:050:28:10

-In silver?

-In silver.

0:28:100:28:12

Bought it in Edinburgh.

0:28:120:28:14

I would say definitely...over 100, if it's real silver.

0:28:140:28:19

-Come on, £55!

-Wow!

0:28:190:28:23

-I love it.

-Do you both seriously love it?

-I would have that.

0:28:230:28:27

-You would pay £100 for it, wouldn't you?

-I would pay 80.

0:28:270:28:30

You would pay £80 for it? Laura would pay £100.

0:28:300:28:33

He paid £55 for it. I think I am smelling a profit here.

0:28:330:28:36

The man is a genius. I've said it for years.

0:28:360:28:38

Only thing to do, for the audience at home, is to find out

0:28:380:28:41

what the auctioneeress thinks about Paul's little cuticle set.

0:28:410:28:44

Anita, how charming is that? Isn't that lovely?

0:28:460:28:48

It is just the trickiest wee item and I love it to bits.

0:28:480:28:52

It is this type of item that the market loves.

0:28:520:28:56

Something that's different, something that's a wee bit quirky.

0:28:560:28:59

There is this very cunning fellow, Laidlaw,

0:28:590:29:02

he paid £55 for this set.

0:29:020:29:04

Do you think you will turn a profit on that?

0:29:040:29:06

I have estimated 70-90.

0:29:060:29:09

It could make a ton, couldn't it? It could make a ton of money.

0:29:090:29:12

Lovely, well that is it for the Reds now, Anita.

0:29:120:29:16

Now for the jolly old Blues.

0:29:160:29:17

The Edwardian aquamarine pendant.

0:29:170:29:20

Very similar to the one here, isn't it?

0:29:200:29:24

I love aquamarines and I think they are beautiful, quite a simple wee thing, very pretty, very bonny.

0:29:240:29:30

Very bonny and what sort of bonny price will you come up with on that?

0:29:300:29:34

70-100.

0:29:340:29:35

£85 paid.

0:29:350:29:38

Now, the white metal figure of the boxer.

0:29:380:29:41

Do you think that's a trophy?

0:29:410:29:43

I think it has been a trophy at one point. There would have been

0:29:430:29:48

a little plaque or something.

0:29:480:29:52

Money wise?

0:29:520:29:54

It is only plate, isn't it?

0:29:540:29:56

It's only plate. 30-50.

0:29:560:29:58

£50 they paid, so they might be lucky to get away with that and not make a loss.

0:29:580:30:02

What about the watch - the plated, open-faced, keyless Lever watch?

0:30:020:30:06

Yeah, uh-huh. These watches are very common in the auction rooms.

0:30:060:30:12

This one is a very nice clean one and we like that.

0:30:120:30:16

It's ready to be taken by the purchaser and put into his waistcoat pocket to use immediately.

0:30:160:30:24

-What you call ready to go?

-It's ready to go.

-Yes, ready to go.

0:30:240:30:27

-Yeah.

-So, how much?

-40-60.

0:30:270:30:30

£55 paid.

0:30:300:30:32

I have to say I think £55 is quite a walloping price to pay.

0:30:320:30:35

We'll find out what it's really worth at auction in a moment.

0:30:350:30:38

But I fancy they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it!

0:30:380:30:43

Now, Chris and Paul, bat and ball, father and son,

0:30:430:30:48

you spent £190.

0:30:480:30:51

£110 of leftover lolly went to Kate Bliss,

0:30:510:30:53

what did she spend her 110 on?

0:30:530:30:56

-It looks small.

-It is fairly small, it's also quite feminine, actually.

0:30:560:31:00

But I know you guys have got commercial heads on,

0:31:000:31:03

so I've gone for a ring.

0:31:030:31:05

I've gone for aquamarine and diamonds,

0:31:050:31:08

and it's a good period ring too, it's not a modern ring.

0:31:080:31:12

When does it date from, do you think?

0:31:120:31:15

It's Edwardian period and you can tell that, typically,

0:31:150:31:18

by what's called a little milgrain setting around there.

0:31:180:31:22

-1910, 1915, something like that...

-OK.

-..in date.

0:31:220:31:25

So have a little look and see what YOU think.

0:31:250:31:28

-Would you like to try it on, Christopher?

-No, thank you.

0:31:280:31:31

-It's a lovely colour.

-Nice and bright, yeah.

0:31:310:31:34

And...I guess the question is, how much did you pay for it, Kate?

0:31:340:31:39

I knew you were going to ask that.

0:31:390:31:42

Well, um...I did blow the lot and spend £110.

0:31:420:31:45

Did you really? Wow!

0:31:450:31:47

Anyway, hold that thought, because for the audience at home,

0:31:470:31:50

let's find out what Anita thinks about Kate's ring.

0:31:500:31:53

-So, Anita, with this ring...

-THEY LAUGH

0:31:530:31:57

So, what do you make of it?

0:31:570:31:59

Well, I'm delighted to see jewellery on the show

0:31:590:32:02

because I enjoy looking at jewellery and I enjoy buying it.

0:32:020:32:06

-And this is the sweetest little 1930s ring.

-So, how much, then?

0:32:060:32:12

I've estimated at 70-100,

0:32:120:32:15

but I think it is of such charm that it could do a wee bit more than that.

0:32:150:32:21

Well, it's a bonus buy, as you know,

0:32:210:32:23

it's going to need to do more than £110 if it's going to do the team any good.

0:32:230:32:27

So that is slightly on the tight side, but not to worry

0:32:270:32:31

because we have Anita leaping to the plate any second now.

0:32:310:32:35

Thank you very much, Anita.

0:32:350:32:37

So, you two kids, are you excited?

0:32:420:32:45

Like, how excited are you, Ruth?

0:32:450:32:47

-Really excited.

-Really excited.

-Are you up there?

0:32:470:32:49

-Up there.

-Lovely.

-Can't wait.

-Good.

0:32:490:32:52

Now, have you got any regrets at all, about what you bought?

0:32:520:32:55

-Um...

-Anything you wished you hadn't bought?

-No, nothing.

0:32:550:32:59

-Everything we're...

-100% confident?

-Yeah, 100%.

0:32:590:33:02

That is lovely. Anyway, first up is the wise old owl and here he comes.

0:33:020:33:06

'182 is a Goebel frosted-glass paperweight.'

0:33:060:33:10

£40. 40.

0:33:100:33:12

20? £20? 20 bid.

0:33:130:33:16

Any advance on 20? Any advance on 20?

0:33:160:33:20

30, with the lady at £30.

0:33:200:33:23

For the Goebel at 30. £30.

0:33:230:33:26

Any advance on 30?

0:33:260:33:29

40, on the phone at 40.

0:33:290:33:32

-Come on.

-40, I'll take it in fives.

0:33:320:33:36

45, yes. 45.

0:33:360:33:40

-Do you want to go 50?

-50.

0:33:400:33:43

On the phone at 50. I'll take it in fives.

0:33:430:33:47

-50, 55.

-60?

0:33:470:33:49

60? 60 on the phone. On the phone at £60.

0:33:490:33:56

Any advance on £60? Any advance on £60? £60...

0:33:560:34:00

How good is that? That's 2 shy of 20. That is £42! 42 smackers up.

0:34:010:34:08

Perfect.

0:34:080:34:09

Now...your necklace.

0:34:090:34:10

Paid £100 for this. Look sharp.

0:34:100:34:13

Can we say 200? 200?

0:34:130:34:17

150.

0:34:170:34:19

Will you start me at 100?

0:34:190:34:21

100 bid. It's beautiful.

0:34:210:34:25

100.

0:34:250:34:26

110, 120, £120.

0:34:260:34:31

Any advance on 120? All done at 120. 120...

0:34:310:34:35

Perfect, plus £20 on that.

0:34:360:34:39

We're not crabbing it, on a roll.

0:34:390:34:41

Lot 184, start me at £20.

0:34:410:34:44

£20 for the Biedermeier chair. £20?

0:34:440:34:48

£10, then. £10, surely.

0:34:480:34:53

£10. 10 bid, 10 bid. Any advance on 10?

0:34:530:34:57

Any advance on £10? Seems very cheap at £10.

0:34:570:35:00

-No.

-Any advance on £10? £10.

0:35:000:35:05

Oh! £10. Which, sadly, is minus £10.

0:35:050:35:11

You had 62, you've now got 52.

0:35:110:35:14

There's nothing the matter with 52.

0:35:140:35:16

That's a proud score. What are you doing about the manicure set, then?

0:35:160:35:20

You could park £52, walk away with pride and it might win you the show at £52.

0:35:200:35:27

Are you going to risk it and go with the old golf clubs?

0:35:270:35:29

-What do you think, Mum?

-I want to go with it.

-You want to go with it?

0:35:290:35:33

I'm happy to go for it. I want to go for it.

0:35:330:35:35

There's a wise head on those shoulders, isn't there?

0:35:350:35:38

-OK, fine. We're definitely going to go with it.

-We're going for it.

0:35:380:35:41

We're going with the bonus buy.

0:35:410:35:43

Now, 188, can we say £100?

0:35:430:35:48

-Can we say £100?

-Oh, come on.

-100?

0:35:490:35:54

£80? £80 for the novelty item, wee bit different. 80?

0:35:540:35:58

50? 30 bid. Any advance on 30? Any advance on 30?

0:35:580:36:04

35, 40,

0:36:040:36:05

45, 50,

0:36:050:36:07

55? 55 with the lady.

0:36:070:36:10

60, fresh bidder. 60? £60.

0:36:100:36:15

You're in profit.

0:36:150:36:17

Any advance on £60? Any advance on £60?

0:36:170:36:21

Any advance on £60? £60...

0:36:210:36:25

Ah, £60. £60 is plus five.

0:36:250:36:28

Overall, then, you are plus 57.

0:36:280:36:31

You did the right pick. Perfect.

0:36:310:36:33

-You're happy?

-Yeah, really happy.

-57 smackers up.

0:36:330:36:36

-(Yes, yes!)

-Don't say a thing to the Blues.

0:36:360:36:40

-No.

-No, we won't.

-Very, very quiet on that. Thank you.

0:36:400:36:43

Now, Chris and Paul, do you know how the Reds got on?

0:36:490:36:52

-No idea.

-You haven't been talking to those women?

-No.

-No?

0:36:520:36:55

Right... how do you rate your chances?

0:36:550:37:00

-Fair to middling.

-Fair to middling?

0:37:000:37:02

-I think we're going to do well.

-You're going to do well.

0:37:020:37:05

You are feeling rather more confident, then, are you?

0:37:050:37:08

You're more confident than your dad.

0:37:080:37:10

Yes, at this point.

0:37:100:37:11

How are you feeling about it all, Kate?

0:37:110:37:14

I think we're going to duck and dive. I think it's going to be a mixture.

0:37:140:37:17

Yes, right. First up, then, is the pendant, here it comes.

0:37:170:37:21

204 is this superb pendant.

0:37:210:37:25

And I can start the bidding here at...£50.

0:37:250:37:31

50 with me.

0:37:320:37:34

-Any advance on 50 on the aquamarine pendant? 50?

-Yep.

0:37:340:37:40

60, 70...

0:37:400:37:41

80?

0:37:410:37:44

80, 90...

0:37:440:37:45

-100?

-100, I'm out.

0:37:450:37:48

Looking good.

0:37:480:37:50

With Lala on the phone at £100.

0:37:500:37:52

£100 on the phone. Any advance on 100?

0:37:520:37:57

-Come on!

-All done at 100.

0:37:570:37:59

100.

0:37:590:38:00

£100, very good, plus 15.

0:38:000:38:03

Well, you'll be very pleased about that. And relieved, I fancy.

0:38:030:38:07

Yes!

0:38:070:38:08

Excellent. Now the boxer.

0:38:080:38:10

205, I'm holding bids on this lot, ladies and gentlemen,

0:38:100:38:15

and I can start the bidding at...30.

0:38:150:38:19

30? 30? Any advance on 30?

0:38:190:38:23

On the boxing trophy, any advance on £30?

0:38:230:38:26

-Any advance on 30? 35, 40...

-She's got bids there.

-..45, 50.

0:38:260:38:31

(Yes!)

0:38:310:38:33

The bid's with me at £50.

0:38:330:38:35

Any advance on £50? All done at £50.

0:38:350:38:39

-Wiped its face.

-Wiped its face, that's OK.

0:38:390:38:41

-There we go, plus 15. You preserved your plus 15.

-Lot 206.

0:38:410:38:46

That is a lovely clean watch and it is in perfect working order.

0:38:460:38:52

And I can start the bidding at £35.

0:38:520:38:58

35 with me.

0:38:580:39:01

40, 45,

0:39:010:39:04

50, 55, 60.

0:39:040:39:07

-£60.

-Yes! Keep going.

0:39:070:39:10

I'm out on there and I'm out on there, 65.

0:39:110:39:14

70, fresh bidder. 70, it's the gentleman at 70.

0:39:140:39:20

Mr Shelley at £70.

0:39:200:39:23

Any advance on £70...? 75, fresh bidder again. 75.

0:39:230:39:28

80, 85...

0:39:280:39:30

-Lordy.

-90...?

-Oh, she's going, look!

-90. With you, sir, at £90.

0:39:300:39:35

All done at £90. £90...

0:39:350:39:39

-For £90.

-Well done!

0:39:390:39:40

Well, that's marvellous, isn't it? That's plus 35...

0:39:400:39:44

of anybody's money. Plus 35 of anybody's money.

0:39:440:39:47

Um, 35, 45. That's plus 50. You are £50 up.

0:39:470:39:52

-What could be better than that?

-We can go home now.

0:39:520:39:55

You can't go home quite yet, cos you've got your bonus buy.

0:39:550:39:58

What are you going to do about this ring? It's £110 worth of ring.

0:39:580:40:01

You could just park the £50 in your back pocket, which could be a winning score,

0:40:010:40:05

that could absolutely cream away with those old Reds.

0:40:050:40:10

Bearing in mind how badly, I mean, how well they did.

0:40:100:40:12

On the other hand, you go with £110, yeah?

0:40:120:40:17

-Run with Kate's ring. Look how well the jewellery's been going.

-Yes.

0:40:170:40:21

What are you going to do?

0:40:210:40:23

-I think we're trusting Kate's judgment.

-You're going to park it?

-No, we're going to go for it.

0:40:230:40:27

You're going to go with Kate's ring and here it comes.

0:40:270:40:30

Can we say £200?

0:40:300:40:33

£200? 150?

0:40:330:40:37

Start me at 100.

0:40:370:40:39

£100 for the diamond and aquamarine 1910 ring.

0:40:390:40:44

£50, then. 50 bid.

0:40:440:40:46

50 bid. Any advance on 50?

0:40:460:40:51

-Any advance on 50?

-Yep.

-60 on the phone. 70, Lala?

0:40:510:40:56

-80.

-80, 90...

-100?

0:40:560:41:00

100.

0:41:000:41:03

-105 with me, Lala.

-110?

0:41:030:41:07

110, I'm out. I'm out at 110. I'll take five.

0:41:070:41:12

-110.

-It's a bargain.

-Come on, yeah. Keep going.

0:41:120:41:16

120.

0:41:160:41:19

120. It's with Lala on the phone at £120.

0:41:190:41:24

Any advance on 120? All done at 120.

0:41:240:41:28

-120...

-GAVEL BANGS

0:41:280:41:31

-Yeah!

-She's a happy girl.

-Well done, Kate.

0:41:310:41:33

That is plus £10.

0:41:330:41:35

Which means over all,

0:41:350:41:36

you are plus £60 which could be a winning score.

0:41:360:41:40

Just don't talk to the Reds for a bit.

0:41:400:41:42

Well done, boys.

0:41:420:41:43

Well, what an extraordinary programme we've had today.

0:41:490:41:52

Amazing, isn't it? Two teams of winners.

0:41:520:41:55

Substantial winnings going both ways.

0:41:550:41:57

Have you been having a chat to each other?

0:41:570:41:59

ALL: No.

0:41:590:42:01

You have no idea who is ahead and who is marginally behind.

0:42:010:42:04

Because I can reveal that there is only £3 in difference...

0:42:040:42:09

-THEY GASP

-..between the scores today.

0:42:090:42:13

£3 between them and they are both substantially up which is really interesting.

0:42:130:42:19

And I'm sorry to say that the team that is marginally behind...

0:42:190:42:25

are the Reds.

0:42:250:42:27

REDS GROAN

0:42:270:42:29

-BLUES LAUGH

-You're behind by winning £57.

0:42:290:42:36

Which is never right, is it, really?

0:42:360:42:38

And these guys over here,

0:42:380:42:39

they're winning by only getting a miserable £60,

0:42:390:42:43

so they've got their 60, you've got your 57,

0:42:430:42:45

and there doesn't seem to be any real justice in all of this.

0:42:450:42:48

Cos you're both equally wonderful, I have to tell you.

0:42:480:42:52

And I'm going to give you £57, all right?

0:42:520:42:54

-Have you had a good time?

-Yes, loved it.

0:42:540:42:57

Loved having you on the programme and we're missing you already.

0:42:570:43:00

-Now, Blues, Chris and Paul, C and P, 60 smackers. Are you happy?

-Delighted.

-Yeah.

0:43:000:43:05

We're thrilled too. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

0:43:050:43:09

ALL: Yes!

0:43:090:43:10

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:180:43:21

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:210:43:24

The Bargain Hunt teams, led by Thomas Plant and David Barby, head to the Royal Highland Centre in Edinburgh where they pit their wits against the clock.

Presenter Tim Wonnacott takes a trip to Paisley to look at the history of the eponymous pattern that put the small Scottish town on the map.