Corby 11 Bargain Hunt


Corby 11

Antiques challenge. Tim Wonnacott serves up the history of the knife and fork in Sheffield, while experts Charles Hanson and David Harper help out the red and blue teams.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to Corby 11. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

On your marks! Off you go.

0:00:030:00:05

Get set! Off you go.

0:00:050:00:07

Let's go bargain hunting!

0:00:090:00:11

We're at Deene Park in Corby so grab a cuppa and watch

0:00:350:00:40

as the Red team go into song and dance mode.

0:00:400:00:44

# Give me the moonlight... #

0:00:440:00:46

-A bit of this?

-Oh, yeah!

-This way!

0:00:460:00:50

I can't do this dance. It falls over my eyes!

0:00:500:00:54

David gets sentimentally attached to the Blue team.

0:00:560:01:00

-Mind if I call you Mummy and Daddy?

-No!

0:01:000:01:03

But how will it end at the auction?

0:01:030:01:06

OK, I'll just have to call you back.

0:01:140:01:17

Yeah, I'm working on Bargain Hunt.

0:01:170:01:20

The best programme on BBC Television. That's quite correct.

0:01:200:01:25

Bargain Hunt, 12.15. Most days.

0:01:250:01:27

Talk to you later. Mwah!

0:01:270:01:30

Competing on Bargain Hunt today we have two couples. For the Reds, we've got Jane and Jane

0:01:320:01:39

and for the Blues, John and May. Welcome, guys.

0:01:390:01:43

-Now, Jane, you're called BJ?

-Cos that's Little Jane and I'm Big Jane. Shortened to BJ.

0:01:430:01:50

Ah. So you're Big Jane. And what do you do for a living, Big Jane?

0:01:500:01:56

-I'm a bus driver/transport manager.

-Now tell us about the night you met.

0:01:560:02:02

We were in a pub, separately, with friends who knew each other.

0:02:020:02:06

-Yes?

-And we were playing pool, then we started singing some sad song.

0:02:060:02:11

-And that was it?

-That was it.

-How long have you been together?

-21 and a bit years.

-Really?

0:02:110:02:17

Now, Jane, you're a karaoke queen?

0:02:170:02:21

-Oh, I love karaoke.

-Do you?

-I can't sing for toffee, but I love it!

-Do you?

0:02:210:02:27

-Would you give us a tune now?

-Yeah!

-What are you going to sing us?

0:02:270:02:32

-I do like country and western, so Billie Jo Spears? Blanket On The Ground?

-I know that one.

0:02:320:02:39

# Come and look out through the window

0:02:390:02:43

-# That big old moon is shining down... #

-You like that twanging guitar!

0:02:430:02:50

# Won't it remind you

0:02:500:02:52

# Of a blanket on the ground... #

0:02:520:02:56

-I think that deserves a round of applause. For bravery!

-Stupidity, more like.

0:02:580:03:04

-So, Jane, what do you do for a living?

-I was a vehicle mechanic.

0:03:040:03:09

I've had my knees rebuilt now, so I can't do that. I'm retired. I do as little as I can!

0:03:090:03:16

How do you rate your chances today?

0:03:160:03:19

-We'll be spectacular!

-Will you?

-We'll either lose brilliantly

0:03:190:03:23

or we'll make a profit absolutely brilliantly.

0:03:230:03:27

I'm feeling some strong vibrations, so good luck, girls.

0:03:270:03:31

Now, John and May... How did you meet?

0:03:310:03:34

We met at a wine tasting at the Hong Kong Jockey Club 24 years ago.

0:03:340:03:40

-How incredibly grand is that? That is a special outing.

-Well, I was a member of the Jockey Club

0:03:400:03:47

-because I owned horses in England.

-And what were you doing in Hong Kong?

0:03:470:03:53

I was the property manager for a big shopping centre.

0:03:530:03:57

-And you went on to run a bar?

-Yes, I bought a bar and did very well out of it, actually.

0:03:570:04:03

And we both moved to the Philippines and bought a beach resort.

0:04:030:04:07

-Beach resort? Was that good fun?

-Oh, yes. Great.

0:04:070:04:11

-May, what do you do for a living?

-As of now, I'm playing housewife.

0:04:110:04:16

-What about hobbies?

-Ohh...

-You're fond of football?

-Yes, I am.

0:04:160:04:22

-I love Man U. I'm supporting Man Utd.

-Are you?

-Yes.

0:04:220:04:26

-I really love sports. I even watch rugby, cricket, you name it.

-Do you?

-Yes!

-Good for you!

0:04:260:04:34

What's your ideal strategy to beat these beastly Reds...lovely Reds?

0:04:340:04:39

-Buy well on things that will make a profit.

-Spend less.

-Spend less.

0:04:390:04:44

And make the most profit.

0:04:440:04:47

-Ah! Are you quaking in your boots?

-Absolutely...not.

-You look like it!

0:04:470:04:53

Not much of a quake going on there! Now the money moment - £300 apiece.

0:04:530:04:58

You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go and very, very good luck.

0:04:580:05:04

So who are our experts?

0:05:050:05:08

Charles Hanson will be advising the Reds.

0:05:090:05:13

And David Harper is assisting the Blues.

0:05:130:05:17

With 60 minutes on the clock, it's time to go shopping!

0:05:170:05:22

Three, two, one, go! Let's go.

0:05:230:05:26

-BJ and Jane.

-Yes.

-We have £300.

-Excellent!

0:05:260:05:31

The sun is shining on us. I hope that's a good sign.

0:05:310:05:34

-Let's just find something to buy.

-What do you want to do?

0:05:340:05:38

-Let's hot foot!

-Hot foot?!

0:05:380:05:41

We're open to offers, ladies. There are all sorts of figurines.

0:05:490:05:54

-Pussycats.

-It's quite cute, isn't it?

0:05:540:05:58

-It is cute and it's a cat.

-And it's by Border Fine Arts.

0:05:580:06:02

-Who were they?

-They're quite renowned. On a par to Beswick.

0:06:020:06:07

-Oh, right.

-This is quite cute. I like it.

0:06:070:06:11

I can't say I'd ever buy it, but it's quite quirky.

0:06:110:06:15

-I'm not a cat lover, but there are lots of cast lovers about.

-It's really wacky.

0:06:150:06:21

-It is.

-Yeah, it's quite cute. I like all this.

0:06:210:06:25

It's like an advertising thing with this wonderful chrome tray which it simulates...

0:06:250:06:31

-That's actually quite heavy.

-It is heavy, isn't it?

0:06:310:06:35

-Do you think it would sell?

-Made in China in 2003!

-Probably not!

0:06:350:06:40

I think it would, but it's priced at £10. We might buy it for £5.

0:06:400:06:45

-Are you really in business to make £5?

-No!

-No!

-We want big hits.

0:06:450:06:51

-But it was nice.

-It was nice.

-I think we'll say, "Thanks for the memories and walk on."

0:06:510:06:58

Very wise, Carlos. That cat was hideous!

0:06:580:07:02

"I agree! I agree!"

0:07:020:07:04

-The little sapphire's nice.

-Is that nine-carat?

-Nine-carat.

0:07:070:07:12

-Nine-carat gold. What kind of stone is it?

-That's a sapphire.

-It's quite fun.

0:07:120:07:18

-Jewellery always does reasonably well.

-What's your very bottom price?

0:07:180:07:23

I can do 20 on that.

0:07:230:07:25

-20. Will that make a profit?

-Well, let's have a look at it.

0:07:250:07:30

Hey, you!

0:07:310:07:33

She's a real barterer, this one! To be honest, I think that's for nothing at 20 quid.

0:07:330:07:40

Go on the high street and try to buy that. You've been very lovely, but it's their decision.

0:07:400:07:45

-We'll have it.

-Thank you very much. Wonderful.

0:07:450:07:49

The Blues aren't hanging around. A gold brooch for £20. Deal done.

0:07:490:07:55

Well done, you two. Just under eight minutes. I love it.

0:07:560:08:01

Right, this way.

0:08:010:08:03

Let's go this way.

0:08:030:08:05

-Walking canes, always sought after.

-You're right.

-The Carlton Club.

0:08:080:08:13

-A gentleman's club in London?

-Yes, look at that!

-You just need the straw hat now.

0:08:130:08:19

-That'll be it.

-The boater!

0:08:190:08:22

-Is that a hallmark?

-Yeah, what we've got here...

-So it's a silver trim?

-Absolutely.

0:08:220:08:27

Silver-collared, Carlton Club cane. Or dandy stick.

0:08:270:08:33

And the hallmark on here is a London and... Do you have a date code for this cane at all?

0:08:330:08:39

-Yeah, it's around 18...

-'85?

-..95.

-1895.

0:08:390:08:45

-Wow, that's old.

-And the wood?

0:08:450:08:48

The timber seems to be lignum vitae. It's wonderful.

0:08:480:08:53

It's a really good cane because of this Carlton Club connection.

0:08:530:08:57

-In my ignorance, I've heard about it, but tell me about it...

-We've never heard of it!

0:08:570:09:03

-Carlton Club? Gentleman's club?

-I think it's the oldest gentleman's club in London.

0:09:030:09:09

And just the feel of it...

0:09:090:09:11

As a cane, it's just beyond expectations.

0:09:110:09:16

That, to me, is a true sign of a gentleman's cane.

0:09:160:09:21

-Canes are highly sought after. What's it worth?

-That's the question.

-I'm asking 185 for it.

0:09:210:09:27

Is that your very best price?

0:09:280:09:31

-We're on Bargain Hunt!

-145 would be my best.

0:09:310:09:34

-It's a gamble, but I rate it...

-Let's gamble!

-Let's go for it.

0:09:340:09:39

-Come on, let's go for it. We'll take that, young man.

-I like it.

-Deal done.

0:09:390:09:45

That's purchase number one, but I think it's gone to Little Jane's head.

0:09:450:09:50

# Give me the moonlight Give me the girl... #

0:09:500:09:54

That's enough!

0:09:540:09:57

This isn't The X Factor!

0:09:570:10:00

-Can you see those in your living room?

-Yes!

0:10:010:10:05

-Hardly!

-I've got a pair of those in my living room!

0:10:050:10:09

-You must have a big room.

-Brilliant.

-What do you think of the shorts?

0:10:090:10:14

My Lord!

0:10:140:10:16

-That suits you.

-Yeah?

-Where's that cane gone?

0:10:180:10:22

-My head's a bit big, but with the cane, a bit of this...

-Oh, yeah!

0:10:240:10:28

-I can't do this dance. It just falls over my eyes!

-Come on.

0:10:280:10:34

-May, what do you think about bears?

-Very nice.

0:10:340:10:38

-How old, do you think?

-He's probably late-19th century.

0:10:380:10:42

It's German or Austrian.

0:10:420:10:45

Black Forest. It's got a nice carved mouth, nicely painted.

0:10:450:10:50

-What do you think, Daddy?

-Do you call him Daddy?

0:10:500:10:55

-Yeah.

-Mummy and Daddy.

-Oh, that's very sweet.

0:10:550:10:58

Can I call you Mummy and Daddy? ..Michael, what's trade on the Black Forest?

0:10:580:11:04

Trade? Er...100.

0:11:040:11:07

-Really?

-It's got everything going for it.

-He has. Apart from the price.

0:11:070:11:12

Absolute death - 80. That really is it.

0:11:130:11:18

OK. What is the absolute double-death trade?

0:11:180:11:22

70. That is it.

0:11:230:11:25

-I don't know if it will make money in auction, but 70 quid.

-It's got everything going for it.

0:11:250:11:32

I know! This is the problem!

0:11:320:11:35

-Put it on the maybe list.

-'I like that.'

0:11:350:11:38

-What?

-That.

0:11:380:11:41

-The Poole?

-Oh, that's lovely!

-Well striking!

-Isn't that magnificent?

0:11:410:11:46

-Gorgeous.

-That defines Poole, with the dolphin mark. Is it expensive, madam?

0:11:460:11:52

Yes, it's 195.

0:11:520:11:54

Fantastic, isn't it? 195. And the best price between friends?

0:11:540:11:59

-125.

-125! That's a good discount.

-It is.

-Boxed with certificate.

-Wow!

0:11:590:12:06

-125. Food for thought, isn't it?

-It is.

-'Hideous! But better than that horrid cat!'

0:12:060:12:14

Here's a fun little thing. On the face of it, a nicely turned fruit wood box.

0:12:190:12:25

The cover only just fits. And if I take it off gently... it reveals a set of these fellows.

0:12:250:12:32

But what are they? Running round the outside are the numbers 1 to 16

0:12:320:12:38

and there are 16 of them in this set. It's a drill.

0:12:380:12:42

You might think this is something to do with dentistry. You could use it, but you'd be in acute pain.

0:12:420:12:50

In the middle we've got a belt-driven device.

0:12:500:12:54

What you do is take one of these drills, insert it into that chuck

0:12:540:12:59

and it would then whizz around at high speed. What this thing was made for is a watchmaker.

0:12:590:13:05

The watchmaker who so skilfully starts off his morning

0:13:050:13:10

with a plate of solid brass,

0:13:100:13:13

that he has to drill through numerous holes of different sizes for his pinions and his arbors,

0:13:130:13:21

would use a little set like this.

0:13:210:13:23

Whether you're a watchmaker or not, you have to admire the quality of this little set

0:13:230:13:29

and one of the things that I admire most about it is the price -

0:13:290:13:34

because it could be yours for £20.

0:13:340:13:38

Gosh. Is that all?

0:13:390:13:42

The gent's got some silver in his bag, just coming out now.

0:13:470:13:51

-Let's have a look.

-It hasn't been seen...

-By anybody!

0:13:510:13:56

-Other than me.

-Other than you.

0:13:560:13:58

Here we go.

0:13:580:14:00

-We've got 28 minutes and counting.

-Have you?

-But we like fresh to the market material.

0:14:010:14:08

-Jane, can you pass me that one?

-That's beautiful.

0:14:080:14:12

-The best I can do on it, trade-wise, is 180.

-Yeah.

0:14:120:14:17

-And the nice little thermometer?

-That's 1910.

0:14:170:14:21

-Do you like anything?

-What I like best from this great bag of delights would be...

0:14:210:14:27

-The thermometer.

-Absolutely.

-It's got that Art Nouveau look.

0:14:270:14:31

The hallmark is Birmingham, around 1908, 1910.

0:14:310:14:35

Lovely Art Nouveau form. It's a bit rubbed, but on its original oak back.

0:14:350:14:41

-Best price on that?

-£60.

-Between friends?

0:14:410:14:46

-Between friends and enemies, it's got to be £60!

-I would guide that at £50-£80.

0:14:460:14:52

-Would you do 55?

-No, I would like to, but I can't.

0:14:520:14:56

-If we bought that one with it... How much is that on its own?

-I'll do the two for £100.

0:14:560:15:03

-You wouldn't do the two for...

-90?

0:15:050:15:08

-Blind 80?

-No, I can't do a blind 80.

0:15:080:15:11

What about two fat ladies? No, you can't twist my arm!

0:15:110:15:15

-That was good, though!

-You've got a bargain on the first one and the other one's nice.

0:15:150:15:22

I'll tell you what... 95 and that's the death.

0:15:220:15:27

-What do you reckon, Charles?

-That would serve us...?

0:15:270:15:31

Once, twice, three times...

0:15:310:15:34

-I want it.

-Yes! Shall we go for it?

-Hold on.

0:15:340:15:38

-Blind 90.

-Come on, Charlie.

0:15:380:15:41

Come on! We'll give you a cuddle.

0:15:410:15:44

We can always walk away.

0:15:440:15:47

You can walk away. I did say 95.

0:15:470:15:50

Go on, then. We'll have a deal at 95.

0:15:500:15:54

For that you can have a kiss as well.

0:15:540:15:58

'Oh, lucky man!

0:15:580:16:00

'But at £90 will they be too hot for the auction?'

0:16:000:16:05

-You do like boxes, May.

-Yeah, I love it. It's really nice.

0:16:100:16:14

Colman's Mustard. That was full of mustard?

0:16:140:16:19

-It's on the label inside.

-Let's have a look.

0:16:190:16:23

-Colman's Mustard. That's a lovely tin, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:16:230:16:28

Obviously made in massive quantities, but not very many have survived.

0:16:280:16:34

-How old?

-What do we think? 1930s? '40s?

0:16:340:16:38

-Perhaps '30? '35?

-It's got to be, hasn't it?

0:16:380:16:42

-What have you got on that tray?

-30.

-£30.

0:16:420:16:46

-Go on, what's trade?

-Best price, please.

-25?

0:16:460:16:51

-I'm from the Philippines. A little bit more, please!

-20?

0:16:510:16:56

-22?

-20, please.

-Split the difference. 21.

0:16:560:17:00

-OK!

-Looks like they've done the deal without me even saying a word!

0:17:000:17:05

-They're good negotiators.

-I'd have got it for a fiver!

0:17:050:17:10

Wouldn't I?

0:17:100:17:12

-Well, it looks like they've done the deal. What have you agreed on?

-Yes, £21.

-Thank you very much.

0:17:130:17:19

'But for £21, will it do good business?'

0:17:190:17:24

-We've spent how much so far?

-Two hundred and...

-35.

0:17:270:17:31

With two items. We've got 12 minutes left to find an item...

0:17:310:17:36

-And leave you some money?

-..for less than £65 and leave me some lolly as well.

0:17:360:17:42

There was the cat and the little thing next to it! If we bought the two together...

0:17:420:17:49

-Come on, it's your day. What's it going to be?

-Let's do a silly thing and get the cat!

0:17:490:17:55

-The cat and the little thing.

-Let's get the cat.

0:17:550:17:59

'Have you lost your marbles, Carlos?! The cats?!

0:17:590:18:03

'No-o-o!'

0:18:030:18:05

This is beautiful inside. I've got to show you inside.

0:18:090:18:13

Imagine this when it was new.

0:18:130:18:16

Oh, that's nice.

0:18:160:18:18

-Isn't that lovely?

-Gorgeous.

-How old is it?

-It's Victorian.

0:18:180:18:23

-1880?

-Yeah, I'd say about that.

-And all these pictures,

0:18:230:18:28

they've been cut out of magazines or children's books and then pasted within the box.

0:18:280:18:34

They would sit there in the evenings and cut these tiny pieces out and then glue them on.

0:18:340:18:40

-That's before people watched Bargain Hunt on TV.

-Long before then! Long before!

0:18:400:18:46

-Do you know what you call that treatment?

-No.

-Decoupage.

0:18:460:18:50

It's amazing that it's survived. A lot of them didn't survive.

0:18:500:18:56

-Absolutely drop-dead gorgeous.

-We haven't got the patience now!

0:18:560:19:00

-What would trade be on that?

-Em...

0:19:000:19:04

I was looking for 60 for it.

0:19:040:19:06

Oh...I'd do it for 55 as it's you guys, but I think at 55 that would make a good profit.

0:19:060:19:13

-I really do.

-What do you think?

-I think it's got a chance. I actually think it's earlier.

0:19:130:19:20

-Can you do 40?

-I couldn't go that low, honestly.

0:19:200:19:24

55 would be... Down the middle - 50?

0:19:240:19:28

-You could... You've got to!

-Beam me up again! All right, £50.

0:19:300:19:34

-If you'd like it for 50, then 50.

-There's nothing wrong with that.

0:19:340:19:39

-You think we'll make a profit?

-I think you've got every chance.

0:19:390:19:44

I'm being very nice because I want the Blues to win!

0:19:440:19:48

Oh, we need people on our side!

0:19:490:19:52

-Shake hands on it, then?

-Thank you very much.

-You will make a profit on it.

-Thanks.

0:19:520:19:59

'Can we have that in writing, please? Anyway, that concludes the Blues' shopping.

0:19:590:20:05

'Meanwhile, the Reds are hunting down that blasted cat.'

0:20:050:20:09

There! We're back! We've come back to see you!

0:20:090:20:14

We liked it the first time.

0:20:140:20:17

-Did you see the other one, Charles?

-I could do with some hair gel!

-A bad hair day.

0:20:170:20:23

-Tell me, madam, are these true Border Fine Arts?

-Yes.

0:20:230:20:28

-But made in the Far East. Does it say Made in China?

-It does.

0:20:280:20:33

-Not very old. They are quirky, they are novel and you're open to offers?

-We are!

0:20:330:20:38

-It says on it £10 and there's £10 on there.

-Steady!

0:20:380:20:43

How would you take £10 for the pair?

0:20:430:20:46

I'd take 12.

0:20:460:20:48

-I think that's fair.

-£12, Charles?

0:20:490:20:52

-Ladies, it's your game.

-£12 is quite good.

0:20:520:20:57

I like them. They're quirky and they're nice.

0:20:570:21:00

-Are we going? Going...gone. Sold. £12.

-That was really easy, that.

0:21:000:21:06

'Take it from me. It won't be easy to make a profit with that pair.

0:21:060:21:11

'There you go.'

0:21:120:21:15

OK, teams. Your time is up. Stop the shopping!

0:21:150:21:19

First, let's recap on what the Reds have bought.

0:21:210:21:25

Will the cane kick up a song and dance at the auction?

0:21:250:21:30

Will the pair of thermometers stand any chance of raising the temperature in the saleroom?

0:21:320:21:39

Can the cats find a new home? Maybe Charles knows something I don't! Mmm. Miaow!

0:21:410:21:47

-Those cats... I can't remember. £12?

-£12.

-£12 for the pair.

0:21:500:21:55

Let's not get catty about this. Don't talk about great pairs. Were you talking about your team?

0:21:550:22:01

-He's a shocker, that boy! Girls, did you have a good time?

-Excellent.

-Oh, yes.

0:22:010:22:07

Very good. Double J, that's what I like to see.

0:22:070:22:11

-Which is your favourite, Jane?

-Really quirky. The silly cats.

0:22:110:22:16

-That's your favourite piece.

-The cane. We bought a lovely cane.

0:22:160:22:20

-How much did you spend overall?

-£247.

-247 you spent.

0:22:200:22:24

-I would like £53 of leftover lolly.

-I think we might manage that.

-£53 leftover lolly.

0:22:240:22:30

-I won't count it. £53, Charles. Straight into the pocket.

-For safekeeping.

-That's it.

0:22:300:22:36

Have you got any idea what you're up to at this moment?

0:22:360:22:41

-Well, Tim, no, not really.

-Good(!)

-My team were no plain Janes,

0:22:410:22:45

-so it'll be big and ornamental, big and decorative, and we'll spend the cash.

-Probably blow the lot?

0:22:450:22:52

-Absolutely.

-Excellent!

-Remember, we've got to make a profit.

0:22:520:22:56

And you don't have to take what he finds. We'll explore that later.

0:22:560:23:01

Right now, let's have a bird's eye at what the Blue team bought.

0:23:010:23:05

I think they should have it.

0:23:050:23:08

The Blues wasted no time with their first purchase of a nine-carat gold brooch.

0:23:080:23:14

Will our bidders be as keen as mustard when this Colman's tin heads under the hammer?

0:23:140:23:21

And will the stallholder have helped or hindered our team with this decorated Victorian box?

0:23:220:23:28

-Somebody told me you spent all the money. Is that right?

-No!

-No!

0:23:350:23:40

-A little bit.

-How much did you spend, May?

-£91.

0:23:400:23:44

-On one object, yeah?

-No, three.

0:23:440:23:47

-Three objects?!

-Yes.

-Strewth!

0:23:470:23:50

I'm from the Philippines. We have to be very tight with expenses.

0:23:500:23:55

-We need a profit, you see.

-I must go over there for a look around.

0:23:550:23:59

-OK, which is your favourite piece, May?

-Oh, it's the box

0:23:590:24:04

that is...100 hundred years old? Is it, David?

0:24:040:24:08

-The decoupage.

-The decoupage.

-The decoupage box. And you, John?

0:24:080:24:13

-I think the same.

-You know what side your bread's buttered!

0:24:130:24:17

Now, £91. I want £209. I can't believe I'm going to take £209 back.

0:24:170:24:25

-You are a phenomenal couple.

-Thank you.

0:24:250:24:29

-You don't like giving it back!

-No.

-No!

0:24:290:24:31

Very slowly. Right, here we go, boy. There's £209.

0:24:310:24:36

-Have I ever given you so much leftover lolly, David?

-Never.

0:24:360:24:40

-That's exactly the way I feel.

-We've made history!

-You're going to go and buy half the fair!

0:24:400:24:46

-I don't like the pressure, Tim.

-I hope you'll blow the lot.

-I'll try.

-Well done, David.

0:24:460:24:52

Good luck with that. And well done, team. And we're going to shove off to Sheffield. Lovely.

0:24:520:24:59

-And here we are in the Museum of Sheffield Millennium Galleries Restaurant.

-There you go, sir.

0:25:070:25:15

-Fish and chips.

-Look at that. How lovely.

0:25:150:25:18

But I've got no cutlery!

0:25:180:25:21

I'll have to eat it with my bare hands.

0:25:210:25:24

Well, I'm going to take you upstairs instead and have a look at some of the museum's exhibits.

0:25:240:25:31

I've picked out some of my favourites from the collection.

0:25:310:25:35

They do have a wonderful selection of cutlery through the centuries.

0:25:370:25:43

The earliest piece is probably this.

0:25:430:25:47

It dates from the Roman period. It's 2,000 years old.

0:25:470:25:51

Can you believe that? Almost contemporary in its look.

0:25:510:25:55

It looks clean and modern with this ring terminal to hang it from a leather thong on your belt.

0:25:550:26:02

This piece is particularly precious to Sheffield because it was dug up in Sheffield Castle.

0:26:040:26:10

It dates from the 14th century and you've got, apart from the rather corroded blade,

0:26:100:26:15

this extraordinary, rather petrified looking bone handle.

0:26:150:26:20

Next door we've got a fork which comes from Italy

0:26:200:26:24

and dates from the 16th century.

0:26:240:26:27

It's interesting, the use and development of forks in Britain.

0:26:270:26:31

They simply weren't used in the earlier periods.

0:26:310:26:36

By this time, the 16th century, foreigners were bringing these two-tine forks in,

0:26:360:26:42

and they were mocked because they were thought to be rather affected, using a fork to prong their food.

0:26:420:26:49

Gradually, they came into general use.

0:26:490:26:53

The set next door is absolutely enchanting. Again, 16th century,

0:26:530:26:58

but with this sheath made of filigree silver

0:26:580:27:03

with this gorgeous, busy, interlaced, rather organic flowers and rosettes.

0:27:030:27:09

It contains a knife, fork and spoon set

0:27:090:27:13

because if you were travelling in the 17th century, you took your cutlery with you

0:27:130:27:19

because your host didn't necessarily provide it.

0:27:190:27:23

Things became pretty fancy as the years went by.

0:27:230:27:27

Look at the ivory terminals from the end of the 17th century.

0:27:270:27:31

It's difficult to tell the difference between men and girls

0:27:310:27:35

because the men wear these incredibly elaborate Farrah Fawcett Major-type wigs!

0:27:350:27:42

Just look at that curlicue! Marvellous, isn't it?

0:27:420:27:46

Perhaps the most exotic cutlery devices of all, though,

0:27:470:27:51

are these porcelain ends.

0:27:510:27:54

These date from the beginning of the 18th century. They're called pistol grips because the shaped end

0:27:540:28:00

resembles a pistol. And, of course, they're exotic because they're made of precious porcelain,

0:28:000:28:06

painted and decorated with sprays of flowers.

0:28:060:28:10

The big question is today, of course, will our teams be capable of carving out a nice little profit

0:28:100:28:16

over at the auction?

0:28:160:28:18

Meanwhile, Charles and David have had time to find their bonus buys.

0:28:210:28:26

Let's see what our auctioneer makes of this week's bargains.

0:28:260:28:30

It's a treat to be in Nottingham at Mellors and Kirk Auction House with Nigel Kirk,

0:28:300:28:36

-proprietor and auctioneer.

-Good morning, Tim.

-Lovely to be back.

0:28:360:28:40

Jane and Jane bought this very nice cane.

0:28:400:28:44

That's intriguing, isn't it?

0:28:440:28:46

It's a lovely thing, isn't it? It's made of palisander wood and it has a silver ferrel,

0:28:460:28:52

engraved with the initial H an the words "Carlton Club".

0:28:520:28:57

So clearly it belonged to a member of the club whose initial was H.

0:28:570:29:02

Superb quality and made by Briggs, who were the leading London stick mounters of the period.

0:29:020:29:08

Around 1910 or so.

0:29:080:29:10

-What would your estimate be on that?

-I think it'll make £100-£200.

0:29:100:29:14

-The team paid £145.

-Very fair.

-They had £300 to spend so put their necks on the line

0:29:140:29:20

-to go with that and I rather admire them for it.

-Yes, indeed.

0:29:200:29:25

The second item, two wacky strut thermometers.

0:29:250:29:29

Completely different periods and slightly odd to have together.

0:29:290:29:33

They are. Very small amount of silver in them. In reasonable condition,

0:29:330:29:39

-but they're not particularly sought.

-What sort of temperature?

-I think possibly up to £60 or £80.

0:29:390:29:45

-Well, they paid 90.

-Oh, dear.

-Yeah. So that could be slightly on the rich side.

0:29:450:29:51

Their last item, however, their taste completely left them

0:29:510:29:55

and we go with these Made in China pussycats,

0:29:550:29:59

-which don't grab me much.

-I think they've taken leave of their senses. They won't get a bid for them!

0:29:590:30:06

-It could be as bad as that?

-I think if we get any bid at all, it could be a very nominal one, but take it.

0:30:060:30:13

Yes, I quite agree! We don't want them back. They paid £12.

0:30:130:30:18

I'm embarrassed, really, to see them come through your sale room.

0:30:180:30:22

-This is not the stuff you normally sell.

-Well, we're not a snooty firm,

0:30:220:30:27

-but although I'm hopefully a competent auctioneer, I'm not a magician!

-Quite.

0:30:270:30:32

The cats aren't going to help them to make great profits, but the bonus buy might. Let's have a look at it.

0:30:320:30:39

Right then, JJ, Jane and Jane, £53 you gave Charles Hanson for his bonus buy.

0:30:390:30:46

-What did you find, Charles?

-Look at that!

0:30:460:30:49

-That's horrible!

-For my cuddly team, a cuddly bear for you.

-Well...

0:30:490:30:55

It's wood. It's a Bavarian Black Forest bear. I believe he's early 20th century.

0:30:550:31:01

And we can see we've got some pens and quills here.

0:31:010:31:05

He's a decorative pen rest of sorts and he cost £53.

0:31:050:31:10

Well...you were robbed.

0:31:100:31:12

There's some woodworm here as well, but Bavarian bears were all the rage about 10 years ago.

0:31:120:31:19

-10 years ago.

-Well, he's cute.

0:31:190:31:22

You don't need to decide right now. Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Charles's bear.

0:31:220:31:29

-Nigel, another amazing dancing bear.

-All things ursine attract interest in the sale room.

0:31:300:31:36

There was a huge vogue for these. They were produced in enormous numbers and a variety of sizes

0:31:360:31:43

in Switzerland at the end of the last century, right up until today. Usually walnut or lime wood.

0:31:430:31:49

And this little bear probably was intended to originally hold a glass vase.

0:31:490:31:55

Rather than pens. They don't look comfortable.

0:31:550:31:58

-But it's pretty average.

-It's a very ordinary one, yes.

-How much?

0:31:580:32:03

I think probably £20-£40. Something in that range.

0:32:030:32:08

Charles paid £53, but then he's very optimistic. That's it for the Reds.

0:32:080:32:14

Now the Blues have a nine-carat gold brooch, which I think is brand spankers.

0:32:140:32:19

It's quite modern. Probably 1975, 1980.

0:32:190:32:24

-Not worth a great deal.

-£15.

-OK, fine. £20 paid. They'll get their money back by a squeak.

0:32:240:32:30

-Next, the Colman's Mustard tin.

-Yes.

-I cannot understand why Colman's produced mustard in a dirty big tin!

0:32:300:32:37

-You're being a little harsh...

-It's a lifetime's supply!

-Yes, this example is in poor condition,

0:32:370:32:44

but this would have been a fabulously colourful object.

0:32:440:32:48

It has a rather nice three-dimensional effect. The panels are moulded in relief.

0:32:480:32:54

Probably £20-£30 because of the condition.

0:32:540:32:59

They paid £21. They might make a small profit. The last item is this rather tatty-looking box.

0:32:590:33:05

-Tell us about that.

-Well, this is a 19th-century English box, decorated with colour paper scraps,

0:33:050:33:13

which have been pasted on every side and, indeed, on the interior.

0:33:130:33:18

It's an example of decoupage.

0:33:180:33:20

-Of course, the interior decoration is much better preserved.

-That's what it would have looked like outside.

0:33:200:33:27

But I'm afraid this has seen better days. I think it will make perhaps £20-£40.

0:33:270:33:34

-OK. £50 was paid. I don't see them making a profit on that.

-No.

0:33:340:33:40

But they were excessively mean. They only spent £91 of their £300, so they're not after big profits.

0:33:400:33:47

They're hoping to get away with a wiped face. And they're going to need their bonus buy.

0:33:470:33:53

Now, John and May, you were completely parsimonious. You only spent £91. Paltry!

0:33:530:34:00

Wisely!

0:34:000:34:02

And probably wisely, John, right.

0:34:020:34:05

David Harper had £209 and the rumour is he blew the lot.

0:34:050:34:09

-David, let's see. Is the rumour true?

-Soon find out.

0:34:090:34:12

Oh, look at that.

0:34:120:34:14

It is silver, early 20th century. Very Art Nouveau in its style.

0:34:140:34:19

-Very nice. Can I take it back home instead?

-That's the reaction we want. Hope the bidders feel that.

0:34:190:34:27

-Hallmarked on the base. What does that tell you?

-It doesn't look like an English one.

-Exactly.

0:34:270:34:33

That is the downside.

0:34:330:34:36

The English hallmark is the one we'd ideally look for.

0:34:360:34:40

We'd be able to date it bang on to the year, the maker, where it was assayed,

0:34:400:34:46

and the silver would be a higher grade. But it still has good value, its weight and its desirability.

0:34:460:34:53

It's incredibly saleable. Did I spend all the money?

0:34:530:34:58

I hope not!

0:34:580:35:00

Ask John for a valuation!

0:35:010:35:03

Well...£85.

0:35:030:35:06

Well, you've bought it. Well done.

0:35:060:35:08

That'll be nice. If it sells at £85 I'll be absolutely delighted. I paid £42 for it.

0:35:080:35:15

-Is that all?

-A lot of haggling!

0:35:150:35:17

-That is good.

-If that doesn't make profit, it'll be a very sad day.

0:35:170:35:21

Everybody's legs are crossed, David. Not long to wait until we find out

0:35:210:35:27

if he makes a mega-profit.

0:35:270:35:29

For the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's bowl.

0:35:290:35:35

-There. Something for your nuts.

-Thank you, Tim. Very thoughtful.

0:35:350:35:41

This is a German silver bowl. Spun silver, dating from about 1920.

0:35:410:35:46

Very typical of that period with this embossed border of fruit.

0:35:460:35:50

The whole feeling is lightweight and rather tinny. Mass-produced.

0:35:500:35:55

-Mm, how much?

-About £40.

-He paid £42.

-Very fair.

-So he's spot on, isn't he?

0:35:550:36:01

-Right, then. That's it. Feeling strong?

-Very.

-You'll need all your strength!

0:36:010:36:07

£20 I am bid for this lot. 25, do I see? I do.

0:36:070:36:11

30, is it? At £25.

0:36:110:36:14

'The auction is underway. Time to let the Reds know what Nigel thought about their feline friends.'

0:36:140:36:22

-The Border Fine Arts cats he thought were repulsive.

-Oh, dear.

0:36:220:36:26

He didn't like them at all. He said you'll be lucky to get a bid.

0:36:260:36:31

It could be sticky. It's the right place for the first two lots, but not the cats. You only paid £12.

0:36:310:36:37

-That's basically £6 per pussy.

-Correct.

-Which is not much.

0:36:370:36:41

First up is the cane from the Carlton Club.

0:36:410:36:45

Lot 117 is a Victorian silver-mounted lignum vitae walking cane by Brigg.

0:36:450:36:51

£30 I am bid for this cane. 30. 40.

0:36:510:36:54

50. 60. 70. 80.

0:36:540:36:57

90. 100. 110? 110.

0:36:570:36:59

120? At £110. All done at 110.

0:36:590:37:04

110.

0:37:040:37:06

It's just 35 off.

0:37:070:37:09

-Now the thermometer.

-Lot 118 is the Art Nouveau silver desk thermometer

0:37:090:37:15

and a similar smaller thermometer. £20 I am bid. 25. 30?

0:37:150:37:20

30. 35. 40. 45. 50. Lady's bid here at 50.

0:37:200:37:25

55. 60.

0:37:250:37:27

65. 70. 75. 80.

0:37:270:37:30

85? 90. 95? 95 to anybody?

0:37:300:37:35

95. 100. And 10.

0:37:350:37:38

120? 120.

0:37:380:37:40

-130? 120, then. I'll sell at 120.

-Yes!

0:37:400:37:44

That is plus £30, which means overall you're only minus £5.

0:37:440:37:48

-How exciting.

-Back in business!

-Now the pussycats.

0:37:480:37:53

Lot 119. Two Border Fine Arts cat ornaments. £10 for them?

0:37:530:37:58

£5?

0:37:580:38:00

£5 I am bid.

0:38:010:38:03

£5. 10 do I see anywhere?

0:38:030:38:05

At £5.

0:38:050:38:07

£5. Just £5, unfortunately. That's minus £7.

0:38:070:38:11

Overall, you're minus £12.

0:38:110:38:13

-£12 down the old proverbial. What about the Bavarian bear?

-Go for it.

0:38:130:38:19

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-We're going for it. Right, they're determined. We're going with the bear.

0:38:190:38:26

His estimate, I have to tell you, is £20-£40.

0:38:260:38:30

-You paid £53.

-Are you going for it?

-No, no, you made your decision! It is an irrevocable decision.

0:38:300:38:36

And I'm the umpire. You are going with it. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Off we go.

0:38:360:38:42

Lot 124 is a Swiss carved lime wood bear novelty stand.

0:38:420:38:47

-Come on, please.

-£20 for this?

0:38:470:38:50

20 I am bid. 25 anywhere?

0:38:500:38:53

25. 30. 35?

0:38:530:38:57

-£30 it is.

-Please, one more...

0:38:570:38:59

At £30. All done?

0:38:590:39:02

£30 is minus £23.

0:39:020:39:06

23...33...35. Minus 35 is the overall...

0:39:060:39:11

It could be a whole lot worse, as we don't half know on here!

0:39:110:39:16

-Yes!

-So keep smiling, girls. Could be a winning score. Don't say a word to the Blues.

0:39:160:39:22

Thank you very much.

0:39:220:39:25

-Do you know how the Reds got on?

-No.

-No.

0:39:310:39:35

Good. We don't want you to know. You've been very hard negotiators and hardly spent a penny.

0:39:350:39:41

-You spent £91. Is that the right strategy or not?

-Well, we hope so.

-We hope so.

0:39:410:39:47

First up is the gold brooch. Here it comes.

0:39:470:39:50

Lot 140. Nine-carat gold open work brooch.

0:39:500:39:55

£20 for this lot? 20? £10?

0:39:550:39:58

10 I am bid. 15 for it? 15?

0:39:580:40:01

At £10.

0:40:010:40:03

£10. That was quick.

0:40:030:40:05

Minus 10. Unbelievable.

0:40:050:40:08

Lot 141 is the J&J Colman Ltd lithograph tin-plate mustard tin.

0:40:080:40:15

Early 20th century. £20 for it?

0:40:150:40:17

£20? 20? £10? 10 only. Bid at 10.

0:40:170:40:22

15 for it? Maiden bid of £10 only.

0:40:220:40:25

£10 on that. That's minus £11. Not looking so good.

0:40:270:40:31

Lot 142 is a 19th-century black-painted box with decoupage decoration.

0:40:310:40:37

£20 for this? 20 I am bid.

0:40:370:40:39

25 anywhere? At £20 only.

0:40:390:40:43

All done. £20. Maiden bid on commission. No further bids?

0:40:430:40:48

£20 it is. That is minus £30.

0:40:480:40:51

That's minus, minus, minus. 30, 42, 51.

0:40:510:40:55

Minus 51. The strategy was to spend little and you've managed to lose £51 of the £91.

0:40:550:41:02

-Do we get a prize for that?

-No!

0:41:020:41:04

What are we going to do about the continental silver bowl?

0:41:040:41:08

-Go with it or not?

-Yes, why not? We love it.

-You love it. OK.

0:41:080:41:13

-That's a decision made.

-Go for it!

0:41:130:41:17

His estimate is around £40. You paid £42. We think it'll do a bit better.

0:41:170:41:23

Anyway, the decision is made.

0:41:230:41:25

Lot 147 is the German silver fruit bowl. Early 20th century.

0:41:250:41:30

£20 for this? 20 I am bid. 25 I'll take. 25 now.

0:41:300:41:35

30? 30. 35? 35. 40.

0:41:350:41:38

-45. 50.

-Yes!

-55.

0:41:380:41:41

60. 65. 70?

0:41:410:41:44

No. £65 and selling.

0:41:440:41:47

That's what we like to see. Well done, David. £65.

0:41:470:41:52

So that is plus £23.

0:41:520:41:55

£23 up. Well done, David.

0:41:550:41:57

That means overall you are minus £28, which is not so bad.

0:41:570:42:02

That could be a winning score. All will be revealed so don't chat to the Reds.

0:42:020:42:07

-So, teams, been comparing notes as to profits?

-No idea.

0:42:160:42:20

Well, it should come as no surprise that both teams made losses.

0:42:200:42:24

It's just the scale of the losses.

0:42:240:42:27

And the team that have made marginally more losses are...the Reds.

0:42:270:42:33

-Oh!

-Oh!

0:42:330:42:36

-I mean, there's only seven quid between you.

-Oh, no!

0:42:360:42:41

And despite the fact that Jane went with her thermometers and made a £30 profit on an item,

0:42:420:42:49

-you are, nevertheless, finishing up at minus £35.

-Oh, well.

-Minus £35.

0:42:490:42:54

-But I hope you've had a nice time.

-Lovely, brilliant.

0:42:540:42:58

But the victors today, by only losing £28, are the Blues,

0:42:580:43:02

largely assisted by David Harper's splendid profit of £23 on your bonus buy.

0:43:020:43:10

-You were up the gum tree without that! Anyway, well done. Happy?

-Very!

-I'm happy for you.

0:43:100:43:16

I'm sorry not to be giving you cash, but we've had a great programme.

0:43:160:43:20

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

-Yes!

0:43:200:43:24

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2010

0:43:370:43:41

Email [email protected]

0:43:420:43:44

Ever wondered about the evolution of your cutlery? Tim Wonnacott serves up the history of the knife and fork in Sheffield to accompany a right royal battle between the red and blue teams. With experts Charles Hanson and David Harper on duty, it's a close finish.


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS