Oswestry 17 Bargain Hunt


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Oswestry 17

Antiques challenge. Two teams do battle at auction in Oswestry. Philip Serrell and a team of paranormal investigators are up against David Harper and two waitresses.


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Eight hundred years ago, two Saxon kings fought over this land.

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Today, the Reds and the Blues will do battle for the ultimate daytime prize -

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a spot of cash.

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Let's go Bargain Hunting! Yeah!

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Today, we're up north, in Oswestry.

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I've got a team of paranormal investigators

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and a team of waitresses.

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So that's lunch sorted out, isn't it?

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Let's have a quick look at what's coming up, shall we?

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Philip Serrell and his ladies in red fall into a love-hate relationship.

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Ooh... Why do I always get the nutters? Why?

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David Harper is not quite hitting the spot with his Blue team.

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-At least we know what we don't want.

-Yeah, exactly.

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But who will come up smelling of roses at the auction?

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And later on, I've got a date with a doll.

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Lucky old me!

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That's all to come. But come on, first let's meet the teams.

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Today, we have two sets of friends.

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For the Reds, we've got Migs and Jenny, and for the Blues we've got Sophie and Jez. Welcome.

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-Hello!

-Hi.

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Now, you're both members of a paranormal investigation society.

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-Yes, we are.

-Is it enough to make your hair stand on end?

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-It can be!

-Yeah!

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-Tell us about it.

-Well, we generally go to places where people report

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they've got disturbances - pubs, hotels, private houses sometimes.

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-Yes.

-And we investigate to see if they are paranormal.

-Right. You're the chairman.

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-I am, yes.

-Yes. And this is your assistant.

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Yes. This is one of my many investigators.

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-So you're waiting for something spooky to happen?

-Yeah.

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Jenny, you're a fan of Bargain Hunt. Tell us about that.

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I've been since it first started many, many years ago.

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What's your favourite bit?

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Just going, "You're not going to make a profit."

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It's easy when you're an armchair critic, isn't it?

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-It's easy to say...

-Well, you're going to find out today, darling, all about it. Good luck.

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Now for the Blues. So, how long have you two girls known each other?

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-We've been friends since we started secondary school, so twenty years now?

-Oh, lovely!

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-Yeah.

-And you work together.

-We do.

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We work in a local restaurant.

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-Is it a popular place?

-It is, yeah.

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I bet they all come in to see the waitresses.

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They do! We get some regulars, yeah.

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-Well, there you are.

-Sophie's got a little way of remembering these people that come in.

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What's your way of remembering?

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-By what they order!

-Oh, do you?

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So I've got Mr and Mrs Fish And Chips and Mr and Mrs Minted Lamb!

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Cos that's what they always have.

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Always have, yeah.

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How do you think you're both going to get on today? Any good?

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-I think we're going to do well.

-Yeah?

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You're going to absolutely hammer the Reds?

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-I think so.

-Is that what you're going to do? I'm sure.

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These paranormalists here are looking quite keen.

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Anyway, very good luck to you all.

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Now the money moment.

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There's your £300. £300. You know the rules.

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Your experts await. And off you go!

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Very, very, very good luck.

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I think we're in for a wizard today, don't you? What?

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Squaring up for the fight ahead are the experts.

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Remember, each team has one hour to buy three items with £300,

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and the winners make the most or lose the least at auction.

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Got a plan, girls?

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-Shiny things.

-Shiny things!

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You've got the wrong bloke for shiny things!

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You two just seem petrified to me.

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-Excited!

-Are you? OK, well, we've got one hour, and it starts now.

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I'll give you a bit of advice, right?

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This'll be the quickest hour of your life. It's a lottery.

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Go for broke, buy what you like.

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And if you want to do well, take no notice of anything that I've got to say.

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OK!

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That's a promising start, Phil...

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I'm sure the Blue team have faith in David.

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What I like about those, they look like they're eighteenth-century coloured Delftware, Dutch pieces,

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but they're much more modern.

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I prefer something a bit plainer, I think.

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That's a bit too flowery.

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-OK. So we're looking for something more refined, sophisticated?

-Yeah.

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-OK.

-More appealing.

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Oh, right. So really, a bit of a bad start on my behalf, then.

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-At least we know what we don't want.

-Yeah, exactly.

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Onwards and upwards, David.

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That's a lazy Susie, girls.

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Sits on the middle of the table, and you'd put food, whatever, on it.

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That's really quite nice. OK?

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My heart's not in it, so I'm not sure.

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This is going to be a hard old day!

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What about that pair of vases? Now, you see, I'm drawn in to certain things.

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I quite like those, actually, yeah.

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I quite like them. They're not ancient, but there's a pair of.

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-Can we have a better look?

-They're probably Italian. Let's see.

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-What are they?

-They'll be Murano, I think.

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-So they'll be Italian, Venetian glass...

-What's the price?

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-..Vases.

-£20.

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Cheap enough. Twenty quid for glass?

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-Fifteen?

-Oh, gosh, please!

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I love negotiating!

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-But...

-Go for it. Are they OK?

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Let's have a look. No handles off.

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-This one seems OK.

-I think they're bonny, decorative items.

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There's nothing wrong with them. I don't think anyone could say that you've made a huge mistake.

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Hi there. What would trade price be on these?

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You've got £2 on them.

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-18! 18.

-15, I think.

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No, I think they're worth 18.

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-Victorian?

-They've certainly got a Victorian shape.

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Dating glass is almost impossible.

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I'll take 17, that's the very best.

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They're definitely a bargain.

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I'm not a fan of odd numbers. 16.

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I'm a fan of odd numbers!

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We'll go 15, then, if you like.

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But these two are an odd pair.

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15's quite a round number.

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I think 17's better.

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I'm happy, if you want to go with them.

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17? Yeah?

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And I'm happy, cos we've only been going three minutes.

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-That's good.

-Suits me! Is it a done deal?

-Yeah.

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-Yes.

-Shake his hand.

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Thank you very much. Thank you.

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-Thank you.

-Thanks a lot. Cheers.

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Thank you!

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Not bad, not bad.

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One down for the Blues.

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I quite like these spoons.

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At auction those aren't going to make that money.

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OK. I'll sell you one so you can make a profit.

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They're both Dutch, and they're both hallmarked. And they are silver.

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But if you're interested, I'd give you a chance for them.

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Do you like those?

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-I do like them, but I'll have a think.

-All right.

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We'll come and see you in a bit. Thank you.

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Back outside, the Blues are proving tricky customers.

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-Not getting you, is it?

-No. I don't like anything with a foot on the end, I'm afraid.

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-Well, yeah. Is it getting you? Is it doing anything for you?

-Not really.

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OK. It's not doing anything for them.

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They're very difficult people. You're not excited, are you?

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-I'm not thrilled.

-No.

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-OK.

-What DO you like?

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Thank you! That was going to be my next question!

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What thrills you?

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Mm! Not a lot, methinks.

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Meanwhile, Phil has found something that makes rather a lot of noise.

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-Do you like that?

-I do, actually! It's quirky.

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It's something different.

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-Yeah, well...

-I'm interested in that, and somebody else would be, as well.

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I love it. And it looks like a football rattle, doesn't it?

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But it's not, it's a bird scarer.

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It's not.

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Is it not a bird scarer?

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It wouldn't have that turned knob there, which is used for...

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This is a learning curve for all of us.

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LOUD CLICKING

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So a nightwatchman's rattle or even a policeman's rattle.

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Is it to scare people off?

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-Yeah.

-I really like that.

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It's so well-turned, so it's not a football rattle or even a bird scarer.

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A lot of them were bird scarers.

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Oh, yeah. It's the same principle, yes.

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It's £49, and I think at auction it's 30 quid's worth.

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I think it could be worth a lot more than that.

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Ah, but you're selling it!

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I am selling it. I do have to make a profit.

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This is going to be interesting.

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If you make a loss, you have a giggle.

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If we make a loss, we cry.

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Anybody got a handkerchief?

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£39 to you.

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36 and we'll deal.

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-OK.

-Thank you ever so much. Thank you very much.

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That's wonderful.

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So, the bird scarer...football rattle...nightwatchman's rattle...

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is the Red team's first item,

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and it hits their shopping trolley in a nice and comfortable 17 minutes.

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Meanwhile, the Blue team are looking for some real quality goods.

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-I like this.

-Let's have a quick look at it.

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-It's all matching.

-Yeah. OK.

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That's not the best

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-sign in the world.

-Right.

-That's foreign.

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Excellent!

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Made in foreign.

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But what's this?

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Phil's got his eye on something.

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-Could we have a look at that little nut, please.

-Yes, of course you can.

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They normally always split,

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because they're turned. This is probably about 1890, 1910.

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Because they're circular, they split.

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You can see that there's a little bit of a split beginning just there.

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They're just primitive things, almost like touristy things.

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You might have put a little sponge in here,

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or you might have put flowers, like potpourri.

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And with these holes, the smell would have come out.

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-I really like this.

-And how much is that, sir?

-22.

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Is that the absolute finito, finito, finito?

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20 is the finito.

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I'm going to unleash them on you in a minute.

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And I tell you, you'll need that savage dog down there to look after you.

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I think at auction it's £15 to £25 worth. That's what I think.

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If you want to make a profit on it, you've got to buy it at 15 quid.

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But as this gentleman also wants to make a profit and he wants 20 quid,

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-we have a sort of impasse here, don't we?

-We do.

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-Yeah.

-If you really like it...

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-I do like it.

-..then if you want it...

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Smile nicely at him.

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Another pound is the very, very best I can do, it really is.

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19 is really my bottom line.

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-Just because I'm feeling cheeky, can I say £18.50?

-No, you can't.

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-Well, you can SAY it...

-19.

-It is up to you.

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-I like it.

-If you want,

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-go for it.

-It feels good. It feels good.

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OK.

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Yeah, £19. Thank you very much.

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-Thank you.

-Thanks.

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Second quirky buy from the Reds.

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How does Phil think they're doing?

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I think you've done really well so far, and the danger now is that we're going to completely chill,

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lose focus and end up buying something stupid for 120 quid.

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-Let's go down here.

-Down here?

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Not one of the last big spenders, our Phil. Oh, no.

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But why not spend a little time with me?

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You have come to an antique fair,

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and you've only got one of these with you.

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It's a £5 note.

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What are you going to find, and how much fun are you going to have?

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Well, I promise you there's lots of fun to be had in a fair like this with a £5 note.

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For example, today I've come across old crab face here.

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What do you think about him?

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This thing was probably made in France or Germany between the wars,

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1920 to 1930,

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and I bet you it was bought by a tourist

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who'd sat in a seaside caff

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and had thoroughly enjoyed a dressed, cooked crab.

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Yummy! Old crab face's head comes off, revealing a porcelain interior.

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You could fill it with relish, and it would give endless entertainment.

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Today, crab face could be yours for £2. That's not much, is it?

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So, what else did I find?

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Well, take a gander at this.

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See that? A gorgeous string of beads.

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They too are made of porcelain, but somebody has cunningly covered

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each of the beads in a different iridescent glaze.

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Just look at these colours.

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Here we've got a mottled tortoiseshelly one, look.

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And here a jade-looking bead.

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This one looks like a bit of amethyst.

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And I love the Yves Klein blue-mottled one.

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Don't you? Almost the same colour as this Yves Klein blue table.

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Absolutely delicious.

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Who has treated the otherwise plain, white, boring, oval beads in this way?

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Well, it could be done by the 1930s factory Ruskin, outside Birmingham,

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or Pilkington's, another factory a few years earlier outside Manchester,

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because both of those factories-produced pieces

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with these mottled, iridescent glazes, kind of down-time-type production,

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when they weren't throwing pots.

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But what did it cost?

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Actually, it cost me £1.50.

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So I've even got £1.50 change out of my fiver,

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I've got two delightful objects, I've had a thoroughly entertaining morning,

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I'm going home with something that's not only intriguing but also of value and is useful.

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Where else can you do that?

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The answer?

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A Bargain Hunt fair.

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# Spend a little time with me. #

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Are these searchlights?

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Are they aircraft lights?

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I wasn't around in the Second World War.

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I wasn't insinuating you were.

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I just wondered if you'd come across similar things.

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Thank you so much.

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Gordon Bennett, you two have got the attention span of a gnat between you, haven't you?

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Listen, listen. Whoa.

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What's funny about that?

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Why do I always get the nutters? Why?

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Well, at least they look vaguely excited.

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OK, let's just have a quick catch-up, then.

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How many items have we bought?

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-One.

-One!

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-We were doing so well.

-I know!

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But is it going to end badly?

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What do you think about that?

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Oh, I quite like that, actually.

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-Hooray!

-It's soapstone.

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-Yeah. I was going to say it's stone.

-It's African. It's Zimbabwean.

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It's been mounted on something.

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It's quite modern, but this African art is actually quite traditional but still feels very modern.

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Oh, it's got a plaque on.

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"Mother nursing sick child.

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"F Madamombe, Zimbabwe, 1987."

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Yeah, so there you go. I spent some of my childhood in Zimbabwe,

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and so I know this work, and it's from the Mashona tribe in the northern part of Zimbabwe, mainly.

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And it's very collectable. Now, I don't know whether this person

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is a particularly well-known artist, and it makes a big difference.

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Some of the artists can make a lot of money,

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but we've got literally 18 minutes to decipher whether this is a particularly well-known artist.

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-What's the trade price on the Zimbabwean stone?

-The very, very best is 140.

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I mean, I don't know. I'm a bit confused with this one because I would have that for myself.

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I think for the amount of money,

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and not to be sure whether it's the right artist, to pay that kind of money for...

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If it was right, it could be worth thousands.

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-I think... I like it.

-It's a real punt.

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I tell you what, can we just stand her up to make sure?

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It'll be very heavy, yeah.

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I see soapstone is a soft stone, yeah? So it is easily...

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-Oh, this is her hair.

-Yeah.

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-Fabulous.

-I love her.

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-I think she's fantastic.

-I really like her, actually.

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-Can she be £100?

-No, sir. Honestly, it's 140.

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It's an interesting thing.

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-But, Jez, you like it.

-I do like it.

-And I like it.

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It's really, really different.

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-We could go for...

-..a chance.

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We could take a risk. We should go for it.

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The auction might put a bit of research in.

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If we can find the artist as a known artist, then it might have a chance.

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-I utterly adore it.

-We all like it.

0:17:010:17:02

-Yep. Excellent.

-We'll have it. Thank you.

0:17:020:17:05

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:17:050:17:06

-Allo, allo.

-Oh, hello.

-Hello.

-Have you just bought it?

0:17:090:17:12

-Yes.

-Zimbabwe.

-Zimbabwe. You recognise it, too.

0:17:120:17:15

Well, I do, really, because I went to Chelsea Flower Show this year

0:17:150:17:19

and they'd got a whole stand of this Zimbabwean soft-ish but coloured stone carving.

0:17:190:17:27

It looked fantastic.

0:17:270:17:28

It's wonderful. I love it too.

0:17:280:17:30

-And that at Chelsea would cost you £1,200.

-Absolutely right.

0:17:300:17:34

And what did you just pay for it?

0:17:340:17:36

-15,000.

-You never did!

0:17:360:17:38

Well, you're a wally, then, aren't you?

0:17:380:17:41

-No, come on. How much did you pay for it?

-140.

0:17:410:17:43

-How much?

-140.

0:17:430:17:45

-Oh! Mother and baby - what's more evocative...?

-I know, I know!

0:17:450:17:48

-Don't you want to own it?

-I do want to own it. Well, we do own it!

0:17:480:17:52

Well, good on you, girls.

0:17:520:17:54

-Thank you.

-They've done well.

0:17:540:17:56

They haven't finished. They've got one more to go.

0:17:560:17:59

-Good luck with that.

-Thanks.

0:17:590:18:01

So, finally, the Blues are really getting into the swing of things,

0:18:010:18:05

and with 10 minutes to go, Migs is taking charge of the Reds.

0:18:050:18:09

Look out.

0:18:090:18:11

-I'm drawn back to the spoons.

-What spoons? Oh, right.

0:18:110:18:14

The Dutch spoons, yeah. They haven't gone away.

0:18:140:18:17

But the spoons might be a good shout, if you like them.

0:18:170:18:19

And we are definitely running out of time.

0:18:190:18:23

The Blues haven't moved far.

0:18:230:18:25

They're at the same store, eyeing up a silver chain purse for £120.

0:18:250:18:31

It's chainmail silver, too.

0:18:310:18:33

This is interesting because this is a different hallmark.

0:18:330:18:36

It's a foreign piece.

0:18:360:18:38

I'm not a purse kind of guy but I think that...

0:18:380:18:41

-It's quite stylish, isn't it?

-..is a stunner. Have a feel of that.

0:18:410:18:45

You'd only want to put notes in, wouldn't you?

0:18:450:18:47

Someone would buy that to use it.

0:18:470:18:49

Can you imagine going to a special event somewhere and it's good enough and it's good quality enough,

0:18:490:18:54

and the condition is there, that you could actually use it.

0:18:540:18:58

-It's quite nice, yeah.

-I think that's pretty drop-dead gorgeous.

0:18:580:19:02

-And it's different.

-What's the best on that one?

0:19:020:19:04

-125.

-125.

-I'm sure it's gone up a fiver!

0:19:040:19:07

-It has!

-120, then.

0:19:070:19:09

-I tell you, you are good.

-Shall we have it the other way - 115?

0:19:110:19:14

-I think it's up to you, but I rate it.

-Yeah.

0:19:140:19:17

-What do you think?

-Have a feel.

0:19:170:19:19

It's really heavy, isn't it?

0:19:190:19:21

It is. It's lovely.

0:19:210:19:22

-Yeah.

-And you've got eight minutes.

0:19:220:19:26

-How much did you say, 110?

-I think we should... Oh. I like it.

0:19:260:19:30

How about 113, because I've got three change?

0:19:300:19:33

-115.

-115. That's another £5.

0:19:330:19:36

-I think give him 115.

-All right.

-You've done well.

-Thank you.

-I really do.

0:19:360:19:41

Sophie emerges as a hard-nosed negotiator in the dying minutes.

0:19:420:19:48

Can Migs do the same with her spoon?

0:19:480:19:52

-Let's talk.

-OK, let's.

0:19:520:19:54

£40.

0:19:540:19:56

Look at her face. How can you refuse that face?

0:19:560:19:59

That's a hell of a discount.

0:19:590:20:01

-I think 45 would be a pretty good price.

-42.

0:20:010:20:05

42, we got a deal.

0:20:050:20:06

-42.

-42. Thank you very much indeed.

0:20:060:20:10

-Thank you.

-Can I just ask you a question?

0:20:100:20:12

-Yes.

-Because I think that was...

0:20:120:20:14

This is a good bit of dealing technology here.

0:20:140:20:17

-Because you'd have taken 35 quid for that, or 40, would you?

-No.

0:20:170:20:20

-But you'd have come down a bit more than 42?

-No, seriously.

0:20:200:20:24

I know you're helping them and for that we are genuinely grateful but...

0:20:240:20:27

I think...

0:20:270:20:28

Steady!

0:20:300:20:33

I think they did well, don't you?

0:20:330:20:34

£69 down to £42.

0:20:340:20:38

And their last item is in the bag.

0:20:380:20:40

OK, the hour is up.

0:20:400:20:43

Time for me to find the teams and see how much leftover lolly there is,

0:20:430:20:47

because, of course, the experts have still to go and bag the bonus buy.

0:20:470:20:52

Let's check out first what the Red team bought, eh?

0:20:520:20:55

£36 was paid for the night watchman's rattle.

0:20:570:21:02

The nuts pomander, a rather cute £19.

0:21:020:21:06

And they went Dutch on the silver spoon, for 42.

0:21:060:21:11

This is very matey, isn't it?

0:21:110:21:12

-Yeah.

-Have you had a good time?

0:21:120:21:14

We have. We've found lots of interesting things.

0:21:140:21:17

-Lots of interesting things, but you've spent a pathetic amount.

-I know.

0:21:170:21:21

Really pathetic. How pathetic was it?

0:21:210:21:23

We're careful shoppers. We spent £97.

0:21:230:21:25

97? I gave you £300 to spend and you only spent £97.

0:21:250:21:28

-We couldn't find anything we liked that was interesting.

-Really?

-Mm-hm.

0:21:280:21:32

Well, OK, fine. £97, then.

0:21:320:21:34

I'll have 203 quid off you.

0:21:340:21:37

-Oh, if you must.

-£203.

0:21:370:21:40

Well, you've obviously had a peach of a morning, Serrell.

0:21:400:21:43

-They've been good fun and I'm going to go and blitz this.

-You're going to blitz the lot.

0:21:430:21:48

-That means spend it.

-I don't know what on, but it's going to go.

0:21:480:21:51

-Is it?

-Yes.

-All right, fine. Well, very, very good luck.

0:21:510:21:54

Tell you what, why don't we remind ourselves what the Blues bought, eh?

0:21:540:21:58

The glass vases were a plum pair at £17.

0:21:590:22:04

They splashed out £140 on the Zimbabwean carving.

0:22:040:22:09

And the silver chain mail handbag cost a pretty penny. Actually, £115.

0:22:090:22:15

Look at the grins on their faces!

0:22:160:22:19

I've never seen two happier people

0:22:190:22:21

and their expert doesn't look too bad, either.

0:22:210:22:23

We've had a whale of a time.

0:22:230:22:24

These two have been brilliant and we've bought three fabulous things.

0:22:240:22:28

-£272, better than all this £50, £90 lark.

-I do agree.

0:22:280:22:34

272. Would that be £28 of leftover lolly, then?

0:22:340:22:37

-Yes.

-Who's got it?

-Me.

-You've got it, Soph?

0:22:370:22:39

OK, come on, darling, let's have your £28.

0:22:390:22:42

Which is a bit of a challenge for old Harper, really, because...

0:22:420:22:46

you know, it's very nice, £28,

0:22:460:22:49

but you're not going to find anything stellar with that.

0:22:490:22:52

-I think I've got a good chance.

-Well, nobody better to have a go

0:22:520:22:55

than you, Harper, very good luck for that.

0:22:550:22:57

Anyway, good luck, girls, because we're heading off somewhere really, really interesting.

0:22:570:23:02

Boy, have I got a hidden gem for you today!

0:23:060:23:09

In a Wolverhampton suburb.

0:23:090:23:11

This is Bantock House Museum, a lovingly restored Georgian house.

0:23:110:23:17

These days, it's home to a treasure trove of objects

0:23:220:23:26

that enthusiastic collectors have donated over the years.

0:23:260:23:30

Daisy St Claire Mander, in about 1952,

0:23:310:23:35

left the museum her collection of dolls,

0:23:350:23:39

some 300-strong,

0:23:390:23:41

and I've made a perfectly arbitrary selection

0:23:410:23:44

of just four to share with you today.

0:23:440:23:48

Now, I make the oldest one the fellow on the far side.

0:23:480:23:52

She's got one of those faces that says, "Look deep into my eyes."

0:23:520:23:58

Slightly spooky. Some would say she's not an oil painting.

0:23:580:24:01

Actually, she IS an oil painting.

0:24:010:24:04

Her face is painted in oil paints, on a simple, shaped plug of wood,

0:24:040:24:12

probably carved by a loving parent with his penknife

0:24:120:24:16

and painted up, in about 1720.

0:24:160:24:20

That hair on that doll is real human hair,

0:24:200:24:23

that's been entwined and woven into kiss curls

0:24:230:24:28

on either side of her head,

0:24:280:24:30

and probably put on 100 years after the original wooden head was carved.

0:24:300:24:35

Scroll forward 100 years to about 1820,

0:24:350:24:40

and dolls had become rather more sophisticated.

0:24:400:24:43

This girl has got a wooden head again,

0:24:430:24:46

this time with no real hair, just a rather fetching painted hairdo.

0:24:460:24:52

Interesting that she's got pierced ears,

0:24:520:24:55

so that you could play with toy earrings and dress her up.

0:24:550:24:59

But the feature I really like is her articulated body.

0:24:590:25:03

Fun, isn't it?

0:25:030:25:05

HE MAKES SQUEAKING NOISES

0:25:050:25:07

The next major improvement for dolls we see in ol' wax face here.

0:25:070:25:12

She's got glass eyes, indeed lovely blue glass eyes, inset into the wax.

0:25:120:25:19

She would date from around 1840 or so,

0:25:190:25:22

and what would have intrigued any child with a doll like this

0:25:220:25:27

is the fact that she's got wax feet.

0:25:270:25:30

There are her sweet little toe-toes.

0:25:300:25:32

So realistic, you can almost...

0:25:320:25:35

-HE SNIFFS

-..smell them.

0:25:350:25:37

But the ultimate in sophisticated 19th century dolls

0:25:370:25:41

has to be this girl.

0:25:410:25:43

This is a bisque-headed doll, a form of porcelain that's unglazed.

0:25:430:25:48

The maker is Armand Marseilles.

0:25:480:25:51

These dolls all have mould numbers

0:25:510:25:54

impressed in the back of their necks,

0:25:540:25:57

which is what makes them so interesting to collectors.

0:25:570:26:00

Each of the mould numbers relates to a style of head,

0:26:000:26:04

and this girl's got an open mouth with several teeth,

0:26:040:26:07

rather starey black eyes,

0:26:070:26:09

and incredibly healthy, pudgy, florid cheeks.

0:26:090:26:14

The big question today is, of course,

0:26:140:26:17

is it going to be child's play for our teams over at the auction,

0:26:170:26:21

or will they just be a lot of cry babies,

0:26:210:26:23

crying out for their mummies and daddies?

0:26:230:26:26

Well, we've trotted up the M6, vaguely, from Oswestry to Knutsford,

0:26:370:26:42

where we find ourselves in Knutsford's fine art auctioneers,

0:26:420:26:45

Frank R Marshall, with Nick Hall.

0:26:450:26:48

-Nick.

-Welcome, Tim.

-Very nice to see you.

-You too.

0:26:480:26:50

Now, the Red team, their first item is this so-called pigeon scarer.

0:26:500:26:54

Is it a pigeon scarer, or a night watchman's rattle?

0:26:540:26:58

So many different names. All the same thing, really.

0:26:580:27:01

We've gone for a bird-scarer.

0:27:010:27:02

Nice thing. And it's old and it's genuine.

0:27:020:27:05

-Yeah, good old Victorian one.

-How much?

0:27:050:27:07

-40 to 60.

-£36 paid.

-Good.

0:27:070:27:11

Next is the coquilla nut pomander.

0:27:110:27:14

How old do you think that is, Nick?

0:27:140:27:16

-About a week yesterday.

-Really?

-Yeah, it's a modern tourist piece.

0:27:160:27:20

It's well made, it's decorative, but no age to it.

0:27:200:27:23

It could easily have been made of plastic but actually it is nut.

0:27:230:27:26

-Ah, it's a proper nut.

-What's it worth?

0:27:260:27:29

Er, £20 or so.

0:27:290:27:30

OK, £19 paid.

0:27:300:27:31

There could be a pound's profit in that. How exciting is that?

0:27:310:27:35

And lastly, then, is this Dutch spoon.

0:27:350:27:38

Yeah, nice bit of export-ware.

0:27:380:27:40

-Which is chunky.

-Mm, decorative.

0:27:400:27:43

I don't know what the mythology is with these long-beaked

0:27:430:27:46

crane-like birds, do you?

0:27:460:27:47

I suspect it's that Japaneseque influence

0:27:470:27:50

that we see in some of these earlier silver bits.

0:27:500:27:52

Yeah, could be, couldn't it?

0:27:520:27:54

-What's your estimate on it?

-40-60.

0:27:540:27:56

OK, £42 paid.

0:27:560:27:57

I think this team have got it just about spot-on.

0:27:570:28:00

I don't think they will even need their bonus buy

0:28:000:28:03

but just in case, let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:030:28:06

Well, this is jolly, isn't it?

0:28:060:28:08

Now listen, you girls, you spent £97, right?

0:28:080:28:11

One of the most uniquely miserable amounts of money you could have spent.

0:28:110:28:15

We gave you 300 notes and you spent 97.

0:28:150:28:18

Which means you had £203, P Serrell, to blow on the bonus buy.

0:28:180:28:23

-What did you blow it on?

-Well, I spent £180 and...

0:28:230:28:27

It's gone!

0:28:290:28:31

-Where is it?

-Well, that's a little one, isn't it?

0:28:310:28:33

Stop mucking about now. Come along, Philip.

0:28:330:28:36

Settle down, dearie. What did you buy?

0:28:360:28:38

-This.

-We're sitting on it.

0:28:380:28:41

-I knew it, actually!

-You knew it?

0:28:410:28:43

-How did you know it?

-No, I like this.

0:28:430:28:45

-Two happy-looking ladies. Is it comfortable?

-It is lovely.

0:28:450:28:48

-Do you like it?

-I do.

0:28:480:28:49

How are you girls with leather?

0:28:490:28:51

-Experts.

-Are you?

0:28:510:28:54

It's not old. It's meant to look like...what, 1920s?

0:28:540:28:57

Yeah. It's clever, isn't it? If this thing is brand Harry spankers,

0:28:570:29:01

how do you get this clapped-out leather look,

0:29:010:29:04

which looks as if it's been in a gentlemen's club for 50 years,

0:29:040:29:08

-which is the look that you want, isn't it?

-Yes, and it cost £180

0:29:080:29:11

and I think it's a really cool thing. I think it's a good-looking thing.

0:29:110:29:15

And more importantly, I think that if you wanted to go

0:29:150:29:18

and replace this, it would cost you a minimum of £300 to £500.

0:29:180:29:22

-Well, at least.

-I would be surprised if it didn't show you a profit.

0:29:220:29:27

-So what do you think?

-We like it.

-You like it?

0:29:270:29:30

-What do you think, Jens?

-Yeah, I like it. You couldn't get one cheaper.

0:29:300:29:33

Anyway, for the audience at home, let's find out

0:29:330:29:36

what the auctioneer thinks about Philip Serrell's settee.

0:29:360:29:40

Well, Nick, you're sitting on it.

0:29:400:29:43

-Very comfortable, isn't it?

-Not bad.

-Yeah, it's all right.

0:29:430:29:46

When was this thing made, do you reckon?

0:29:460:29:48

-Oh, it's brand-new.

-Is it?

-No age at all.

0:29:480:29:50

Just a nice-quality bit of leather.

0:29:500:29:52

This looks as if it's got a bit of age to it.

0:29:520:29:55

Yes, it's sort of artificially aged, and that shabby-chic look, hasn't it?

0:29:550:29:59

So, found by Mr Serrell for £180, and he really rates this, right?

0:29:590:30:04

Brand-new. How's it going to do in the auction?

0:30:040:30:06

Trouble is, of course, it's a nice bit of modern home furnishing

0:30:060:30:10

sat in the middle of our antiques and collectors' sales!

0:30:100:30:13

It might be a struggle with the audience we've got today.

0:30:130:30:16

Right... So how much, then?

0:30:160:30:17

-I've put 100, 150 on it.

-100 to 150?

-Yeah.

0:30:170:30:20

He's going to be crying in his beer.

0:30:200:30:22

Of course, the teams may not go with it.

0:30:220:30:25

Anyway, thank you very much.

0:30:250:30:27

-OK, Tim.

-Let's check out what the Blues bought.

0:30:270:30:31

Soph and Jez are excited for the Blues,

0:30:310:30:34

their first item being this pair of multicoloured glass vases...

0:30:340:30:38

-Lucky them!

-...which I think are absolutely hideous.

0:30:380:30:41

Yeah, not my favourite lot in the sale, I'll be honest.

0:30:410:30:44

It's what we term "end of day" glass.

0:30:440:30:46

Yeah. Could be the end of the week, those.

0:30:460:30:48

At least they're not cracked or messed about with.

0:30:480:30:51

No, they're in good condition. Relatively decorative,

0:30:510:30:54

not expensive. They should get away.

0:30:540:30:56

-What do you call "not expensive"?

-I've put about £30 on them.

0:30:560:30:59

£30? Really? They only paid £17.

0:30:590:31:03

They'll be completely chuffed if you achieve that, Nick, I tell you!

0:31:030:31:07

Next is the Zimbabwean soapstone group, which, I have to say,

0:31:070:31:12

-I admired and coveted quite a lot in the fair.

-It's a good thing.

0:31:120:31:17

-It's a great lump, isn't it?

-There's a lot of artistry in these things.

0:31:170:31:20

It's part of a group of artwork we term "Shona art", from the tribe Shona.

0:31:200:31:25

-Mm-hm.

-This particular piece is by a chap called Fabian Madamombe.

0:31:250:31:30

He's part of the second generation of Shona artists, born in the Fifties,

0:31:300:31:34

and can do quite well at auction.

0:31:340:31:36

-So you've done research on this?

-I've done a history on that one.

0:31:360:31:40

-So, what do you think it's worth?

-Well, we've got a wide spread.

0:31:400:31:43

We've put 100 to 200 on it, it's a bit of a niche market,

0:31:430:31:46

but it should do well.

0:31:460:31:47

Well, they paid £140, actually.

0:31:470:31:49

-Hopefully, a profit in that.

-More or less spot-on.

0:31:490:31:52

Yeah. Sculpture's doing well at the minute.

0:31:520:31:54

Good. And lastly, and for something completely different,

0:31:540:31:57

how about a solid silver chain-mesh handbag?

0:31:570:32:00

-For those evenings in the Knutsford wine bars.

-Yes, absolutely!

0:32:000:32:03

-How do you rate this?

-Erm, £100, £150.

0:32:030:32:06

Silver's doing well.

0:32:060:32:08

-It's a decorative item, good order. Ought to do it.

-OK. £115 they paid.

0:32:080:32:13

And I think the important thing is that this bag doesn't seem to be snagged at all.

0:32:130:32:18

I mean, that mesh is quite delicate, and it is in remarkably good nick.

0:32:180:32:22

-Perfect condition, yeah.

-So according to your estimate, it's going to be just fab.

0:32:220:32:27

-We'll do our best.

-They too are not going to need their bonus buy, perhaps.

0:32:270:32:31

But let's go and have a look at it anyway, shall we?

0:32:310:32:34

OK, girls, £272 you've spent, which was a magnificent effort,

0:32:340:32:39

giving the old boy only £28 to spend.

0:32:390:32:41

So what did David Harper spend it on?

0:32:410:32:44

Right, OK, a rather handsome Roman gentleman.

0:32:440:32:48

He is Italian, and I think he's 19th century,

0:32:480:32:51

and it's a Grand Tour piece.

0:32:510:32:53

It's a bronze Roman bust mounted on a horn plinth.

0:32:530:32:57

Have a feel of him. A lovely thing, very unusual, nice weight.

0:32:570:33:01

-It is, actually.

-Definitely bronze, yeah.

0:33:010:33:04

-It's bronze.

-So, how old is it?

0:33:040:33:06

19th century.

0:33:060:33:08

-It's a big century, obviously!

-100 years!

0:33:080:33:11

-Very safe answer there.

-I think I've got away with it, don't you?

0:33:110:33:15

-They were impressed.

-How much?

0:33:150:33:17

Well, I only had £28, and I blew every last pound,

0:33:170:33:20

and it took me a very, very long time to get him for £28. That's all I had.

0:33:200:33:24

-What do you think, Jez? Is that something you'd buy?

-Yes. I do like it.

0:33:240:33:28

But it's a real antique, and it's a novelty thing, and it's quirky.

0:33:280:33:32

It's got to do £50, I think. My opinion, it should do £50 and more.

0:33:320:33:37

-We're standing by here, David, for your prediction.

-Thank you, Tim.

0:33:370:33:41

But now, for the audience at home, let's find out

0:33:410:33:44

what the auctioneer thinks about David's little bust.

0:33:440:33:47

Well, what do you make of that little sweetheart?

0:33:470:33:50

It's a sweet little thing, really, a nice bit of Grand Tour memorabilia.

0:33:500:33:54

Probably 19th century.

0:33:540:33:56

Whether the top and bottom started out life together, I'm not sure, but it sits well.

0:33:560:34:00

It's an odd mix, isn't it? That's a bit of horn there,

0:34:000:34:03

and then is that wood or another solid lump of horn on that little plinth?

0:34:030:34:07

-I think that's all horn, the base.

-Is it?

-Yeah.

0:34:070:34:10

And then this little bronze bust on top of a Roman emperor, I guess.

0:34:100:34:15

-Nice little thing.

-It's got the look.

0:34:150:34:17

OK, now, David Harper's cunning.

0:34:170:34:20

-Mm.

-What's your estimate on this?

-50 to 80.

0:34:200:34:22

-£28 he paid.

-He did well.

-He did well.

-Mm. A good eye.

0:34:220:34:26

-Thank you very much, Nick.

-You're welcome.

0:34:260:34:29

-So, got any worries about anything, Jens?

-No, nothing at all.

0:34:360:34:39

No? No particular item that you've bought giving you a problem, Migs?

0:34:390:34:43

-No.

-No? What about you, Phil?

0:34:430:34:45

I think they're going to do very well.

0:34:450:34:47

Well, this is exciting, isn't it? We're on the edge of the abyss.

0:34:470:34:50

-Here it comes, the rattle.

-Just settle down.

0:34:500:34:53

Lot number 40 is the Victorian stained-beech bird scarer.

0:34:530:34:57

I've got a bit of commission interest. Straight in at £20.

0:34:570:35:00

-Oh!

-Any advance?

0:35:000:35:02

£20 with me on commission.

0:35:020:35:03

At 20. 5. Book's out, madam. It's with you, seated.

0:35:030:35:06

30 behind you. 35, second row.

0:35:060:35:08

40, the gent.

0:35:080:35:10

You're in profit.

0:35:100:35:12

45 the bid's online. If you're all sure, selling at 45...

0:35:120:35:16

Lovely, £45 on the internet.

0:35:160:35:18

We like that. You're plus £9. That's a proper job.

0:35:180:35:21

Lot number 41 is the 20th century

0:35:210:35:26

subcontinent carved and pierced coquilla nut pomander.

0:35:260:35:30

A bit of work gone into it.

0:35:300:35:31

Where are we going to say? £20? £20. Someone surely will take the bid.

0:35:310:35:35

Some very interested parties in the far corner willing you on.

0:35:350:35:38

£20, someone, somewhere, surely.

0:35:380:35:41

Got to be worth that. 15?

0:35:410:35:43

Take a tenner, get the ball rolling.

0:35:430:35:45

Or get the nut rolling. 10, I'm bid. 15 seated.

0:35:450:35:47

Still in, sir? 15 seated.

0:35:470:35:49

I've got 20 in the front, madam in the second row. 25 behind you.

0:35:490:35:53

Anyone else coming in? At £25. Any advance? Are we all done?

0:35:530:35:56

You sure? At 25.

0:35:560:35:58

-And that is plus £6, yes?

-Monster profits!

0:35:580:36:02

Nothing the matter with a profit, is there?

0:36:020:36:05

Lot number 42 is the early 20th century Dutch export

0:36:050:36:08

white-metal souvenir spoon.

0:36:080:36:10

£20 to start. £20 anywhere?

0:36:100:36:12

Surely at £20. Nice bit of Dutch silverware. 20 bid online.

0:36:120:36:15

Thank you for the internet. £20. 5 anywhere? Anywhere else?

0:36:150:36:19

The bid's online. It's going. It's going at £20. I have to sell.

0:36:190:36:23

I cannot believe it. £20.

0:36:230:36:26

-You were unlucky.

-£20. You are minus £22 on that.

0:36:260:36:29

You were plus 15, so that means you're minus 7 overall.

0:36:290:36:34

-I am, as they say, without breath.

-Mm-hm.

0:36:340:36:36

But anyway, breathless or not, are you going to go with the bonus buy?

0:36:360:36:40

-Are you going to go with that leather sofa?

-Definitely.

0:36:400:36:43

We're definitely going with the bonus buy.

0:36:430:36:45

I can tell you now, the auctioneer's estimate is 100 to 150,

0:36:450:36:48

so he's not that optimistic.

0:36:480:36:50

The big question is, who's right?

0:36:500:36:52

And here it comes.

0:36:520:36:53

Lot number 46 is the good-quality

0:36:530:36:57

modern brown leather sofa in the Art Deco taste.

0:36:570:36:59

Commission interest.

0:36:590:37:01

I'm coming in at £100.

0:37:010:37:04

The bid's with me at £100. 110.

0:37:040:37:06

120 with me now. 120 bid.

0:37:060:37:07

130. 140. 150.

0:37:070:37:10

Bid's on the phone. The book's out.

0:37:100:37:13

It's 140, and you bid at 150. Thank you, sir. 150 in the room.

0:37:130:37:16

160. 170 in the room, sir.

0:37:160:37:18

With you at 170. At 170 now.

0:37:180:37:21

180. Phone bid at 180.

0:37:210:37:23

190. Back in the room at 190.

0:37:230:37:25

< Well done, Phil.

0:37:250:37:26

200 here. Phone bidder at £200.

0:37:260:37:29

210 with you, sir. 220.

0:37:290:37:31

230. £230, all done.

0:37:310:37:34

Last chance. Selling.

0:37:340:37:37

-GAVEL BANGS

-I love you!

0:37:370:37:38

Oh, wonderful!

0:37:380:37:40

Cor, blimey O'Riley!

0:37:400:37:42

£230. That is plus £50, which means overall you are, miraculously,

0:37:420:37:49

thanks to Philip, transported into plus 43.

0:37:490:37:53

£43. The big thing is, do not tell the Blues a thing, all right?

0:37:530:37:57

-Mum's the word, all right? Well done, Phil.

-Zipped.

0:37:570:38:00

Jez, you're looking a bit nervy, love.

0:38:080:38:11

Oh, I'm really nervous.

0:38:110:38:12

-Why are you really nervous?

-I don't know!

0:38:120:38:15

-I'll be all right in a minute.

-Soph, are you nervous?

0:38:150:38:18

-I'm excited!

-You're excited.

0:38:180:38:20

How excited are you on a scale of excitement out of one to ten?

0:38:200:38:23

-Trembling.

-Trembling? Oh, that's good.

0:38:230:38:25

We love trembling and really frightened.

0:38:250:38:28

The first lot up are the vases, and here they come.

0:38:280:38:30

62 is the pair of

0:38:300:38:33

late 19th century end-of-day multicoloured glass vases.

0:38:330:38:37

I am so excited!

0:38:370:38:39

I've got a bit of commission interest, as well.

0:38:390:38:42

I'm going to start straight in with me now at £25.

0:38:420:38:45

-Ooh!

-25, the bid's with me. £25.

0:38:450:38:47

Any advance? 30 I can take. 5. 40.

0:38:470:38:50

5 with me. Are you still bidding?

0:38:500:38:52

It's £45. The bid's with me. All done?

0:38:520:38:55

That's three to twenty.

0:38:560:38:58

I make that plus 28.

0:38:580:39:00

Plus 28, chickens!

0:39:000:39:02

Lot number 63, nice bit of stone carving, this, from the Shona tribe.

0:39:020:39:08

This particular piece is by Fabian Madamombe.

0:39:080:39:11

-Fabian Madamombe.

-Know him well.

0:39:110:39:13

I've got commission interest.

0:39:130:39:16

I'm going to start the bidding with me at £100.

0:39:160:39:19

Anyone else coming in? With me at £100. I'll take 110 now.

0:39:190:39:22

Any advance? 110. 120.

0:39:220:39:25

130. The book's out.

0:39:250:39:26

With you, sir, seated, at 130 now.

0:39:260:39:29

130, I'm selling.

0:39:290:39:30

He has sold it for £130.

0:39:300:39:33

I mean, I can't believe it. That's minus £10.

0:39:330:39:36

-Minus 10? Oh!

-It's minus £10.

-It's OK.

0:39:360:39:38

Lot number 64

0:39:380:39:40

is the George V imported sterling silver mesh lady's cocktail bag.

0:39:400:39:43

What are you going to say for this? £100 for it. 100 somewhere, surely.

0:39:430:39:48

100 for it. 80. 70.

0:39:480:39:49

Get the ball rolling at £50.

0:39:490:39:51

-Oh, no!

-£50?

0:39:510:39:52

Solid, hallmarked silver mesh evening purse.

0:39:520:39:55

Thank you, sir, 50 online. The bid's online at £50.

0:39:550:39:58

-Oh, no.

-The bid's online at £50.

0:39:580:40:01

It will be sold, make no mistake. All sure? Thank you, madam, 55. 60.

0:40:010:40:05

-Go on!

-In the room at £60. Still bidding here?

0:40:050:40:08

65. You all finished online?

0:40:080:40:10

It's in the room at 65. All done, if you're sure.

0:40:100:40:13

Minus 32.

0:40:140:40:16

Right? I mean, chin up, because that is not good luck, I tell you.

0:40:160:40:21

That silver bag, you'd melt that down for £100.

0:40:210:40:25

-And that's just the metal.

-Yeah.

0:40:250:40:27

So, what are you going to do about your little bust?

0:40:270:40:29

-Do you fancy going with the little bust?

-Definitely.

0:40:290:40:32

You're going to have a tickle with that? I don't blame you.

0:40:320:40:35

But on this current form, anything can happen.

0:40:350:40:37

Anyway, here comes your bust.

0:40:370:40:39

Lot 68 is the 19th century Grand Tour

0:40:390:40:42

bronze miniature bust of a Roman emperor.

0:40:420:40:45

50 for it. 40.

0:40:450:40:47

30. Surely someone at £30.

0:40:470:40:49

Thank you, sir. 30, I'm bid. 5 online.

0:40:490:40:51

40 now. With you, sir, at £40.

0:40:510:40:53

Any advance on £40? Are you bidding online?

0:40:530:40:55

45.

0:40:550:40:57

45 online. 50 with you, sir. Back in the room at £50.

0:40:570:41:00

5 online, sir? Can you squeeze another one?

0:41:000:41:03

55 against you. At £55.

0:41:030:41:06

£55 is, at least, £2 up from 30.

0:41:070:41:11

-That's plus £27.

-Brilliant.

0:41:110:41:12

Not half bad, matey. Well done. And that means overall you are minus £5.

0:41:120:41:19

-Oh!

-That is so close. This is the helter-skelter of life.

0:41:190:41:23

Now, minus £5 could be a winning score, so don't talk to the Reds, all right?

0:41:230:41:27

-Thank you.

-OK.

0:41:270:41:29

-So, teams, been chatting, have we?

-No.

-No?

0:41:370:41:41

Well, all I can say is that each team should be very, very grateful

0:41:410:41:45

that they've got such great experts

0:41:450:41:48

-who've done so incredibly well for them today!

-Oh!

0:41:480:41:53

It's all a question of scale, though, and I have to reveal

0:41:530:41:56

-that the runners-up today, unfortunately, are the Blues.

-Oh!

0:41:560:42:00

Your overall score is minus £5, and that just isn't good enough, girls,

0:42:010:42:05

just not good enough today.

0:42:050:42:07

But we've had a rip-roaring time. Have you enjoyed it?

0:42:070:42:10

-Absolutely.

-You look a bit gutted. Are you all right?

-Fine!

0:42:100:42:13

-They've been wonderful.

-I knew I'd lost.

0:42:130:42:16

Winning isn't everything, it's taking part, and you've been great.

0:42:160:42:20

But the victors today, by a long chalky,

0:42:200:42:23

because they're going to actually take home £43... Migs?

0:42:230:42:27

But before you go into congratulatory mode,

0:42:270:42:30

-I have to tell you that £50 profit came from our Phil today.

-It did.

0:42:300:42:35

I mean, £50 off that old leather sofa,

0:42:350:42:37

that was a considerable achievement.

0:42:370:42:39

So, we've been everywhere, all round the houses,

0:42:390:42:42

but ultimately, you've come up trumps.

0:42:420:42:45

-Thanks to our hero.

-Yeah, he is our hero, isn't he?

0:42:450:42:49

I mean, not everybody would make the Bargain Hunt team

0:42:490:42:52

lug a two-seater solid leather settee

0:42:520:42:55

-halfway across the north-west of England!

-Three counties!

0:42:550:42:58

Three counties, and counting, to make a profit.

0:42:580:43:02

So if it hadn't made any money, you'd have been in trouble, Serrell.

0:43:020:43:06

I'm glad you've had a good time. Thank you very much, Phil. Congratulations.

0:43:060:43:10

-And join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting. Yes?

-Yes!

0:43:100:43:13

Subtitles by Red Bee Media

0:43:260:43:29

Email [email protected]

0:43:290:43:32

Two teams do battle for that elusive profit at auction in Oswestry. Philip Serrell and a team of paranormal investigators are up against David Harper and two waitresses, but who will serve up the winning bargains? It is a fight to the finish!

Meanwhile, host Tim Wonnacott has a date with four dolls at the fascinating Bantock House Museum.