Derby 16 Bargain Hunt


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Derby 16

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head to Derby to uncover a variety of antique bargains. Helping the blue and red teams are experts Mark Stacey and David Barby.


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Transcript


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No, this is not University Challenge, it's a challenge of an altogether different sort.

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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Today, we're at the Jaguar Antiques Fair at Derby University.

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With the high rolling red team.

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-I want to spend some money.

-Yes.

-What about you?

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Well, yes, if it's worth it.

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I agree with that, let's spend some money on something good.

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And a feisty blue team.

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And I know by your face, Holly, that you're going to completely

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ignore what I say and do what you want anyway.

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But it's all smiles all round at the auction.

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Yes!

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That's all still to come, but first let me remind you about the rules.

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To become Bargain Hunt graduates, our teams have just 60 minutes

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and £300 to find three items to sell at auction.

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The winning team is the one that makes the most profit or least loss.

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£500.

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That's the theory anyway, but first let's go and meet the teams.

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Competing on Bargain Hunt today, we've got a couple of friends and a mother and daughter.

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We've got Ken and Bruce for the friends,

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and we've got Holly and Beverley for the mother and daughter.

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-Welcome all.

-Thank you.

-Lovely to see you.

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Now you two guys, how long have you been friends and where did you meet?

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I'm afraid it's nearly 30 years ago, and I met Bruce when he was waiting

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for yet another interview, which he passed.

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Well, I would do, wouldn't I!

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-You were at school then, were you?

-Yes, we were both school teachers.

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Ten years ago I retired, early retired.

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I help out at the Ashby de la Zouch Museum with 50 other volunteers. We love it, it's good fun.

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-Do you actually collect anything in particular yourself?

-Yes, I'm a book collector.

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I'm very keen on the works of John Buchan, John Meade Falkner

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and other authors, and I've got nearly 7,000 books at home.

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But more recently, last couple of years I've been collecting ampullae.

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-Tell us about ampullae then.

-Well, here's an ampulla.

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-Yes.

-And it's made of lead, and it's a small holy water container.

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This one has a big W on it.

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Allegedly, it's meant to be from Walsingham but I'm hoping today that it means winner.

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Now, Bruce, do you still teach?

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I teach critical thinking.

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What's critical thinking?

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It's trying to get people to look at things objectively and not take things at face value.

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Well, that's brilliant. What do you like to collect?

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I collect DH Lawrence, Evelyn Waugh, modern first editions.

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-To find first editions in dust covers and stuff like that is nearly impossible now, isn't it?

-Yes.

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Have you had any discoveries?

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I was a bit lucky, because I actually bought a whole range of

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Shakespeare miniatures, and they cost me £10, but one was missing.

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Literally months later, in Ulveston in Cumbria,

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I walked into a book shop and guess what was for sale for 50 pence?

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The book, the specific book from that collection. I'm not sure how much it's worth, but...

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-Same publisher, same imprint, the whole thing?

-I think it was...

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It was the missing one.

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The missing book.

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We're on the mark with you, we're going to have rather fun today.

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Now girls, are you quaking in your boots, all these guys nattering on?

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-Not really.

-It's something else, isn't it?

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-Absolutely.

-Yes. What do you do for a living, Bev?

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I'm a retail and finance manager at Blackbrook Zoological Park.

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-Are you?

-I am, yes.

-But you haven't always worked at the zoo, have you?

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No, I haven't, I've been an interior designer for 20 years.

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-Gosh. So you know about antiques?

-Absolutely.

-Great.

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So you've been buying things and placing them in clients' houses to enhance the beauty of their homes?

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-Absolutely.

-The nice thing about being an interior decorator I always think, I've never done it myself,

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but I might turn my hand to it, is spending somebody else's money to create what you want.

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-Exactly.

-Which is such fun, isn't it?

-It is, yes.

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I mean, take our £300 today.

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-You're going to be taking our £300 and converting it into zillions of profits.

-I do hope so.

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Yes, I hope so too. Now darling, what do you enjoy collecting?

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I collect blue and white china,

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David Winter cottages, I also collect teapots.

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Yes. How many teapots have you got?

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I've probably got about 400.

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-400 teapots!

-Yes.

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I mean, we're talking big time here, aren't we.

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-So, Holls, what do you do for a living, baby?

-I'm a full-time

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student at Nottingham Trent University, I'm studying product design. All going well.

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Tell us about the course. Product design, is that good?

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Yes, it's really good. It's completely different to what I

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originally thought it would be, compared to what I was doing, design technology.

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It's a completely different scale.

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So I really enjoy it.

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-Are you really looking forward to competing on Bargain Hunt?

-Absolutely.

-I am, yes.

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-You're up for this.

-Yes, definitely.

-It's a great place, you're going

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to have lots of fun, and we're going to have lots of fun.

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-Now the money moment, £300 apiece. There you go, £300, £300.

-Thank you.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go, and very, very good luck.

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400 teapots, eh? Cheers!

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Now, time to meet our experts.

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Teaching the Reds a thing or two is lecturer in bargains, David Barby.

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And helping out the Blues, someone with all his faculties, Mark Stacey and a 2:2.

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Time to start shopping!

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Some nice stuff here.

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They're nice, Mum.

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Oh, no. What's the best you can do?

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The absolute base would be 120.

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-120.

-What do you think about it?

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-Well, it's a little silver necked decanter.

-What do you think of that?

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It's attractive. But it's a spoon.

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Come on, get your teeth into something, you lot!

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These are nice. They are from Nottingham.

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What's the date on them? 1837, nice and early.

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-Ken.

-Yes.

-Come and have a look at this.

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-Yes, OK.

-These are quite interesting.

-I like that.

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-Oh, his mark.

-His mark. That's particularly useful.

-Yes.

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This was typical.

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Often you wouldn't get a signature, somebody else would write the name

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and then the person would just put a cross or some other form of imprint to show that they had agreed.

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-And it's all hand-written as well.

-And it's fairly local as well.

-It's a local one.

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-Are they from the same place?

-Sutton Boddington.

-It's Derby.

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This one is Nottinghamshire.

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Obviously boundary changes.

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That's interesting, isn't it? I love anything to do with history.

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Social history, and you couldn't get anything more basic than housing.

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-It's more and more popular.

-It is indeed.

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We need a good price. A good price, we'll go for that.

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I think they're a little bit on the top side for £12.

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-What do you think or not?

-I wouldn't want to go above ten for each.

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Why don't you offer 16 for two?

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Go and have a word, the dealer's over there.

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Certainly if I lived in Sutton Boddington, or it was my name, I'd be very interested in that.

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Oh, I think so as well.

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To see whether the cottage still exists is the interesting factor.

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Yes. How are we doing, Bruce?

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-Deal done.

-How much?

-£16.

-That's not bad.

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I think that is very, very good.

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£16 indeed. For some old deeds.

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I think it's a nice little bowl.

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-Nice colour.

-It's quite nice because it's got its paper label as well.

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What is the price again, sir? 125?

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We said 125.

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-125. Oh, gosh. I think it's a little bit too much.

-Yeah.

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Come on, girls!

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Now what about this, do you like bits of jewellery and things?

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-Holly, Holly, Holly!

-What?

-That.

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Oh, the little jewellery box.

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I mean, that is quite pretty, isn't it?

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That is beautiful.

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-Why do you like this?

-Just it's very, very pretty.

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It looks a little bit Art Deco-y to me.

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The top's a bit worn, but I just think it's really pretty.

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Well, you've got your arts mixed up. It is more art nouveau.

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-Right.

-What does the ticket say? Does it give a date on it?

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120. Birmingham 1913.

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So we're slightly off the art nouveau period, but you've

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still got that slight sort of, you know, organic shape to it,

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to the decoration, but it's pressed out in a mould, really, and cut out and then applied to the box.

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Then you keep your pins in there, and of course you keep your little

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-valuables in there, your little silver...

-I think that's really, really pretty.

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-What is the price on it?

-120.

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-That's quite a lot.

-It is.

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-Would you like to know what I think if we put it into auction?

-Yes.

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I would say we're probably looking at an estimate of around about 70-100.

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-It is a nice shape though, isn't it?

-Yes, it's beautiful.

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-Heart shape. Is it something we'd like to negotiate on?

-I think so.

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-I reckon so, yes.

-Because you both kind of lit up when you saw it.

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-Yes, I like that.

-Now, it's got 120 on it.

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What's the best you could do?

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Best price is £80.

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£80. That's not too bad. If you remember what I said, I said an estimate wise of 70-100.

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What do you think about £80?

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-I reckon so.

-I think we should go for it.

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You are sweet to us, is there any way we could tweak you down a little bit, do you think, maybe 70?

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Please.

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Cash?

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It's worth a try. I mean, they're really sweet to us.

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-Oh, yes, he'll meet you halfway.

-I think we're happy with that.

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-Absolutely.

-Thank you very much indeed, that's very sweet of you.

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We've only used ten minutes and we're still all loved up after that heart-shaped trinket box.

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How much is the box, please, with the Ruskin stone?

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-400.

-Oops!

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Have you got anything within our price range?

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What have we got here? A Keswick trivet.

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This is Keswick School of Industrial Art. And it's typical with the design, actually.

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It's nice.

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It is nice.

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But I rather like this little

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ink stand here.

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That's actually Imperial Zinn and it's stamped under the lid with the Imperial mark.

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-What do you think?

-It's nice.

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-I like the shape of it, certainly.

-It's good.

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-So what age is it, roughly?

-It dates from about 1900.

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-This is quite clever. I like it immensely.

-I do.

-What does that say?

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-That says 60.

-What is the very best you can do on that?

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I'll take ten off. 50.

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-Is that your very best?

-I'll take 40.

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That's good. We'll go for that. 40. Thank you very much.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

-Enjoy it.

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Wow, two items purchased within the first 15 minutes.

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I like your style, boys.

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I tell you what we'll do, if we do this middle section - because there are three levels -

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if we do the little middle level there, and then we can go down the round level after that, OK?

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Yes.

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If you woke up this morning and found that you'd got £50, you had a lucky touch last night,

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and you didn't know what to do with the £50, you could have come to an antiques fair like this

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and bought a selection of objects, actually, for £50.

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Let me show you what my selection is for you today.

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Well, here's an unusual object.

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It's a horn spoon.

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I know, I can hear you say, surely that's plastic not horn.

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I didn't know you could get horn that's quite as clear as that.

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Well, you can.

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And this is an unusual Scottish spoon. It's got a silver shield

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on it, onto which you could engrave your initials, and down the sharp end, there's something that looks

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like a whistle - which actually IS a whistle.

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Next, in our galaxy of treasures we have this little fellow.

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It's a Triceratops, but what, I hear you ask, is a Triceratops doing on top of a weighted 925 silver base?

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Well, the secret's in this little clip on his back, because this

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thing is made as a menu holder, but just in case you haven't got a menu

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to put on the dinosaur stand, I just happen to have acquired this little fellow.

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It's a Victorian photograph of a quadricycle.

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A very rare and extraordinary form of bicycle,

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except it's got four wheels, two big ones opposite one another and these two little ones on either side.

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Now this is a rare and esoteric type of bicycle, and as such this image is quite unusual.

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But look how nice it looks when placed on this dinosaur menu holder.

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The three items would cost you a total of £50.

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£20 for the Scottish horn whistling spoon, which is a jolly

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good price, because I think in Scotland the thing's worth about 60.

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£20 for the solid silver dinosaur menu stand,

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which must be worth £30 or £40, and £10 for the bicycling card.

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What else would you have spent your £50 on?

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I like those. Those are very pretty.

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They're lovely, they're quite early. What do you think, Holls?

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-Not my first choice.

-No, quite.

-It's not for you.

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Let's have a look, they're lovely quality, and I

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-love blue and white so it's worth considering those.

-Absolutely.

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This is Minton, containing within this little bowl is the history of the early art movement in England.

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Mildly boring to me.

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Boring? Each to their own, Ken.

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It's £108. You might be able to negotiate on that.

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We'll come back to it, I think.

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It's entirely up to you.

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I think we'll think about it.

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If it's meant to be, I'm sure the bowl will still be there later on.

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I actually really like that.

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-That's very pretty.

-It is very pretty, actually.

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Minton, Perth pattern vase. You're not impressed, are you?

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-Not really. I can imagine it as a pair.

-What a gorgeous pansy vase.

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-Thank you, it is.

-Are you into pansies?

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-No, but I very much like that, I think it's very pretty.

-Transfer printed, isn't it?

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It is transfer printed, then coloured by hand, but quite nice.

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It's one of the chintzy type designs.

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-Won't be much money, will it?

-No.

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-How much do you think?

-55 is the best price.

-Is it?

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-I've got £30 in my mind.

-Have you?

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Well, that's only in my mind.

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-No, that's nearer to where it needs to be.

-I might be going out of my mind.

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-You having a nice time?

-Yes.

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-We are, yes.

-You bought one item, we're about half an hour into it.

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-We are.

-So pansies or not, buck up!

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Hello, hello. The Reds are having a mid shop tactic chat.

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-I want to spend some money.

-Yes.

-What about you?

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-Well, yes, if it's worth it.

-I agree with that.

-That's OK.

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Let's spend some money on something good. David, find us something!

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Don't just stand there, go and spend it!

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Now, what do you think?

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It's a little postal balance.

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It's carved as a bear.

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Now, the price is 295.

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-295. Well, you said you wanted something unusual.

-Yes.

-Quirky.

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Yeah.

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-Expensive.

-That is

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-all those things.

-But bears are very collectable.

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What do you think?

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I'd like to look a bit longer. It's a lot of money.

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-I'm forming an opinion.

-Depends on how much it would come down.

-I'm forming an opinion.

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Why don't we ask the guy?

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Excuse me, sir, what's the very best you could do on that?

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Well, I've got 295 on it.

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I'll do it for 225.

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Is that your very best?

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Is that your very, very best?

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The very, very best I could do, I'd take £200 for it.

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I think it's quite charming.

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I would agree with that. I would agree. It's charming.

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It's a hefty section of our budget.

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You wouldn't take just under the 200, would you, sir?

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No, that's as good as it gets.

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I can tell. Fair enough.

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It's a lovely thing.

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Nice to meet you. Thanks very much.

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Oh, it's a shame there's not three or four of those.

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-I thought you wanted antiques!

-I do!

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-We're looking at a Pete Townsend guitar there.

-£25!

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Oh, sorry, that's the poster.

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-Goodness me! So what are you asking for that?

-£5,000.

-I've got good taste.

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I like expensive things.

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I've got enough for a plectrum!

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Now look, this is an antique, girls.

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I'll give you that, Holly.

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And look at this now. You've heard of the Nanking cargo?

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-I have, yes.

-And we've got a nice label on there.

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-This was before you were born, I should imagine!

-Yeah.

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They discovered this, Holly, from a cargo that had been

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lost at sea, so this had been under the water for 200 years.

0:17:080:17:11

But what do you think?

0:17:110:17:13

-I like that.

-Do you like it, Holly?

-Yes, I like that it.

0:17:130:17:15

I like that. I think we should have that.

0:17:150:17:18

Well, I think we should try and negotiate. I mean, this one is cracked, mind you,

0:17:180:17:22

but you know, if we sort of

0:17:220:17:25

asked him what he would do the best for the two.

0:17:250:17:28

Do you want to ask? Do you want to ask him, Holly?

0:17:280:17:30

-I reckon £35 for the pair.

-No, but I think less than that.

0:17:300:17:33

-And me. A lot less.

-What's your best price for the pair?

0:17:330:17:35

What have I got on there? 25.

0:17:350:17:37

37.

0:17:370:17:40

I tell you what, I'll do them both for 25.

0:17:400:17:43

-You see, I like round numbers.

-£30.

0:17:430:17:45

-20.

-I'll knock another couple off. £22, how about that?

-Yes.

0:17:450:17:50

I think we're happy with that, 22.

0:17:500:17:53

-Thank you very much.

-Where's your money then?

0:17:530:17:56

So now they are head-to-head, each team has two purchases but time is marching on. What is the plan?

0:17:560:18:03

Right. What about the bear?

0:18:030:18:05

-I like the bear.

-He likes it.

0:18:050:18:07

I got worried by him saying it's speculative.

0:18:070:18:09

Well, the only way you're going to make a profit is being speculative.

0:18:090:18:12

-Yes, true.

-And you've got to speculate to accumulate.

0:18:120:18:17

Right. Ken?

0:18:170:18:19

My view is we'll go and look at the bowl, and I'll change my mind again.

0:18:190:18:22

We'll go for the bear.

0:18:220:18:24

-All right?

-Yes.

0:18:240:18:25

The bear. We'll go.

0:18:250:18:27

Decision made, it's the bear. Will it still be there?

0:18:270:18:31

Run, boys, run!

0:18:310:18:34

-I love that, Mum.

-Which?

0:18:390:18:41

-That little teapot thing.

-Oh, Holly, that's horrid.

0:18:410:18:44

That's cute!

0:18:440:18:45

-Do you want to have a look at it?

-I do, yes.

0:18:450:18:48

-Hello there. Can we have a look at this? Do you mind if we...

-You can.

-Is it a set?

0:18:480:18:52

I'm not sure, I think it's obviously

0:18:520:18:55

made at the same time, and looking at it it's probably 1930s.

0:18:550:19:01

If you look at them they're different shapes.

0:19:010:19:03

I think it's still cute, though.

0:19:030:19:06

But it's not right, Holly.

0:19:060:19:08

I mean, if that was going in for sale it would probably make,

0:19:080:19:12

oh, if you were lucky £30, £40, and it is marked up at £75.

0:19:120:19:16

-It's quite nice.

-I know.

0:19:160:19:19

But it's not a set, girls.

0:19:190:19:21

I mean, those two are the best part of it

0:19:210:19:23

and those are later.

0:19:230:19:26

But it's not a complete set, so people are going to be...

0:19:260:19:28

-Yeah.

-Very anti from there.

0:19:280:19:30

Well, I still like it. I would still - I'd buy it.

0:19:300:19:33

-Is it your sort of thing?

-Yes.

0:19:330:19:35

Do you want to negotiate on it? Do you want to find out the best price?

0:19:350:19:37

I reckon so, yes. What's the best price you could do for it?

0:19:370:19:40

Probably £65 would probably be my lowest.

0:19:420:19:47

-You couldn't do it for 50 then?

-55 and that would be it.

0:19:470:19:50

Do you reckon?

0:19:500:19:52

I think you will struggle with it at auction, to be honest.

0:19:520:19:55

I can see why you like it, because it's very 1930s, the chrome and the white and it's very young.

0:19:550:20:00

It appeals to a young market.

0:20:000:20:02

I can see that, but it is fundamentally three different pieces. But it is your choice.

0:20:020:20:07

I mean, I can only advise you, and I know by your face, Holly, you're

0:20:070:20:10

going to completely ignore what I say and do what you want anyway.

0:20:100:20:14

-And it is on your head.

-I like it.

0:20:140:20:16

-I like it. Well, then you buy it.

-My mum likes it as well.

0:20:160:20:18

Well, your mum and you must buy it and completely ignore me.

0:20:180:20:22

Nothing personal, Mark!

0:20:220:20:24

52 and I'll take it.

0:20:240:20:26

Go on then.

0:20:260:20:28

-Deal.

-That's it.

0:20:280:20:30

-Why am I even here?

-Oh, you love it.

0:20:300:20:32

-I like it.

-You love it.

0:20:320:20:34

So, the Blues are all done, but is the bear in the bag for the Reds?

0:20:360:20:42

We've thought long and hard, this is the one that interests us.

0:20:420:20:46

It's an intriguing piece. It's speculative.

0:20:460:20:48

Speculative, that's the problem.

0:20:480:20:50

And it's our money supply that's the problem.

0:20:500:20:52

Is there any way, just ten more?

0:20:520:20:54

-£10 off. Go on. £10

-£190.

0:20:540:20:57

-OK. £190.

-Well done.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:570:21:00

Thanks very much.

0:21:000:21:01

Right. That's it. Time's up.

0:21:030:21:06

First, let's remind ourselves what the Reds have bought.

0:21:060:21:11

Bruce managed to negotiate the 19th century legal documents down to £16.

0:21:110:21:17

The boys found a pewter ink stand which they bought for £40.

0:21:170:21:22

And finally, Ken and Bruce chose a Bavarian bear postal scale for £190.

0:21:220:21:29

Now, spring into step.

0:21:310:21:32

Listen, you two, I thought you were going to peak early there.

0:21:320:21:35

-You made two purchases in quarter of an hour.

-We did, very early.

0:21:350:21:38

-Then desperately mucked about.

-We saved the best till last.

0:21:380:21:41

Confidence in the last piece.

0:21:410:21:43

You may have confidence in it, but it's a lot of mucking about in the meanwhile.

0:21:430:21:46

Yes, I don't know whether my heart can stand it. It's pounding away.

0:21:460:21:50

-I know. Now you spent up. Did you spend 246?

-246, I think.

0:21:500:21:53

We've got 54 for expert delivery.

0:21:530:21:56

£54 goes across David. There we go, that's all complete, David.

0:21:560:22:01

What are you going to do with your £54?

0:22:010:22:03

I've already got my eye on something as we've been going round.

0:22:030:22:06

-I bet I know what it is.

-Don't try to second guess him.

0:22:060:22:09

Sorry, sorry.

0:22:090:22:11

He is such a cunning fox, this man, he may have laid a false scented

0:22:110:22:17

trail to an object that you think he's going to go for, but actually,

0:22:170:22:21

-like the dilettante that he is, he will flit off and find something else.

-Completely strange.

0:22:210:22:25

Brilliant. Jolly good. I am glad you've had a nice time.

0:22:250:22:29

Very good, David, but for us let's find out what the Blues have bought.

0:22:290:22:33

The girls fell in love with a heart shaped pin cushion trinket box, theirs for £75. Ah.

0:22:330:22:41

Plucked from the sea bed, a couple of Nanking cargo saucers, salvaged for £22.

0:22:410:22:48

Finally, Holly and Bev bought a four-piece tea and coffee set for 52 smackers.

0:22:490:22:55

Right then team, how much did you spend?

0:22:570:22:59

-149.

-£149. Now, do you think that's a lot, Holly, or not?

-No.

0:22:590:23:05

No, says Bev. Just like that.

0:23:050:23:07

It's a lot to me.

0:23:070:23:09

So I would like £151, please.

0:23:090:23:11

-Who's got the 151? You don't like giving that back, do you?

-No.

0:23:110:23:14

-OK, £151.

-Thank you, Tim.

0:23:140:23:17

Have they behaved themselves, these girls?

0:23:170:23:20

No. Absolutely not. I don't know why I was here.

0:23:200:23:23

Your opinion is going to count a lot for that £151 and they could be depending on you with this, Mark,

0:23:230:23:30

so I think you're going to have to stiffen up, old fruit.

0:23:300:23:33

And very good luck. But for the rest of us we're heading off to Buckinghamshire.

0:23:330:23:37

What could be more divine than that?

0:23:370:23:39

This is Claydon House, a manor which was passed

0:23:500:23:54

from generation to generation of the Verney family for over 400 years.

0:23:540:23:59

It sure is a fine example of 18th century architecture, both inside and out.

0:24:020:24:07

But today, I'd like to show you something rather personal.

0:24:070:24:11

This is very strange up here, isn't it?

0:24:130:24:16

Originally a landing, it's been converted into the Verney family private museum.

0:24:160:24:23

Now, Sir Harry Verney, in the 19th century, had an extremely famous sister-in-law.

0:24:230:24:29

She was none other than Florence Nightingale.

0:24:290:24:33

And, not surprising, in this cabinet we've got a memorial to Florence.

0:24:330:24:38

And you can see some images of her here.

0:24:380:24:41

There she is, standing on her return from the Crimea.

0:24:410:24:44

Below, here's a photograph of the harbour at Balaclava.

0:24:440:24:49

And of course Florence Nightingale's most famous achievement in

0:24:490:24:54

the Crimean War was establishing the British Hospital at Scutari.

0:24:540:24:59

And, intriguingly, two of these bands, which would either have been

0:24:590:25:03

worn as a sash or as armbands on her nurses, survive in this cabinet.

0:25:030:25:10

But I think one of the most charming pieces of memorabilia is this,

0:25:100:25:14

which on the face of it looks like a small cricket ball.

0:25:140:25:18

But, if you read the label, it says "Orange, given by Florence Nightingale

0:25:180:25:23

"to a sick soldier during the Crimea,"

0:25:230:25:29

which has been preserved by him and kept for 160 years and was

0:25:290:25:34

re-presented back to the family to go into their little museum.

0:25:340:25:39

Isn't that charming?

0:25:390:25:41

Sir Harry's son, Sir Edmund Hope Verney, was in India at the time of the civil war,

0:25:410:25:49

and as a result of that conflict, the British had to reconquer those parts of India held by the rebels.

0:25:490:25:56

That meant deposing some of the Maharajahs, and as a result of that, these spoils of war, which are

0:25:560:26:04

exquisite gold Damascened steel pieces of armour and chain-mail,

0:26:040:26:10

found their way into the museum.

0:26:100:26:13

The most spectacular and eye-catching display in the museum though, has to be this array

0:26:130:26:20

of musical instruments running up the centre.

0:26:200:26:23

This little lot collectively is known as a gamelan, and these were made in Java.

0:26:230:26:29

But they were commissioned specifically by Sir Stamford Raffles, who was the man who founded

0:26:290:26:36

Singapore, and they're an incredibly important survival illustrating Javanese performing arts.

0:26:360:26:44

So keen was Sir Harry Verney to buy this set that he had to persuade his

0:26:440:26:50

wife to give up six months of her allowance so that he'd have the cash to make the purchase.

0:26:500:26:57

The big question is today, of course,

0:26:570:27:00

are our teams over at the auction going to be in tune?

0:27:000:27:04

Mark and David have been busy, though, searching for their bonus buys.

0:27:070:27:11

With any luck, today's bargains will be music to the ears of our auctioneer.

0:27:110:27:15

Well, we've had a quick whizz across from Derby to Nottingham to Mellors and Kirk's excellent sale room.

0:27:170:27:25

It's a treat to be here, Nigel.

0:27:250:27:27

-Very nice to have you, Tim.

-Now, Ken and Bruce went with these documents.

0:27:270:27:31

What do you make of these fellows?

0:27:310:27:34

They're obviously unique in one sense, and yet in another they're not.

0:27:340:27:37

They're the sort of material which, in enormous quantity, survives still

0:27:370:27:42

in lawyers' offices the length and breadth of Britain.

0:27:420:27:44

If it's your own home or piece of land they relate to, they're great.

0:27:440:27:48

And what do you call these documents, Nigel?

0:27:480:27:50

Well, this particular one is an indenture. Because of this wavy line, and it means that the agreement is

0:27:500:27:56

absolutely unique, and that only the other half is the genuine part to it.

0:27:560:28:01

So the solicitor at the time that we signed up our agreement

0:28:010:28:05

cut it in half, my half like a jigsaw puzzle, and it makes it go against your half?

0:28:050:28:08

Absolutely. It's completely unique.

0:28:080:28:10

Well, I never knew that. Isn't that interesting?

0:28:100:28:13

Gosh. Now, that bit of information, of course, is going to enhance

0:28:130:28:17

-the value dramatically, isn't it?

-Not a jot.

0:28:170:28:20

-What's it worth, then?

-I think a tenner for the two, probably.

0:28:200:28:23

-Do you? They paid £16. Next is the pewter inkwell.

-Yes.

0:28:230:28:27

Which I think is rather a poor example, I have to say.

0:28:270:28:31

-I agree.

-How much do you think it's worth?

0:28:310:28:33

Probably 30 or £40.

0:28:330:28:35

-Maybe 50 on a good day.

-They paid 40, so that might be a bit dodgy.

0:28:350:28:39

Their main hope, to wit they're pinning all their colours, is this little Bavarian bear.

0:28:390:28:48

Well, at first sight, it's a sweet little object, isn't it?

0:28:480:28:50

-But I have some serious reservations about this one.

-Do you?

0:28:500:28:53

I don't think it started out life as a postal scale, I think there's a question about that.

0:28:530:29:00

Because, why would you put a mechanical gadget like this that completely hides and obscures

0:29:000:29:07

the beautifully carved little bear?

0:29:070:29:09

That would affect your opinion of value, then?

0:29:090:29:11

It will. I think if others are of the same view, I think it's probably going to be maybe £40-£60.

0:29:110:29:18

Oh, lordy. £190 they paid for this!

0:29:180:29:22

I think that's probably rather too much.

0:29:220:29:24

If you're right and they're wrong, they're going to need their bonus buy.

0:29:240:29:28

So let's go and have a look at it.

0:29:280:29:29

Now, Kenneth and Bruce, you spent 246.

0:29:320:29:35

You gave him £54 to spend on the bonus buy. What did you do with it?

0:29:350:29:40

-Great consideration on this. I sought a second opinion.

-It's very small.

0:29:400:29:43

It is small, but I think quite rare.

0:29:430:29:47

Now, this is a carved nut.

0:29:470:29:51

-Both of you are...

-...carved nuts!

0:29:510:29:53

Both of you are of a scholastic, scientific inclination.

0:29:530:29:56

This little piece here, we call it Scrimshaw.

0:29:560:30:00

Possibly done by a sailor, who might have gone to Tasmania,

0:30:000:30:04

and spent the hours of boredom just cutting into that.

0:30:040:30:08

I think 20 minutes, rather.

0:30:080:30:10

Oh, no, a little bit longer than that.

0:30:100:30:12

It's got all these sort of lines going across, which is quite extraordinary. What do you think?

0:30:120:30:17

It's a very tactile little piece, it needs handling and turning around in the hand.

0:30:170:30:21

You shake it, it's still got the nuts inside.

0:30:210:30:23

David, I had huge faith in you at one stage.

0:30:230:30:27

-The big question is, how much?

-£15.

0:30:270:30:30

£15 for a little piece of Scrimshaw.

0:30:300:30:33

See how great Bruce now thinks this is?

0:30:330:30:36

I think there's a possibility there, David, of helping us towards a plus.

0:30:380:30:43

-I think, good buy, mate.

-Really?

-Well done.

-I'm going to pass it back.

0:30:430:30:46

So, from one nut, to another nut, to a serious nut!

0:30:460:30:52

Well, you don't pick it now, you pick it later.

0:30:530:30:55

Maybe after the sale of your first three items.

0:30:550:30:58

But let's find out now, for the audience at home,

0:30:580:31:00

what the auctioneer thinks about David's little nut.

0:31:000:31:04

Well, you've got to be a nutcase to be an expert on Bargain Hunt, I tell you.

0:31:060:31:10

I'm afraid it's modern. It's a reproduction.

0:31:100:31:12

Yes. What do you think it's worth?

0:31:120:31:15

I dare say £20, maybe, as a guess.

0:31:150:31:17

-£15 is all they paid.

-That's not unreasonable.

0:31:170:31:20

-It's a bit of fun.

-It is.

0:31:200:31:22

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:31:220:31:24

What an amazing collection of stuff we've got here. I just love it, don't you?

0:31:240:31:28

-Yes, it's great.

-To kick off, then, we're going to have this silver pin cushion, which is, I suppose,

0:31:280:31:35

for people who are intensely in love with needlework, is it?

0:31:350:31:39

I think it's for hatpins, actually, Tim, rather than needlework.

0:31:390:31:42

It would have sat on an Edwardian lady's dressing-table.

0:31:420:31:45

Right.

0:31:450:31:46

It's made of silver, it doubles up as a little jewel box.

0:31:460:31:50

Lined in velvet with a padded top.

0:31:500:31:52

-What's your estimate on that?

-40-60.

0:31:520:31:54

£75 paid.

0:31:540:31:56

Well, I don't know, but I feel a bit of a surprising result perhaps coming from that. I do hope so.

0:31:560:32:01

Now we span a few centuries in ceramic terms. What do you make of those?

0:32:010:32:06

Well, they're Chinese porcelain made for export to the West, and

0:32:060:32:09

they're from the famous Nanking Cargo that was sold at auction 250 years later than it was intended to be.

0:32:090:32:17

The date is middle of the 18th century, 1750 or so.

0:32:170:32:21

So there we have it. How much?

0:32:210:32:23

£20-£30 only.

0:32:230:32:25

£22 is what they paid. You're estimating £20-£30, and they may therefore turn a small profit.

0:32:250:32:32

-Let's hope so.

-Much more encouraging, though, is this brilliant set of chromium-plated clad earthenware.

0:32:320:32:39

There's no missing it, is there?

0:32:390:32:41

It's right there in your face.

0:32:410:32:43

-Absolutely.

-They've got a few interesting features, haven't they?

0:32:430:32:46

They have. It's earthenware with a chromium-plated

0:32:460:32:48

metal casing for insulation purposes, at least in the case of the two pots.

0:32:480:32:53

And the design is great.

0:32:530:32:56

Are we talking Festival of Britain here?

0:32:560:32:59

Are we talking just after the Second World War, do you think?

0:32:590:33:01

I think probably just after the Second World War, yes.

0:33:010:33:04

Actually, a stunning set. What's your estimate?

0:33:040:33:08

I suppose £30 or £40.

0:33:080:33:11

OK, £52 paid. It just depends on who's at the auction, doesn't it?

0:33:110:33:13

-Yes, it does.

-But, looking at this, they may well need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:33:130:33:19

How exciting is this, girls?

0:33:210:33:23

Are you gagging to find out how much Mark has spent of your £151?

0:33:230:33:28

-I'm intrigued to more than anything.

-I can tell.

0:33:280:33:31

Put them out of their agony, will you?

0:33:310:33:34

Now look at that, girls. Isn't that wonderful?

0:33:340:33:37

This is gilt-bronze,

0:33:370:33:39

French Champleve enamel, in that sort of Japanese style of the last quarter of the 19th century.

0:33:390:33:47

But wonderful detail and quality.

0:33:470:33:49

And I didn't spend all of your money.

0:33:490:33:52

I spent only £95.

0:33:520:33:54

-For one?

-No. I've got

0:33:540:33:55

the matching pair, discreetly in my pocket, to surprise you.

0:33:550:34:00

What do you think of those, girls? Aren't they knock-out?

0:34:000:34:03

As it's a pair, definitely. I thought you'd only bought one for a moment.

0:34:030:34:07

-I just think they're absolutely delicious.

-They're quite nice.

0:34:070:34:09

Not what I expected from you. I quite like those.

0:34:090:34:12

-I'm impressed.

-I think they're absolutely marvellous.

0:34:120:34:15

-And you paid how much again?

-95, Tim.

0:34:150:34:17

£95. For the top, top grade Champleve and gilt bronze?

0:34:170:34:21

Absolutely.

0:34:210:34:23

-You're happy, girls?

-Yes.

0:34:230:34:25

You pick later if you want to, but for the audience at home, let's find

0:34:250:34:29

out what the auctioneer thinks about the candlesticks. Well done, Mark.

0:34:290:34:31

-So, Nigel. They look Oriental, they smell Oriental, but they're not Oriental, right?

-No, they're not.

0:34:340:34:40

These were made either in France or England, and I'm inclined to think they were made in France.

0:34:400:34:45

Although they're unsigned, they're very reminiscent of the work of the bronze founder Ferdinand Barbedienne.

0:34:450:34:50

-Great gilding, isn't it?

-Super gilding.

0:34:500:34:52

Is that not just how really rich gilding ought to look on bronze?

0:34:520:34:57

-The whole thing works really well, and they're super quality.

-Very, very smart.

0:34:570:35:01

A signature would greatly increase the value, but there's no doubting that they're circa 1880.

0:35:010:35:07

-What sort of estimate?

-100-150, I think is nice and competitive.

0:35:070:35:10

Very good, £95 was paid.

0:35:100:35:12

Very reasonable.

0:35:120:35:15

I think they're an absolutely brilliant, belting bonus buy

0:35:150:35:19

which we look forward to seeing sold in a moment.

0:35:190:35:21

So, you cool cats, are you pretty excited?

0:35:310:35:34

We are. The bear is going to go for big money.

0:35:340:35:38

-Really?

-We're going to make a lot of money on it.

0:35:380:35:40

The auctioneer thinks it's a cobbled together thing.

0:35:400:35:43

He thinks the bear is the bear, and the scales are the scales, and they didn't start off life together.

0:35:430:35:48

-That's his view.

-What does he know?

0:35:480:35:50

Your first lot is coming up now. And it's the indenture.

0:35:500:35:53

Lot 205, two deeds, one an indenture.

0:35:530:35:57

£20 for them, please? £10?

0:35:570:36:00

Ten I'm bid, thank you.

0:36:000:36:03

15, 20?

0:36:030:36:05

£15, all done?

0:36:050:36:08

Paid 16, minus one. It's nothing.

0:36:080:36:13

Lot 206 is the steel cast pewter inkwell. £30 for this?

0:36:130:36:18

£20?

0:36:180:36:21

20 I'm bid, thank you. 25, 30? 35?

0:36:210:36:24

£30, in the centre of the room, selling for 30.

0:36:240:36:28

£30, minus £10, you're minus 11.

0:36:280:36:32

Lot 207 is the Swiss limewood carving of a bear.

0:36:320:36:36

Several bids on this, including one of £80.

0:36:360:36:40

80, 90 for it? 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, 140, 150, 160, 170.

0:36:400:36:48

At £170, a commissioned bid.

0:36:480:36:50

Selling at 170.

0:36:500:36:54

-That's very good.

-Not quite wiping its face.

0:36:540:36:56

-But it got near.

-That was very good.

0:36:560:37:00

Far better than the estimate of £40-£60.

0:37:000:37:05

Minus 31, that's where we're at, minus 31. What about this nut now?

0:37:050:37:08

-No question.

-Could this nut save your day?

0:37:080:37:10

No question, we're going for it.

0:37:100:37:12

-It's a nice piece, we're going for it.

-So that's it, then.

0:37:120:37:15

We are going with the nut!

0:37:150:37:17

Lot 214 is this interesting

0:37:170:37:19

Scrimshaw type decorated terrestrial globe in the form of a nut.

0:37:190:37:25

£20 for it?

0:37:250:37:27

20 I'm bid, thank you. 25 anywhere?

0:37:270:37:30

At £20, 25 I'll take.

0:37:300:37:33

Selling then at £20.

0:37:330:37:35

£20, only one nut about, I'm afraid.

0:37:380:37:43

Was that the one that bought it or the one that purchased it?

0:37:430:37:46

So, you are minus 26.

0:37:460:37:49

Minus 26 is very respectable, it could be a winning score.

0:37:490:37:52

-Don't say a word.

-Our lips are sealed.

0:37:520:37:55

-We'll have to trust you boys on this.

-Thank you very much.

0:37:550:37:59

-Perky?

-Yes, definitely.

0:38:110:38:13

I love it. You've not been talking to those boys, have you?

0:38:130:38:16

-No, no, not at all.

-Absolutely not.

0:38:160:38:18

They're wicked, they are. First up, then, is your trinket box in the shape of a heart.

0:38:180:38:24

What could be more lovely? Here it comes.

0:38:240:38:27

Lot 235, the silver heart-shaped pincushion.

0:38:270:38:31

£30 for this lot is asked and bid. 35, 40, 45, 50?

0:38:310:38:36

50 for it? 50, madam. 55 here, 60?

0:38:360:38:40

70. In the room and selling.

0:38:400:38:44

-Did he sell it for 70?

-70, yes.

-Oh, dear, that's minus 5.

0:38:460:38:49

Lot 236, two Chinese saucers from the celebrated Nanking Cargo,

0:38:490:38:54

mid-18th century. £20 for these? Any interest?

0:38:540:38:57

£20 I'm bid, thank you. 25 for them?

0:38:570:39:01

25, 30?

0:39:010:39:03

We're in profit.

0:39:030:39:05

40? At 35, then.

0:39:050:39:07

£35 I'm selling.

0:39:070:39:09

That is plus 13 on that, that's super.

0:39:120:39:14

Lot 237, the chromium-plated

0:39:140:39:16

metal and earthenware composed tea and coffee service.

0:39:160:39:20

£20 asked for it. Is bid at 20.

0:39:200:39:22

25 anywhere?

0:39:220:39:24

Come on!

0:39:240:39:27

35, 40, 45 to either of you?

0:39:270:39:30

£40, then, with me.

0:39:300:39:33

-Come on, a bit more.

-If you're sure. £40.

0:39:330:39:35

-That's a shame.

-£40.

-Sorry about that.

0:39:360:39:38

That's minus 12, you were plus eight, you're now minus four.

0:39:380:39:44

-Oh, petal.

-So near yet so far.

0:39:440:39:46

-We've got one more to go.

-You have.

0:39:480:39:50

-Now, you're minus four, now that could be a winning score.

-I hope so.

0:39:500:39:55

No mucking about now. This could be a winning score.

0:39:550:39:59

Serious now. Serious.

0:39:590:40:01

Minus £4, are you going to stick at minus four and maybe win the show,

0:40:010:40:05

or risk £95 of the left over lolly on the candlesticks?

0:40:050:40:09

We've got faith in you, go for it.

0:40:090:40:11

-You're going to do us proud.

-I hope so. I do like them a lot.

0:40:110:40:14

So, you're going to go with the bonus buy, and here it comes.

0:40:140:40:17

Lot 244 is the pair of French

0:40:170:40:19

gilt-bronze and Champleve enamel chinoisery candlesticks.

0:40:190:40:25

Very nice things indeed. And £150 for them is bid.

0:40:250:40:29

160, 170, 180, 190, 200,

0:40:290:40:33

220, 250, 280 for them?

0:40:330:40:37

280, 300, 320, 350, 380, 400.

0:40:370:40:44

At £400 and I sell at £400? If you're quite sure.

0:40:440:40:48

£400! That is something else, isn't it?

0:40:520:40:55

You are up £301!

0:40:550:40:59

Now, did that come at you out of the blue?

0:40:590:41:02

-Oh, yes.

-Made my day.

0:41:020:41:04

-Kiss him, for God's sake.

-Oh, my God!

0:41:040:41:07

I can't believe it!

0:41:070:41:08

Look, don't say a word to the Reds.

0:41:080:41:11

It's so exciting.

0:41:110:41:13

Well, well, well, we've had a surprising programme today, I have to tell you. Have you chaps been

0:41:220:41:28

-chatting at all?

-No.

-You've managed to restrain yourselves all round?

0:41:280:41:32

As the audience knows, one team has done spectacularly badly,

0:41:320:41:38

and another team has done spectacularly well.

0:41:380:41:40

And the team that's done spectacularly badly are the Reds.

0:41:400:41:46

Actually, not that spectacularly badly.

0:41:460:41:49

Minus £31, they got a nice bonus buy out of David Barby, making their end score minus 26.

0:41:490:41:56

Which, in normal circumstances, would be a winning score on Bargain Hunt.

0:41:560:42:01

But they have not reckoned with the unbelievable skills of the Blues.

0:42:010:42:07

Who, I have to say, at a moment were minus £4 and looking dead dodgy

0:42:070:42:13

until in came Mark Stacey,

0:42:130:42:16

steaming to the rescue.

0:42:160:42:18

Steaming so much to the rescue

0:42:180:42:19

that he produced £305 of profit on a single bonus buy object.

0:42:190:42:25

£305 profit! How about that?

0:42:250:42:28

That's something else.

0:42:280:42:31

Which means, overall, you are £301 up.

0:42:310:42:35

So, what does it feel like, to be having £150 apiece with your mother?

0:42:350:42:42

Where's my pound?

0:42:420:42:44

-Does it feel great?

-It certainly does. He was fantastic.

0:42:440:42:48

Wasn't he fantastic! I quite agree with you.

0:42:480:42:51

-We'll have David, we'll have David!

-We've had a thoroughly lovely

0:42:510:42:55

-programme, join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:550:42:59

Subtitles by RED BEE MEDIA LTD

0:43:170:43:19

E-mail: [email protected]

0:43:190:43:22

Tim Wonnacott and the Bargain Hunt team head to Derby to uncover a variety of antique bargains.

Helping the blue and red teams are experts Mark Stacey and David Barby. A pair of French candlesticks produce a staggering amount at auction and Tim also finds time to visit Claydon House in Buckinghamshire.