Builth Wells 2 Bargain Hunt


Builth Wells 2

Antiques challenge. A Mr and Mrs Doubleday make up one of the bargain-hunting teams in this episode, and in their honour both teams have double the shopping budget.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, viewers, I would like you to meet one half of today's teams.

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-So what are your names?

-Mr and Mrs Doubleday.

-Really?

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-Yes, really Doubleday.

-That gives me a bit of an idea.

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Let's go Bargain Hunting.

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We are at Builth Wells at the Royal Welsh Showground.

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Today is Double-Up Day.

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Does that mean double the trouble?

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Jonathan Pratt has trouble keeping track of Red team Susannah and Sarah.

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-Where are they now? Oh no!

-And there is more trouble with time.

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-And time is?

-Six minutes left.

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On the Blue team, Noel and Kate make Kate Bliss very happy.

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I have every confidence we have a fighting chance to beat Jonathan.

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I think we have a good team here.

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But as you know, the auction room has its highs. This is fantastic.

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And its lows. Oh, dear, bad luck. That is bad luck.

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Now, the only thing that changes today is the amount of money

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we give the teams, because instead of giving them the £300

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it is Double-Up Day, so we give them £600 apiece,

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and that is why my pockets are bulging.

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That is coming up later.

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For now, let's meet the teams.

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-And here they are.

-Hello.

-Hello and welcome.

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So, Sarah, how did you first become friends?

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Well, I met Suzanne

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when I was 13 and I started babysitting for her children.

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At university I used to work for her promoting her photography

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business, when I graduated I worked for her full-time

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-and now we are just friends.

-Isn't that nice? You haven't always been a photographer, have you?

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I have been a photographer for seven years.

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I used to be a marketing manager for Royal Mail,

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but I wanted to do something different and I have always had a passion for photography.

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-What sort of photography do you do?

-Mostly portraits.

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I work a lot with children and animals.

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All the things you are not supposed to work with.

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Somehow you manage to find time to train for marathons.

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I have done four marathons in three different countries.

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The first ones I did in my 20s and I did another one in Berlin last year.

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Sarah, you also have put your body through punishment over the years.

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I have broken bones in my body on three different continents.

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Playing netball at school I broke my fingers,

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and then I went on a girls' holiday to Thailand

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and got a stress fracture in my foot

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and slipped on an unsecured rug in Mexico a couple of years ago

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and I have had a plate put into my hand to stick me back together.

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Poor you! So quite accident-prone, then.

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Suzanne, how will you get on as a team?

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-We are going to do all right. We will have a good time.

-Fingers crossed.

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The big question is are you going to be good enough to beat the blues?

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That's the question!

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So Kate, how long have you two been married?

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28 years. Love at first sight.

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I was introduced to Noel, and this wonderful gentleman rose up

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out of his chair and I thought, "I'll have him."

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Did you get any choice in the matter at all?

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Well, in all honesty I would have to say it was only a small part.

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-You weren't brought up in this country, were you?

-I was not.

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-I was brought up in Jamaica.

-Jamaica!

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I went over there when I was five with my parents and my brother and sister.

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Did you come back to go to university?

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I came back to train as a teacher in Bristol.

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Noel, you are retired, but what did you used to do?

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We formed a charity in Russia after I'd been on a visit

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when I was the UK director for a Bible producing organisation.

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-What is the charity?

-Its primary interest is to help in the orphanages in Russia.

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We helped a hospital or two, but it still continues

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because the need is still there despite the changes since my time.

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If you can, will you be buying something Russian?

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If we can find something we would love to.

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How do we all feel about having £600 to spend today? Happy about that?

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-Bring it on.

-On that happy note I am going to give you your £600.

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A huge wodge of cash.

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You know your rules, the experts await - off you go and good luck.

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Dosvedanya!

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I am very excited, because we have £600.

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Who has got the money?

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Have you got the money? Right.

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Well, I am gunning for silver.

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That sounds good.

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-You're going to spend it, you are not going to leave me much at all.

-No.

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I was hoping I might have £500 to spend. Let us have a look in here.

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The enamel is very good.

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They are saleable.

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I don't think we will make a huge profit on them.

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-What about a green dog?

-What, sorry?

-The green dog.

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-Is it your sort of thing?

-No, shall we pass him by?

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He's probably... Oh, he's Crown Devon.

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They are collectable with glass eyes, but there are a few of them round as well.

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-Do you like him?

-He caught my eye.

-D'you like him, Noel?

-Noel won't like him.

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-Yes, I suppose, like the expression.

-He is cute.

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It's a collectables market rather than antiques market.

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£48 is the price. I think he could make anything from 20 to 30.

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-A bit too much risk.

-We could ask, if you like him.

-Let's ask.

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While Kate checks the price let's check the Reds.

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They are late 19th century. Typically Staffordshire made.

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-Very Victorian style.

-I don't like this.

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-I am hoping we might get inspired in a minute.

-Anything you can see?

-No.

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I think Susannah is going to be difficult to please.

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What about that dozy dog?

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-Well...

-Tell me!

-The good news is,

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after a bit of negotiating they have come down to 35.

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Now I have to tell you I think that stands a chance at 35.

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As I said it is an area of collectables rather than an antique.

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It is 1930s.

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Crown Devon is a good English firm

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and they were known for making models like this.

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-He is called Bingo after the Bingo dog.

-That's nice!

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He is in this lovely Art Deco green, which is a really '30s colour.

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Shall we have Bingo?

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I think so - Kate seems to think we might make a profit.

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-We are not spending heaps.

-It can be our cheap and cheerful.

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-Then we go up market.

-Yes.

-He really caught your eye, didn't it?

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-Yes, and I love the colour.

-Great.

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I will do the deal and I will catch you up.

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Bingo is in the bag, but you have £600 to spend.

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It is collectable. At £35, it is not such a bad buy.

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Now I am hoping we can spend a bit more and get something of quality.

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That is quite cool.

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What you have to worry when it has a neck that has been broken,

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but because... I was wondering how it happened. You'd continue with this,

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put a shade on it and you have the lit insides - that is sweet.

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-How much it is?

-I have no idea. For me that is a good buy - it's modern design.

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-How much is it?

-The fitting is cool.

-I love it because of the colour.

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-In the absence of seeing anything...

-Exactly.

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The Monart vase. What is your price on it?

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I have £300 on it.

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£300.

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So would you move on that at all?

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-The best would be 240.

-240 best price?

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I really like it.

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But I can see you going, "That's a lot of the money gone."

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It is not my decision. Your choice. What do you think?

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I don't dislike it.

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It is a large chunk of the money going on something that

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potentially I don't know anything about that glass maker,

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I don't know anything about how much it is likely to make.

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I am more comfortable spending it on something I know.

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OK. Well, you are not convinced.

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-Let's think about it.

-We've got a bit of time.

-Can we come back?

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We can come back. We can always come back.

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You haven't sold it to Susannah, mate, but you might have a bigger problem.

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Where the hell are they now?

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Oh, no!

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Where on earth are they?

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There's too many people wearing red.

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We have temporarily misplaced our expert.

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He is trying to direct us to items,

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but at the present time, we don't know where he is!

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Oh, dear. Jonathan loses the girl yet again.

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Except this time there's two of them.

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I have found something in the fair with an Eastern European flavour.

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What possible connection is there between these glorious Welsh hills

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and the Ural mountains in Russia?

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Well, on the face of it, there is no obvious connection.

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But, actually, if you look at this little object, there is.

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Once upon a time, this exquisitely fashioned box was a lump of stone.

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And it probably fell from a quarry or mountainside in the Russian Ural mountains.

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It has been so beautifully carved.

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I'm no mineralolgist. I couldn't identify precisely this stone for you.

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But I would guess it's some sort of Russian quartz.

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If I hold it up to the light, you can see the thinness of this mineral

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with the light coming through those creamy sections.

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The other nice thing about it is the frame.

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On the front edge we have this modest-looking button which helps you open it.

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But it is no ordinary button.

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Instead of having a plain silver blob he has inserted this lovely

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pink semi-precious stone, which has been cut en cabochon

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which means it's smooth on all its outer surface.

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If you look inside, you can just make out a tiny mark. That says AK.

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And next door to that it says 830.

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That indicates the fineness of the metal. AK are the initials of the work master.

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If you look at the workshop of the greatest Russian manufacture

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of objet d'art and luxurious products, Carl Faberge,

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the makers all registered their initials.

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If one was able to prove AK worked for the great Carl Faberge, then bingo.

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All your troubles are over.

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In short, this is an absolute treasure.

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The cost is £175.

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£175 for all this history, for all this workmanship,

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the fine quality of this thing just takes your breath away.

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To say I am excited about this is an understatement.

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Mark you, I do get excited quite easily.

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Now, more excitement. Jonathan's spotted his girls.

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I was looking at a stand, I turn round and everyone had disappeared.

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-Have you found something?

-No.

-Were you looking for me?

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-We didn't have an expert with us.

-Starting to panic.

-OK.

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There is a couple of things I want to show you.

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I am taking you out of what you are looking for directly.

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Intriguing. What have you found?

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-First thing is a hall lantern.

-OK.

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-Do you not like it?

-I don't hate it.

-I don't hate it.

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It's a decorative interiors type of thing.

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If you think not really, I'll avoid that.

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What about these overlay lamp bases?

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I don't like those.

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I point those out because at the moment there is more people

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in the Eastern Bloc buying this sort of thing so, there is more interest.

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-How old are they?

-They are not that old.

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He's asking 375 the pair. If they were antique you would be looking at £1,000-plus.

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-I don't like them.

-They are impressive with decent shades. Quite a classy interior...

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I am just gauging, OK...the looks I am getting, let's move on.

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I do like, I really like that.

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I quite like it.

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In a big grand hall, I think it would be a feature.

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When you have an old house you could still have old floorboard and modern art.

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-You have to look at it in the context of the room.

-Yes.

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An idea. We can come back.

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Suzanne is not convinced.

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No. As long as I convince you that is one down.

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-50% of the way down.

-One down, one to go.

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-OK.

-How much?

-No, 110?

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It's on at 110. He said he would do it for £90.

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-So that is less than a sixth of the budget.

-It is not a lot of money.

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-She really likes it.

-I know she does.

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-We will wander on.

-I do like it.

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What is your best?

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Best price £320. Not one penny less.

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That is more than we want to pay.

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The nice thing about it is that it is a child's chair.

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-And child's chairs are very desirable.

-How old would it be?

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It is in the 17th century style but this is a Georgian country piece.

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-Yes.

-It has lovely features, you can see how it has been constructed.

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Can you see on the back where the pins show through?

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These pegs are often left to stand proud.

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You can feel the pegs there.

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-It's a really nice piece. 320 is a very fair retail price.

-Is it?

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It's... Retail price.

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At auction, for a profit, I'd say 250 is a good price.

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I think it would get that at auction. Certainly.

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It might make quite a bit more. How are you feeling?

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Could we have a quick look round?

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Could we have a quick look round? If you think that's a good deal we'll go with it.

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We've got half an hour left.

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So you are doing really well.

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Not doing so well are the reds. Time for a team talk, I think.

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-We have less than 20 minutes. Hear the panic in the voice now.

-OK.

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Less than 20 minutes. We have less than £600 and not spent a penny.

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Certainly, one item definitely, we have to buy. Right now.

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I know what I prefer.

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-What you want to buy?

-I want to buy the lamp.

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Buy the lamp, OK? Yes?

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-Let's go and buy the lamp and get that sorted.

-OK.

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-Where is it?

-Down here.

-Down here? Let's do the lamp.

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-Absolutely best price?

-Absolutely.

-Are you sure?

-I'll make it 280!

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-OK, yes please.

-240, yep.

-I really really like that.

-We've bought something, woohoo!

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We've got 19 minutes left and this is the first buy!

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-You carry on buying and I'll get it wrapped up.

-Thanks, that's that done, brilliant.

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Finally a buy under their belt but the Doubledays have been busy emptying that silver cabinet.

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-I'm looking underneath.

-What do you think?

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I quite like these salts, actually.

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-Which?

-The octagonal ones, see those?

-Ah!

-Can we have a look at those, please?

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We'll have the whole cabinet out.

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Lovely, thanks.

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-They are nice.

-These are little salts.

-They're very stylish.

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Are they silver or plate?

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-They are silver. The hallmark is quite rubbed on this one.

-Yes.

-But on that one it's quite clear.

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So, £58 on the ticket price. They're 1913, George V.

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I love the octagonal shape. Little pedestals.

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-I like them.

-You like them?

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Would those fit the silver request you put in at the beginning?

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-It would. I'd buy those.

-Well, hang on, don't buy them yet, we need to negotiate.

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We need to know what he'll charge us.

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-What's the very best you could do?

-Well done, Noel.

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-On those it would be 50.

-50. What do you think?

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-I think 45 and you've got a deal.

-I'll have to check with the boss!

-OK.

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If we went for those...silver salts, chair?

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-And just the chair.

-Big gamble. And...

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-Bingo.

-Yes, yes.

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-As we've known you too long, yes.

-Ah, thank you so much.

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-What do you think, are you happy?

-I love them.

-I'm happy about it, yes.

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-Are you happy at 45, Noel?

-Yes, I am.

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-If you think they'll make a...profit. I think we've got a chance at that.

-I think we do.

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-Well done, we've got some silver.

-Yes.

-Shall we go back to that chair?

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Yes, I think we should see if he'll do it for 300 but if not, we still take it, I think.

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Come on then. I'm relying on you to negotiate, Noel! Come on...

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Here's the chair. So what are your feelings now, what do you think?

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I must say it's a nice piece but I just have a feeling that it's too high a price, that's the problem.

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-What do you think, Kate?

-I feel the same, I don't think we'll make a profit.

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Much as I like it, I think it's lovely.

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I think we should see... Until we're sure we've got to the bottom price,

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he's prepared to take and then make a decision.

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-Hi. We don't want to pay 300.

-How much do you want to pay, then?

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We want to pay... We want to pay 275.

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OK, give me your money.

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-Thank you. Done. Happy? Thank you very much.

-No problem.

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That's how you do it with time to spare.

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-Take note, girls.

-What'll we do is,

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we'll buy that hall lantern and we have to find something else.

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We've got nine minutes to find two items, OK...

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Did you run that by Susannah, Jonathan?

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-We're going to take it. Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

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-We'll come back and pay later.

-That's fine.

-Super, thanks.

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-Let's look at the other one.

-What's the other one?

-Come on, this way.

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-And time is...?

-Running out, Jonathan.

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Six minutes.

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That's a rather sweet thing. That's lovely. I'm glad you stopped here when we've only got two minutes left.

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This stall is very fashionable at the moment.

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-OK, that's good.

-It's good, when you buy something here, there are a lot of buyers out there.

0:19:500:19:55

-OK.

-You can take it from this arena and put it on the internet,

0:19:550:19:58

which this guy will be selling over and the likelihood is you get someone in America or somewhere else.

0:19:580:20:03

So, that, the best price on that would be worth going for,

0:20:030:20:07

possibly, whatever the best price may be.

0:20:070:20:11

195.

0:20:110:20:12

195.

0:20:120:20:14

And this chap.

0:20:140:20:15

How much is that? 320.

0:20:150:20:17

Do we have...?

0:20:170:20:19

-How much have we got?

-270.

-Could we do 265 and leave me a fiver?

0:20:190:20:23

-No?

-OK, what can we get?

0:20:250:20:27

What about the letter opener? How much is that? 195?

0:20:270:20:30

-Yes.

-Quick time check.

0:20:300:20:33

-That's 320. You've got one and a half minutes left.

-OK.

0:20:360:20:39

-What do you think of that?

-That's pretty. Ruskin pottery top.

0:20:390:20:42

John Ruskin was the art guru of the 19th century.

0:20:420:20:44

-How much is it?

-280. Have we got 270?

0:20:440:20:47

30 seconds left. >

0:20:470:20:48

-How much have we got?

-We've got to leave him something.

-How much have we got?

0:20:480:20:52

-We can't do 270, won't leave anything.

-We've got...

0:20:520:20:54

-Have we got 270 left?

-We've got 270. Can you do 265?

0:20:540:20:57

Let's do it, go for it.

0:20:570:20:59

That leaves me a fiver out of 600 quid. Thank you very much.

0:20:590:21:03

We did warn you.

0:21:030:21:06

Deep breath, Jonathan! Shopping torture...over!

0:21:070:21:11

Time for our teams to hand over any leftover lolly to their experts.

0:21:130:21:17

Jonathan pleaded with Susannah

0:21:200:21:23

and Sarah to buy this Monart vase with light fitting for £240.

0:21:230:21:30

Next up, Jonathan persuaded them to buy this lantern for 90.

0:21:300:21:34

And with time running out, they had to buy this pewter box for £265.

0:21:340:21:41

-I don't know what to say.

-That was fun.

-That was exhausting.

0:21:410:21:44

Jonathan, you looked like the cat what got the cream.

0:21:440:21:48

-Between these two blondes, you've had an intense hour.

-I'm knackered!

0:21:480:21:53

Knackered! Even a young man like you. I don't know!

0:21:530:21:57

So, girls, nobody will tell me how much you finally spent.

0:21:570:22:01

-We spent 595.

-That means £5 left over to go to Jonathan.

0:22:010:22:05

-Called a lady, isn't it?

-Yes, but it's not a lot of money.

0:22:050:22:09

-What are you going to do, Jonathan?

-There's not a lot I can buy with a fiver, it's not easy.

0:22:090:22:13

-You can pop down the burger van.

-Here's a polystyrene punnet!

0:22:130:22:17

That's it, but you're quite satisfied with the service you've had from Jonathan?

0:22:170:22:21

He was excellent. He put us in the right direction.

0:22:210:22:23

-That's what we want.

-In the last five minutes, positive.

0:22:230:22:27

-Good luck, Jonathan, good luck, girls.

-Thank you.

0:22:270:22:30

Why don't we check out what the blues bought?

0:22:300:22:32

Noel and Kate bought this glazed dog for a miserable £35.

0:22:330:22:38

Then they only spent 45 on this pair of silver salts.

0:22:380:22:42

But they finally splurged and shelled out £275

0:22:430:22:47

on this 19th-century child's chair.

0:22:470:22:51

-Any regrets?

-No!

-Actually, do you mind me interrupting?

0:22:510:22:55

How much did you spend in the end?

0:22:550:22:56

-We spent £355.

-£355. Is that all?!

0:22:560:23:03

-But we did spend rather a lot on one piece.

-What was that?

0:23:030:23:06

It was a child's chair. A copy of one made in the 18th century?

0:23:060:23:12

Yes, it's a 19th-century piece, but it's 17th-century-ish in style.

0:23:120:23:17

Oh, yes? That's as clear as mud, then!

0:23:170:23:19

How much did you spend on that?

0:23:190:23:22

-£275.

-Of your £355?

-Yes.

-Indeed.

0:23:220:23:26

-That's quite a big wodge. Is that a worry to you?

-Yes.

0:23:260:23:29

-Will you have a sleepless night before the auction?

-No.

-I don't think so.

0:23:290:23:35

Please may I have the £245 of leftover lolly? Thank you.

0:23:350:23:40

-And like the Inland Revenue, we take from one and hand to another. There's your £245.

-Thank you.

0:23:400:23:46

What are you going to do? Hopefully blow the lot!

0:23:460:23:49

I think I'll have a go but I need to find something with a serious chance, I think.

0:23:490:23:55

-I'll sidle out this way.

-I think I'm getting the vibrations here.

0:23:550:23:59

Good luck, team! For the rest of us,

0:23:590:24:01

we're heading off to Port Sunlight, to the Lady Lever Art Gallery.

0:24:010:24:06

How wonderful.

0:24:060:24:07

It was built by William Hesketh Lever - industrialist,

0:24:200:24:24

philanthropist and art-lover - who filled these galleries

0:24:240:24:28

to the rafters with his collection of works of art, erotica and exotica.

0:24:280:24:36

And in terms of European works of art,

0:24:380:24:41

I guess there's no more exotic or desirable object than this.

0:24:410:24:47

This was the most desirable style to collectors in the 18th century.

0:24:470:24:54

This picture is the most wonderful combination

0:24:540:24:58

of European manufacture and Chinese ingenuity.

0:24:580:25:02

It was bought by William Hesketh Lever in 1918

0:25:020:25:06

and he would have been passionate about acquiring it

0:25:060:25:09

because it reflects the very apogee of 18th-century collectability.

0:25:090:25:15

The plate itself was made in Europe,

0:25:150:25:18

then shipped to the Orient to be decorated.

0:25:180:25:21

The subject of the picture has nothing to do with any original Chinese art.

0:25:210:25:27

What the Chinese are doing is producing images which suit the European market.

0:25:270:25:34

The subject itself includes a hawker - the gent here -

0:25:340:25:38

and his swain - a shepherdess seated beside the river.

0:25:380:25:45

In the foreground, Arcadian sheep with their lambs.

0:25:450:25:48

The village on the other side of the river is quasi-European.

0:25:480:25:52

This could have been lifted from a Bruegel painting from the 16th century.

0:25:520:25:57

But the really clever technical part of this picture

0:25:570:26:00

is that it's partly mirrored.

0:26:000:26:03

How exactly did the Chinese manage to scratch away

0:26:030:26:08

at the mirrored surface behind to reveal sufficient clear glass

0:26:080:26:14

to then apply this delicate paint from the reverse?

0:26:140:26:17

Because this is a reverse-painted mirror picture.

0:26:170:26:21

It's all incredibly cunning.

0:26:210:26:23

But not half as cunning as this piece of furniture.

0:26:310:26:35

Just look at the scale of it.

0:26:350:26:37

It hardly comes up to my chest,

0:26:370:26:39

but absolutely reeking of the Orient again.

0:26:390:26:43

Surely you've got a Chinese restaurant somewhere near you

0:26:430:26:46

that has a porch with a swooping pagoda-like roof, haven't you?

0:26:460:26:50

This lovely sweep down that takes you to these curly Qs in the corner of the roof.

0:26:500:26:56

In this example, with these turned wooden bells.

0:26:560:27:00

If I crouch down, you see this open section?

0:27:000:27:03

It's got a barley-twist column at the corner and here,

0:27:030:27:07

on the side, typical Chinese fretwork.

0:27:070:27:11

You can almost imagine a Chinaman leaning over this balustrade,

0:27:110:27:15

doing a bit of fishing in the stream down below.

0:27:150:27:19

The panel underneath has got blind fretting.

0:27:190:27:21

Like this pierced fretwork, but fretting

0:27:210:27:25

that's applied against a solid panel - hence blind fretting -

0:27:250:27:29

and underneath, some more typically Chinese asymmetric pierced work.

0:27:290:27:35

Positively Chinese, right? Chinese made? You agree? You do agree. Good.

0:27:350:27:40

Well, you're wrong. This was made entirely in England.

0:27:400:27:44

It was made around about 1752, 1754 by the wonderful

0:27:440:27:50

father-and-son British combo cabinet makers William and John Linnell.

0:27:500:27:56

They made this piece as part of an enormous suite

0:27:560:27:59

for the Duke of Beaufort at Babington House.

0:27:590:28:02

And after that suite was broken up, in 1922, this came on the market

0:28:020:28:08

and Hesketh Lever just had to have it.

0:28:080:28:11

Exotic? You bet. Now, the big question today is, of course,

0:28:110:28:16

how exotic are our teams going to be over at the auction?

0:28:160:28:19

Jonathan and Kate have had enough time to bag their bonus buys

0:28:240:28:27

and auctioneer Jeremy Lamond is ready to roll.

0:28:270:28:32

-Jeremy.

-Nice to see you, Tim.

-Very nice to be back.

0:28:320:28:35

So, Suzanne and Sarah, their first item is this Monart pot.

0:28:350:28:40

Yes, it's a glass vase from the 1930s.

0:28:400:28:43

A bit of aventurine speckling, by the look of it, in it,

0:28:430:28:46

and of course, this double light fitting,

0:28:460:28:48

-which is quite uncommon to have that.

-You kind of rate this, do you,

0:28:480:28:52

this business with having a light bulb on the top?

0:28:520:28:54

-I think that adds to it.

-Oh, good. I suppose the principle being

0:28:540:28:59

that when that bottom light bulb is on, you get some sort of internal colouration

0:28:590:29:03

within this thing, which is marvellous, isn't it?

0:29:030:29:06

-Anyway, what's your estimate?

-£80-£120.

-How much?

0:29:060:29:09

-£80-£120.

-£80-£120?! They paid £240 for this thing!

0:29:090:29:13

-It might make it. It's a 'Come and get me' estimate.

-Is it?

0:29:130:29:17

Oh, I see. See that confidential smile? That means something. Good.

0:29:170:29:22

Next, is this Moroccan lamp, which, I have to say,

0:29:220:29:25

-is one of the most hideous things I've seen in yonks.

-Yes.

0:29:250:29:28

I think you might see them in Marrakesh, made out of bits of tin.

0:29:280:29:31

-I don't think it's very old, and it's a bit cracked.

-It's a shocker.

0:29:310:29:35

On the other hand, it has got a look to it,

0:29:350:29:38

this kind of feathery piercing.

0:29:380:29:40

That would be just the job to go with your Moroccan restaurant look.

0:29:400:29:44

-How much?

-£50-£70.

-They only paid £90, so that's not too bad.

0:29:440:29:48

And lastly is the arts and crafts pewter cigarette box.

0:29:480:29:54

I think it is Archibald Knox-style, although it's not marked at all.

0:29:540:29:58

And it doesn't appear to be in the books,

0:29:580:30:00

so it should sell well for what it is -

0:30:000:30:03

a good, pretty, Archibald Knox-style box. And it's not signed... £40-£60.

0:30:030:30:08

£40-£60?! They paid £265 for this! On the other hand,

0:30:080:30:12

we have got the possibility of the bonus buy doing incredibly well.

0:30:120:30:16

They did, after all, leave their expert £5 to find the bonus buy.

0:30:160:30:20

And, by jingo, they'll need it, so let's go and have a look.

0:30:200:30:25

OK, S and S, Suzanne and Sarah. This is your bonus buy moment.

0:30:250:30:29

You were so miserable with Jonathan, you only gave him the £5.

0:30:290:30:33

-What did you spend it on?

-Well, you were constantly looking for...

0:30:330:30:36

-Aha!

-..the claret jugs!

-Fantastic.

0:30:360:30:39

Do you know how hard it is to find something for £5 at the fair?

0:30:390:30:43

-And you found a claret jug.

-Now, this one in particular, I like.

0:30:430:30:46

-It does have a bit of a gash.

-That's why it's a fiver.

0:30:460:30:49

It's a good shape. The handle dates it towards the end of the 1800s.

0:30:490:30:54

-There's a bit of aesthetic about it, which is quite sweet.

-I think it's quite nice. I like it.

0:30:540:30:59

There's a hint of the Orient. I'd say circa 1900.

0:30:590:31:01

-How much do you think it will make us?

-£15 or £18.

-Is that...?

0:31:010:31:04

-Tim shakes his head! OK, maybe £6 or £8!

-It's only a nervous twitch.

0:31:040:31:08

-It's not a shake at all.

-I quite like it. It's all right.

0:31:080:31:11

It is, as you say, a stylish object.

0:31:110:31:14

And if anybody was worried about that, it could be polished out.

0:31:140:31:19

Anyway, there we go. For the audience at home, let's find out

0:31:190:31:22

what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's little jug.

0:31:220:31:26

Well, if you only had five pounds to spend,

0:31:260:31:28

I think you could do worse than buy that.

0:31:280:31:31

A claret jug. Always useful, chipped or not chipped,

0:31:310:31:34

but there's also a Wurttemberg Metallwarenfabrik mark, WMF,

0:31:340:31:39

on here, which is good news. We have put £20-£30 on it.

0:31:390:31:42

Have you? Even in that state?

0:31:420:31:45

Jonathan will be delighted about that because he only paid £5 for it,

0:31:450:31:48

If you can turn a small profit on that, that'll be delightful, because they need it.

0:31:480:31:53

Right, now, the Blues. First up, a bit of ceramic, said to be Bingo.

0:31:530:32:00

It's a bit of a dog, isn't it?

0:32:000:32:02

-Looks dozy to me.

-It's actually called Perky Pup.

0:32:020:32:06

-It's Crown Devon. Perky Pup. And he looks perky, doesn't he?

-Perky Pup!

0:32:060:32:11

1935 to 1965, they made Perky Pups, and this is a Perky Pup.

0:32:110:32:15

Isn't that sweet? Bravo for researching that. That's lovely.

0:32:150:32:20

We think he is £20-£30.

0:32:200:32:22

I'm afraid they have bought a pup here, because they paid £35 for it.

0:32:220:32:26

Might just scrape home, cos it's cute.

0:32:260:32:29

Next are these so-called salts. Trophy cups, aren't they?

0:32:290:32:34

Yes. If they are salts they don't have liners,

0:32:340:32:37

but good, solid silver objects but light gauge,

0:32:370:32:40

fairly lightweight. I think they are £30-£40.

0:32:400:32:43

-OK. £45 paid.

-That should be OK.

0:32:430:32:45

So we've got two just about get-away-with-its,

0:32:450:32:48

but their major investment

0:32:480:32:50

in this double-up day is in the 17th century-style child's chair.

0:32:500:32:55

I think it's late Victorian at the earliest.

0:32:550:32:58

Just because of the way it's constructed,

0:32:580:33:00

it's quite thin, it's quite contrived in a way.

0:33:000:33:02

I like the style of the thing. I've always liked Wainscot back chairs.

0:33:020:33:08

It's no wonder lots of reproductions of these were made.

0:33:080:33:11

Charming to have it in the child's shape.

0:33:110:33:13

But it's the period it was made in that's vital...

0:33:130:33:17

-It's key to the value of it.

-..to the value, isn't it?

0:33:170:33:19

-I think it's £100-£150.

-Do you want to know what they paid?

-Go on.

0:33:190:33:22

-£275.

-A snip(!)

0:33:220:33:24

OK.

0:33:250:33:26

I fancy they'll need their bonus buy, though, so let's have a look.

0:33:270:33:31

Now, Kate and Noel, the bonus buy moment.

0:33:310:33:34

You had £600 to spend, you spent £355.

0:33:340:33:38

You gave £245 to Kate. What has she spent it on?

0:33:380:33:41

I went back to my old favourite, silver.

0:33:410:33:45

Ooh. I say. £245? How much did you actually spend on it?

0:33:450:33:49

I'll tell you in a minute. Let me tell you what it is first of all.

0:33:490:33:53

It is a silver pocket knife or fruit knife.

0:33:530:33:56

Dated from 1926, and the blade is all in good condition,

0:33:560:33:59

which is what you should look for on little pocket knives like this.

0:33:590:34:02

It's got a rather attractive engine-turned case,

0:34:020:34:05

but the most important thing, perhaps, is the maker.

0:34:050:34:08

It is by Sampson Mordan, so that might justify the price that I paid.

0:34:080:34:13

-How much did you pay? I did pay £60.

-£60.

0:34:130:34:19

-You think that will make a profit?

-I think it has a chance.

0:34:190:34:23

-You know your silver.

-What do you think about it, do you like it?

0:34:230:34:26

-Er...

-Not much?

-Yes.

-Would you pay £60 for it?

0:34:260:34:30

-No!

-Well, there you are!

0:34:300:34:31

No, I wouldn't, actually, but it is quite nice.

0:34:310:34:34

-It's lovely. We'll see how it does.

-There we are, Kate.

0:34:340:34:37

Thank you very much for that.

0:34:370:34:38

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer

0:34:380:34:41

thinks about Kate's little fruit knife.

0:34:410:34:43

There we go. Something to cut up your fruit with.

0:34:430:34:46

Little fruit knife, engine-turned, Sampson Mordan mark, 1926.

0:34:460:34:51

Good, well-engineered and crafted piece of silver.

0:34:510:34:54

-Quite appealing, and good if you had an apple.

-If you wanted to peel it.

0:34:540:34:58

I would say it's £20-£30 worth.

0:34:580:35:00

-Would you?

-It's not big money. What did they pay?

0:35:000:35:02

She's just paid £60 as her bonus buy.

0:35:020:35:05

-That's a lot of apples for £60.

-You're so right there, maestro.

0:35:050:35:09

-Does it stand any chance at all?

-No.

-Great(!)

0:35:090:35:13

On that happy note, we better shove off to the auction

0:35:130:35:16

-and find out what happens. Thanks.

-Thank you.

0:35:160:35:18

-OK, Sara, Suzanne. How are you feeling, girls?

-Nervous!

0:35:240:35:28

-It is exciting, isn't it?

-It is, but I'm a little sceptical.

0:35:280:35:33

-We'll see.

-And you? You too, Suzanne?

0:35:330:35:37

I'm afraid so. I think we didn't purchase wisely on some of them.

0:35:370:35:41

Well, you've had the double-up opportunity, the 600 notes.

0:35:410:35:44

£240 you spent on the Monart vase.

0:35:440:35:47

His estimate is £80-£100, and here it comes.

0:35:470:35:51

This Monart glass vase. Various commissions here.

0:35:510:35:55

-At 110, 120, 130 I'm bid already.

-A good start.

0:35:550:36:00

130, a commission bid. At £130 I've got. At 130. 140 internet.

0:36:000:36:06

150 commission.

0:36:060:36:07

Against the internet at £150, 160 internet bid. At 170,

0:36:070:36:12

-180.

-We're getting there.

0:36:120:36:16

-190. £190.

-Ooh, this is exciting.

-Keep it coming, guys.

0:36:160:36:20

At £200, internet bid. At 220.

0:36:200:36:25

Internet bid 240. £240.

0:36:250:36:28

You've wiped your face. This is fantastic!

0:36:280:36:30

At £240. I'm selling, then, if you're all sure in the room, at 240.

0:36:300:36:35

For goodness sake!

0:36:350:36:36

-Oh, well.

-That is so brilliant. You've wiped your face.

0:36:360:36:41

The Moroccan metal and opaque glass hall lantern showing for you.

0:36:410:36:45

Bid me £30 for it. 30 bid. Front row. At £30 it is.

0:36:450:36:50

I'll go five. £30. Front row. Any more?

0:36:500:36:54

At £30. I'm selling it at £30. All sure at 30?

0:36:540:36:58

-Boo!

-£30 is minus 60.

0:36:580:37:03

Arts and Crafts Archibald Knox-style,

0:37:030:37:06

two-division cigarette box.

0:37:060:37:08

-Interest here, so £70, £80, £90.

-OK.

0:37:080:37:11

I'm starting at 90. Various commissions at 90. At £90.

0:37:110:37:16

Come on, guys. Come on, internet.

0:37:160:37:19

Selling, then, at £90 to a commission bidder.

0:37:190:37:22

-Oh, dear.

-I can't believe it!

-£90!

0:37:220:37:25

You paid £265, you got £90 for it.

0:37:250:37:28

So that's minus 175, plus 160 is minus £235.

0:37:280:37:33

-We have the £5 bonus buy.

-What do you think?

0:37:350:37:38

It's a really, really big decision.

0:37:380:37:42

-Go on.

-I wouldn't, I'd stick. Keep the winning score!

0:37:420:37:47

I'd fancy £235 minus is not a winning score.

0:37:470:37:50

-Are you going with the bonus buy?

-We'll risk it.

-Yeah.

0:37:500:37:53

The WMF glass claret jug. We'll start nice and low at £15.

0:37:530:38:00

Where's 15? £15 for it. 15 is bid.

0:38:000:38:05

In the room at £15. At £15 I've got.

0:38:050:38:08

At 15 with the lady here at 15.

0:38:080:38:10

You all finished at £15?

0:38:100:38:13

-A profit of £10, which is great.

-Fantastic.

-Excellent.

0:38:130:38:16

-Takes you to minus £225.

-Oh, well!

0:38:160:38:18

The big thing here is don't talk to the Blues.

0:38:180:38:21

-No. We'll be looking very happy.

-Go out looking ecstatic!

0:38:210:38:24

-You look so happy anyway.

-Oh, we are.

-It was fun!

0:38:240:38:27

How do you rate your chances today?

0:38:370:38:39

We're going to do really well. Fantastic.

0:38:390:38:42

We're excited about it.

0:38:420:38:44

I think we're going to be all right, let's put it that way. Yes.

0:38:440:38:48

Your double-up, it's not necessarily much easier to make the profits on.

0:38:480:38:53

Your first item is Bingo.

0:38:530:38:56

It's not Bingo. According to the auctioneer he is Perky Pup.

0:38:560:39:00

Does that make a difference?

0:39:000:39:02

Perky Pup is its correct trade name and that's how he is catalogued.

0:39:020:39:08

Crown Devon matte glazed green Perky Pup.

0:39:080:39:11

Character dog. What about him, Perky Pup?

0:39:110:39:15

£15, who wants Perky Pup? 15 bid, front row. At 15.

0:39:150:39:20

-We all finished at £15 for the Perky Pup?

-Come on!

0:39:200:39:24

-Yes?

-£15. I can't believe that.

0:39:240:39:28

That's minus 20. Bad luck. Bad luck.

0:39:280:39:32

That is bad luck, I have to say it is bad luck.

0:39:320:39:35

Pair of George V octagonal silver salts. 25 the pair.

0:39:350:39:38

-25 to start me. Where's 25?

-Come on!

0:39:380:39:45

20 to go. 15, surely? 15. In the corner now, at 15. 18 now.

0:39:450:39:52

Against you 20. Yes, 22. 25.

0:39:520:39:55

£25 now. At 25. We're there at 25.

0:39:550:39:59

Minus £20. I can't believe that either. £25 for solid silver...

0:39:590:40:03

-It's looking precarious!

-Precarious when it comes to the chair.

0:40:030:40:07

This child's elm armchair.

0:40:070:40:09

Various commission bids here. Lots of interest. 120.

0:40:090:40:13

At £120. 130 on the phone.

0:40:130:40:15

140. At £140. 150, 160, 160 against you.

0:40:150:40:21

170, 180. At £180. 190.

0:40:210:40:24

Commission is out with you. At £190.

0:40:240:40:27

It's a telephone bid at £190. All finished at 190.

0:40:270:40:32

-Sorry, chaps.

-It did a lot better than the estimate,

0:40:320:40:35

which is minus £85. That's £105.

0:40:350:40:38

That's minus £125. Minus 125 is not too bad, I'll tell you.

0:40:380:40:44

With the state of this that and the other, minus £125 is not too bad.

0:40:440:40:48

What are you going to do about the fruit knife?

0:40:480:40:50

-What are we going to do?

-I think we go with it.

0:40:500:40:53

-We can't go much worse into the deep.

-You could do a lot worse.

0:40:530:40:58

-It's £60 at stake.

-I think we go with it, don't you?

0:40:580:41:01

£60 is quite a lot.

0:41:010:41:03

What do you think, Kate? You're looking slightly shifty.

0:41:030:41:07

-I go with the boss.

-I say we go with it.

-Are you sure?

-Yes, yes.

0:41:070:41:10

The silver fruit knife, Sampson Mordan, Sheffield.

0:41:100:41:13

1926, interest at £20. I can start at £20.

0:41:130:41:19

22, 25, at 25. 28, 30 now.

0:41:190:41:23

At 30 against you. It's a commission bid.

0:41:230:41:26

At 30. 35. £40 commission. At £40 to a commission bidder at £40.

0:41:260:41:34

-£40.

-It was worth a try.

0:41:340:41:36

I almost think we had more money for it there.

0:41:360:41:38

Minus 20 for that, you are minus £145.

0:41:380:41:41

That could be a winning score, so don't say a word to the Reds.

0:41:410:41:47

Right. Good.

0:41:470:41:50

-Well, teams, we've been chatting, have we?

-No!

0:41:590:42:02

Communicating what the scores are?

0:42:020:42:05

It's no secret that the scores are appalling.

0:42:050:42:08

This is Double-Up Day, we've doubled up our losses big-time.

0:42:080:42:12

We've got hundreds of pounds worth of losses from both teams.

0:42:120:42:17

But loved it.

0:42:170:42:18

But the team with the really whopping loss today are the Reds.

0:42:180:42:22

THEY CHEER

0:42:220:42:23

I'm sorry, girls, but minus £225 is a serious number, isn't it?

0:42:230:42:29

You did get a nice touch out of the £5 claret jug,

0:42:290:42:33

so you should walk tall.

0:42:330:42:35

But overall, I'm afraid it was not a pretty picture.

0:42:350:42:37

-Have you had a nice time?

-We've had a lovely time.

0:42:370:42:40

-We've loved having you on.

-Thank you.

0:42:400:42:42

The victors, who have managed to win by only losing £145.

0:42:420:42:47

-Hooray!

-Nothing really to cheer about there, Noel,

0:42:470:42:52

it's minus all the way through

0:42:520:42:53

but you have nevertheless won as a result,

0:42:530:42:56

and I congratulate you. Have you had a good time?

0:42:560:42:58

-We've had a fantastic time.

-We've loved having you on the show.

0:42:580:43:01

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:010:43:04

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:210:43:25

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:250:43:28

A Mr and Mrs Doubleday make up one of the bargain-hunting teams in this episode, and in their honour both the Blues and the Reds have double the shopping budget. But does a double-up day mean double trouble? Thankfully, there is only one Tim Wonnacott!


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