Kedleston 24 Bargain Hunt


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Kedleston 24

Antiques challenge. Husband and wife teams visit Kedleston Hall. With double the cash to spend, both teams are drawn to pricey items. But will splashing out pay off?


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Double the money, double the fun! Let's go bargain hunting!

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Today's happy hour of shopping takes place here at Jaguar Antiques Fair

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in the grounds of Keddleston Hall. And coming up:

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Anita leads the first of our husband and wife teams off at a pace. Well, sort of.

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Are we walking too fast for you, my love?

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Malcolm struggles to keep up and the Blues struggle to decide.

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-You're not overly keen.

-I don't think it'll make any money.

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Thankfully, the bidders know what they want.

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Come on. More!

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Come on.

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Instead of the usual £300, today our teams get a whopping £600 each

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to buy their three items

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before they head off for auction. The team wins that makes the most profit or least losses. Simple.

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Innit? Now let's go and meet today's teams.

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-Malcolm, I gather you're retired.

-Yes, Tim.

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You don't look as if you ought to be. What did you do before?

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I worked in the car industry for a component manufacturer.

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I was head of quality and sustainable development. I'd worked enough!

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And quality control is everything when it comes to motor cars.

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People don't realise how many things have to work when they turn the key and expect the engine to start.

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Your work was officially recognised.

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It was. I'm pleased to say I was honoured in 2005 with an OBE for services to the automotive industry.

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When you go to the Palace, do you get a cup of tea and all that?

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If you're receiving an award, you get an orange juice or water.

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If you're there to watch, you don't get anything for three hours!

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You're involved in the Scouts.

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I joined the Cubs when I was just 7 and a half and I've been involved ever since.

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Today I actually run a Scout group in Birmingham Children's Hospital.

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I actually brought you along a badge, Tim, as a souvenir of our visit.

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-We're open only to children that are in hospital.

-Yes.

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-It's a Scout and Guide group. The Guides get upset if I miss them.

-Quite right, too.

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Scouting brought you two together.

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It is. We met at a meeting and a month later we went out. After six days, we got engaged.

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-Gosh.

-We'll have been married 30 years next year.

-Olwen, what do you do?

-I'm now retired,

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but I was Deputy Head in a school for children with learning difficulties. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

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-What do you like to collect, Olwen?

-Well, I've got a collection of mice.

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-We've got over 100 mice.

-100 mice?!

-Probably over 100 cats.

-100 cats?!

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-And two real cats.

-Oh, right.

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Well, very, very good luck. Now, moving on to the Blues.

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-Mark, the Army has played a great part in your life.

-It certainly has.

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I joined the Army straight after leaving college and through it I've gained some good trades

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-and seen a lot of the world.

-Yes.

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-You both grew up in Germany.

-Yes.

-But you never actually met there.

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-No.

-Not at all. Miles apart.

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-Where did you meet?

-Barnstaple.

-Barnstaple?!

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It was just in one of the bars. Serena was out with her friends. I lived in Barnstaple.

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We bumped into each other, found out we were both army and it took off from there, really.

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-So although you were brought up in Germany, you consider yourself a Brummie.

-My dad's from Birmingham.

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-So's my mum.

-Yeah? So there's a good Birmingham connection between our teams.

-Very strong.

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-Which is nice. What do you do?

-Floor manager for a retail company.

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-Do you want to stay with them forever?

-I hope to be store manager.

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-And you want to start your own jewellery business?

-On the side.

-Oh, on the side!

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-You want to stay in retail, but have a private business.

-Pocket money!

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-You are an entrepreneur!

-Yes.

-You'll be rather good today.

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-Anyway, very good luck. Looking forward to it?

-Very much so.

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-There's going to be some competition. It's just as well you get your £600, then.

-It is!

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You are lucky! Your experts await. And off you go!

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Very, very, very good luck.

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Sizing things up for the Reds is Anita Manning.

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-What will we go for?

-Jewellery, silver if it's well hallmarked.

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I wouldn't mind something like Crown Derby cats.

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Oh, yes, cats! Your specialist subject.

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-And Nick Hall will be walking the Blues.

-You like model vehicles?

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Yep, anything to do with HGVs or aircraft.

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-Let's get stuck in.

-Yes, let's go.

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-We've got a big budget, so we can think big.

-I like the sound of that.

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-So you like Art Nouveau?

-I like Art Nouveau.

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-I have no taste at all. I'm a typical man.

-Oh, right!

-Speak for yourself!

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-This is a splendid piece. Is that expensive?

-Yes!

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-You're looking at 300.

-So we're making good choices?

-Excellent choices!

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-It's finding the right thing.

-Yes.

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-Do you like pendants?

-Yes, I do.

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Since she left school. She couldn't wear them at school in case children pulled them.

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-Mark, I've found you a grandfather clock in the middle of this field.

-I'm chuffed. That's really nice.

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There are several things we have to have a look at closely.

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-Firstly, the case...

-It's damaged. Isn't that damage?

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The base tends to split. I suspect someone has added this piece on. There's a split base on there.

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It's a bit tired looking, I'll be honest with you.

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Even just to handle this, it sings quality.

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-Does it?

-It sings quality.

-What grade of gold would that be?

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-This is...

-9 carat.

-..9 carat.

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It's always nice to have it hallmarked.

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-You can see the colour changing as you...

-Yes.

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-It catches the light.

-Yes.

-It catches the light. Beautiful.

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-I think this is lovely. It looks lovely.

-Beautiful, isn't it?

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And it feels so delicate, but very nice.

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-It is a substantial piece.

-Yes.

-A substantial piece.

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This concerns me. It does put buyers off if you've got the base repaired in any way.

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-They tend not to be too happy about that.

-OK.

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The case itself is made of oak. An English piece,

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would date to about 1800, thereabouts.

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The dial is a painted square dial.

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If we just open up the glass and have a look in there,

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you can see we've got the clockmaker's details there - Evans of Pwllheli. A Welsh clock.

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-Sadly, we're not going to a Welsh auction. That would be perfect.

-Yeah.

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I suspect the paintwork on the dial is original. That's not been got at.

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-There's maybe a replacement dial there.

-Yeah.

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It's not going to be a massive seller at auction. It would have to be really cheap.

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We should have a chat with the stall holder to see if it can be cheap. And see where we go.

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-Thank you.

-I like it. You're not over keen on it, are you?

-I don't think it'll make any money.

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Oh, dear. I thought we might be about to buy.

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-Can we ask how much that is?

-I can do that for 450.

-450? Right.

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I'd just be uncomfortable spending that much in one go.

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If it was 350, I'd be more comfortable. What would it sell for?

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We'd be lucky to see that.

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-But that's the type of piece that could fly.

-You think so?

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-£450?

-It leaves us 150.

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-You have 17 beautifully-faceted amethysts.

-Yes.

-17 of them.

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-Not just one. And they're graded beautifully.

-OK.

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-I think your wonderful enthusiasm has done it.

-You couldn't do anything for us on the price?

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No.

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The price is stuck at £450.

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Anita's being persuasive. I can't watch.

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Hi, guys. I tracked him down. He was hiding away.

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Now he was asking 450. We'd had a bit of a chat and a natter and he's down to 350.

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-It's a lot of money in one go.

-It is with how much we've got.

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Normally people only get £300 and to spend over that for our first item is a lot of money.

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-You're not overly struck?

-No.

-It would have to come down a lot lower.

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-I'm thinking what it would make in auction. It ought to make about 400 quid.

-Not much profit.

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Well, in this game, profit's profit!

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You want everything, don't you? A grandfather clock AND profit!

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That is the name of the game, Nick.

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-It's up to you two, of course.

-Shop on?

-Shop on!

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OK, teams. 20 minutes down.

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Somebody please buy something!

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What about the necklace?

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Now gold is high just now. People are buying sovereigns.

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-And that's a sovereign case.

-That's a wee sovereign case.

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The mechanism is in perfect working order. That's what we want.

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-And isn't that nice, that lovely machined silver?

-Yes, it is.

-The design on the back.

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Do we know the date on this one?

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-< 1906.

-1906.

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It's a London hallmark. That shows the quality.

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-And how much?

-95?

-< 95, I need.

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If you went for the two, I'd do the two for 500.

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So that would be £450 and this would be 50, because it's being thrown in with it.

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The original price was 95 and the original price on that was 510.

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-Shall we go?

-Yes.

-I think so.

-We've got items of quality.

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-Items of quality.

-Yes.

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OK? I think that's absolutely fine.

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Yes, thank you very much. I hope you do very well.

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A bit like buses - you wait for ages, then they all come at once.

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We've got £100 left. That's plenty.

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-What do you fancy next?

-Something a bit quirky?

-Plenty of time to go.

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Some fantastic contemporary items there.

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-That's a splendid stereoscope.

-It is, isn't it?

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-1,400.

-How much?

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-1,400.

-1,400?!

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-Yes, even with that noisy generator, you heard him right, Nick!

-That clock looks more attractive now!

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I think you're right!

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You could just about get a gin and tonic in there!

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Good news, Nick. It's still for sale, but he's very adamant on 350. We couldn't get him down any further.

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-So you've done the deal?

-350.

-That's all right. That leaves us profit.

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-I hope so, yeah.

-There's only one more thing to worry about. You two have to carry that!

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Here we go!

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Even without Nick's muscle, the Blues have clocked up item one. About time, too!

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I'm really happy about that. I want to take it home, not sell it.

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-Are we walking too fast for you, my love?

-Keep up, Malcolm!

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-How long have we got left?

-38 minutes.

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I do love my smalls. And by smalls I mean collectables that fit into a glazed-top cabinet.

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Like this little gem.

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Surprise, surprise. It's a scent bottle.

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This is glass, but it's a rare and unusual glass,

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made by Webb's of Stourbridge.

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And it was made around about 1880.

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This is called overlaid glass or cased glass.

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When it was blown, the yellow was blown originally,

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and then a thin layer of opaque or white glass was blown over the entire teardrop shape.

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And then they cut through, partly using acid,

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and partly using a sharp maser-like tool

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to shape these fern-like leaves.

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Now these bits of glass are extremely desirable.

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The survival rate of these things is quite small.

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So when you get one in good condition, like this, it's a bit of a marvel to behold.

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I quite like the stopper, too, which is silver gilt.

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It was made by Sampson Mordan and Co in London.

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And if I unscrew it like that,

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you reveal the aperture, you take a little dollop of eau de cologne

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and dab that around your person and be overall rather sweet-smelling.

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The dealer is asking for this rare little scent bottle

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£950.

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Quite a smell, eh?

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-Have you seen what I've seen, Nick? Toys.

-No!

-Toys! It's got to be.

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-He's found himself a toy shop. Let's have a look.

-Oh, yes.

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Ah, heaven.

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-Oh, Serena...!

-No!

-He's in toy heaven, isn't he?

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-I could spend a fortune here.

-'We could be here for some time!'

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-Now, has Serena dragged Mark away from the toys?

-That is in beautiful condition.

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-Er, no.

-With the original box as well.

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-That's, em...

-You know what this is all leading up to?

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-The big question.

-What price are you looking at for this?

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The book price on that is about 350. >

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That's more than my grandfather clock!

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The gentleman broke that when he was four years old and his father had it repaired.

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It's not been repainted. I just left it as I got it.

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-So how much is the boxless model?

-About 120.

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120 without the box. I mean the paintwork's not bad.

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Beautiful condition with the grille. It's still got silver on it.

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-And these are very commercial models.

-I like this as well.

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I'm being selfish because I bought the grandfather clock, but would you possibly move down to 100?

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-That's nearer our budget.

-Please!

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-I was going to say 110.

-105?

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-Oh, she's away!

-She's good at this.

-She is, yeah. 105?

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I will do. I think we'll go for that.

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-A tank and artillery gun sight.

-That's functional if you've got a tank!

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-You know what we need to do now.

-Shop for her.

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-Small and dainty.

-Just like you.

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I just spotted this mouse. I think it's Crown Derby.

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It is. It is indeed.

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It just struck me as strange in that it's normally so traditional, but this looks like a computer mouse.

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That's a very interesting comment on that and I love it to pieces.

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You're right in that it's Crown Derby.

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But Crown Derby is still in operation and they make these wonderful little animals.

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I think it's interesting

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the comparison you made with something that is very, very modern.

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-Do you think that would be appealing to somebody at auction?

-I do.

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It's got that wee bit of quirkiness.

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My reaction is that it's a little expensive. That's a retail price.

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-£50?

-The box says 65, that says 50.

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What do you think it's worth? 20?

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-No, no. It's worth more than that.

-35.

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It's probably worth more than that.

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If that went into auction, I would estimate it

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between...

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40 and 50,

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-40 and 60.

-So anything I can get below 40 should put us into profit?

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Uh-huh. Go and see what you can do. I think that's an interesting piece. I like it.

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-How are you doing? Two down?

-One to go.

-Spent most of the budget on things that I wanted!

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-Is this how it always is?

-Yes.

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Poor Serena.

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Now vintage costume jewellery, of course,

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-can be a bit of a goer. There's a lot of movement in that market.

-OK.

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These are beautiful. I don't know if they are pink topaz,

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but stunning little things there.

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At last! Something for Serena. Right, how's Malcolm doing?

0:18:250:18:30

I got £20 off.

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-They're going to sell it to us for £30, even though it was originally at 65.

-Well done.

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-She's very happy for us to have it at £30 and she hopes we make a profit.

-Well done!

-Well done.

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-He is a good negotiator!

-He is.

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-Nearly all these in here are vintage costume jewellery.

-Right.

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-This is Trifari from the 1930s.

-Yeah.

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-Was that an American firm?

-American firm, Trifari. A very big firm.

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-This one here with the pink stones?

-That's Trifari again.

-Yes.

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They hired a Japanese guy, Kunio Matsumoto, in the '70s.

0:19:060:19:11

-Right.

-And he made some fantastic pieces.

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:19:110:19:15

-The earrings and the bracelet set.

-He only worked there for a brief period in the '70s.

0:19:150:19:22

-What sort of money would that be?

-Around about £120.

0:19:220:19:25

Now if we were to say to you we kind of like those, but that is a bit of a budget buster.

0:19:250:19:32

-We were thinking about 85 quid. Is that something you could live with?

-Yeah.

0:19:320:19:38

Sounds like a good deal.

0:19:380:19:40

It is very sought after.

0:19:400:19:43

-Now, Serena, do you like it?

-I do.

-What about do I like it?

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-We've heard all about your clocks and your cars.

-I'm discarded now!

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-We're on jewellery now.

-Very nice.

-I think there's a margin of profit.

0:19:520:19:57

The chap's right. This is where the market is moving. You want to be where it's moving into, not out of.

0:19:570:20:04

It's a good little lot. £85, I think there should be something in it.

0:20:040:20:08

We're going to a fine arts sale.

0:20:080:20:11

-What do you reckon?

-Yeah, sounds good.

-I think you have a deal, sir.

0:20:110:20:15

-Are you happy with these?

-Very happy.

-Well, that's our third and final purchase for the day

0:20:160:20:22

-and you've left me a little bit.

-Yes.

-I'm happy.

-Well done, guys.

-Thank you very much.

0:20:220:20:29

Time's up. Right. What's in the Reds' shopping trolley?

0:20:310:20:35

Malcolm and Olwen made the most of their extra dosh,

0:20:350:20:39

splashing out £450 on an amethyst necklace. Wow.

0:20:390:20:44

Left with a few coins, they bought a sovereign case for £50.

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And spent £30 on a small piece of Crown Derby.

0:20:500:20:55

-We have bought some lovely quality items and things that we all like.

-Yes.

-And it's been a pleasure.

0:20:550:21:01

-Thank you for your advice.

-A mutual admiration society!

0:21:010:21:06

That's all this is.

0:21:060:21:08

-Get on all right with them, Anita?

-We had a wonderful time.

0:21:080:21:12

-How much did you spend?

-£530.

-That's a proper amount, that is.

0:21:120:21:17

-£70 of leftover lolly somewhere, please.

-Sir.

-£70. You've got a lot of pressure.

0:21:170:21:23

-You've got £70 only to spend. How will you get on?

-Very speedily.

-Good girl. Good luck with that.

0:21:230:21:31

But for the rest of us, let's remind ourselves what the Blues bought, eh?

0:21:310:21:36

Mark and Serena also started high,

0:21:360:21:39

spending £350 on a longcase clock.

0:21:390:21:42

Mark went to toy heaven

0:21:420:21:45

and spent £105 on a boxless truck.

0:21:450:21:49

Serena was eventually allowed to spend £85

0:21:490:21:53

on some 1970s retro jewellery.

0:21:530:21:55

Bling!

0:21:550:21:57

-How much of the 600 have you spent?

-Five hundred and...

-Forty. 540.

0:21:570:22:03

That's smashing. Which piece is going to make the most profit, do you think?

0:22:030:22:08

-The jewellery.

-I've got something about that grandfather clock. I think that'll do it.

0:22:080:22:13

-You're with the jewellery?

-Yeah.

-Have you got a prediction, Nick?

0:22:130:22:17

-The clock could just scrape it. It wasn't dear.

-To make the maximum profit.

-Yeah.

0:22:170:22:22

-Lovely to have 600, yes?

-Wonderful. In fact, it would've been nice to have had 1,200.

-Greedy guts!

0:22:220:22:28

Anyway, there's £60 of leftover lolly somewhere.

0:22:280:22:32

-Have you got that, Serena? Thank you. £60.

-Thank you.

0:22:320:22:35

How difficult do you find it sourcing these bonus buys?

0:22:350:22:39

Not that difficult. There's such a vast array of stuff out there.

0:22:390:22:43

-There's always a dealer's mistake to be found.

-You're in safe hands.

0:22:430:22:47

The experts are off to spend the leftovers in the fair.

0:22:470:22:51

So why don't we go back in time

0:22:540:22:57

at Cannon Hall in Barnsley?

0:22:570:23:00

In the 18th century, if you were invited to feast at a house like this, you'd dine in style.

0:23:020:23:08

The amazing thing about dining in the 18th century

0:23:210:23:25

is that the kit got ever more complicated as the century progressed.

0:23:250:23:31

I mean, extraordinarily elaborate objects were produced by cabinet-makers and suppliers

0:23:310:23:38

to entertain the rich.

0:23:380:23:40

For example, we've got here what looks like a faceted, decorative urn made of mahogany.

0:23:400:23:48

But if I give it an oink from above, it reveals a fitted interior,

0:23:480:23:52

pierced with a whole lot of concentric rings within which are all these apertures.

0:23:520:23:58

And they're to hold cutlery.

0:23:580:24:00

Now, cutlery containers come in various shapes and sizes.

0:24:000:24:05

This is a more traditional shape with a sloping top.

0:24:050:24:08

It too has got a fitted interior with all those curious, pierced apertures,

0:24:080:24:13

but these are very often spoiled in the 19th century when the interiors are ripped out

0:24:130:24:19

and replaced with horizontal bars to hold writing paper and stationery.

0:24:190:24:24

But this one is complete and it's even got its lock, so you can lock the silver away.

0:24:240:24:30

This handsome decanter sits on top of a block of mahogany that has been through a lathe,

0:24:300:24:37

hence these different sized rings which enable the decanter, whatever size it might be,

0:24:370:24:43

to sit comfortably on the top,

0:24:430:24:46

then the outer border is raised to stop the decanter falling off

0:24:460:24:51

when it's pushed around the table on these original brass casters.

0:24:510:24:56

It literally coasts across the table.

0:24:560:25:00

But the ultimate must-have accessory

0:25:000:25:03

in a dining room is a sideboard like this.

0:25:030:25:07

Let's just step back and have a look at it.

0:25:070:25:11

We've got a side table or side board

0:25:160:25:19

which is separate from the two pedestals on either end.

0:25:190:25:24

A bit later in the century and into the 19th century,

0:25:240:25:28

those two pedestals morph into one piece of furniture,

0:25:280:25:32

but here, they are most definitely in three parts.

0:25:320:25:35

The urns placed on these pedestal cupboards aren't just decorative.

0:25:370:25:42

They have a practical purpose.

0:25:420:25:45

If I take the cover off and you have a squint inside,

0:25:450:25:49

you can see they're lined with lead with a little hole in the bottom,

0:25:490:25:54

then most unusually, and this is a very rare feature,

0:25:540:25:58

the fluted frieze on the pedestal pulls open like that,

0:25:580:26:01

like a little magic compartment, you stick your finger inside,

0:26:010:26:06

give it an oink and out comes the tap.

0:26:060:26:09

But what's the fluid?

0:26:090:26:11

Some people say you fill the container with wine.

0:26:110:26:15

I don't like the thought of my Chateau Margaux going into a lead-lined container

0:26:150:26:21

and then coming out of a brass tap.

0:26:210:26:24

No, I think this was definitely used for holding water

0:26:240:26:27

because on the dining table, they wouldn't have ten or twelve glasses.

0:26:270:26:32

There would simply be two or three glasses that would need rinsing during a long dinner party.

0:26:320:26:38

There is a further purpose to these pedestals. If I open the door,

0:26:380:26:42

underneath, you can see that it's metal-lined,

0:26:420:26:45

the idea being that you'd shove in some charcoal in the bottom

0:26:450:26:49

and the heat of the charcoal would warm the plates set out in those racks.

0:26:490:26:56

The big question today is, of course,

0:26:560:26:58

will our teams be being warmed up at all over at the auction?

0:26:580:27:03

It's a treat to be in Market Harborough in sunny Leicestershire with Mark Gilding

0:27:140:27:20

-at Gilding's, the family auctioneers. How is everything going?

-Very good, Tim. Very busy.

0:27:200:27:25

Now, the first item is a bit of a shocker and that's this gold and amethyst necklace.

0:27:250:27:31

-How do you rate that, Mark?

-It's only amethyst. It's only nine-carat gold.

0:27:310:27:37

-I rate it at £60 to £80.

-Do you really? That is a shocker, isn't it?

-It is.

0:27:370:27:42

-£450 they paid.

-Wow!

0:27:420:27:45

-We've got a way to go there, haven't we?

-We have really, at £60 to £80.

0:27:460:27:51

So is it a style of jewellery,

0:27:510:27:54

that kind of fringe necklace, which is not particularly popular in the market?

0:27:540:27:58

Yes, we see all too many of them which is a good indication

0:27:580:28:02

that they're not really things that people are keeping and wearing.

0:28:020:28:06

So that could be a serious black hole.

0:28:060:28:09

-Next is the double sovereign case. Do you like that one?

-Yeah, that's OK.

0:28:090:28:13

-It's silver, nice engine-turned decoration.

-How much?

-£40 to £60.

-£50 paid.

0:28:130:28:19

That's a bit more like it.

0:28:190:28:21

And then we've got the perennially popular Crown Derby, limited edition type paperweights.

0:28:210:28:28

-Yes. Yeah.

-This time, a beetle. Or is it a mouse?

0:28:280:28:32

-It looks like a mouse.

-Or a scarab. Or half a boiled egg.

0:28:320:28:37

-40 to 60.

-£30. So that, I think, is their best buy.

-Yes, I think so.

0:28:370:28:41

Well, they had £70 of leftover lolly.

0:28:410:28:44

Let's see what Anita spent it on.

0:28:440:28:47

Now, Malcolm and Olwen, you spent a magnificent £530.

0:28:470:28:53

You left £70 for Anita to find you a bonus buy with.

0:28:530:28:58

What did she find?

0:28:580:29:00

-Oh, my goodness!

-I know you like quality and this is a quality item.

0:29:020:29:07

It's a wonderful iridescent paperweight by John Ditchfield.

0:29:070:29:12

Now, this isn't an old item. It's within the last 25 years.

0:29:120:29:16

What we have is this lovely, iridescent lily pad with a wee silver frog sitting on the top.

0:29:160:29:23

-That looks lovely.

-And if we look underneath, we can see the mark for John Ditchfield.

0:29:230:29:29

That's important because the collectors like to see that label.

0:29:290:29:33

-Have you seen them before?

-I haven't actually, no.

0:29:330:29:37

-It's the sort of thing that would appeal to me.

-And not to me.

0:29:370:29:41

Not to you, not to you.

0:29:410:29:43

-How much?

-£70.

0:29:430:29:46

-£70?

-Uh-huh.

-I think I like our paperweight better.

0:29:460:29:49

But what do you think it might make?

0:29:490:29:52

I've seen them getting between 80 and 140.

0:29:520:29:56

Very good, chaps. You don't pick it now. You pick it after the sale of the first three items.

0:29:560:30:01

Let's check out what the auctioneer thinks about the paperweight.

0:30:010:30:06

John Ditchfield, a legend.

0:30:070:30:09

-Yes.

-It is extraordinary how the price of Ditchfield's glass has held up, isn't it?

0:30:090:30:16

Absolutely, yeah. Quite a lot of things have dropped like stone, but these are OK.

0:30:160:30:21

-How do you rate that one?

-I rate it at 80 to 120.

0:30:210:30:24

Marvellous, that Anita Manning. She only paid £70 for it.

0:30:240:30:28

There could be money in it at 80 to 120, couldn't there?

0:30:280:30:32

Yeah, there's been lots of people looking at it.

0:30:320:30:36

I think they're going to need whatever they can get, providing they go with it.

0:30:360:30:41

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:30:410:30:44

Their first item, snuggled up against the wall over there,

0:30:440:30:48

-that's the Georgian, eight day, kind of cottage-cased clock, isn't it?

-Yes.

0:30:480:30:52

And Welsh as well. At least it's got an eight-day movement in it.

0:30:520:30:57

The case seems to be generally in good order.

0:30:570:31:00

-I think we'll make £300 to £400.

-They paid 350.

0:31:000:31:04

-Good.

-If you can get halfway there, they'll be really, really chuffed.

0:31:040:31:08

At least they're not falling into a dark jewellery hole.

0:31:080:31:12

Or are they? What about the necklace and earrings?

0:31:120:31:15

Very bling, aren't they? Nice and bright and shiny.

0:31:150:31:18

-Yeah. It's got something, hasn't it?

-It has. This has got something about it.

0:31:180:31:23

Well marked as well by Trifari, 1970s.

0:31:230:31:27

And costume jewellery is selling pretty well at the minute.

0:31:270:31:31

-What's your estimate?

-£30 to £40.

-Is that all? What, for all three?

0:31:310:31:36

-Well, a bit of a "come and get me" estimate there.

-Yeah, yeah. What's it really worth then?

0:31:360:31:42

-On a good day, we'd get 80, perhaps 100.

-Perfect. £85 is what they paid.

0:31:420:31:47

And their middle item is the Foden truck. I've seen a lot of these sold.

0:31:470:31:52

They're always cropping up in the boxes and they do quite nicely, but this one has got no box.

0:31:520:31:58

-No box makes me think 30 to 40.

-They paid 105. They've paid too much, frankly.

-Yes, they have.

0:31:580:32:04

Anyway, let's have a look at their bonus buy.

0:32:040:32:07

Gosh, it's getting crowded in here! Busy saleroom, eh?

0:32:080:32:12

Now, guys, this is your bonus buy moment.

0:32:120:32:15

You spent £540. You gave Nicholas £60 to spend on his bonus buy.

0:32:150:32:20

-What did he spend it on? Nick?

-Ta-da-da-da!

0:32:200:32:23

-Look at that!

-Oh, very nice.

0:32:240:32:27

Aren't they handsome? One each.

0:32:270:32:29

-Candle-holders?

-Absolutely.

0:32:290:32:32

They are silver plate, not solid hallmarked silver, not on the £60 you left me.

0:32:320:32:37

-That would be a big wish.

-It would. So, main question then, how much did you...?

-They were the full £60.

0:32:370:32:44

-But I got them down from a lot more than that.

-Excellent. Good work.

0:32:440:32:48

-How much do you think they might make?

-There's a slim profit, maybe £10 or £20 in it.

-Not too bad.

0:32:480:32:54

They're 19th century, classic Adams revival,

0:32:540:32:57

good quality silver plate, Sheffield plated, weighted bases, handsome things.

0:32:570:33:02

-You think you'll make more than 60.

-Yes.

0:33:020:33:05

-Is that because you like the feel of them?

-They're quite heavy.

-Yeah. That's a sign of the quality.

0:33:050:33:11

-I think there could be some money made in that.

-Good.

0:33:110:33:15

Nick, you've got two takers there, but you decide later after the sale of your first three items.

0:33:150:33:21

Let's check out what the auctioneer thinks about Nick's sticks.

0:33:210:33:26

Oh, dear.

0:33:280:33:30

I mean, I think there's less silver plate on this than there is base metal.

0:33:300:33:35

-Wouldn't you?

-Yes, well polished.

-Well polished.

0:33:350:33:39

I don't know what these would cost to re-plate, but it would be not inexpensive, I guess.

0:33:390:33:45

-Certainly more than they're worth.

-What are they worth?

-50 to 70.

0:33:450:33:49

He paid £60, which is not a lot in one way,

0:33:490:33:54

but if you were laying up a posh dining room and you wanted some Adam-style sticks

0:33:540:34:00

and you looked at them and you could see more rub-through nickel than you can silver, it's not a good look.

0:34:000:34:07

It's not, but in good order, they would perhaps be a couple of hundred.

0:34:070:34:11

-Yes, but they are what they are and you can only do what you do, right?

-Yes.

-Yes.

0:34:110:34:17

-Now, Malcolm and Olwen, how are you?

-Fine, thank you.

-Are you?

-Yes.

-Yeah, good.

0:34:250:34:30

The amethyst necklace is your big punt, isn't it?

0:34:300:34:34

The auctioneer has been a bit sniffy about it. He doesn't think it's worth anything like £450.

0:34:340:34:40

-He thinks it's worth more like 60 to 80.

-Oh, no.

-Auctioneers have been wrong before.

0:34:400:34:45

-That's very true, Malcolm.

-We just have to keep our fingers crossed.

-We do.

0:34:450:34:50

-60 to 80 is a very, very, very low estimate.

-It is.

0:34:500:34:54

But he's going to encourage so many buyers to have a go

0:34:540:34:58

because they think they can get 17 amethysts and a string of nine-carat gold

0:34:580:35:03

-for that amount of money, so who knows?

-That's right.

0:35:030:35:06

-Here it comes.

-134 is a Victorian, yellow metal necklace

0:35:060:35:11

with 17 graduating amethysts and fine chain marks, 9ct.

0:35:110:35:16

Bidding starts me here at £100.

0:35:160:35:18

110. 120. 130. 40.

0:35:180:35:20

-150. 60. 70 I'll take?

-Come on, more.

-It's £160 I'm bid. 170.

0:35:200:35:25

180 now? 180 bid. At 180. 190. 200. At 200 bid.

0:35:250:35:28

220. 240. 240 bid. At 240. And 60 I'll take?

0:35:280:35:32

240. 260. 280.

0:35:320:35:34

-Here we go.

-On the internet, you just need to press the button. 280.

0:35:340:35:39

You're out. Make no mistake, this will be sold.

0:35:390:35:42

£280 and I will sell at 280...

0:35:420:35:45

-That's a good deal better than 60 to 80.

-It is.

0:35:460:35:49

I'm not sure there's not more money in that.

0:35:490:35:52

Anyway, 280 is two shy of that, 150... That's minus 170. Here we go. Here comes the sovereign case.

0:35:520:35:58

135, modern, hallmarked silver, double sovereign case.

0:35:580:36:02

London 1983.

0:36:020:36:05

Bidding here, £20. The sovereign case at 20. I'm bid 22, 25.

0:36:050:36:09

28. 28 I'm bid now for the double sovereign case.

0:36:090:36:13

At £28. 30 do I see? At 30 now.

0:36:130:36:15

At £30. At 30. 2 I'll take?

0:36:150:36:18

£30. The internet wins then. You're all out in the room? I will sell...

0:36:180:36:22

£30 is minus 20.

0:36:230:36:25

-The auctioneer's been wrong twice.

-Equals 190.

0:36:250:36:29

136, Royal Crown Derby paperweight. Mould is a mouse.

0:36:290:36:32

With a printed mark and a gold stopper and a box.

0:36:320:36:36

£20 I'm bid then. 20. Here at 20.

0:36:360:36:39

22. 25. 28.

0:36:390:36:41

-30. 32. 35.

-Well done, Malcolm.

0:36:410:36:44

-£35 I'm bid. At 35.

-You're in profit there.

0:36:440:36:48

£35. In the middle at 35 and selling away now at £35...

0:36:480:36:53

-That is plus 5. Well done, Malcolm. That was your choice.

-It was.

0:36:530:36:57

A vindication of your taste there, I would say, Malc.

0:36:570:37:01

Anyway, overall, you are minus 185.

0:37:010:37:04

Now, that could be a winning score. Alternatively, you could go with the bonus buy.

0:37:040:37:10

Are you going to trust wee Anita and go with Ditchfield?

0:37:100:37:13

-It's up to yourself.

-Anita has lovely taste.

0:37:130:37:16

-Malcolm, what do you feel?

-I have real trust in Anita.

0:37:160:37:20

On your head be it.

0:37:200:37:22

-Here it comes.

-140 then is a John Ditchfield, Glasform paperweight.

0:37:230:37:29

Mould is a frog on a lily pad.

0:37:290:37:31

£30, £40, £50, £60, £70, £80 bid.

0:37:310:37:34

90. 100. 110.

0:37:340:37:37

120. 130...

0:37:370:37:39

In the room then at 130. 140 I'll take? 130 bid. 130. I'm all out...

0:37:390:37:44

-That's brilliant.

-And selling in the room at £130...

0:37:440:37:49

-OK, he sold it for 130.

-Yes!

-Well, enough said.

-Thank you.

0:37:490:37:53

That is plus £60.

0:37:530:37:55

-That is a very, very nice contribution. Thank you very much, Anita.

-I'm very happy for you.

0:37:550:38:01

Which makes your overall position 125.

0:38:010:38:05

Minus 125.

0:38:050:38:07

It could have been so very different, but that is no shame because you had a good old punt.

0:38:070:38:13

-How are you feeling, team, OK?

-Yes.

-I'm nervous.

-Are you?

0:38:290:38:33

-Have you been talking to the Reds at all?

-No.

-Very good.

0:38:330:38:37

Your big money is with the longcase clock,

0:38:370:38:40

which is your first item, you paid £350 for it.

0:38:400:38:43

But I can reassure you that the expert auctioneer has estimated it at 300 to 400,

0:38:430:38:49

so you paid a price slap bang in the middle of his estimate, so you should be all right.

0:38:490:38:54

-152.

-Here it comes.

-19th century oak, longcase clock.

0:38:540:38:59

And bids have to start me here at...

0:38:590:39:02

100. 120. 140. 160.

0:39:020:39:04

180. 200. 220. 240. 260.

0:39:040:39:07

280. 300.

0:39:070:39:10

-£320. With me at 320.

-Good start.

-320. 340 I'll take?

0:39:100:39:15

It's £320 bid here on the book. I will sell at 320...

0:39:150:39:20

Bad luck. Just shy. Just £30 shy. Minus £30.

0:39:210:39:27

OK, now the Foden truck.

0:39:270:39:29

The Dinky Supertoys Foden flat truck...

0:39:290:39:33

And bids start at 20. £22. Here with me at 22.

0:39:340:39:38

25. 28. 30. 32. 35. 38.

0:39:380:39:41

£40. Bid at 40 now. At 40.

0:39:410:39:43

-Uh-oh!

-42. 45. 48.

0:39:430:39:46

50. 5. 60.

0:39:460:39:49

£65. 70 I'll take?

0:39:490:39:51

-It's 65 there. Are you all out?

-I think it's broken down.

0:39:510:39:55

70. He's back in. At 75 now. Bid at 75.

0:39:550:39:59

£75 and I will sell now at 75...

0:39:590:40:02

£75, bad luck.

0:40:030:40:05

-Minus 30.

-That's not as bad as I thought it could be.

0:40:050:40:08

154, 1970s Trifari bracelet.

0:40:080:40:11

A pair of matching earrings.

0:40:110:40:13

-And bidding for this lot... £20. I'm bid at 20. At £20...

-Come on.

0:40:130:40:18

22. Bid at £22. At 22. Bid at 22. 25 I'll take?

0:40:180:40:22

-25. 28. 30. 32. 35...

-No internet interest on it at all.

0:40:220:40:26

-42.

-Not yet.

-45, new bidding. At 45. 48 now...

0:40:260:40:30

It's about £100 short of what we want it to be.

0:40:300:40:34

55. £55 with the lady then. At 55 and selling...

0:40:340:40:38

At £55...

0:40:380:40:40

Good Lord, look at that!

0:40:400:40:42

On the first lot, you lost 30. On the second lot, you lost 30.

0:40:420:40:46

And on the third lot, you lost 30.

0:40:460:40:48

-We were consistent.

-Consistent losers! Excellent, yeah.

0:40:480:40:52

You're minus 90. So what are you going to do about the candlesticks?

0:40:520:40:57

I reckon "go for it". If we lose, we lose.

0:40:570:40:59

Shall we go for it? You never know, it might make some money.

0:40:590:41:03

-Come on, Serena, your decision.

-Yes, go for it.

-We trust Nick's judgment.

0:41:030:41:08

-Are you going to go with it?

-Yeah.

-You're going with the bonus buy.

-Fingers crossed.

-Here it comes.

0:41:080:41:13

158, a pair of silver-plated candlesticks.

0:41:130:41:16

Neoclassical style, well polished.

0:41:160:41:20

£20 bid. The pair of these at £20. I'm bid 20.

0:41:200:41:24

£20. 22. 25. 28.

0:41:240:41:27

I'm bid here at 28. 30 do I see? It's £28. 28 I'm bid.

0:41:270:41:31

-I thought these would make more.

-They're worth more than that!

0:41:310:41:35

30. 32. 35. Shaking his head.

0:41:350:41:39

At the back at 35. 38 do I see?

0:41:390:41:41

At £35. In the room then at 35...

0:41:410:41:45

-We trusted you.

-35. That is minus £25.

0:41:450:41:48

Sorry, guys.

0:41:480:41:50

So, overall, that is minus 115.

0:41:500:41:53

-We really were consistent.

-All the way through.

-Yeah.

0:41:530:41:57

I'm afraid it's all in the old overdraft, but minus 115, it could be a winning score.

0:41:570:42:03

Well, what excitement we've had! There is barely a sheet of Bronco between our teams today.

0:42:100:42:17

-So have you chaps been talking at all?

-No.

0:42:170:42:20

Well, you know that you've both made stonking losses, but there is only £10 between you.

0:42:200:42:26

And the team that have made marginally more losses are the Reds.

0:42:260:42:31

£125-worth, actually, which is nothing, really, is it?

0:42:330:42:38

But it would have been a lot worse without Anita's £60 profit from the paperweight.

0:42:380:42:43

-Congratulations, Anita. Have you had a nice time?

-Very.

-Wonderful.

-We've loved having you on the show.

0:42:430:42:49

But the victors who have won by only losing £115...

0:42:490:42:53

-are the Blues.

-It's a win.

-It is.

0:42:530:42:55

-Had a good time, Serena?

-Very good.

-Fabulous.

-Loved having you on the show.

0:42:550:43:00

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:43:000:43:05

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2010

0:43:210:43:25

Email [email protected]

0:43:250:43:28

Husband and wife teams prowl the grounds of Kedleston Hall. With double the cash to spend, both teams are drawn to pricey items with experts Anita Manning and Nick Hall. But will splashing out pay off at auction? Tim Wonnacott explores the dining room at Preston's Cannon Hall, a place to feast in style.