Builth Wells 3 Bargain Hunt


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Builth Wells 3

Antiques challenge. Jonathan Pratt keeps wandering off from his team-mates at the Royal Welsh Showground, and host Tim Wonnacott visits the Lady Lever Art Gallery.


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We're keeping it simple today, Bargain Hunters.

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Meet Jan and Jan, and Dave and Dave.

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Two teams of Bargain Hunters.

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And, of course, me.

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Now, introductions are over.

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Let's go bargain hunting.

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We're in the Royal Welsh Showground, in the heart of Wales.

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But our teams won't have time to enjoy the scenery.

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WELSH MALE VOICE CHOIR SINGS

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Oh, no. They've got to go shopping.

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Coming up on today's show:

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The Blues try some hard bargaining.

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-45.

-No!

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The Reds try hard to trust their expert.

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Smell like me.

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What a load of rubbish!

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And I head north to the Lady Lever Art Gallery in the village of Port Sunlight.

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But first, let's chat to our teams.

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Well, we're not going to forget anybody's names today, are we,

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because we've got Jan, Jan and Dave, Dave.

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-Jan, Jan, Dave, Dave, hi.

-Hi, Tim.

-Lovely to see you.

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-Now, Jan, you have been great friends with Jan here, haven't you, Jan, for 11 years?

-Yep.

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-How did you first meet?

-She was my boss and we've stayed friends ever since.

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I hope! Until today, maybe.

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No, you'll be fine after today, I can tell.

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What did you do for your boss?

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-Where did you work?

-I was a part-time housekeeper.

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-Hotel business?

-Yeah.

-Lovely.

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-Have you always been in the hotel business, Jan?

-No.

-How did you start?

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I started in around about 1984 when I bought a large house and turned it into a nine-bedroom B&B.

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And then I bought a hotel.

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-And then I sold out and bought another hotel.

-You're a bit of an entrepreneur then.

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-So you know how to turn a bit of money into money, then?

-I hope so.

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Well, let's hope those talents will extend to antiques.

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You're also rather a fine arrows player.

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Well, I try to be. I've been at it for a long time.

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-Chucking the old darts.

-Yes.

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So, how good are you at darts?

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Average, very average, but we go on - it's a bit like this programme - good competition, In It To Win It.

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-But you've got an eye for a bargain, haven't you?

-I had one really good buy, yeah.

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My £2-odd box of jewellery turned me into £250 for one item.

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-Did it really?

-I was pleased with that.

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I should think you were. It's no wonder you chose her as your team mate.

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Do you think you're going to work well together today as a team?

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-I think so.

-I think so. Well, we won't fall out, that's for sure.

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Well, I've heard that before, actually. Very good luck.

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Now for the Blues. Dave, Dave.

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-Hi, Tim.

-You've been friends for 25 years.

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-Indeed.

-But didn't you start off as rivals?

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We had teams that competed against each other, in a boat handling competition.

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Oh, right. This is sea cadets.

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That's right. And then I went on to become one of the national judges

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and was fortunate enough to be judging his team.

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-Ha-ha!

-But they were very good.

-So did you pay him back, then?

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No, I didn't. They were very good.

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-They did win.

-Now, Dave, once upon a time you really were one of the boys in blue, weren't you?

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I was a policeman in Greater Manchester.

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So how come you're not still a copper?

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I came out after 12 years, after a bit of an incident in Yorkshire,

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which is not in Greater Manchester.

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It involved a man with a firearm.

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He drew his gun and I drew my truncheon, and he lost.

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Well, that was a moment, wasn't it?

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Actually, you're very modest,

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because you got the Queen's Commendation for bravery. That's right, yes.

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-Dave, you've inherited a spectacular collection from your son.

-Yeah.

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My son, when he was in Cubs, decided to get his collector's badge and go for spoons, for some unknown reason.

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And we've now got a collection of about a thousand.

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People go all over the world and it's become a bit of a joke.

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People bring back all manner of things. But it's really quite quaint.

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-So what do they do, nick them from the hotels?

-I don't ask them that.

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Whatever they give me is all in good faith.

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So, what are your plans for tactics today? What tactics have you got?

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-We thought we'd buy something nautical...

-Surprise, surprise.

-..and maybe a bit of silver as well.

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Right, fine. Right, well there's your ambition, good luck with it.

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Now, the money moment. Here is your £300. £300 apiece.

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You know the rules, your experts await.

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And off you go, and very, very good luck.

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Well, you know what they say about sailors.

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Let's meet our experts.

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Jonathan Pratt is taking a punt on the Reds.

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And Kate Bliss is betting the farm on the Blues.

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So, Jan and Jan.

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-What is it you're looking for today?

-Silver, some silver.

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-Something quirky.

-Different.

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-Nautical.

-A good theme.

-The theme of the sea.

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-Seafaring, marine, perhaps?

-That sounds good.

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Well, that sounds pretty laid back to me. I like the sound of that.

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Well, we'll start outside and then we'll go inside.

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Let's have a little browse around.

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Shall we start in here? There's a lot to go at. Yeah?

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This is more you, is it not?

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Look at that.

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-Nautical theme.

-I know, it's a nice boat. I was looking at that.

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But a little bit out of our budget, unfortunately. Nice ship, though.

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Ah-harrrrr, it's plain sailing so far for Team Dave, but Jan-Jan are all at sea.

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They've even lost Jonathan already.

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Come on, Jonathan. Our hour's going.

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Come on!

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Move it.

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Blues are heading for their first port of call.

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Dave, do you like the boat up here?

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-On the plate?

-Not really. It looks dead cheap to me.

-It looks what?

-It looks dead cheap.

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-Looks dead cheap?

-I quite like it. Do you?

-He quite likes it.

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Well, let's just go with the flow.

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Can you tell us a little bit about it?

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-It's Royal Doulton.

-Is it? What kind of age though?

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-1930s-'40s.

-It is a '30s one?

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Lovely.

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There's a series of them.

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Thank you. They're called chargers.

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Let's have a look, shall we? HMS Victory, here we go.

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It's a good-sized plate, isn't it?

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Or charger. It's really made for decorative purposes, obviously.

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Not made to be used as a plate.

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As well as being glazed, depicting the ship, it's got that moulded feel to it as well,

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so the design comes out in relief at you.

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-What about this here?

-That is actually done in the manufacture of the pottery.

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That was done in the firing of the piece.

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If we turn it over though, you can see quite clearly the Royal Doulton mark.

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Registered in Australia, it says there, quite interestingly.

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So this may well have been made for export purposes.

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And it's in the Famous Ships series, and this one being the Victory, the flagship of Nelson,

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is a particularly nice one, I think.

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-Let's have a look at the price, shall we, before we go any further?

-88.

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He's quick off the ball.

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88, you're absolutely right.

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-It caught your eye.

-It caught my eye.

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-I quite liked it. I didn't notice it being Victory at first, but that's got some significance with us.

-Mmm.

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-That could be our nautical piece.

-It could be your nautical piece.

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-What about the price though?

-At auction I would say it's probably going to be nearer the £50 mark.

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£50-70, I'd probably say. I think £88 is pushing it.

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For retail purposes, that's a fair price. But not at auction.

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-Good. So we need to do a bit of negotiating.

-Let's go and have a chat.

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That is the name of the game, Dave.

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1900s. That's really early.

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Cos it's deco style. The deco style starts very, very early.

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That's very bold. FGHI, would be about 1908.

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It says circa 1900.

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I'd say it's probably more like 1910. But even so.

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It still very early. It is Liberty's. The marks are up though.

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It's not something you look at as the weight of the silver.

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It's all about the fact that it's Liberty's and it's a strong design.

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The price on there is 225, but there's a good buying public for this sort of thing.

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If you're going to be bold and you're going to go, right, we're going to go for it.

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-Something like that will do it.

-Yeah.

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But if it's going to go for about £150 at auction, we'd have to get it lower than that.

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No, because the lady wouldn't go as low as that.

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An auctioneer would always try and get away with what is seen to be a tempting estimate.

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So if it's £150-£200, it would hopefully generate interest on it.

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-Yeah.

-I quite like that, actually.

-Well, we know where it is.

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Well, we'll leave you to work on them, Jonathan.

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Now, how are the Blues getting on?

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£60 is the bottom line.

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£60? What do you think, Kate?

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I think that's fair. What do you think, H?

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Well, taking your advice of course, and this lady needs to

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fill the plate, yeah, go on, let's give it a whirl.

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-£60?

-It's our nautical one, then.

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-Yep.

-Let's go for that. Let's do it.

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I like it. Well done.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you so much.

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One down, team Dave, well done.

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Now, how's Jonathan getting on at persuading those Jans?

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What would be your lowest price on that?

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Well, I possibly could stretch it to the £150 for you. Do you think? 150?

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You've picked it up, you like it. You've picked it up and you've realised its Liberty.

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-That's two good factors.

-Yeah.

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And I think the price is fair on it.

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-I think it is too.

-Yeah.

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-We'll go with it, then. Let's go.

-Right. Can we have it, please?

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Team Jan is finally off the starting blocks. Thank goodness for that.

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And I have found something interesting too.

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You might think that me wandering around with this thing had something to do with sheep.

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Cos the glorious hills of Wales, of course, are stuffed with sheep,

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and a shepherd would have a stick like this.

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Actually, this thing has nothing to do with sheep.

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Because this thing, and millions like it, would have been found in haberdashers' shops.

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And if you're a shop assistant, and not terribly tall, you would reach for one of these things

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and stretch up above you and remove an object from one of those shelves.

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And it worked like this. This is a piece of bamboo, hollow up the middle.

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Down this end, we've got some bronze jaws with hatcheted sections here

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to enable you to get a firm grip.

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Down the other end, we've got this handle arrangement,

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and if I squeeze the handle, hey presto, the jaws shut.

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So, say my hat is way up there on the top shelf,

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and I want to get it off the top shelf, what the girl would do is,

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she'd reach up like that with this thing, which is called a long arm,

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she'd then grip it very, very tight up there, she'd get it off the shelf

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and she'd then remove it and present it to the potential customer and say, "Does the hat fit, sir?"

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Well, actually, the hat does fit, and this is a most interesting piece of kit. What did it cost?

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It's yours for £60 off a stall down the way.

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That's pretty good, isn't it?

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I've seen perhaps a dozen of these sell over the last 10 years

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and I would guess the average price at auction in London would be around £300-£400.

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So, how does that grab you? Ooh!

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Where's Jonathan?

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He's wandered off again.

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We've lost Jonathan again. Where is he?

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-Well, he's obviously looking at something interesting.

-Jonathan!

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Oh, Jonathan, do stick with your team, old fruit.

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-Sorry.

-Come on!

-How much is the platter?

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-You tell him, Jan. Hit him with your crutch.

-Do you like the hip flask?

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That's quite nice. That's a glass and silver one combined.

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Let's have a little look at that.

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That's great. So you could use the bottom, the silver a bit, as your little cup.

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So, all very neatly done.

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The class is in good condition. And this one is really nice quality,

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you can see how the glass has been faceted and cut around the top.

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It's not just a bog-standard moulded glass flask.

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And this has been gilded inside to protect the silver, really, from the liquor.

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As well as for decorative purposes.

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Have a little look, see what you think of that.

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-That feels light. Is that...Is that not silver?

-It's marked on the side.

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Yes, it should be hallmarked on the top and on the cup, on the base.

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There we go. That's right.

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So, what age are we talking, Clive?

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Let's look at the hallmark. Yes.

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It is London 1907.

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So it's George V, so it's over 100 years old.

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-Do you like that?

-I do.

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-It's quite handy.

-What about the price?

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-It's 195.

-195.

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A bit of room for manoeuvre there, surely?

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Would you do 150?

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-Now.

-Now, this very moment?

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-Immediately.

-Yes, go on.

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We'll do 150.

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You're a good man. Thank you very much.

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-Oh, we've got a deal! Have we got a deal?

-Thank you very much indeed.

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-Happy days.

-Well done. There's no messing with you lot, is there?

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No messing indeed.

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And Kate seems very happy with her Daves.

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I think it's going really well.

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I don't think I've been with such decisive contestants for quite a long time.

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They know what they want and they are getting good prices. I've got no complaints.

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The Jans are less decisive. I think I'd better have a quick word.

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-Listen, you're halfway through and you've only bought one thing.

-We've got to hurry up.

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You have. You've got to what they call buck up.

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I hope that's done the trick.

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How much are your daguerreotypes?

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I've got one of those in my family album.

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£28 is on that one. £28. This is really early photographs.

0:14:260:14:30

Yes. And basically it's like printed onto the back of the glass.

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This is like cut velvet. This is how they would have done a very early photograph.

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This would be the alternative to having a portrait miniature.

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You're talking 1860s-1870s.

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Is this collectible? What would you do with it otherwise?

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You know, an ordinary person wouldn't buy it, would they?

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They do. Dealers buy them. People collect them.

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-It's quite damaged though, isn't it?

-But the price is quite good on it.

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It's a novelty item in that respect. You don't often see it on Bargain Hunt. Would you accept £20 for it?

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I could do 20 on that one, yeah.

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-£20? Do you think so?

-Yes.

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-It's a bit of history.

-Well, you said it like that to me now, Jonathan.

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You've put doubt in my mind.

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I always like to have that little come out and the end and say, it's your decision.

0:15:110:15:15

Of our budget, it's not much spent.

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That means we've got some more to play with on the last object and it leaves me a nice sum.

0:15:170:15:21

-A princely sum!

-A fiver.

-We'll go with the daguerreotype. Thanks very much.

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-It's a bit of a mish-mash.

-Come back to it.

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-It's been converted to a lighter.

-What do you reckon?

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I'd leave it as it is.

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Let's go down a bit.

0:15:400:15:42

I think we'll wander round here then maybe try the next shed.

0:15:420:15:45

Team Dave...!

0:15:450:15:47

Team Dave! You've lost focus.

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What about the bottle?

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Wow.

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That would take a while, wouldn't it, to get through that?

0:15:540:15:57

There's a lot of splash-ons.

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Let's ask the lady.

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It's the factice, which is the shop display dummy,

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and then after the initial display, they were sent back and they were smashed.

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-SMASH

-Like that?

-Like that!

0:16:100:16:13

Don't say it again, please.

0:16:130:16:15

So if you turn it round, on the other side it's got the fact it's a factice, a shop display dummy.

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So what would be your best price on this?

0:16:210:16:25

How much have you got left?

0:16:250:16:28

We've got £130. So if it was £125, it would give me a fiver.

0:16:280:16:33

But we have to leave him some money

0:16:330:16:35

-to go and buy another present.

-A tenner sounds great. £120.

0:16:350:16:39

£120? I've got no idea if that's good or bad, to be honest with you.

0:16:390:16:43

I mean, it's a big bottle of perfume, nonetheless.

0:16:430:16:46

It's collectible. You know.

0:16:460:16:49

You're ladies - your choice.

0:16:490:16:51

Go on. I've pushed it for the daguerreotype. Your choice now.

0:16:510:16:55

I mean, it's modern collectible.

0:16:570:16:59

I can imagine Tim sitting there with the auctioneer now and saying,

0:16:590:17:05

"What on earth have they bought this for?!

0:17:050:17:08

"What a load of rubbish!"

0:17:080:17:11

-It's not cheap tat.

-What do you want to do?

0:17:110:17:14

-Go on.

-Her decision.

0:17:150:17:18

She said yes. Right, we're done.

0:17:180:17:20

Thank you very much. Job done.

0:17:200:17:22

Dying minutes for the Blues. What can Kate pull out of the bag?

0:17:220:17:27

I think we've got seven minutes, guys. What do you think?

0:17:270:17:30

-Picked you up some nice stuff.

-Yeah? Shall we have a look?

0:17:300:17:33

-They've got the original bits in them.

-Yes. What can you do on the salts for us?

0:17:330:17:39

£60?

0:17:400:17:42

-Do you like those, guys?

-They are attractive.

0:17:420:17:45

Little boat-shaped salts.

0:17:450:17:47

They've got their blue glass liners, which is quite nice.

0:17:470:17:50

-And there's a pair.

-They're a pair.

0:17:500:17:52

Hallmarked on the side. Quite nice, clear hallmarks.

0:17:520:17:55

Have a look. You have that one.

0:17:570:17:58

-£60.

-I think we need to go for it. We are at the end.

-Let's do it.

0:17:580:18:04

We haven't got much time, have we?

0:18:040:18:06

I think they'd polish up a bit better, actually. I like the feet.

0:18:060:18:10

-They're identical.

-Will you do 50 for us?

0:18:100:18:12

At a push? Can you do 50?

0:18:120:18:14

I'll meet you halfway.

0:18:140:18:16

£55 I'll do.

0:18:160:18:18

That gives you a good chance.

0:18:180:18:20

-I like the fact they've got their liners too.

-I think we'll go for it.

0:18:200:18:26

Go for it. Let's do the deal.

0:18:260:18:27

-We're done.

-It's a deal. Thank you very much indeed.

0:18:270:18:31

Salty cellars for some salty sea dogs.

0:18:320:18:36

Well done, Kate.

0:18:360:18:38

Right, that's it. Time's up.

0:18:380:18:42

Let me out of here!

0:18:420:18:44

Time's not up for our experts though because they need to spend the leftover lolly on a bonus buy.

0:18:460:18:51

Will our teams choose to use them at auction?

0:18:510:18:55

Well, we'll have to wait and see, won't we?

0:18:550:18:57

But before all that, let's remind ourselves what the Reds bought.

0:18:570:19:02

They started off with this Art Deco silver bowl.

0:19:050:19:09

Then Jonathan persuaded them the daguerreotype was a bargain at £20.

0:19:090:19:15

And finally, they took a punt on the Hugo Boss perfume bottle.

0:19:150:19:20

listen, you lot, I think you did very well. What did you finish up spending?

0:19:200:19:24

£290.

0:19:240:19:26

£290? That is such a good total out of £300.

0:19:260:19:29

-That means there's only £10 left for JP to go off.

-Yes.

-Where is the £10, please? Lovely.

0:19:290:19:34

Now, listen, which piece is going to bring the biggest profit then, Jan-Jan?

0:19:340:19:38

Oh, definitely the aftershave.

0:19:380:19:40

Aftershave? You agree with that, Jan, don't you?

0:19:400:19:42

-No, I don't.

-Oh, lovely.

-I still think the dish is going to.

0:19:420:19:45

It's got the Liberty mark on it and that'll go.

0:19:450:19:47

-You've had a run around today, haven't you, Jonathan?

-Oh, yes.

0:19:470:19:50

I'm going to present you with a whole £10 note, right?

0:19:500:19:53

That's your pocket money to go and spend and find something really stellar for us.

0:19:530:19:59

-Thank you very much.

-And I have a horrible feeling we're going to need it!

0:19:590:20:03

Good luck, girls. Why don't we check out what the Blues bought, eh?

0:20:030:20:08

Bradders spied the decorative HMS Victory charger.

0:20:080:20:13

They all felt the silver and glass hipflask was worth the £150 price tag.

0:20:130:20:18

And with time running out, Kate found them a pair of silver salts.

0:20:180:20:23

-How did you get on then, chaps?

-I think we did really well. Got some good stuff.

0:20:240:20:29

-What's your favourite bit?

-A little hip-flask.

-Hip-flask.

0:20:290:20:32

That's typical that, isn't it?

0:20:320:20:35

Senior Service, all the rest of it, they've got to have a nip. Got to have your tot of rum.

0:20:350:20:39

That's right. It was empty, though.

0:20:390:20:41

Not for long! What's your favourite bit?

0:20:410:20:43

Can't disagree with him.

0:20:430:20:45

-It's a really lovely piece.

-Is it?

0:20:450:20:46

Right, that's your favourite. And how much did you spend overall?

0:20:460:20:49

-£265.

-£265. I want £35 of leftover lolly, please.

0:20:490:20:53

-Oh, you've got it there. £35.

-Thank you very much.

0:20:530:20:57

-Got anything in mind though? Have you spotted something already?

-No, I haven't.

0:20:570:21:04

We won't tell them then. Good luck, chaps.

0:21:040:21:07

Thank you. For me though, and you, and all the rest of the world,

0:21:070:21:11

we're about to head off to the Lady Lever Art Gallery in Port Sunlight. How special is that?

0:21:110:21:16

Port Sunlight in the Wirral is a model village that was built in 1888 by a soap tycoon.

0:21:230:21:31

Lord Leverhulme was an avid collector of fine art and furniture.

0:21:310:21:36

He wanted to share his enthusiasms with his workforce,

0:21:360:21:40

so in 1922 he built this magnificent gallery,

0:21:400:21:43

slap-bang in the middle of the workers' model village.

0:21:430:21:48

He was born in 1851, the son of a grocer,

0:21:480:21:53

and made his fortune selling soap.

0:21:530:21:56

But his taste in paintings was not exactly squeaky clean.

0:21:580:22:04

If we take this canvas,

0:22:040:22:05

it's by far not the largest in the collection, nor the most important,

0:22:050:22:10

but it does sum up that Victorian industrialist's taste in art.

0:22:100:22:17

What we've got here is a girl that's lying on a marble slab

0:22:170:22:22

with absolutely nothing on.

0:22:220:22:25

She is as naked as a jaybird.

0:22:250:22:28

At first glance, you just have to admire the technical skill

0:22:280:22:34

of the artist, Lawrence Alma-Tadema.

0:22:340:22:37

She's just come from the Roman baths, where she's got jolly hot,

0:22:370:22:41

and she's come to the tepidarium,

0:22:410:22:44

which is what this picture is entitled.

0:22:440:22:46

She's come to the room to cool down, having had her bath and sauna.

0:22:460:22:52

Now the artist, Lawrence Alma-Tadema,

0:22:520:22:55

in this High Victorian period of art,

0:22:550:22:58

produced works that specifically harked back to life in Roman times.

0:22:580:23:04

And on the basis of Victorian prudery,

0:23:040:23:07

where everything, including furniture legs, is covered up,

0:23:070:23:11

all of that prudery is thrown to the winds to the altar of art.

0:23:110:23:17

And in artistic terms you're able to bare all

0:23:170:23:22

without causing offence to the audience,

0:23:220:23:25

because this is fine art.

0:23:250:23:29

And Alma-Tadema, producing pictures of this ilk,

0:23:290:23:32

became the most prolific and highly paid Victorian artist of all time.

0:23:320:23:38

But Alma-Tadema isn't the only one with an eye for the ladies.

0:23:400:23:45

This is a Pre-Raphaelite painting,

0:23:460:23:49

one of several in the collection here at the Lady Lever.

0:23:490:23:53

And it's by Dante Gabriel Rossetti.

0:23:530:23:57

Now, the early Pre-Raphaelites

0:23:570:23:59

included Rossetti, Holman Hunt and Millais,

0:23:590:24:02

and in 1848 they set up something called

0:24:020:24:05

the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood.

0:24:050:24:08

The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was set up as a reaction to the stuffy formality

0:24:080:24:14

of the artistic authorities, principally the Royal Academy,

0:24:140:24:17

and by harking back to an earlier period of art, ie before Raphael,

0:24:170:24:24

they felt that the early medieval period of art

0:24:240:24:29

was the true, honest and proper root of artistic endeavour.They created a stir at the time,

0:24:340:24:37

principally because of the bright colours that they employed

0:24:370:24:41

and the sensuous way in which they displayed their womenfolk.

0:24:410:24:46

This picture is entitled The Blessed Damozel,

0:24:460:24:49

which is appropriate for Rossetti,

0:24:490:24:52

because not only did he compose a poem to this subject,

0:24:520:24:56

but it harks back to the mythical figure of Damozel,

0:24:560:25:01

a creature who had died

0:25:010:25:03

and from heaven wistfully looks down onto Earth,

0:25:030:25:08

at her lover, longing for him to join her in the afterlife.

0:25:080:25:14

Now, this is particularly poignant for Rossetti.

0:25:140:25:17

His wife, his model, his muse, Elizabeth Siddal,

0:25:170:25:22

had died of a drug overdose in 1862

0:25:220:25:26

and her characteristics, principally,

0:25:260:25:29

were her bright red hair, delicious eyes and sensuous red lips.

0:25:290:25:35

So this is surely her sitting as Damozel would have done in heaven,

0:25:350:25:42

looking down at Rossetti gazing wistfully to the sky,

0:25:420:25:46

waiting to join her.

0:25:460:25:48

What a lovely, romantic notion.

0:25:480:25:51

The big question is today, of course,

0:25:510:25:53

will our auctioneer be falling in love with the team's lots?

0:25:530:25:56

How lovely to find ourselves on the banks of the River Severn in Shrewsbury

0:26:020:26:07

at Halls' saleroom with Jeremy Lamond.

0:26:070:26:10

-Welcome.

-Thank you.

0:26:100:26:11

So first off, JJ, that's Jan and Jan to you and me.

0:26:110:26:15

We've got the Art Deco bowl.

0:26:150:26:18

Interesting little bowl, very Art Deco handles.

0:26:180:26:21

Silver, but the marks are rubbed, which is a problem for the market.

0:26:210:26:26

Marked "L Ltd,"

0:26:260:26:28

which is not Liberty, it's Lanson in this case.

0:26:280:26:31

-Not Liberty?

-Not Liberty. I don't know what they paid for it, but...

0:26:310:26:35

-They paid a lot of money.

-..£30 to £50.

-What?

0:26:350:26:38

-It's not Liberty.

-It's not Liberty.

0:26:380:26:41

-They paid £150. They thought it was Liberty.

-No, it's Lanson.

-Oh, dear.

0:26:410:26:45

-So that's a blow.

-Could be.

0:26:450:26:48

Right, what about the daguerreotype?

0:26:480:26:50

Good-looking fellow.

0:26:500:26:52

Yeah, must be after 1840, when it was invented.

0:26:520:26:54

-There's lots of them about and it's not in a union case...

-No, quite.

0:26:540:26:59

..which is what the collectors want.

0:26:590:27:01

So I think £10 or £20.

0:27:010:27:03

-They paid £20. So that's about the right price, perhaps, to pay.

-Yeah.

0:27:030:27:07

So, if we're going to really splash out, though,

0:27:070:27:10

this is the object to do it with.

0:27:100:27:13

This lovely large sample of Boss fragrance.

0:27:130:27:16

How do you rate that? When do you think it was made?

0:27:160:27:19

Well, it can't have been made before 1985, because Hugo Boss didn't make fragrance before 1985.

0:27:190:27:26

-Did he not?

-So that dates it.

0:27:260:27:27

Well, it says on the back here "dummy".

0:27:270:27:30

-So presumably it's not got anything smelly in it.

-It has. Vinegar.

0:27:300:27:34

-Vinegar? Really?

-Yes.

-Gosh.

0:27:340:27:36

-It's a shop display, isn't it?

-I've rather gone off it.

0:27:360:27:39

And what's it worth?

0:27:390:27:41

Well, what do you pay for a press-moulded glass empty bottle?

0:27:410:27:44

-Hmm, tricky, isn't it?

-Tricky one, that.

-£5 to £10.

0:27:440:27:47

You reckon? You wouldn't splash out and spent 10 to 20, would you?

0:27:470:27:50

-Could do.

-Yeah. Lovely.

0:27:500:27:52

They paid 120.

0:27:520:27:53

Right.

0:27:530:27:55

Lovely. They've got a huge dark hole opening up

0:27:550:27:58

underneath their arrangements today, and they're going to need the bonus buy,

0:27:580:28:02

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:28:020:28:04

OK, Jan-Jan, you gave Jonathan £10 of leftover lolly.

0:28:040:28:09

-We did. We were generous, weren't we?

-You certainly were.

-Ouch!

0:28:090:28:12

So the poor chap's gone off with a £10 note and bought you a bonus buy. What is it, Jonathan?

0:28:120:28:17

Are we ready for this?

0:28:170:28:19

Oh, lovely!

0:28:190:28:20

-There we go.

-I like owls.

-A little glass owl.

0:28:200:28:23

-It's moulded glass, as you'd expect, really, for under a tenner.

-For £10!

0:28:230:28:28

-UNDER a tenner?

-Ooh, yes, I'm giving it away, aren't I?

0:28:280:28:31

-You are.

-Under a tenner. But it's quite a decorative little object.

0:28:310:28:35

There's two little defects, a chip there and one on the base,

0:28:350:28:37

but otherwise I think it's a rather pretty object.

0:28:370:28:40

I paid £8 for it. It's an early-20th-century thing, I'd say.

0:28:400:28:43

Do you like owls, Jan?

0:28:430:28:46

I do.

0:28:460:28:48

It's about the same as the rest of the rubbish we've bought!

0:28:480:28:52

-About a tenth of the cost, though!

-Yes!

0:28:520:28:56

-No, I think it's very nice.

-Oh, well... That's good, then. Lovely.

0:28:560:29:00

Jonathan's relieved by that, because you spent...how much did you say?

0:29:000:29:03

-£8.

-£8 on this Lalique-lookalike paperweight.

-Yes, exactly.

0:29:030:29:08

You could use it for a paperweight.

0:29:080:29:10

It was the sort of thing... Lalique did their car mascots, and it's the same sort of size as one of those.

0:29:100:29:15

Same sort of size, same sort of idea. Anyway, enough of that.

0:29:150:29:19

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's little owl.

0:29:190:29:24

-There we go, wise old owl for you.

-Well, it's a frosted glass owl.

0:29:240:29:28

It's not Lalique, it's not Sabino...

0:29:280:29:32

it's probably not old.

0:29:320:29:34

-Is it Woolworths?

-It could be.

0:29:340:29:36

-Late Woolworths?

-Eastern European or Polish, but possibly not a wise buy.

0:29:360:29:42

The man only had £10, in fairness.

0:29:420:29:44

Leftover lolly was only £10.

0:29:440:29:46

He had to go and buy something so he paid eight for this.

0:29:460:29:49

Well, he might get his money back because...owl collectors

0:29:490:29:52

and paperweight collectors, that's cross-fertilisation.

0:29:520:29:55

All right, lovely, thank you.

0:29:550:29:57

That is it for our Reds. Forecasting a bloodbath here.

0:29:570:30:00

And now for the Blues.

0:30:000:30:03

Their first investment is in the form of HMS Victory.

0:30:030:30:07

Yeah, Royal Doulton Series Ware, moulded plate, probably 1930s.

0:30:070:30:13

Very popular old England theme.

0:30:130:30:16

Good subject, and it's in good condition.

0:30:160:30:20

-So what might it be worth, then, on a good day, with the wind up its tail?

-I think £40 to £60.

0:30:200:30:25

£60 paid, so they're in the frame there. Jolly good. Well done, Blues.

0:30:250:30:29

-Next is the little silver-mounted flask.

-Right.

0:30:290:30:33

-How do you rate that, Jay?

-Silver, obviously, cut-glass.

0:30:330:30:37

Elegantly done. 80 to 120.

0:30:370:30:40

Right...

0:30:400:30:42

-Is that good?

-No.

-No.

-'Fraid not.

0:30:420:30:45

Have to try harder. £150 they paid.

0:30:450:30:48

Well, they might get that at the end of the day.

0:30:480:30:50

It's not damaged, it's not particularly worn.

0:30:500:30:53

And it's quite fragrant.

0:30:530:30:55

Do you think it's more for fragrance than something that goes down the cakehole?

0:30:550:30:59

I think it could be fragrance rather than hunting or hip-flask,

0:30:590:31:03

because you have to unscrew the top and it's got no cover,

0:31:030:31:06

and it's a bit inconvenient to take into the field.

0:31:060:31:10

Anyway, the estimate's 80 to 120, they paid £150.

0:31:100:31:14

That is not all that hopeful.

0:31:140:31:16

What about those squat tiny little salts?

0:31:160:31:20

Cauldron-shaped salts like that are very common indeed.

0:31:200:31:24

So if the teams are searching for something unusual that might take off

0:31:240:31:29

this is not they.

0:31:290:31:31

-No. Bog-standard, isn't it?

-Pretty much.

-Mm.

0:31:310:31:34

-So what's your estimate on the silver salts?

-30 to 50.

0:31:340:31:38

Our team paid £55 for them, actually. So they're on a bit of a hiding there.

0:31:380:31:42

-They might get away with it.

-They might do.

-But the prospect of making a PROFIT is very small.

0:31:420:31:48

Therefore they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look.

0:31:480:31:52

Right, Dave and Dave, you spent £265, you gave the lovely Kate Bliss £35. What did she spend it on?

0:31:520:31:58

Well, I scoured the fair and I must have been thinking subconsciously

0:31:580:32:03

-that Dave was a spoon collector, so I came up with these.

-Wow.

0:32:030:32:08

Now, they're not perhaps the most exciting bonus buy under the sun

0:32:080:32:12

but the reason I bought them

0:32:120:32:14

was to have the best chance of making a profit, which of course is the name of the game.

0:32:140:32:19

So have a little look at them. They're in their original case.

0:32:190:32:22

They are English silver, they date from 1938

0:32:220:32:26

and they're all hallmarked on the reverse,

0:32:260:32:30

as you'd expect for Sheffield, 1938.

0:32:300:32:32

And they're what's known as Hanoverian pattern,

0:32:320:32:35

so the very tips of the handles just tip up a little bit,

0:32:350:32:38

which is known as Hanoverian pattern. Quite a commercial little set really.

0:32:380:32:42

-So what would you expect to make on it?

-I think we might make £10 profit on a good day.

0:32:420:32:47

Do we know what you paid?

0:32:470:32:49

-I paid £20.

-£20.

0:32:490:32:52

And you think they might make £30?

0:32:520:32:54

-I think they might.

-Yes. £5 a spoon.

0:32:540:32:57

-What do you think about it, Dave-Dave?

-Yeah, they might have a bit of profit in them.

-You think?

0:32:570:33:03

-We'll...consider it.

-Well, six solid silver spoons, in a case, for £20.

0:33:030:33:08

I would say there's a lot of places you'd go

0:33:080:33:11

and you'd get six plated spoons in a case for £20, but solid silver ones?

0:33:110:33:15

I think we have to consider this quite carefully, Dave-Dave.

0:33:150:33:18

-We'll see.

-You're looking rather down in the mouth, mate.

0:33:180:33:22

-No, we'll see.

-Dave's the spoon man.

-No, they look good, they look good.

0:33:220:33:26

-It depends on our other products, doesn't it?

-Well, it certainly does.

0:33:260:33:29

You have to sell the first three objects, then you make

0:33:290:33:32

your decision as to whether you're even going to go with this £20 risk.

0:33:320:33:35

Now, for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Kate's spoons.

0:33:350:33:40

There you go. Just what every auctioneer loves to receive.

0:33:400:33:44

-There we are.

-Half a dozen silver teaspoons in their case.

0:33:440:33:47

1938, silver teaspoons, cased.

0:33:470:33:50

Good presentation case. Obviously someone was terribly excited at tea,

0:33:500:33:54

-there's a bit of a tea stain here.

-Nasty stain.

0:33:540:33:57

-But we think £20 to £30.

-Do you?

-Yes.

-Perfect.

0:33:570:34:00

Kate Bliss paid £20 for it and she has every chance of a huge success.

0:34:000:34:05

-We shall try very hard for her.

-As usual.

0:34:050:34:09

-Are you taking the auction today?

-I am.

-Super. Should be a riot.

0:34:090:34:13

OK, Jan-Jan, we're at the edge now, how are you feeling?

0:34:210:34:24

Fine, fine. Yes, we're going to make lots of profits.

0:34:240:34:28

That's lovely. Is she always like this?

0:34:280:34:31

Most of the time, yes!

0:34:310:34:33

-Just as well you're good friends.

-Sometimes she behaves!

0:34:330:34:36

OK, the Hugo Boss aftershave bottle, which you paid £120 for, he's estimated at £5-10.

0:34:360:34:42

-He doesn't know what he's talking about.

-It's a typo.

-A typing error!

0:34:420:34:45

-He says it's full of vinegar or a similar straw-coloured liquid.

-Rubbish.

0:34:450:34:51

-Rubbish.

-For display purposes.

0:34:510:34:53

And it dates from after 1986.

0:34:530:34:56

-He's had the benefit of looking all this stuff up.

-Yes.

0:34:560:35:00

I'm only reporting it, right? Don't shoot the messenger.

0:35:000:35:02

-OK, we'll try not to.

-There we go.

0:35:020:35:04

So there is a bit of a problem, frankly.

0:35:040:35:07

-Yes, quite a big problem.

-And you've spent the 290, which is lovely, and I love it when you spend up,

0:35:070:35:12

and I really hope that Hugo Boss does the business for you.

0:35:120:35:15

-Yes.

-First up is your silver Art Deco bowl, and here it comes.

0:35:150:35:20

The silver two-handled Art Deco bowl

0:35:200:35:22

by Lanson Ltd, Birmingham, circa 1930.

0:35:220:35:25

Again, various commissions here.

0:35:250:35:27

-20, 25, 35. At 35 to start it. At 35, 40.

-Come on, keep going.

-Here it comes.

0:35:270:35:32

45, commission bid.

0:35:320:35:34

At £45.

0:35:340:35:36

-It will keep going, don't worry.

-£50 now, new place at £50.

0:35:360:35:40

Internet is out, at £50 now, at 50?

0:35:400:35:42

-He'll come back in.

-Lady in the room at £50. Selling?

-No!

0:35:420:35:46

-Oh, dear. £50, that's £100 down the doo-doo.

-For goodness' sake.

0:35:460:35:50

Lot 139 is the daguerreotype of a gentlemen, Victorian.

0:35:500:35:53

What about that? £10, bid me? £10 to start it. Little one, £10?

0:35:530:35:57

Who's got 10? 10 at the back. 10 at the back of the room now, 12 now.

0:35:570:36:02

£12, 15. 18. At £18. Lady here.

0:36:020:36:05

Go for 20, go for 20.

0:36:050:36:07

-Come on.

-Bid is in the room. £18.

0:36:070:36:09

-22 against you, 25.

-A bit of profit.

0:36:090:36:12

-£28, still with you at 28. Your bid.

-We might get back that £100!

0:36:120:36:17

Selling at 28...

0:36:170:36:18

That's brilliant, girls. That's plus £8. Well done, Jan.

0:36:180:36:21

The shop-display Hugo Boss.

0:36:210:36:23

Please bear in mind the contents are not original.

0:36:230:36:26

Do not splash it all over, or anything. £10, who's got 10?

0:36:260:36:30

-£10? £5? Oh, internet, 10. £10.

-More than that.

-Paid £120.

0:36:300:36:34

Not original contents, internet, please note. £10 I've got.

0:36:340:36:37

At 10? £10 on the internet, then.

0:36:370:36:40

We're selling it for 10 only?

0:36:400:36:44

-Dear, oh dear. There's a smell about.

-Yeah.

0:36:440:36:47

-Minus 110.

-Should have done more than that, just for the bottle.

-I'm quite amazed actually.

0:36:470:36:52

I make that minus 202.

0:36:520:36:54

-Minus 202, OK?

-Yes.

0:36:540:36:56

-Not so brilliant, really.

-No, not a very good score, that.

0:36:560:36:59

You spent 290 and 202 down the drain.

0:36:590:37:02

Anyway, we had the £8 left over for the bonus buy.

0:37:020:37:06

-What will you do about that?

-We'll go with it.

0:37:060:37:09

-On that happy note, we're going with the bonus buy?

-Yes. We're going to have our owl.

0:37:090:37:13

The fishy owl. OK, here it comes.

0:37:130:37:16

The opaque glass owl's head, paperweight, showing for you there.

0:37:160:37:20

What about it? £5, start me.

0:37:200:37:22

Fiver bid immediately, at £5.

0:37:220:37:24

At five, here in the front row.

0:37:240:37:26

Who'll have a go? At £5?

0:37:260:37:27

-Come on.

-At five, any more? £5 for the paperweight?

0:37:270:37:31

-It's your bid. 10 on the internet. You're out.

-Yes!

-There we go.

0:37:310:37:34

-Someone with taste!

-£12, with you. Internet is out.

0:37:340:37:38

-At £12. It's in the room, a live bid in the room.

-We've got profits!

0:37:380:37:42

At £12, you've got it, looks like.

0:37:420:37:44

£12, that's brilliant, Jonathan.

0:37:450:37:47

-I'm spent.

-Plus four.

-Well done.

0:37:470:37:49

You're four pounds up on that, which means overall you're minus £198, which is not so brilliant.

0:37:490:37:55

It's under 200.

0:37:550:37:56

Exactly, under 200. Don't tell the Blues a thing, right?

0:37:560:38:00

-No chance!

-Good. Thank you.

0:38:000:38:02

Now, Dave-Dave. Do you know how Jan-Jan got on?

0:38:090:38:12

Not at all. They've not told us.

0:38:120:38:14

We didn't want you to find out either. Now, how do you rate your chances, Dave?

0:38:140:38:18

I think we'll make on the salts.

0:38:180:38:21

I'm not too sure about the hip-flask thing, and I really don't know about the plate.

0:38:210:38:26

-Right, so you've got two doubtfuls. What about you, Dave?

-I'm keen on the plate and the salts.

0:38:260:38:31

-And if the worst comes to the worst you've got the spoons to go back on, right?

-That's right. Maybe.

0:38:310:38:36

-Don't look at me like that!

-Maybe.

0:38:360:38:38

Anyway, first up is the Victory decorative plate and here it comes.

0:38:380:38:42

-The Royal Doulton HMS Victory plate, the famous ship series.

-Oh, Dave.

0:38:420:38:46

Lot 160, commissions here at £35, £40, £45.

0:38:460:38:50

At 45.

0:38:500:38:52

We want more, come on.

0:38:520:38:54

The ship series plate at 45.

0:38:540:38:56

Any more? At £45, selling at 45.

0:38:560:38:57

-On, no.

-Come on, behave.

0:38:570:39:00

£15 off, bad luck, lads.

0:39:000:39:02

45, minus 15.

0:39:020:39:04

-Here we go.

-Now your flask.

0:39:050:39:07

Silver-mounted cut-glass flask, Percy Whitehouse, London, 1907.

0:39:070:39:11

Lot 161, and again, interest here at £70, £80, £90.

0:39:110:39:14

At £90, on commission at £90.

0:39:140:39:17

-Give it some.

-At 90 it is.

0:39:170:39:19

At £90, all done at 90?

0:39:190:39:22

Selling it, then, for £90.

0:39:220:39:24

Oh, this is... 90, minus 60 on that.

0:39:240:39:27

-Can't believe that, can you, Kate?

-That's a lot.

0:39:270:39:31

Now, here come the salts.

0:39:310:39:33

Birmingham 1918, lot 162.

0:39:330:39:36

Bid me £20 to start. £20, where's 20?

0:39:360:39:39

-At 22, 25. 28, 30. 32, 35.

-Come on.

0:39:390:39:45

35 against you, sir. 38, 40.

0:39:450:39:48

42, 42 still with you, sir, at £42.

0:39:480:39:51

Second row, at £42.

0:39:510:39:55

He's selling at £42, that's minus £13.

0:39:550:39:58

Minus 13, 60, 73, 83, 88.

0:39:580:40:03

Minus £88, chaps.

0:40:030:40:05

-Minus 88.

-Oh, guys.

-Shouldn't laugh really, should you?

0:40:050:40:08

But it could be a lot worse, I tell you. This could be a winning score.

0:40:080:40:12

-What are you going to do about the spoons? Go for it.

-We've got to go for it.

-You're going to go for it?

0:40:120:40:17

I think we're all in agreement, aren't we, that six spoons,

0:40:170:40:21

solid silver in a case, for £20 is a pretty good find for Kate.

0:40:210:40:24

-Absolutely.

-So you're going to chance it, yes?

-Yep.

0:40:240:40:27

-Yep.

-All right, we're going to go with the bonus buy. Here it comes.

0:40:270:40:30

The cased set of six Hanoverian-pattern silver spoons.

0:40:300:40:33

Here we go, Kate. All on you now, girl.

0:40:330:40:36

-No pressure(!)

-No, none at all!

0:40:360:40:38

Sheffield, lot 166. At 15, £16 I'm bid. At 16, 18 now?

0:40:380:40:44

At £18. Front row at 18.

0:40:440:40:47

Who else wants a go, at 18?

0:40:470:40:49

-Front row.

-Oh, come on. Oh, come on!

0:40:490:40:51

20, just in time. £20, you're out.

0:40:510:40:55

At £20, front row? Yes? 22.

0:40:550:40:57

At 22, at 22, you're out now, sir. At £22. Front row, then.

0:40:570:41:02

The bid at 22...

0:41:020:41:04

-Just out of trouble, Kate. Well done.

-Amazing.

-Well...

0:41:050:41:08

Overall, you're minus 86.

0:41:080:41:10

You're minus £86. Don't tell the Reds a scrap, because this could be a winning score.

0:41:100:41:15

It will be.

0:41:150:41:17

-Well, teams. Been chatting, have we?

-No.

-No.

0:41:230:41:26

Not about results?

0:41:260:41:27

-Not about results.

-You have no idea?

-Everything else but not results.

0:41:270:41:31

There are some similarities between our teams today. Both have made substantial losses.

0:41:310:41:35

That should come as no surprise.

0:41:350:41:37

Both teams made a profit with their experts' bonus buys.

0:41:370:41:41

-Well done.

-So both of our experts are feeling very pleased with themselves, I hope.

0:41:410:41:46

But one team, sadly, made nearly double the losses of the other,

0:41:460:41:51

and the running-up team that managed to have that amazing feat

0:41:510:41:56

-were the Reds.

-Oh, dear.

0:41:560:41:58

Minus £198 you are, Jan-Jans.

0:41:580:42:02

Are you sure you've added that up right?

0:42:020:42:05

No, but that's the score that we're running with, minus 198.

0:42:050:42:10

I do not propose to go through the whole humiliating total for you.

0:42:100:42:13

-Thank you for that.

-Doesn't matter a scrap.

0:42:130:42:16

You've been great fun, it just wasn't your day today in the auction room, quite frankly.

0:42:160:42:21

-No.

-But you had a nice time?

-Fantastic.

-Yes.

0:42:210:42:23

I can reassure you that it wasn't really the day for the Blue team

0:42:230:42:27

in the auction room either, except that they only managed to lose £86.

0:42:270:42:32

-So, there you have it.

-Well done.

-That nice little profit on your set of spoons, Kate...

-LITTLE profit.

0:42:320:42:38

£2, of course, helped tremendously.

0:42:380:42:41

-Have you had a nice time, chaps?

-Fantastic. Met some wonderful people.

-Yes, it's lovely, isn't it?

0:42:410:42:45

The team spirits on this programme are quite extraordinary. Anyway, we've had a great time.

0:42:450:42:50

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

-ALL: Yes!

0:42:500:42:54

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:130:43:15

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:150:43:17

Jonathan Pratt keeps wandering off from his team-mates at the Royal Welsh Showground, while it's plain sailing in the Kate Bliss camp. But who will make the biggest profit at auction?

Meanwhile, host Tim Wonnacott takes a look at some saucy Victorian paintings in the Lady Lever Art Gallery.