Norfolk 23 Bargain Hunt


Norfolk 23

Antiques challenge. Two teams of sisters go head to head at Norfolk fair, Paul Laidlaw and Jonathan Pratt are on hand to offer their expertise.


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Transcript


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Somewhere round here are some hidden gems,

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and we've only got 60 minutes to find them.

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So let's go bargain hunting!

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We're in Norfolk, with a show full of sisters!

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Hit it!

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# Sisters are doing it for themselves #

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Well, with a bit of help from our experts!

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-THEY LAUGH

-Paul gets desperate.

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Just buy something, please!

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Jonathan makes his sisters a promise.

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If we don't make a profit on that, I...

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-Don't say "eat your hat". You haven't got one.

-I haven't.

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-I'll eat my hanky.

-THEY LAUGH

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Ooh, tasty!

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Let's go meet 'em.

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-Hello, girls.

-Hello, Tim.

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My favourite sort of programme, this. Now, Jill,

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should we say sisters or Weather Girls?

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-Weather Girls is OK.

-Why's that, then?

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Well, we've been known to sing a little on karaoke,

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and that Weather Girls song happens to be our favourite tune.

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How lovely! So, apart from singing, what do you collect?

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I collect cranberry glass and I also like small silver items,

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and I've just started a new collection of drinking glasses.

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To go with your karaoke drinking evenings in the pub?

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-Absolutely!

-Lovely!

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But you dig this stuff up a bit, don't you?

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Yeah. My partner Paul was digging in the garden,

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and he happened to dig up an item which was jet black,

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and when we cleaned it up, it was a little silver bowl,

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so I was very chuffed with that, and it started the collection.

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Now, Jean, tell us about your big bingo win.

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Well, it was big to me. It might not be to other people.

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I usually go with some friends, and nobody turned up that night

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and I was on my own. And I won £1,400!

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-Did you really?!

-So I sat there real calm and collected,

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nonchalant, as if it didn't mean anything,

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and afterwards I got up and went to the toilet

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and I went, "Yes!" THEY LAUGH

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-So you got your lucky side, yes?

-I think so.

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How are you going to get on with this antiques game?

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-Well, I think we'll do OK.

-Yeah.

-Hmm.

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-Well, very good luck.

-Thank you very much.

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Great. Now for the Blues - sisters-in-law this time,

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which is wonderful. What else have you got in common?

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Well, she's my best friend, really,

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-and we're both members of the WI.

-Oh, really?

-Yes.

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So, Gwen, on the WI, you must have some pretty good fundraising skills.

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Oh, well, they're better now than they used to be, Tim.

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What sort of things do you get up to?

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Well, I think the worst thing that I was ever part of

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was actually in the grounds of the fire station.

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We decided to sell hot soup,

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but the burner we had heating the soup up

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managed to set fire to the tablecloth and the table,

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so we put the fire out by using the soup!

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-HE LAUGHS

-Well, that sounds very profitable!

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-What did the fire brigade do?

-Luckily they weren't there,

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but we lost a lot of money, because we had to recompense the church,

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because that was their trestle that we'd borrowed, so we actually lost money.

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You could've burned down the fire station.

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That would've been a scream, wouldn't it?

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Good. Um, so, Sal,

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you had a bit of a dramatic career change when you were younger.

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Yes. I started off life in Barclays Bank,

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and after I had the children,

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a job became available on the local farm,

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-and, er, I spent 20 years there.

-Oh, did you?

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-Till I was made redundant.

-You'll be quite tough, then.

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Oh, yes.

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Quite a good idea, to change out of banking into gardening,

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-I would say.

-Yes.

-You were green before your time.

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-That's right, yes.

-Lovely!

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I think you'll do terribly well on this programme.

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Now, there's £300 apiece. Here we go. There's your £300.

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300 smackers. £300. You know the rules. Your experts await.

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And off you go, and very, very, very good luck.

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So, it's the Weather Girls versus the WI.

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Should be fun!

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# It's raining men

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# Hallelujah...

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And in today's shower, we've got Paul Laidlaw...

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-Come on, let's do it!

-OK.

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..and Jonathan Pratt.

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Shall we just have a quick wander down there

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and just see if anything catches our eyes?

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# It's raining men #

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Get stuck in, boys and girls!

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Wow, look! WI dish!

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-£4!

-£4?

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I think you may have to come back when we've finished shopping.

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That's a little Edwardian carriage clock.

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-That is all right, yes.

-Unusual shape, see?

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It's not a carriage clock. It's a carriage timepiece.

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And they've got a platform cylinder escapement,

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but nonetheless it's going to be a French movement, probably,

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or Swiss. The back doesn't look the right age, though.

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No. It looked quite shiny.

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-How much is that?

-110.

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-110.

-I could do 100 on that.

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-It might be, at 100...

-Cos they always have this.

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-That's for the movement.

-It's a different shape.

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I'm slightly confused about that.

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-It's in its box and everything.

-Very strange shape.

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I haven't seen one that shape before.

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Can you do any better than that?

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Er...

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-90.

-And that's it?

-90.

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The case has that worn, battered feel about it.

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It's still intact, but it has that nice roughed-up look

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which looks the part on the mantelpiece, has that vintage feel.

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That's what's important. It's also going,

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-so you can tell the time with it.

-I really like it.

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-We like the clock.

-That's, you know...

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-Do you like it?

-Yes.

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-We both like it.

-That was a very positive "yes"!

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-"Yes!"

-Yes!

-OK. We'll take the clock.

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-OK.

-Thanks very much.

-You're welcome.

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-Job done. That's one out the way.

-Thank you.

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'"Out the way"? Sorry, viewers. He's loving it really.

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'£90, and one down.'

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-Silver, copper.

-Yeah. No signing.

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-You've had 20 minutes, guys!

-Oh! 20 minutes!

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20 minutes, and we're close, but close isn't good enough!

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Right!

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-'Come on, Paul. You can do it.'

-A casket.

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That doesn't live up to my expectations when I see it.

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How do you feel about the spinning wheel?

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-Have a wee look at that.

-Gosh!

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-OK.

-How old will it be, Paul?

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Er, it will be a Victorian affair, a 19th-century affair.

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-Now, if you have a love of treen...

-Yeah.

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..the rustic working of wood, in this instance...

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Look at the elements here! All these little turned spindles,

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the work that went into producing each component

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and then marrying them to make what's essentially a tool,

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-but in truth, isn't that a piece of furniture?

-It is.

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It's got some insect damage. An old repair I'm comfortable with.

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That's fair enough. That's a joint that's opened. A spindle missing.

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We need to ask the guy... It would be nice if that was sitting in a box.

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I think he said he'd got a spare spindle.

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-I mean, it is what it is!

-What price, Paul?

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-Sitting at 65 at the moment.

-What do you think it would...

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They're unpredictable. A good one's a few hundred pounds.

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But they're always unpredictable.

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But in that state, what do you think would be the...

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It's going to be worth £40 to £80.

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-You need to buy it for 40 or less.

-So if we can get it for 40...

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It may be hard work, but if you bat your eyelids at the guy,

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cry, beg...

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'Or maybe just ask for his best price!

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'Or is that just too old fashioned?'

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-Your wheel - have you got the spindle?

-I have somewhere.

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-I'll, er...

-"Somewhere"'s not good enough!

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PAUL LAUGHS We need it!

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We'll find it, I promise.

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So, what would your best price be on that?

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-The absolute bottom price?

-I can't flutter my eyelids.

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THEY LAUGH

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-I can!

-Go on, then. Right! £50.

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Nice round figure. Well, for me it is.

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PAUL LAUGHS Um...

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-I was thinking more 40.

-£40.

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-Please.

-That doesn't really give me...

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-I know, but it might not go for -

-45.

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-45.

-No...

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-It's a gamble.

-Oh, please!

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40. Go on. Please.

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-Oh, £40. There you go.

-Oh, bless!

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THEY LAUGH

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'Our sisters have had a flutter.

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'A third off, and they want the spindle!

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'Honestly!'

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If it had a lot of decoration on it...

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The prices are a little bit...

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We've taken 30 minutes, so you've got half an hour to go.

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I quite like the pressure now. We now need to start thinking.

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We can do this. We can do this.

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-A big Murano glass dish for £15.

-Yeah, I quite like that.

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You know, um... Presumably it says Murano...

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-Maybe it doesn't.

-Sometimes that's not marked, is it?

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It would have had a sticker, perhaps.

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-But it's a very usable bowl.

-That's beautiful, that is.

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-I would use that.

-He's got that price on there.

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He says it was 29 for something else.

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-If we could get it for about 12...

-You might get it for 12 quid.

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I would say you'd double your money on that.

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OK, it is a bit scratched.

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-Yeah.

-We were saying not 20th century...

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-But for that...

-Style sells.

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It does, yeah.

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-I'll hold it up here and smile.

-All right.

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'Mmm, that should help, Jonathan!'

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Come down a bit on that one?

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There's a lot of head-shaking going on down there.

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'Maybe a bigger smile, then?'

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He's not happy to come down, cos he's obviously reduced it.

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-OK. So it's 15 or nothing.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

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What do you reckon? Bit of Murano glass...

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-We can't lose a lot of money, can we? It's only 15.

-Exactly.

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This will make up for, perhaps, our doubts on -

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-We both quite like it.

-I think so, yes.

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-OK.

-We'll have it.

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'So, a chunk of glass for a massive £15.

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'Big spenders? Not!

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'Right, Jill and Jean. You still need two.

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'They don't count. Cute, though. Woof!'

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-Hello, there.

-Hello!

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There's Britannia again. I like these letter clips.

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I think they're lovely objects. So elegant!

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No tremendous substance in them. That's very utilitarian.

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It's an office piece. What's this little affair here?

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-Is it a little bank or inkwell?

-Inkwell.

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-World War inkwell.

-Oh, that's cute!

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You've got a little French tank there.

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That's got Reims on. Souvenir of Reims!

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So, in the 1920s, there was quite an interest in touring the battlefields

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-of France and Flanders.

-That's right.

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You'll see no end of trench art here today.

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Very little of it was made in the trenches.

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Most of it was made to service the tourist trade in the 1920s,

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and this was one of those pieces, and that's a souvenir of Reims.

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I think it's a charming little piece.

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-What was the price on there?

-45.

-45...

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-I have very little room to move on that, I'm afraid.

-OK.

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Can you see the appeal, that there are people out there for such?

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I do, but it depends on whether they're going to be there at the auction.

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I mean, it's... Can you help us on that?

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I know you said there wasn't much, but if it came push to shove

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-and the heavens open...

-Could you do it for under 40?

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-Not 35?

-38.

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Let's not quibble over £3. Can we make it that round number at 35?

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-Do a deal at 35.

-It's your...

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If you don't want it, Jill, don't go for it.

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I'm sure that we'll see something. But I think it might be worth a punt.

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Time's cracking on!

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-Can we...

-Do you think it would be worth a go?

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I think Paul does. I think we have to do what Paul...

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'Take the hint, girls!'

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-What do you reckon?

-Do buy something, please!

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-Do it!

-Let's do it.

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-We'll have it, please, at 35.

-Thanks very much.

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-You're welcome.

-Thank you, sir. Thank you very much.

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-Thanks a lot.

-Number two!

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'Paul, you're so subtle!

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'They've got "Reims" of cash left.

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'"Reims"! Get it?'

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That's a little teapot. £50...

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But the way it's made, it's very, very finely potted.

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-People collect pearlware, though, don't they?

-Oh, yeah.

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-We can come back.

-Shall we leave that?

-Yeah.

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-Do you like that?

-I did! I saw it before.

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If we can't find anything else, that may be it.

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'Good plan, Sally!'

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-Do you like it?

-I do, actually. I think that's very attractive.

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-OK. So, we expect it to be -

-Will it be gold?

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Nine-carat gold, I've no doubt. Put that down there.

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It's a pretty little brooch. Is it expensive?

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-Not really, no. It's 35.

-£35.

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In an auction environment, in all honesty,

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that's at the high end of my estimate.

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-It doesn't grab you.

-It's not, "Wow!"

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You'll buy a brooch like that for 20 to 30 any day of the week.

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-It's something we can...

-Come back to, yeah?

-Yeah.

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'Yeah. "Brooch" that later.'

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-Ladies?

-Yes?

-A piece of furniture.

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-Ah!

-OK?

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It is made of... Crikey, this is the hard bit for me.

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-How much time have we got left?

-Seven minutes.

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So I don't want to chat for too long!

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This is, um... It's either walnut or mahogany.

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It's a kind of faded look. I think it's walnut.

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It's basically Victorian. Moulded leg like this,

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-which is typically about 1870...

-Has somebody stripped that down?

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-Looks a bit faded, and -

-The top split.

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They used to stain these with bull's blood to make it look like mahogany.

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-Ah!

-So it might have been faded, and they wanted to darken it up.

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There's a split in the top where it's seasoned, but it hasn't broken all the way through.

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-It's heavy.

-It's nicely turned.

-How much do you think the guy wants,

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bearing in mind the prices of the other furniture? How much do you think?

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I mean, it's a bit scruffy, but... What do you think?

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-25?

-35?

-Oh, thank you!

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"£20", he says. If you got that for 15 quid,

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-you'd make a profit on it.

-I think so.

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-I think it would be a good deal.

-If you can get it for that.

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-I mean, I quite like it. I mean...

-Take 15?

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DEALER REPLIES OFF-MIC

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It would need a lot of work doing to it.

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It needs a little bit of a clean, and there's a crack in the top.

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-Can we say at the middle?

-That's damaged!

-18?

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It's not quite in the middle. It's more in your favour on that side.

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-Shall we do it for £18?

-Yeah, go on.

-Or would you like the teapot?

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We're not going to lose much on it, are we?

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-We won't lose anything on it.

-That's pretty sturdy.

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-Yeah.

-That's not wobbly or flimsy.

-Yes, we'll have it! We'll have it.

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If we don't make a profit on that,

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-I...

-Don't say "eat your hat". You haven't got one.

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I haven't really got a hat, have I? I'll eat my hanky.

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-Ugh, no. I wouldn't want to do that.

-THEY LAUGH

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'Nice! With or without the hanky-panky,

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'Gwen and Sally are done.'

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-No.

-No tools.

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-No.

-It's not real exciting.

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'"Bearly" any time left, girls.'

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Ten minutes, folks. Ten minutes.

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170. It needs to be...

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-A lot cheaper.

-It needs to be half that.

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We're really running out of time. Five, six minutes.

0:16:290:16:33

-I know.

-Are we buying something here and now?

0:16:330:16:35

Are we going to take a plunge? We're in for a penny, we're going for it?

0:16:350:16:39

-Because we're not going back.

-Yes.

-I'm going to look at this stall.

0:16:390:16:43

Let's... We've three minutes.

0:16:430:16:46

'Yeah! I love a good team talk.'

0:16:460:16:48

-What do you think, Jill? A lamp.

-The one with the milk glass is nice.

0:16:490:16:53

Victorian. Globe's a replacement. You pay more for a fabulous globe.

0:16:530:16:58

-I like the milk glass.

-I like the bottom bit.

0:16:580:17:01

And this conical cast-iron base. Is there a price on that?

0:17:010:17:04

I got 68 on that.

0:17:040:17:05

-Could it be...

-What's your best?

-55 would be my best.

0:17:050:17:09

-55.

-Would you take 50 for it?

0:17:090:17:11

-Please!

-Help them out. We're a bit close to the edge here.

0:17:120:17:15

-Go on, then!

-Thank you!

-Thank you very much.

0:17:150:17:18

-Thanks ever so much. Thank you.

-Thank you!

0:17:180:17:21

We've literally no time left, I suspect.

0:17:210:17:24

-Brilliant!

-Thanks very much.

0:17:240:17:26

-Talk about close call!

-Oh, man alive!

0:17:260:17:29

-Oh, wow, wow!

-Brilliant!

0:17:290:17:31

-THEY LAUGH

-Jill, I tell you, I'm beat!

0:17:310:17:35

'Pretty tired and emotional myself!

0:17:350:17:38

'But our sister act have done it, and here's how.

0:17:380:17:41

'Jill's eyelids batted them the first buy,

0:17:410:17:44

'a spinning wheel for £40. And with a bit of persuasion,

0:17:440:17:48

'the sisters went with Paul's novelty inkwell.

0:17:480:17:51

'And with seconds to spare, this lamp was snapped up for 50.'

0:17:530:17:58

-Now, you spent £125, yes?

-We have.

-Yes.

0:18:010:18:04

I would like, please, £175 of leftover lolly.

0:18:040:18:07

That's great. Thank you very much. Jeanie, which is your favourite bit?

0:18:070:18:11

Um... I think my favourite bit is the last item, actually, our lamp.

0:18:110:18:16

-Your lamp. And what about you, Jill?

-Yeah, I agree.

0:18:160:18:19

-I really liked the lamp. I did.

-Will that make the most profit?

0:18:190:18:23

-No.

-No.

0:18:230:18:25

What's going to make the most profit?

0:18:250:18:27

-I think that little inkwell may.

-I think the inkwell will.

0:18:270:18:30

Every time you mention the inkwell, you look lovingly at Paul.

0:18:300:18:34

THEY LAUGH

0:18:340:18:36

There you go. £175. That's a good old wodge, isn't it?

0:18:370:18:40

-That's a good one.

-You've had a great time up till now?

0:18:400:18:43

-Fantastic.

-Brilliant.

-That's lovely, and good on you. Good luck, Paul,

0:18:430:18:47

with your search for the bonus buy. Why don't we check out what the Blue Team bought, eh?

0:18:470:18:51

Gwen and Sally's first find was the timepiece in a box, for 90.

0:18:510:18:56

The Murano glass, bought for 15.

0:18:560:19:00

And they splashed out on this antique table.

0:19:040:19:08

£18 paid.

0:19:080:19:10

Well, that's pretty good. That means we come in for some leftover lolly.

0:19:120:19:15

-So, how much did you spend overall?

-£123.

0:19:150:19:19

-On all three?

-On all three.

-123. That's not much.

0:19:190:19:22

So, does that mean I get 177 back?

0:19:220:19:25

-Well, you do, yes.

-177. Is that 177?

-Yes.

0:19:250:19:29

There we go. Thank you very much. That's quite a lot.

0:19:290:19:31

-That's a lot of money.

-Which is your favourite piece?

0:19:310:19:34

Um...

0:19:340:19:36

-I think I like the Murano glass.

-Is that your favourite piece?

0:19:370:19:41

-I think the same with me.

-Yes? You're pleased with that?

0:19:410:19:44

-I think that was a bargain.

-All right.

0:19:440:19:46

-But is it your favourite piece?

-Yes, I think so.

0:19:460:19:50

-She's the treasurer.

-I'm the treasurer.

0:19:500:19:53

Which piece is going to bring the biggest money, then?

0:19:530:19:55

I think...

0:19:550:19:57

-It might be that table.

-It might be that table.

0:19:570:20:00

-Oh, lovely.

-Because, er...

-Don't be so disparaging!

0:20:000:20:03

-I know!

-It's the certainty and positiveness of it all!

0:20:030:20:07

I think you've punched them into a state of complete submission.

0:20:070:20:11

-It took an hour.

-It took an hour, yeah.

0:20:110:20:14

-He's had his work cut out.

-You did take it almost to the line.

0:20:140:20:17

Good luck, girls. Meanwhile, I'm heading off

0:20:170:20:20

to the most glorious house in Cambridgeshire,

0:20:200:20:23

which you're going to adore. It's called Peckover House, actually.

0:20:230:20:26

The North Brink here in Wisbech

0:20:340:20:37

has been home to the movers and shakers

0:20:370:20:40

of this Cambridgeshire town for centuries.

0:20:400:20:44

And one particular family, the Peckovers,

0:20:440:20:47

who were bankers and had made a huge fortune,

0:20:470:20:50

lived here at Peckover House.

0:20:500:20:53

But we're not here to actually have a look at the house at all today,

0:20:530:20:57

but what lies beyond it.

0:20:570:20:59

Wow!

0:21:040:21:06

The family created this garden in the early 19th century.

0:21:130:21:16

Many of the unusual trees and shrubs were planted by the Peckovers

0:21:230:21:28

nearly 200 years ago.

0:21:280:21:30

The garden is a series of adjoining areas or rooms,

0:21:350:21:39

each furnished so the Peckover family could enjoy it

0:21:390:21:43

all the year round.

0:21:430:21:45

This is the rustic summerhouse.

0:21:450:21:47

The rustic look deliberately created by the Victorians,

0:21:470:21:52

using bark-covered timbers,

0:21:520:21:55

so that this structure sits harmoniously

0:21:550:21:58

overlooking these quintessentially Victorian trees,

0:21:580:22:03

monkey puzzle and the like.

0:22:030:22:06

And what do we have here?

0:22:060:22:08

Another Victorian gardener's favourite,

0:22:080:22:11

a wee trug,

0:22:110:22:13

effectively a basket that's been made out of sweet chestnut

0:22:130:22:18

with slivers of willow that have been cut, soaked in water

0:22:180:22:23

and then bent into this traditional trug boat-type shape.

0:22:230:22:28

What's fun about this thing is

0:22:280:22:31

that it's been made into a combination trug

0:22:310:22:34

and walking stick, and particularly special for Peckover House

0:22:340:22:39

is this little inscription from the owner,

0:22:390:22:42

Alexandrina Peckover, 1895.

0:22:420:22:46

And, of course, it was Alexandrina who donated the place

0:22:460:22:50

to the National Trust. Trug on!

0:22:500:22:54

How charming is this?

0:23:010:23:03

The pets' cemetery,

0:23:030:23:05

poor little pussies from the 18th to the 20th century.

0:23:050:23:09

And just in case there's the odd shower,

0:23:210:23:24

or it's baking hot and you want to take refuge,

0:23:240:23:28

how about this?

0:23:280:23:30

Called the Victorian summerhouse,

0:23:300:23:32

and with all this green lattice and the shaped outline,

0:23:320:23:36

I suppose dating from the 1840s.

0:23:360:23:39

Peacock hedge.

0:23:440:23:45

HE MAKES SQUAWKING SOUND

0:23:450:23:47

'Let me introduce you to someone who knows this garden inside out.'

0:23:470:23:52

So, Alison, how long have you been working here at Peckover?

0:23:520:23:55

-I've been working here for 13 years now.

-Have you?

0:23:550:23:58

-Yes.

-It's a great garden, isn't it?

-It's fantastic.

0:23:580:24:01

I really enjoy my job here. It's quite a small garden,

0:24:010:24:04

only about two acres, but it's got so much jam-packed into it.

0:24:040:24:07

Which is your favourite bit of the garden?

0:24:070:24:10

A place very dear to my heart is the orangery.

0:24:100:24:12

It's one of my favourite parts because it houses our very old orange trees.

0:24:120:24:16

-Can we have a look?

-Yes, certainly.

-Good.

0:24:160:24:19

Thanks.

0:24:190:24:20

-So here are the famous orange trees!

-Yes. Three very old orange trees.

0:24:240:24:30

-How old are they?

-We are led to believe

0:24:300:24:33

that they're 300 years old, but they haven't been here that long.

0:24:330:24:37

The Peckovers bought them over 100 years ago from a local auction,

0:24:370:24:40

and the bill of sale then said they were over 200 years old,

0:24:400:24:43

so that makes them over 300 years old now.

0:24:430:24:46

-Gosh! They look in very good heart.

-They are.

0:24:460:24:49

They're fruiting every year. We have a good crop off them.

0:24:490:24:53

It's a wonderful thing to see. Thank you very much.

0:24:530:24:56

-Thank you for showing me that. Good luck.

-Thank you.

-Bye.

0:24:560:24:59

Isn't that lovely?

0:25:000:25:02

Of course the big question today is,

0:25:020:25:05

how fruitful and productive are our teams going to be

0:25:050:25:08

over at the auction?

0:25:080:25:10

Well, we've had a serious trot an hour southwards, roughly,

0:25:280:25:32

from Norwich to Campsea Ashe in Suffolk,

0:25:320:25:36

to be at Abbotts saleroom with Geoffrey Barfoot, our auctioneer.

0:25:360:25:40

-Good morning.

-Good morning!

-Excellent to be here.

0:25:400:25:43

-Now, Jill and Jean have gone with this spinning wheel.

-Yeah.

0:25:430:25:47

-It had a problem, though, because you can see it's missing -

-A spoke.

0:25:470:25:52

I don't think that's going to make a tremendous difference to the value.

0:25:520:25:56

Oh, good. The stallholder said he'd try and find it,

0:25:560:26:00

-but he's clearly failed to.

-It's snapped off and got lost

0:26:000:26:04

-somewhere along the line.

-They are quite delicate things,

0:26:040:26:07

when you think of all these moving parts whizzing round

0:26:070:26:11

in the 18th century.

0:26:110:26:13

Quite elaborate, but lots of worm and problems with it.

0:26:130:26:17

What do you think it's worth, Geoffrey?

0:26:170:26:20

I think just to stand in the corner and look pretty, £40 to £60.

0:26:200:26:24

OK. £40 they paid, so that's not too bad.

0:26:240:26:26

-I think that's in line, yeah.

-Good.

0:26:260:26:28

Next is the First World War inkwell, which is a pretty wacky object.

0:26:280:26:33

-It is, isn't it? It's a souvenir item.

-Yes.

0:26:330:26:36

We come across all sorts of things made up by people in the trenches,

0:26:360:26:41

-trench art...

-But that's not.

-..using shells and stuff like that.

0:26:410:26:45

But this has been made in a factory in France

0:26:450:26:48

after the First World War, sort of 1920s, something like that.

0:26:480:26:52

In a strange way, it's sort of celebrating it.

0:26:520:26:55

But I guess interesting today for anybody who collects inkwells,

0:26:550:26:58

-and people do collect inkwells, don't they?

-Yeah.

0:26:580:27:01

-Do you like it?

-Yes, I do, in a quirky sort of way.

0:27:010:27:05

-Hmm. How much do you like it?

-Not a great deal.

0:27:050:27:08

-Ah!

-I think probably £20, £30.

0:27:080:27:11

-You don't like it enough.

-No.

-THEY LAUGH

0:27:110:27:14

-£35, they paid.

-Right, right.

0:27:140:27:16

-But it might make it, mightn't it?

-It's got a chance

0:27:160:27:19

-with a good wind behind it.

-What's your market like in these parts

0:27:190:27:23

-for Victorian oil lamps?

-Usually quite good,

0:27:230:27:26

but that example is a bit plain.

0:27:260:27:29

-Just a plain white opaque reservoir.

-You like them fancy in these parts?

0:27:290:27:35

Coloured shades, coloured reservoirs,

0:27:350:27:37

-so that one is a bit plain.

-How much?

0:27:370:27:40

-40 to 60.

-£50 paid.

0:27:400:27:42

-Right.

-I reckon that this team are pretty well spot-on

0:27:420:27:46

with everything they bought, and won't need their bonus buy,

0:27:460:27:49

but let's go and have a look at it anyway.

0:27:490:27:51

So, girls, you spent £125. You gave Paul Laidlaw £175

0:27:510:27:56

of leftover lolly. What did you spend it on, Paul?

0:27:560:27:59

Take a look at these. See what you think.

0:27:590:28:02

-Ooh!

-Oh, my God!

0:28:020:28:04

-Lot of metal for your money.

-Gosh!

0:28:040:28:07

What's your kneejerk reaction? And don't humour me here,

0:28:070:28:10

because I have an opinion on these that may surprise you.

0:28:100:28:13

-Is it spelter?

-It is.

-I like them.

0:28:130:28:15

-You like?

-I do!

-I think others will, too.

0:28:150:28:18

There's an appeal in these. Not to my taste.

0:28:180:28:20

They're not fine things, but they are antiques,

0:28:200:28:24

late 19th century. You've got the medium correct - bronzed spelter.

0:28:240:28:28

They are reproductions of fine art, OK?

0:28:280:28:32

They're commonly called Marly horses.

0:28:320:28:36

They are reproductions of full-blown bronzes

0:28:360:28:41

commissioned by Louis XIV for his palace at Marly,

0:28:410:28:45

-sculpted by Guillaume Coustou...

-Coustou.

-..Coustou,

0:28:450:28:51

and modelled after Graeco-Roman versions,

0:28:510:28:54

and they represent man taming the brute beast,

0:28:540:28:59

brute nature. So there's a pedigree, there's a heritage here.

0:28:590:29:03

But we're not interested in that. We're interested in shekels - pounds, shillings and pence.

0:29:030:29:07

-How much did you spend?

-This is the nitty-gritty.

0:29:070:29:10

These didn't cost me a lot of money. They cost me £35.

0:29:100:29:15

-You're joking!

-Yeah. That's a good reaction.

0:29:150:29:17

I think that is going to be the reaction of most people.

0:29:170:29:20

I'm not taking them home. They're not me.

0:29:200:29:23

But they're undeniably good furnishing, period pieces,

0:29:230:29:27

-and they have a price tag.

-Are we going to make a profit?

0:29:270:29:30

-Yeah.

-Excellent.

0:29:300:29:32

-Fantastic.

-That is really good.

0:29:320:29:34

-Really pleased.

-Very happy.

-Excellent. So am I, then.

-Spot-on!

0:29:340:29:37

So, do you think you'll be picking them?

0:29:370:29:40

We'll see how our others go. THEY LAUGH

0:29:400:29:43

But I think you might be on a winner there.

0:29:430:29:46

-Yeah. That's quite exciting.

-Lovely.

0:29:460:29:48

No more excited than we are. Anyway, for the viewers at home,

0:29:480:29:51

let's find out if the auctioneer finds them equally exciting.

0:29:510:29:55

Here we go, look. Cantering in.

0:29:560:29:59

-How do you rate those?

-Little bit of damage, I've noticed,

0:30:000:30:04

on the leg there. It's been soldered back on at some time.

0:30:040:30:08

-Very brittle.

-Very brittle. It's a soft metal.

0:30:080:30:11

-How much, Geoffrey, do you think?

-Perhaps £40 to £60.

-OK, fine.

0:30:120:30:16

-Paul paid £35.

-Right. Right.

0:30:160:30:18

-And he's very canny.

-Yeah.

0:30:180:30:20

Right. That is it for the Reds. Shove him next door to his mate.

0:30:200:30:25

And now for the Blues, Gwen and Sally.

0:30:250:30:29

They went with the little carriage timepiece, perfectly clean,

0:30:290:30:32

perfectly straightforward. What do you think that's worth?

0:30:320:30:36

Just a basic timepiece, so it doesn't strike or chime or anything.

0:30:370:30:42

-Some cracking on the dial.

-Condition's not brilliant, then.

0:30:420:30:46

The carrying case is a bit scuffed and battered, as they often are.

0:30:460:30:51

-Yeah.

-30 to 50?

-£90 paid.

0:30:510:30:53

That could be a bit of a struggle.

0:30:530:30:55

The shallow Murano glass bowl, that's pretty straightforward.

0:30:550:30:59

-Good chunky piece.

-Mm.

0:30:590:31:02

But obviously a bit modern for an antique sale.

0:31:020:31:06

-What do you think? 1970s, 1980s?

-Yes. I would think '70s, isn't it?

0:31:060:31:10

-I'd put it in at 20 to 40.

-£15 is what they paid.

0:31:100:31:14

So they've done well with that one. And the finale

0:31:140:31:17

is that little tripod table on the end.

0:31:170:31:19

-How do you rate that?

-Very faded, very bleached out.

0:31:190:31:22

Got quite a nice column and base, but nasty split across the top.

0:31:220:31:27

Generally rather tired.

0:31:270:31:29

Like me.

0:31:290:31:31

-I've got that in at 40 to 60 again.

-Have you?

-Yeah.

0:31:310:31:34

They'll be pleased with that, because they only paid £18.

0:31:340:31:38

-I think there's a profit there.

-Good!

-Yeah.

0:31:380:31:40

That's marvellous. All in all, then, what they lose on the clock

0:31:400:31:44

they make up on the table, dee-da, dee-da.

0:31:440:31:47

But let's go and have a look at their bonus buy anyway.

0:31:470:31:50

Now, Gwen and Sally, you spent £123. You gave Jonathan £177.

0:31:500:31:55

What did you spend it on, Jonathan?

0:31:550:31:57

You know what I'm like. I like to spend the money if I'm given it,

0:31:570:32:00

-so I...

-Not all of it!

0:32:000:32:03

-Oh, that's my little teapot!

-Yes!

-Oh, you cheeky thing!

0:32:030:32:07

Yeah. I... It was one of those things. When you -

0:32:070:32:11

-What's going on here, please?

-I picked it up first,

0:32:110:32:14

before even Jonathan saw it. I saw that and loved it.

0:32:140:32:18

The guy had it listed as late 19th century,

0:32:180:32:21

and it's not. It's quite obviously earlier.

0:32:210:32:23

And I'm thinking, "Well, he's asking £65 for it,"

0:32:230:32:27

and so I thought, well, you know, "I'll go back and see what"...

0:32:270:32:30

And, um, he took £40 for it.

0:32:300:32:33

-Oh, brilliant!

-OK. It's English,

0:32:330:32:36

late 18th century, about 1780.

0:32:360:32:38

It's in that tradition of English porcelain, copying the Chinese.

0:32:380:32:43

I'd love it to be from Lowestoft. That's where we are locally.

0:32:430:32:46

It's quite possibly Liverpool or Caughley or somewhere like that.

0:32:460:32:50

It's unmarked, but it has that lovely blue tinge of the glaze.

0:32:500:32:54

-The downside is, the handle's been off.

-Yes.

0:32:540:32:57

-There's been some restoration.

-But if it's 200-and-odd years old,

0:32:570:33:01

-my handle might be off!

-Some would say you're off your trolley.

0:33:010:33:05

-THEY LAUGH

-But don't worry about it.

0:33:050:33:07

-But we love it. We love it.

-It's a child's teapot.

0:33:070:33:10

I reckon there's a healthy profit in it.

0:33:100:33:13

-I'd like to see it make £100.

-Oh, brilliant!

0:33:130:33:15

I think it has every chance of doing that.

0:33:150:33:17

You don't have to decide right now. You can decide after the sale of the first three items.

0:33:170:33:22

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks

0:33:220:33:26

about Jonathan's little pot.

0:33:260:33:28

Well, Geoffrey, they say that size doesn't matter.

0:33:280:33:31

-Nice little teapot.

-Over to you.

0:33:310:33:33

I've given it a good look. It has had some restoration.

0:33:330:33:36

Um, the rim has been rebuilt. If you...

0:33:360:33:40

..just put your tooth to it, it feels soft to the touch,

0:33:410:33:45

so one's assuming that originally it's a doll's tea set.

0:33:450:33:49

But nicely decorated.

0:33:490:33:51

-I'd put it in at 80 to 120.

-Oh, well, they'll be delighted.

0:33:510:33:54

-That's great. Exciting stuff, eh?

-We wait and see.

0:33:540:33:57

We certainly do. Thank you very much.

0:33:570:33:59

180. 190.

0:34:010:34:04

200. 220.

0:34:040:34:06

240. 260.

0:34:060:34:08

280 to Nigel. Sell at 280.

0:34:080:34:12

-Are you happy?

-Yes, we're happy.

-Perfectly confident?

0:34:140:34:17

-Yes.

-Ably supported by Mr Laidlaw, which is great.

0:34:170:34:20

Your first lot up is the spinning wheel, estimate £40 to £60.

0:34:200:34:24

-£40 paid, and here it comes.

-OK.

0:34:240:34:26

Antique turned spinning wheel there.

0:34:260:34:29

How do you see that one, then? Put me in at £50 to start.

0:34:290:34:33

50. Well, 30 to go, then, surely. Anyone start me? 30?

0:34:330:34:36

-Oh, please, please!

-20, then. Up we go, then.

0:34:360:34:39

Come along, do. £20 I'm bid. On the maiden bid at 20.

0:34:390:34:43

Five's in the middle. At 25.

0:34:430:34:45

30. At 30.

0:34:450:34:46

-Five. 35.

-Go on! One more, one more, one more.

0:34:460:34:50

Cheap lot. 40 bid now on the right-hand side.

0:34:500:34:53

-At 40 I'm bid over here.

-You've wiped your face.

0:34:530:34:56

Absolutely.

0:34:560:34:58

At £40. It's on the right here at 40. And I sell away, then, at £40.

0:34:580:35:03

-Perfect. That's a relief.

-Yeah, it is, actually.

0:35:030:35:07

-That's a big relief.

-Yeah. Pleased with that.

0:35:070:35:09

OK!

0:35:090:35:11

Now the inkwell.

0:35:110:35:13

One novelty inkwell there in the form of a First World War tank

0:35:130:35:17

attacking the gunning placement. Interesting lot.

0:35:170:35:20

How do you see that one, then? Put me in at £40.

0:35:200:35:23

20 to go, then, surely. Anyone start me at 20? 20 in the front row.

0:35:230:35:27

On the maiden bid, straight in at 20.

0:35:270:35:29

At 20. Five at the back. At 25.

0:35:290:35:31

30. Five.

0:35:310:35:33

40. Five.

0:35:330:35:36

45 is in front, the wardrobe. At 45. Any other bids?

0:35:360:35:40

At £45. It's in front, the wardrobe, at 45. All done and dusted, then,

0:35:400:35:44

-at 45...

-£45.

0:35:440:35:47

That is plus £10. Very good, team.

0:35:470:35:50

Now the oil lamp.

0:35:500:35:53

The Victorian oil lamp. There we are. Nice Victorian oil lamp.

0:35:530:35:57

How do you see that one, then? Put me in at £50.

0:35:570:35:59

Well, 30 to start, then, surely. Nice little oil lamp. Start me 30.

0:35:590:36:03

Well, 20 and up we go, then. Come along, do.

0:36:030:36:06

£20 I am bid, sir. Thank you. At 20.

0:36:060:36:08

At £20 I'm bid. An opening bid of 20. Do I see a five anywhere?

0:36:080:36:12

-At 25.

-Oh, no!

0:36:120:36:16

25's in the middle now. At 25. 30 with Basil.

0:36:160:36:18

At 30. He knows we've got some power cuts coming.

0:36:180:36:22

-Yes, come on. Sell it!

-At £30 I'm bid, right at the back at 30.

0:36:220:36:26

And I sell, then, at 30. Are we all done, then, at 30?

0:36:260:36:29

£30, which is minus £20. Now, you were plus ten before.

0:36:290:36:33

Minus 20. It means that you are minus £10 now.

0:36:330:36:37

What are you going to do about the Marly horses? Go with them?

0:36:370:36:40

-I think so. Yes, please.

-Definitely? That's a decision made?

0:36:400:36:44

-Yeah.

-For certain?

-Yes.

0:36:440:36:46

Right, then. We're going with the spelter horses, and here they come.

0:36:460:36:50

Horse-and-groom figures there, in spelter. How do you see those, then?

0:36:500:36:53

Put me in at £100. Well, 50 to start, then, surely.

0:36:530:36:56

Good decorative objects. 50? Well, 30 and up we go, then.

0:36:560:37:00

30 surely. Well, 20, then, and up we go.

0:37:000:37:04

Three places. 20. Five in the doorway.

0:37:040:37:07

30. With Basil at 30. At five.

0:37:070:37:10

At 35. It's against you, Basil. It's in the doorway. 40 now.

0:37:100:37:13

In the doorway at 40. At £40, I'm bid.

0:37:130:37:16

At 40 I'm bid. Do I see five anywhere?

0:37:160:37:18

At £40. It's in the doorway, then. Are we all done and dusted?

0:37:180:37:22

-45. He's back in.

-Yes!

0:37:220:37:24

At 45. He's back in, then, at 45. And I shall sell at 45...

0:37:240:37:28

£45 is plus £10,

0:37:280:37:31

which means, overall, you're absolutely nowhere.

0:37:310:37:34

Up a creek! THEY LAUGH

0:37:340:37:37

-Without a paddle!

-You've wiped your face good and proper.

0:37:370:37:40

Oh, dear! Oh, dear!

0:37:400:37:43

-Anyway, there's no shame in that.

-No.

-It could've been a lot worse.

0:37:430:37:48

-It could!

-Oh, that was so exciting!

0:37:480:37:51

The big trick now is, don't say a thing to the Blues.

0:37:510:37:54

-Lips sealed.

-Everything sealed.

-Yes.

0:37:540:37:57

-Do you know how the Reds got on?

-No.

-Not at all.

0:38:020:38:04

No idea? OK. Well, I'm delighted about that,

0:38:040:38:07

because you don't want to know, I tell you.

0:38:070:38:09

First up is the carriage timepiece, and here it comes.

0:38:090:38:12

Early 20th-century brass-cased carriage timepiece,

0:38:120:38:15

in the Morocco-leather carrying case there.

0:38:150:38:18

How do you see that one, then? Put me in at £50 to start.

0:38:180:38:21

-50. Well, 30, then, and up we go.

-50?!

0:38:210:38:24

Well, 20 to get started, then.

0:38:240:38:27

-£20?!

-Don't worry, don't worry.

-20 I'm bid. At 20.

0:38:270:38:30

You bidding, Brian?

0:38:300:38:32

22, and a brand-new bid at 25. 28. 30.

0:38:320:38:35

-Two. 35.

-Paid 90!

0:38:350:38:38

-40.

-I know. He's getting there. He's getting there.

0:38:380:38:40

45. 45 is in the front row.

0:38:400:38:43

-Long way to go!

-45, then, in the front row.

0:38:430:38:46

-No, no. Come on, come on! Sorry.

-At 45...

0:38:460:38:50

-Oh!

-I did have a second thought after we'd bought it,

0:38:500:38:53

-but I can say that, can't I?

-Minus 45.

0:38:530:38:56

-We saw that crack.

-Exactly, afterwards.

0:38:560:38:59

Here comes the bowl.

0:38:590:39:00

How do you see that one, then? Put me in at £40.

0:39:000:39:02

Look handsome on the dining table.

0:39:020:39:05

Well, 20 to start, then, surely.

0:39:050:39:06

£20, surely.

0:39:060:39:08

-Might not do a thing round here.

-Come on!

0:39:080:39:12

Ten and up we go, then. Come along, do. Ten I'm bid. At £10 only.

0:39:120:39:15

12 down here. At 12. 14.

0:39:150:39:18

16.

0:39:180:39:19

16 is on the end here. Only at £16.

0:39:190:39:23

Are we all done, then, at 16? Cheap little lot, then.

0:39:230:39:26

At £16, then. All done at 16.

0:39:260:39:28

-You've made a pound.

-£1.

-Oh, did we make a pound?

0:39:280:39:31

Yeah. Paid £15. You just made one back.

0:39:310:39:34

Oh, good.

0:39:340:39:36

Late-Victorian tripod table. Bit of restoration needed,

0:39:360:39:39

but a good little lot nonetheless.

0:39:390:39:42

Start me off at 50. Well, 30 to start, then, surely.

0:39:420:39:45

Come along, do. 20, then, and up we go.

0:39:450:39:48

Anyone start me? 20 for the tripod. Come along, do. Cheap little lot.

0:39:480:39:52

Anyone start me? 20. Well, ten and up we go, then, surely,

0:39:520:39:55

for a tripod table. What are we doing?

0:39:550:39:58

Ten in the front row. At ten. At £10 only. At ten I'm bid.

0:39:580:40:02

At £10. It's on a maiden bid. It's going to be sold at ten only.

0:40:020:40:06

-At ten only.

-Oh, no!

0:40:060:40:09

Cheap little lot at £10.

0:40:090:40:10

-That's minus £8.

-That's appalling.

0:40:100:40:13

Don't worry. We'll claw it all back. We'll claw it all back.

0:40:130:40:17

Anyway, listen, that is minus 53, plus the one. That's minus 52.

0:40:170:40:21

Yes?

0:40:210:40:22

Minus £52. So what are we going to do about the teapot?

0:40:220:40:26

We've decided we're definitely going with it.

0:40:260:40:29

-Yeah. I don't blame you, actually.

-I loved it anyway.

0:40:290:40:32

-Yes. All right, then.

-We need the profit.

-Certainly do,

0:40:320:40:36

the way this is shaping up. OK. So you're minus £52.

0:40:360:40:39

You're going with the miniature teapot, and here it comes.

0:40:390:40:42

Nice little teapot. Put me in at £100 for it to start.

0:40:420:40:46

100. Well, 50 to start, then.

0:40:460:40:49

-50 I'm bid.

-Straight in.

-I have a commission at 60. 70.

0:40:490:40:52

80. 90, seated in the chair. At 90.

0:40:520:40:56

-Gentleman seated, at £90.

-Go on!

-Come on.

-Any other bids? At 90.

0:40:560:41:01

Seated, at 90. And I sell at 90, then...

0:41:010:41:04

-Oh, blimey.

-Still made a loss.

0:41:040:41:06

£90 equals an incredible profit of £50.

0:41:060:41:11

And as you were minus 52, overall you're minus £2.

0:41:110:41:15

-I'm sorry.

-That's all right.

-That's not too bad, is it?

0:41:150:41:18

-Minus £2.

-Could be the winner.

-Could be a winning score.

0:41:180:41:21

-You've watched this programme before.

-Absolutely!

0:41:210:41:25

-Just about every day.

-Lovely.

0:41:250:41:28

Anyway, all will be revealed in a moment.

0:41:280:41:30

Well done, girls, and Jonathan. That's a marvellous profit.

0:41:300:41:34

You lot been chatting to one another?

0:41:380:41:40

-No.

-You're looking very jolly.

0:41:400:41:42

Well, I can reveal that there is just £2 between you.

0:41:420:41:47

-I mean, how crucially close is that?

-Flippin' 'eck!

0:41:470:41:51

We haven't got any losers. We only have runners-up.

0:41:510:41:54

And the runners-up today are the Blues.

0:41:540:41:56

THEY LAUGH

0:41:560:41:58

The Blues have managed to lose by only losing £2.

0:41:580:42:02

Right? I mean, you had £45 down the old proverbial

0:42:020:42:06

with that carriage timepiece, which was a blow.

0:42:060:42:09

But yet, Jonathan, your bonus buy made a profit of £50,

0:42:090:42:12

which rescued the team from the abyss,

0:42:120:42:16

-which was brilliant, wasn't it?

-It was.

-Very, very exciting.

0:42:160:42:20

Very exciting and well done, and I'm sorry it's only £2 between you,

0:42:200:42:24

but it just shows how close it can be on an excellent show like this.

0:42:240:42:28

The victors, though, have managed to win

0:42:280:42:31

by winning absolutely nothing.

0:42:310:42:34

They have got the ultimate wiped face,

0:42:340:42:36

because their end score is zero, which is really good, isn't it?

0:42:360:42:40

-Nice round figure.

-It's really good. A nice round figure!

0:42:400:42:43

Zero IS a round figure. £10 profit on the inkwell. Very nice, too.

0:42:430:42:48

£10 profit on the equestrian sculptures, the Marly horses.

0:42:480:42:51

Well done on that. So that's really good expert buy on that.

0:42:510:42:55

-So I congratulate you.

-Thank you.

-Tight as tight can be!

0:42:550:42:59

There's hardly a sheet of lavatory paper between them.

0:42:590:43:02

We've had a great show. Join us soon for more bargain hunting, yes?

0:43:020:43:05

Yes!

0:43:050:43:07

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:070:43:11

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:110:43:15

.

0:43:150:43:15

Two teams of sisters go head to head at Norfolk fair, Paul Laidlaw and Jonathan Pratt are on hand to offer their expertise. After a slow start both teams get two in the bag, but struggle to hunt out the elusive third bargain. Tim Wonnacott heads to Wisbech in Cambridgeshire and explores a walled wilderness, the pride and joy of one family for 150 years.


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