Lincoln 17 Bargain Hunt


Lincoln 17

Antiques challenge. In Lincoln, two married couples go head-to-head, and sometimes hand-in-hand. But will there be too much marital stress over at the auction?


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Transcript


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Hello! Let's go Bargain Hunting.

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Yeah!

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We Bargain Hunters have come to the Lincoln Fair,

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literally hundreds of stalls stuffed with antiques and collectables.

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But how are our contestants going to cope with all this choice?

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Our two married teams are looking for bargains from around the world.

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The Zulu had these around their necks.

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It's a bit of African tribal art, probably from Swaziland.

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-Am I talking you into it?

-No.

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And this lot want the world.

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We've got Ceylon. That's now Sri Lanka.

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-Sh!

-Kenny, you just keep looking at the atlas.

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And I visit an intriguing London house

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to meet a remarkable Bargain Hunt guest.

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But for now, let's meet those teams.

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-And here they all are. How lovely. Hi, everyone.

-Hi.

-Hi.

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-Lauren, how did you meet Kenny?

-When we were about 14 or 15,

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-myself and my friends - not Kenny, he's ten years older than me...

-Is he?

-Obviously.

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We used to hang about at the top of the street where his work was.

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It sounds quite sinister but it's not.

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And he was a lorry driver and he used to wave and we used to wave back.

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But later, I worked in a bar and that's where we met.

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-And he said what?

-"Have you grown out of sitting on street corners now?"

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-That was his chat-up line.

-That was a good chat-up line.

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How romantic!

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-So you pulled him another quick half and that was that.

-Yeah.

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-Now, Kenny, you've got a couple of kids, yeah?

-Yes, yes.

-And a dog.

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Oh, Rufus, yes, he's a barrel of fun.

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And you like to take him out for walkies and all that?

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-Yes, he loves a run.

-Oh?

-Yes, he does like chasing cows.

-Does he?

-Yes.

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I took him in the field one night and he decided to round them up

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and herd them towards me.

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-So I was...

-In the dark?

-Yes, so I was running away, chased by cows.

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-And the dog.

-You were lucky.

-I was.

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So how do you think you're going to get on with the missus as a team?

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-We'll be great.

-Really?

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-It might look like we're falling out but we're not really.

-No, this is happily married life.

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Oh, yeah. Every day.

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-How many years have you been together?

-11 years, now.

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-Have you?

-Married for eight.

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It's going to be a test today, I can tell you.

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HE LAUGHS

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Now, Barry and Sheila. How did you and Barry meet?

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-We were at the theatre in Leicester.

-Oh, were you?

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Barry was acting because he's the big actor.

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He was playing the village idiot.

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-I thought he was a very good actor and then I married him and realised it wasn't acting.

-Oh, yes?

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That's brave talk, that is, for the television. You'll be in trouble later.

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So you were seriously theatrical in your youth, were you?

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Yes, I was an actor. I was in rep.

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Then I got married and I decided that marriage and theatre don't really go together.

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It can be difficult, moving around, and so I became a drama teacher.

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-Oh, did you?

-Yes.

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But you've had great success, haven't you? You mixed with the stars.

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In repertory days I worked with people like John Shrapnel,

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Eric Idle, Richard Eyre, Jonathan Lynn.

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They went on to do great and wonderful things.

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I got married.

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-And you went on to teach, which is very nice.

-Yes.

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So what are your strengths going to be today then, Sheila,

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in your team with your artistically talented and well-coordinated husband?

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-Thanks, dear.

-Ordering him around and keeping him under control, really.

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-Really?

-Yes.

-The controlling presence.

-That's right.

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-Yes.

-I'm the organiser.

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-Does that mean you're going to take the money?

-Of course.

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It's the money moment. £300, look. There you go.

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£300. You know the rules. Your experts await.

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And off you go and very, very, very good luck.

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So who's counselling our married couples today?

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Hoping to keep the divorce rate down for the Reds is David Harper.

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And making the bonds of marriage secure for the Blues,

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it's James Lewis.

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Let the ceremonies begin.

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Right, now, a married couple. Do you fall out?

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-Not very often.

-Regularly.

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-What are you looking for?

-China, pottery, that sort of thing.

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-Yes.

-Both of you?

-Ceramics.

-Yes, ceramics, silver.

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-Shall we just agree with Lauren?

-That's probably best, yes.

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Come on, then.

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-Ah, Doulton.

-I like that.

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-Mass produced as a series ware, so it's not rare.

-OK.

-OK.

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Well spotted, Kenny. I think it's quite stylish, actually.

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-Are these covered in paper?

-Yes, it's paper lined. It's almost like wallpaper.

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Date wise, a very good way, if it's not dated on the globe itself,

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of dating an atlas will be to look at the countries

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because country names change, don't they?

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So think of a country that you know has changed its name.

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We've got Ceylon. That's now Sri Lanka.

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So when did Ceylon become Sri Lanka?

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'There might be a quiz at the end of this, viewers!'

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-It was the '50s, wasn't it?

-I would have thought so. After the Second World War.

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'1972, to be precise.'

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Africa's always a great one.

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Southern Rhodesia became Rhodesia in the '60s and then Zimbabwe in 1980.

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So it's pre-1960s.

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Oh, hang on. Philips' Challenge Globe. It's dated there. 1959.

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So there you go.

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'Now that's why we call them experts!'

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It's teak. Got a bit of an art deco feel going to it

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but it's a definite '50s slant.

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What have we got on the globe?

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-Could be 90.

-Could be 90, yeah?

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Now, Lauren, what do you think about it? You tell me.

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It's handsome to look at but...

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-We're not talking about me, Lauren.

-Oh, such a charmer!

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Erm, I like it if Kenny likes it.

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-Would you take 60 at all, for it?

-I'll take 80.

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-70, maybe?

-That's it.

-Meet in the middle at 75.

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-No...

-No, we're going for... Sh!

-Kenny!

-70.

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You just keep looking at the atlas.

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75, yeah? Is that agreed?

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-Marvellous.

-Do you like 75?

-75's brilliant. That's great.

-OK.

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'Ah, Kenny, you can get a say, as long as it's the same as Lauren's.'

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'Now, I'm training my beady eyes on you guys. What have you got?'

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So what we've got is basically an oval slab of hard stone,

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probably an agate,

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and then this is cut-card work that's engraved and chased afterwards.

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Now, I think it looks Continental

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but there's one thing that screams quality here.

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-If you look on the lip there, do you see the name?

-Yes, yes.

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Betjeman's. Betjeman's were a 19th century company

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that specialised in unusual patents

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and here we've got that and that.

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And that's what makes it a Betjeman's patent.

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-I love the design on the top. I do like that.

-Nice thing.

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It's in a French style but it's English.

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The date, I guess, is about 1860, 1870.

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What could he do on that for us? 60?

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Would you do it at 50?

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-Shall we go?

-Yes, OK, we will.

-OK.

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-I think at 60 we've got a deal.

-OK.

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-Happy with that, guys?

-Yes.

-Yes, indeed.

-OK.

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The great thing about Barry and Sheila is they're good fun

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but they're really open-minded.

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They don't have minds set in stone.

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How's the marriage holding out on the Red side?

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-Oh!

-They are beyond revolting.

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-You know who that is, don't you?

-I'm not sure I want to look.

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-Is that Napoleon?

-Yeah, and there is Josephine.

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Yes. That could be you two, couldn't it?

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-Yeah?

-Mm.

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-Are you trying to buy things?

-No, no, not without your expertise.

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Oh, but it's nice to see you're still holding hands.

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There's time yet.

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Now, James, what are you holding?

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-What is it?

-I would have thought a surveyor's level or something.

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'No!'

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But the ball, I think, at some stage, has been added.

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-Yes?

-I think that's probably a 19th-century bowling ball,

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for skittles.

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-It's somebody from a bowling club that's had it.

-Funny thing.

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-A bit too quirky.

-I agree with you.

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-What do we think about the lamp?

-I like the shape.

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And I do like the pattern

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but I would have liked the curves, the lines in it, to have been more blue,

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rather than the lilac.

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Eh, what a demanding woman.

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You get used to it.

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Do you?

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It's a piece that you might refer to as an end-of-day.

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There's bits and pieces of leftover stuff

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made into a lamp.

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I mean, look at the wiring and look at that top.

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That looks very '50s. '50s and '60s pieces are so retro, so popular.

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They're doing very well.

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-What have you got on that? Is it...?

-55 quid.

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Oh, really? As much as that?

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-The best I could do is 45 quid.

-45.

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On a good day, it could do quite nicely and make 10 or 20 quid

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but on a bad day, you're going to lose 10 or 20 quid.

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-It's a chance you take, isn't it?

-It's always the chance you take.

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-Kenny, have a feel of it. Is it talking to you?

-Do you like it?

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'Kenny, she's letting you speak again!'

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-I do, actually.

-What about 35?

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-I couldn't, honestly.

-40?

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-Yeah, 40 quid, yeah.

-40 quid.

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-Lovely.

-I think we've done the deal.

-Yes.

-Thanks, we'll have that.

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-Thank you.

-Well done.

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I think of our buys so far, my favourite is the globe

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as a potential profit maker.

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The glass lamp, in actual fact, is the one I would want to take home

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because you do rewire that and you do put a shade on

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and it will look absolutely stunning.

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That was bad English.

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Sounded fine to me, David,

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but let's take a look at an object what I got.

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Nowadays, if you're having a cup of tea...

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and you take a bit of sugar,

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all you do is take one of these hideous plastic spoons,

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white sugar, look, dunk it in, give it a bit of a stir up - lovely.

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Now, that would not be acceptable behaviour

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in genteel society.

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Smart people in 1900 had their sugar in cubes

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and if you had cubed sugar, you needed one of these jokers.

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I've picked up these solid silver sugar nips to share with you

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the beauty of their design.

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If you look at this semicircular piece here

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it almost looks like a bit of industrial art,

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with these rivets.

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It's very much turn of the century, Jugendstil style,

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this is 1900, Austrian influence, and it's an extraordinary feature.

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I love the end of the nips themselves.

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Do you see that? They've been bifurcated.

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Further up you can see more of this Viennese influence

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in the plunger part

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and on the end it says patent and a registration number.

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And all round, these nips are in good condition.

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What would a pair of sugar nips like this cost you?

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Out there in the fair today they could be yours for £65.

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What might they make in a specialist sale?

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Well, they could bring, I don't know, £120, something like that.

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In fact, I think I might nip off and buy them.

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-What is it?

-They're tobacco gourds or snuff bottles.

-Yes?

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These sort of snuff bottles were used all over the world.

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The Zulu were said to have these around their necks before the Battle of Rorke's Drift.

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The idea was they'd have their cannabis mixed with other herbs and spices

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-and they would take that before battle.

-For bravery.

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And they'd have them around their necks.

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Some are actually pinned into ears like that in South American tribes.

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-These things are a bit of fun. Slightly unusual.

-Yes.

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-What do you think?

-Well, I think if we can get him down a bit...

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-A quirky object.

-They're worth 20 quid to me. Let's ask.

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-He says 25.

-25, OK.

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-I think they're worth that.

-OK.

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-But is there a profit? My heart says buy them...

-You don't think there is?

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-..my head says leave them and think.

-We could leave them and come back.

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-They might have gone. That's life.

-Then we won't have them.

-OK.

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So they're sniffy over the price of the snuffy.

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You've only got one buy, Barry and Sheila, and 20 minutes left.

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The Reds are still holding hands. That won't last.

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Now, this is a wonderful object. It's a bit of African tribal art.

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'Oh, cripes, here we go again.'

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It's probably from Swaziland or Zulu Natal

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and it's a milking pail.

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They sometimes come on three legs or just a plain rim like that.

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-But it's nice and early. It's got a good colour.

-How old?

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Well, tribal art is very difficult to date

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but this one is certainly 60 or 70 years old.

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It's lost its cover but it's 45 quid.

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Will it sell?

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Oh, this is just it. If I was there and allowed to buy, yes, it would

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and I would also pay more than £45 for it.

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-Am I talking you into it?

-No.

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Is it a bit of tribal art the right thing to sell in Lincolnshire?

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-Well...

-Am I going to be the only person in the auction room that likes it?

-Probably.

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-Am I going to say, "Sorry, guys, I've made you a loss"?

-Possibly.

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-Shall we put it down and think about it?

-Yes.

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It sounded like a definite no to me, James, but what do I know?

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Hello, woof-woofs.

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Rrr!

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-He's ugly.

-He is not ugly! How could you say he's ugly?

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Lauren, you don't think he's ugly, do you?

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-Erm... Erm...

-You're not dumfounded again?

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No, well, I am, I'm sorry. How old is he?

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He's Bretby. He will be late 19th century.

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Normally they mark Bretby with a sunburst.

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-What sort of money is he?

-85.

-85.

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-I mean...

-But I will do him for 40.

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-I think...

-He looks reliable, doesn't he?

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-Now, what breed is he?

-It's a shar-pei.

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Well, there you go. I wouldn't know that.

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So let's think there's a couple of shar-pei owners in there.

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They're going to want to buy him desperately, aren't they?

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He's fairly cute.

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It's not exactly the ancient thing that you're looking for

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but he's got the 100 years to him, I would say.

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With those wrinkles, I'd say 100 plus.

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Let's leave Lauren to ponder.

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Right, now, what does that say to you?

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-Well, Continental?

-Ugly piece of brass, if you don't like it.

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Erm, I don't know - matches, cigarettes.

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-Exactly what it is.

-Cigars.

-What's his mouth for, then?

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Imagine you're a smoker and a drinker from the 19th century

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and you've had a hard day at work.

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You go to your local bar or tavern with your cigar

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and you haven't got your matches.

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No such thing as buying a lighter from the bar.

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You would go along and this would be plumbed into the mains gas supply

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and out of his mouth would be a flame lit from mains gas.

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You would take your light from one side, light it from the mouth,

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light your cigar and put it back in here.

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And where would this have been made? It could be English or Continental

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but looking at him, he's almost like a gold prospector or a miner.

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So you can imagine this would have been in the Wild West

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on one of those bars with those prospectors and men of real courage,

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going and lighting their cigars from that.

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Quite a story behind this, I think.

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-And what's it made from, brass?

-Cast brass. £45.

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-What do you think? Profit in it?

-It's got to be worth 35 quid.

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-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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I can see it making 60 or 70 in a good sale,

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so if we can get for 35, that's a double money situation.

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While they're off bargaining, let's see if that wrinkly doggy has some new owners.

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He is quite handsome, isn't he?

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Now, if he can be confirmed as being a Bretby piece,

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it's a stonking bargain at 40 quid.

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Lauren, we've got nine minutes left.

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Talk to the dog. Are you going to take him home or not?

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I quite like him and I will agree to buy him if I can name him.

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OK. What are we going to call him?

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Graham.

0:17:560:17:58

-Graham?

-Straight there. Definite Graham.

0:17:580:18:00

Right, OK. Are we going to have him for 40 quid?

0:18:000:18:03

-Definitely.

-Definitely.

-I think he's the best buy of the day.

0:18:030:18:07

-Thank you. We'll have him.

-He's lovely.

0:18:070:18:09

So wrinkly Graham is theirs and they are done.

0:18:090:18:13

Now, have Barry and Sheila bargained hard enough for their tavern lighter?

0:18:130:18:18

-We've had a word with the stallholder...

-Yes?

0:18:180:18:22

..and he said that he would let us have this for £35.

0:18:220:18:26

So I think we should go for it.

0:18:260:18:28

-So let's have him.

-It's a deal.

-It's a deal.

-Brilliant.

0:18:280:18:31

-Thank you.

-Thank you.

-Let's move on.

0:18:310:18:33

Move on indeed, Blues. You only have a few minutes left.

0:18:330:18:37

-Five minutes. I think we've got to go and get the Swaziland bucket.

-OK.

0:18:380:18:43

Right, it looks like we can have it for £35 because he's not here...

0:18:460:18:50

At this rate, we could have it for nothing.

0:18:500:18:53

Unfortunately, it doesn't work like that, James. Anyway, job done.

0:18:540:18:58

Lauren and Kenny first navigated their way to the globe.

0:19:050:19:09

David then persuaded them to gamble on this 1950s lamp

0:19:090:19:13

and finally, they're walking Graham, the wrinkly shar-pei, to auction.

0:19:130:19:18

I hope he don't bite!

0:19:180:19:19

-You've had fun, haven't you?

-We have.

0:19:190:19:22

It's like going round having a drinks party with you lot.

0:19:220:19:25

Kenny, which is your favourite piece? Old smiler?

0:19:250:19:28

-Graham's my favourite.

-Ah! Graham!

-Don't ask!

0:19:280:19:31

Gorgeous Graham.

0:19:310:19:32

-What about you, Lauren? Which is your favourite?

-He is.

0:19:320:19:35

-And how much did you spend all round?

-£155.

-£155.

0:19:350:19:39

I get £145 of leftover lolly, please.

0:19:390:19:42

-Thank you.

-That's for you, my love.

-£145. It goes straight to the man.

0:19:430:19:48

-Thank you very much.

-What are you going to do with that, David?

0:19:480:19:51

I think something shining and blingy, especially for Lauren.

0:19:510:19:55

Ah! How sweet.

0:19:550:19:57

-You don't mind me saying that?

-No, no, not at all.

0:19:580:20:00

There's going to be trouble, I can see.

0:20:000:20:03

Good luck with that.

0:20:030:20:04

Why don't we remind ourselves what the Blue team bought, eh?

0:20:040:20:08

Barry and Sheila first parted with cash for the inkstand.

0:20:080:20:12

Will there be gold in them there hills

0:20:150:20:18

for the American prospector lighter?

0:20:180:20:20

Finally, they ran the length of the fair

0:20:240:20:27

to grab the African milk stool but almost ran out of time.

0:20:270:20:30

How much money did you spend, actually, Sheila?

0:20:310:20:34

-Altogether, £130.

-£130. So I'd like £170 of leftover lolly from someone.

0:20:340:20:41

-Lovely. £170 going across to you, James.

-Lovely.

0:20:410:20:44

James' task is now to spend all that money. Got anything in mind?

0:20:440:20:48

-Do you know, I'm just going to try and blow the lot.

-Ooh! Do!

0:20:480:20:52

Because I'm so mean normally, I'm just going to go for it.

0:20:520:20:56

Anyway, very good luck to you. Meanwhile, we're off.

0:20:560:20:58

We're off somewhere incredibly special

0:20:580:21:01

and I tell you, it's not local.

0:21:010:21:03

I'm in London today to meet a rather special Bargain Hunt guest,

0:21:100:21:15

who's waiting for me inside this building,

0:21:150:21:18

the Linley Sambourne House.

0:21:180:21:21

Our guest is the great-grandson of Linley Sambourne,

0:21:250:21:28

a Victorian cartoonist for Punch magazine.

0:21:280:21:32

His grandson knows this house very well indeed.

0:21:320:21:35

He is Lord Snowdon.

0:21:350:21:38

It's extremely kind of you to come here and join us at Linley Sambourne House today,

0:21:410:21:47

which of course occupies a very special place in your heart,

0:21:470:21:51

-doesn't it?

-Yes, indeed.

0:21:510:21:53

I'm very, very fond of it. It's fairly chaotic.

0:21:530:21:58

It has its special atmosphere, though, doesn't it, still?

0:21:580:22:01

Nothing's changed at all since my great-grandfather was here.

0:22:010:22:08

Your mother was instrumental in saving this house, wasn't she?

0:22:080:22:12

Yes, indeed.

0:22:120:22:14

'Inspired by this house,

0:22:140:22:16

'the Countess of Rosse formed the Victorian Society,

0:22:160:22:19

'along with a group of influential friends,

0:22:190:22:22

'in order to preserve Victorian art and architecture.'

0:22:220:22:26

Don't forget, all Victorian things were very unpopular for a long time

0:22:270:22:31

and it was due to people like John Betjeman and my mother

0:22:310:22:35

to get it going again.

0:22:350:22:37

And she loved this house and it shows.

0:22:370:22:41

Does it have any special childhood memories for you?

0:22:410:22:44

Yes, it was always immensely gloomy...

0:22:440:22:47

and it shouldn't look lit.

0:22:470:22:50

No. Of course, as your great-grandfather was a photographer

0:22:500:22:57

and you're a photographer, you know all about light, don't you?

0:22:570:23:01

-I don't use them.

-You don't use them at all?

0:23:010:23:04

-Daylight.

-No.

0:23:040:23:06

Do you think there are any similarities between Linley Sambourne's photography

0:23:060:23:12

and your works?

0:23:120:23:13

He was very talented.

0:23:130:23:15

If some of that talent brushed off on me, I'd be delighted.

0:23:160:23:19

Well, I think it has done, for certain.

0:23:190:23:21

Sambourne took pictures of himself and his family

0:23:220:23:25

posing as the satirical characters he wanted to portray.

0:23:250:23:29

He then used them to help create his famous cartoons.

0:23:290:23:33

He used the upstairs bathroom as his darkroom

0:23:350:23:38

to develop the prints,

0:23:380:23:40

although Lord Snowdon remembers the bath for different reasons.

0:23:400:23:44

Oh, I loved the bath. It's just slabs of solid marble.

0:23:440:23:49

So what you had to do was you had to run it twice,

0:23:490:23:53

once to heat the marble and the other time to heat your bum.

0:23:530:23:57

Do you have any favourite pieces in the house that you particularly like?

0:23:580:24:03

I wouldn't like to pick out one particular thing.

0:24:030:24:06

-I think the whole point of it is really being en masse.

-Yes.

0:24:060:24:11

So if you isolate any...

0:24:110:24:14

it doesn't work.

0:24:160:24:18

-Where did you get your tie from?

-I've got hundreds of them.

0:24:180:24:22

-Have you?

-I have, actually.

-You always wear a bowtie?

-Always, yes.

0:24:220:24:25

I feel quite undressed without it.

0:24:250:24:28

Don't show me.

0:24:280:24:30

Well, thank you very much for joining us.

0:24:300:24:33

-A great pleasure.

-Thank you.

0:24:330:24:35

Lord Snowdon's absolutely right, isn't he?

0:24:400:24:43

This is the most extraordinary house.

0:24:430:24:47

100 years of multi-layered family history,

0:24:470:24:52

all still contained

0:24:520:24:54

in a building where absolutely nothing has been thrown away.

0:24:540:24:59

And yet it's open to the public to be able to enjoy it

0:25:000:25:04

in this fragile environment.

0:25:040:25:06

Of course the big question today is

0:25:070:25:09

which of our teams over at the auction

0:25:090:25:11

is going to turn out to be particularly fragile?

0:25:110:25:14

Well, it's lovely to have popped down the road to Golding Young and Thomas Mawer

0:25:250:25:30

to be with Colin Young.

0:25:300:25:31

-Colin, good morning.

-Good morning, Tim.

0:25:310:25:34

Anyway, first off for Lauren and Kenny is this globe,

0:25:340:25:37

which I see is dated 1959.

0:25:370:25:40

-How do you rate that, Colin?

-I think it's fine.

0:25:400:25:43

Most schools would have that type of globe as a good educational tool for their geography classes

0:25:430:25:49

and today it's got some age, it's, what, 50 years old,

0:25:490:25:53

so I would have thought somebody would be pleased to relive their youth

0:25:530:25:58

and have that in their study.

0:25:580:25:59

-What's it worth?

-Well, I've put an estimate of £30-50 on it.

0:25:590:26:04

Well, you'll be popular. They paid £75.

0:26:040:26:07

-I mean, they do make funny amounts, globes, don't they?

-They do.

0:26:070:26:10

-They can sell quite well.

-You're right.

0:26:100:26:12

-I'd regard your estimate at 30-50 as a bit of a tease.

-Yeah.

0:26:120:26:15

Now, this art glass lamp.

0:26:150:26:18

-I don't think it's particularly art glass, do you?

-No.

0:26:180:26:21

I'll be honest, it does look to be probably Venetian.

0:26:210:26:25

It does have that British look about it - they've mentioned that it's British -

0:26:250:26:29

but I would have thought that's a mass-produced thing from Italy.

0:26:290:26:33

-And the only British thing is the electric fitting.

-A nice piece of chrome.

0:26:330:26:38

-I see it's got a hairline crack.

-Yes, next to the drilled hole.

0:26:380:26:41

-That's not so hot, is it?

-It's not.

-Cracked glass is not a good buy.

0:26:410:26:45

-No, it's not.

-No. Lovely.

0:26:450:26:47

-What's your estimate?

-20-40. It's safe at that sort of money.

0:26:470:26:51

-OK, they paid £40, so they're on the edge.

-Mm.

0:26:510:26:54

Excellent. And lastly, we come up with this shar-pei fellow here.

0:26:540:26:58

It looks pretty grotesque

0:26:580:27:01

but on the other hand, grotesque things are popular.

0:27:010:27:04

They can often sell quite well.

0:27:040:27:07

It came in listed as being Bretby.

0:27:070:27:09

I can't find anything in past results for a Bretby example like that,

0:27:090:27:14

-so we've catalogued it as "style of".

-That's the safe way to do it.

0:27:140:27:17

-And Bretby were pretty good at marking everything.

-They were.

0:27:170:27:22

It's a factory that's been well researched,

0:27:220:27:25

so if you can't find it, it probably isn't Bretby.

0:27:250:27:28

-But it's got the look.

-It has. The estimate's 30-50.

0:27:280:27:31

-OK, £40 paid.

-I'm sure there'll be somebody out there

0:27:310:27:35

that's got a shar-pei that wants a little mate for it.

0:27:350:27:39

On that basis, I fancy, depending on what happens with shar-pei,

0:27:390:27:42

they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:27:420:27:45

Now, Lauren and Kenny, you spent £155, you gave the boy 145.

0:27:460:27:52

What did David Harper blow it on?

0:27:520:27:54

Well, as you know, Tim, I was thinking of Lauren with these purchases.

0:27:540:27:57

-Very kind of you.

-A little bit of bling, I think.

0:27:570:28:00

-Ooh, sparkling!

-Take one each.

0:28:000:28:02

-What are they?

-They're salts.

-Very well done.

0:28:020:28:06

-And they've got liners.

-Original liners.

0:28:060:28:09

-Tired liners.

-Tired?

0:28:090:28:12

-Recently used liners. There's still salt in there.

-Oh, yeah.

0:28:120:28:15

Have a look at the base. Nicely marked in Chester,

0:28:150:28:19

which is a rarer hallmark.

0:28:190:28:21

So we've got 1919 and 1920, very elegant and a pair.

0:28:210:28:26

-They are pretty.

-They are. They're growing on me.

0:28:260:28:28

-That's good, then.

-Good.

0:28:280:28:30

-Guess how much I paid for them.

-I think you paid 85.

0:28:300:28:35

Ooh. Kenny?

0:28:350:28:37

-100.

-Oh, even better.

0:28:370:28:39

-15.

-Excellent!

-One five?

0:28:390:28:42

-15.

-Oh, my word. Oh, well, congratulations.

0:28:420:28:47

-Well, thank you very much.

-That's great, isn't it?

0:28:470:28:49

-Now they really love them.

-Yeah, they're amazing.

0:28:490:28:52

I do think they should double their money and maybe a bit more.

0:28:520:28:56

On that happy note, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about David's salts.

0:28:560:29:01

There we go.

0:29:020:29:04

-Looks flavoursome.

-Mm.

-Salt or mustard?

-I would go with salt.

0:29:040:29:09

-I'd go with mustard.

-Well!

-We're perfectly matched here, Colin.

0:29:090:29:14

-Solid silver, Chester, yeah?

-Yeah.

0:29:140:29:16

Good marks on them. Clean. Liners are in reasonably good order.

0:29:160:29:20

This one's a bit nibbled around the edge.

0:29:200:29:24

Slightly different dates. One might have been done in December 1919

0:29:240:29:27

and one done in January 1920.

0:29:270:29:30

-At least they're adjoining years.

-Indeed.

0:29:300:29:32

It won't matter once they're on the table.

0:29:320:29:34

All silver buyers are going to go for these.

0:29:340:29:37

-There will be a price for them.

-How much?

-30-50.

0:29:370:29:40

-Good old Harper because he only paid £15.

-Absolute bargain.

0:29:400:29:44

Anyway, that's it for the Reds, now for the Blues.

0:29:440:29:47

The cunning James Lewis has gone with the Betjeman patented inkwell,

0:29:470:29:53

-which looks a handsome object, Colin.

-It does.

0:29:530:29:55

-It sits very well on the desk.

-It does.

0:29:550:29:57

And would have been expensive when it was made in 1880 or something like that.

0:29:570:30:02

It would. It certainly would have come from a high-class retailer.

0:30:020:30:06

It's interesting the patent that's on there.

0:30:060:30:09

I must admit I've never come across it before.

0:30:090:30:12

I think it will add interest to it but not necessarily too much value.

0:30:120:30:17

-I would put an estimate on it of 80-120.

-James will be delighted.

0:30:170:30:21

-£60 paid. I think that's very reasonable.

-Yes. Absolutely.

0:30:210:30:25

-OK, next is this bar match-holder device.

-Yeah.

0:30:250:30:31

-Said to be American.

-Yeah.

0:30:310:30:33

And it purports to be circa 1870. I don't know what you think.

0:30:330:30:38

I would have thought it's a lot newer than that,

0:30:380:30:40

purely because of the quality of it.

0:30:400:30:44

-Just the casting of the base is very poor quality.

-Yes.

0:30:440:30:49

We've still put an estimate on it of £40-60, that level.

0:30:490:30:53

-I couldn't see it going beyond that.

-James only paid a modest £35.

0:30:530:30:58

Now, I know you love the old ethnographic stuff.

0:30:580:31:02

-Yeah.

-Tribal is a favourite.

0:31:020:31:03

What do you make of our so-called Zulu milk pail?

0:31:030:31:07

Erm, I think it's quite a fun thing

0:31:070:31:10

and it was great to do a little bit of research, find out a little bit more about them

0:31:100:31:15

and then once you know what it is to have a little bit of disappointment coming in.

0:31:150:31:20

-Ah.

-It's been catalogued well. It's gone out to the world.

0:31:200:31:23

Tribal art buyers have shown great interest in it

0:31:230:31:27

and they've told us it's been cut down and they're not interested.

0:31:270:31:30

What, it's only for half a pint rather than a whole pint?

0:31:300:31:33

It is. I'm afraid the quality's been creamed off that.

0:31:330:31:37

-What's it worth?

-I would think it's going to be make, 10, £30, 50.

0:31:370:31:41

That sort of range. It's going to be low tens.

0:31:410:31:43

It's not as exciting as we'd hoped.

0:31:430:31:46

-OK, £35 is what he paid.

-OK.

0:31:460:31:48

So he's pretty well on the cusp for two of them

0:31:480:31:51

and the inkwell should do well, so they may not need their bonus buy but let's have a look, anyway.

0:31:510:31:56

Now, Sheila and Barry, you spent £130 - pretty miserable, really.

0:31:570:32:01

£170 of leftover lolly went to James Lewis,

0:32:010:32:04

who's looking very pleased with himself

0:32:040:32:06

and what did you spend it on, Jimmy?

0:32:060:32:09

You're going to be disappointed because I only spent not very much

0:32:090:32:13

on a pair of wonderful gourds.

0:32:130:32:16

-Yes.

-I remember those.

-I do.

-Yes.

0:32:160:32:19

We looked and left.

0:32:190:32:20

-What, you've rejected them already?

-Yes.

-I just couldn't resist.

0:32:200:32:25

Oriental works of art are doing so well at the moment.

0:32:250:32:29

Chinese is doing very well, Japanese, still OK.

0:32:290:32:32

But it's the really big thing at the moment

0:32:320:32:34

and they weren't expensive,

0:32:340:32:36

-so I thought let's have a go.

-How much did you pay?

0:32:360:32:40

Well, £25.

0:32:400:32:42

-£25?

-Yeah.

0:32:420:32:43

How much are they worth? Are they going to make a profit?

0:32:430:32:47

I thought I'd got away with that one.

0:32:470:32:49

Er, I think they should make £45-50.

0:32:490:32:52

-Really?

-I'm hoping so.

0:32:520:32:55

-Do you like them?

-Yes, actually. Yeah.

0:32:550:32:57

Yes, I think so.

0:32:570:32:58

I like them. Whether they're going to make a profit, I'm not so sure.

0:32:580:33:02

-Oh! Have faith.

-Well, Sheila, you don't have to decide now.

0:33:020:33:05

You'll decide after the sale of your first three items.

0:33:050:33:08

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about James' gourds.

0:33:080:33:13

-There you go, Colin.

-Thank you.

0:33:140:33:16

-Little something for the weekend.

-Yes.

0:33:160:33:19

-Little bit of a storage device, there.

-Yeah, what - snuff?

0:33:190:33:23

Er, it's big for snuff in the first place.

0:33:230:33:26

I mean, this one's 20 a day, here. You've got a 10 a day pack.

0:33:260:33:30

-That's a lot of snuff, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

-Anyway, there we go.

0:33:300:33:34

Whatever it had in it,

0:33:340:33:35

it's quite a handsome little storage container.

0:33:350:33:39

-No, they are quite nice.

-Perfectly nice little chaps.

0:33:390:33:42

-And what are they worth?

-I would have thought £30-50.

0:33:420:33:45

-Really?

-Yeah, I would have thought plenty of people would have a punt.

0:33:450:33:49

-I wouldn't sniff at that, I tell you.

-No.

0:33:490:33:51

-£25 paid.

-I think that should be reasonably safe.

0:33:510:33:54

-£12.50 each. That's not so much.

-No, it's...

0:33:540:33:58

For all the labours that have gone into it, it isn't a lot of money.

0:33:580:34:01

We look forward to hopefully seeing some profit. Thank you, Colin.

0:34:010:34:05

-So how are you feeling, guys?

-I'm excited.

-Are you?

-Yeah.

0:34:130:34:16

-Are you nervous, Lauren?

-No.

-No?

-No.

0:34:160:34:19

-What about you, Kenny?

-Yes.

-You look a bit nervous, old fruit.

0:34:190:34:23

First lot up is your globe and here it comes.

0:34:230:34:26

There we go. This is a 1950s desk globe.

0:34:260:34:29

Who's going to start me at £30 for it?

0:34:290:34:31

30? 20 to go then. £20, anybody? Come on, ladies and gentlemen, £20.

0:34:310:34:35

-Come on.

-10 to go then, surely?

0:34:350:34:37

-£10. £10 down there. At 10 bid. At 10. I'll take 12 then.

-Come on.

0:34:370:34:41

12 bid. 15. 18. 20. At 20 bid, 22, five.

0:34:410:34:44

5 bid, 28. 30 bid.

0:34:440:34:46

At 32, 35, 38, 40, 2. 42.

0:34:460:34:50

-45. 48. 50.

-It's doing OK.

-And 5. Bid 60?

0:34:500:34:53

£60 anywhere now?

0:34:530:34:56

-Come on.

-60.

-Yes.

-Five.

0:34:560:34:57

70. 70. At £70 bid. Five anywhere else now?

0:34:570:35:01

-One more.

-At £70 bid. Any more? I'll take 2.

0:35:010:35:03

No? 70 at the back of the room, then. Selling at £70.

0:35:030:35:07

-Ooh!

-Not quite good enough. It's minus five.

0:35:070:35:11

But it looked really dodgy, didn't it? Oh, dear.

0:35:110:35:13

Lot 1082 is an art glass lamp base, circa 1950.

0:35:130:35:17

Who's going to start me at £40 for that? 30 to go, then.

0:35:170:35:20

£30, anybody? 30? 20, if we must, then. £20, anybody?

0:35:200:35:23

£10. 10 bid. 12 anywhere else, now? 12 bid.

0:35:230:35:27

15 bid. 18 bid.

0:35:270:35:28

20 now. £20 bid. 22?

0:35:280:35:31

22. 25. 28, now.

0:35:310:35:33

No? At 25 at the back of the room. At 25 bid.

0:35:330:35:36

-28. Anybody else going to see the light?

-Oh!

0:35:360:35:39

-Going at £25.

-25 is minus 15. Bad luck on that, chaps.

0:35:390:35:44

-Come on, Graham.

-So now... Come on, Graham.

0:35:440:35:46

-It's Graham!

-Come on!

0:35:460:35:47

There we go. This is an early 20th century, treacle-glazed pottery

0:35:470:35:52

model of a dog, possibly Bretby.

0:35:520:35:54

We're fairly sure it's a shar-pei.

0:35:540:35:56

Who's going to start me at £50 for it? 50?

0:35:560:35:58

-50? 30 to go, then. 30?

-Come on.

0:35:580:36:01

-20 to go. £20.

-No!

0:36:010:36:03

Thank you. £20 bid. It looks reluctant, as well.

0:36:030:36:07

-20 bid.

-No! He's so lovely.

0:36:070:36:10

Not good, is it? Not good.

0:36:100:36:12

20 bid. 22 on the internet.

0:36:120:36:14

25. 28 now.

0:36:140:36:16

28 bid. 28, 30. 30 bid.

0:36:160:36:18

32 do I see? 32.

0:36:180:36:20

35. 38 now?

0:36:200:36:22

Just look at those sad eyes. TIM SOBS

0:36:220:36:25

Of the auctioneer, not the dog. 38? 36, then? No?

0:36:250:36:29

Last call, then, going. All done at £35.

0:36:290:36:33

-That's minus £5.

-No!

-Bad luck, guys.

0:36:330:36:35

-That is minus 25 tally. A small loss on each piece, I'm afraid.

-Yeah.

0:36:350:36:40

-So what are you going to do about these salts?

-We shall take them.

0:36:400:36:43

Every faith. We have every faith in them.

0:36:430:36:46

Well, that was worth it.

0:36:470:36:50

Goodness only knows what will happen when you make a profit.

0:36:500:36:53

-So are we going to go with the bonus buy?

-Yes.

-Definitely.

0:36:530:36:57

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

-Decision made. Here come the two salts.

0:36:570:37:00

A pair of George V silver circular salts

0:37:000:37:03

with the blue glass liners.

0:37:030:37:04

Who's going to start me at £50 for them? £30 to go, then. 30?

0:37:040:37:08

20 will do, then. £20. Only £10 each.

0:37:080:37:11

-£20 bid.

-We're in profit.

0:37:110:37:12

20 bid and now 2 and five, 25. 28? 28, 30.

0:37:120:37:16

32, 35? No? 32 bid. Five, surely?

0:37:160:37:19

At 32 bid. Any more bids? We're down here and we're selling at £32.

0:37:190:37:24

-£32.

-Come on!

-You have made £17 at a stroke.

-Brilliant.

0:37:240:37:30

Which is very good. So 25 less 17 is eight.

0:37:300:37:34

-You're minus £8.

-Oh!

-Oh!

-Which is nothing is it, really?

-No.

0:37:340:37:37

I mean, it really is nothing, minus £8.

0:37:370:37:40

The big thing is now, don't talk to the Blues at all, right?

0:37:400:37:43

-Yes.

-Zip it.

-Absolutely.

-Well done, Kenny.

0:37:430:37:46

-Have you been talking to the Reds?

-Tried to.

0:37:580:38:01

-What, and they wouldn't communicate?

-Not at all.

0:38:010:38:04

-They're pretty tight-lipped, aren't they?

-Yeah.

0:38:040:38:06

-Husband and wife, you see. You know what it's all about.

-Yes.

0:38:060:38:10

The first item is the inkwell and here it comes.

0:38:100:38:13

A Victorian ormolu and agate inkstand.

0:38:130:38:16

Who's going to start me at £100 for it? 100.

0:38:160:38:18

80 to go, then. 80.

0:38:180:38:19

50 will do, then. £50, anybody? 50. And five, now?

0:38:190:38:22

At £50 bid. Five now, surely? 55. 60. And five?

0:38:220:38:26

-70.

-Yes!

-Five.

-You're in profit.

0:38:260:38:28

80? Five. 90.

0:38:280:38:31

Five. 100 now.

0:38:310:38:33

-At 95 bid.

-95.

-100 now, surely?

0:38:330:38:36

At 95 bid. I'll take £100 surely? No?

0:38:360:38:38

At 95 in the middle of the room, then. At £95.

0:38:380:38:41

-Yes!

-Well done, James.

0:38:410:38:42

£95 is plus 35. There's still money in that, James, but there you go.

0:38:420:38:46

There we go. 1104 is a cast-brass novelty match holder

0:38:460:38:52

and cigar lighter.

0:38:520:38:53

Who's going to start me at £50 for him? 30 to go, then.

0:38:530:38:56

£30? 20 to go, then, surely? £20, anybody?

0:38:560:38:58

Ten? Ten bid. 15 now do I see?

0:38:580:39:01

15, 20. At 20 bid. Five? 25 bid. 30? At 30 bid. 35?

0:39:010:39:04

Bid 40 and five. Bid 50 and five.

0:39:040:39:07

60 now? 60.

0:39:070:39:08

And five. £70, gentleman's bid at 70.

0:39:080:39:10

Five anywhere else? Then going. All done at £70.

0:39:100:39:13

£70. You've doubled your money on that. Plus 35 on that one.

0:39:130:39:17

-Now, the milk pail.

-You had faith in my pail.

-Absolutely.

0:39:170:39:22

A piece of tribal art. There we go. This is a carved wooden milk pail,

0:39:220:39:26

possibly Swazi, possibly Zulu.

0:39:260:39:29

£30 for it. £20 to go then, surely? £20, anybody?

0:39:290:39:32

10 to go then, surely? 10, anybody?

0:39:320:39:34

10? £10.

0:39:340:39:36

-£10. 10 bid. 12 bid.

-Look out.

0:39:360:39:40

15 bid. 18.

0:39:400:39:42

20 now, surely? 22 again?

0:39:420:39:44

22, fresh bidder. 25 bid.

0:39:440:39:47

28, now. 28 bid. 30 again, surely? 30? Can we draw another one?

0:39:470:39:51

-Go on.

-Go on!

-At 30, surely?

0:39:510:39:54

28 bid. 30. No prizes for guessing where this one's from.

0:39:540:39:59

30 bid. 32 anywhere else, now?

0:39:590:40:02

-At 32 bid.

-Go on!

-One more!

0:40:020:40:04

35, then? Going at £32.

0:40:040:40:07

THEY GROAN

0:40:070:40:09

Better than I expected.

0:40:090:40:12

Well, that's minus £3. That's £70 of profit, less the three is £67 up.

0:40:120:40:20

-What are we doing?

-What are you going to do about the gourds?

0:40:200:40:23

-You can park them. James won't mind.

-You don't have to take them.

0:40:230:40:27

Or risk £25 on the snuff gourds?

0:40:270:40:31

I can see those on somebody's stand at £30-£35 each,

0:40:310:40:36

so I think somebody's going to rate them at 70.

0:40:360:40:39

I certainly don't think they're going to make less than 25.

0:40:390:40:42

-And that's what you paid for them?

-We'll go for it.

0:40:420:40:45

-Are you sure?

-There's a potential profit.

0:40:450:40:48

I'll forget the bucket and we'll go for it.

0:40:480:40:50

-Are you sure about this?

-We'll go for it.

0:40:500:40:53

We're going with the bonus buy and here it comes.

0:40:530:40:55

There we go. Lot 1109. Two Japanese gourd bottles this time.

0:40:550:40:59

Good gourd! Who's going to start me at £50? 30 to go.

0:40:590:41:03

20 to go then, surely? £20, anybody?

0:41:030:41:05

£20 on the internet. 20 bid. Two anywhere else now?

0:41:050:41:08

At £20 bid. The bid's from China. At £20 bid. And two now, surely?

0:41:080:41:11

-At £20 bid.

-That's cheap!

0:41:110:41:13

At 20 bid. Two, surely? At 22. The excitement continues.

0:41:130:41:17

-25. At 25 bid.

-Yes!

-25 bid.

0:41:170:41:20

At 25 bid. You can all join in in the room, if you like.

0:41:200:41:23

At 25, internet buyers take it, then, and we are selling at £25.

0:41:230:41:27

-Phew!

-Well done, James.

0:41:270:41:29

Lucky.

0:41:290:41:31

Wiped its face. Good.

0:41:310:41:32

-So you preserved, just, your £67 of profit.

-We're in profit!

0:41:320:41:38

Which is really good and such a rare occurrence, too.

0:41:380:41:40

-Just don't say a word to the Reds.

-No.

-No, no, no.

0:41:400:41:43

-Not a word to the Reds.

-No, no.

-Well done, guys. Well done, James.

0:41:430:41:46

-Everybody happy? Yes?

-Yes.

0:41:540:41:56

Jolly good. That's what we like to see. Been chatting at all?

0:41:560:41:59

-No!

-No!

-No, not at all.

0:41:590:42:01

Well, on Bargain Hunt we don't have losers but we do have runners up

0:42:010:42:04

and the runners up today are the Reds.

0:42:040:42:06

-GROANING AND LAUGHTER

-Oh, no!

0:42:060:42:11

I mean, you did pretty nicely. You lost on the first three items.

0:42:130:42:17

Pretty good.

0:42:170:42:18

But then you went with the bonus buy, which was your big, big moment.

0:42:190:42:23

-£17 profit on that.

-Oh, yes.

-Which is pretty good, yeah? Lovely.

0:42:230:42:27

Which reduced your losses to only minus 8.

0:42:270:42:29

-But have you had a nice time, Kenny?

-It's been marvellous.

0:42:290:42:32

-You had a good time?

-Fabulous.

-Thanks for joining us.

0:42:320:42:35

But the victors today, who are going to take folding money home,

0:42:350:42:39

serious doh-ray-mi, £67.

0:42:390:42:41

-Well done!

-How about that? That's 65. Here's your two.

0:42:410:42:44

-You can have that.

-That's super, isn't it?

0:42:440:42:46

-Have you got anybody in particular to thank?

-Yes. James, definitely.

0:42:460:42:51

Well, credit where credit's due. Well done, James.

0:42:520:42:55

Join us soon for some more Bargain Hunting, yes?

0:42:550:42:57

Yes!

0:42:570:42:59

Subtitles by Red Bee Media ltd

0:43:160:43:18

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:190:43:21

Bargain Hunt comes from Lincoln, where two married couples go head-to-head, and sometimes hand-in-hand. But will there be too much marital stress over at the auction? Tim Wonnacott chats to Lord Snowdon about his family's wonderful Victorian home.


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