Lincoln 19 Bargain Hunt


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Lincoln 19

Antiques challenge. Two teams battle it out in Lincoln with the help of experts James Lewis and David Harper. Also, Tim Wonnacott casts his eye over a Victorian spy camera.


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LineFromTo

Hello. Do you read your horoscope?

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I do. Mine says I'm going to have a day full of thrills and excitement,

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which is perfectly true, so let's go bargain hunting!

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Today, we've come to Lincoln, one of the largest fairs in Europe,

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but will all this choice simply befuddle our teams?

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'Well, it's certainly given the Reds some strange ideas.'

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-What are you looking at now?

-I just saw a pig on a tractor.

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-That really appeals to you, Tom?

-Yeah.

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'And you'll never guess what the Blue team get up to!'

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Keep going. Keep going.

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You've hit the spot.

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'Oh, Lord! Will the good vibrations shake 'em up at auction?'

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It's worth that in weight.

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-Come on.

-Yes!

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Well done.

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I think we should meet those teams, don't you?

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-And here they are. Hello, everybody.

-Hello.

-Lovely to see you.

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-Nabil, how did you two first meet?

-I first met Tom when I was 16 when I went to school with him.

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You left your schooling quite late, didn't you? Oh, you'd been somewhere else before!

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-Previously, yes.

-Fair enough.

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-But at 16, you came together and you hit it off?

-Yes, as best friends. It was friendship at first sight.

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-So it goes right back to those schooldays and you've kept up ever since?

-Yes.

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So much so that I was Tom's best man and we had quite a good stag do before his recent marriage.

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We went to the Norfolk Broads and hired two boats, ten blokes on each.

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And my lasting memory was seeing three friends... I won't name them.

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But I do remember John and Manj stark naked on top of the boats.

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Yes. Those boisterous stag nights are like that, aren't they?

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-Yes, they can be.

-Did you have a camera with you?

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-No.

-No.

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Well, that's a dirty shame.

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-Your nickname is Nobby.

-That's right.

-Does that go back to your schooldays?

-Yes.

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I keep trying to leave it there, but it seems to keep following me.

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-It's a good nickname.

-It's a classic nickname.

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-Good luck, both of you.

-Thank you.

-Jane, how did you and James meet?

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Well, we met through mutual friends.

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-Some sort of party, was it?

-Um...several.

-Yeah.

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-But now you're in business together?

-Yes.

-We are.

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So partners in more sense than one?

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-Absolutely.

-What's your business?

-We have a riding school and livery yard.

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-So horse-riding is a passion of yours then, Jane?

-Yes, yes, since a child.

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-You've got various things about your person to prove this?

-I do. I have a tattoo of my horse Simon.

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-Simon?

-Simon. Yes, I have a tattoo of Simon.

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On my back.

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-As it's on your back, have you ever seen it?

-I can see it in the mirror. When I'm getting out of the bath.

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Do you often go and admire your back and see how Simon's getting on?

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-Make sure he isn't fading?

-No, he's not fading.

-Or putting on weight or anything like that?

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If it came to the choice between Simon and James...

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-If it ever came to that moment...

-I'd be packing my bag.

-And you had to pick, what would happen?

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-Simon is a defenceless animal. I have to look after him. He's in my care.

-Yes.

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What's the big ambition for you both?

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-We want to...

-While we're still young enough to go and try something, we want to go to France.

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-And set up a stable business?

-We're up for sale at the minute.

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We just want to buy somewhere, a smallholding with a few acres,

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and grow a few things and live off the land.

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-Don't, for goodness sake, sell up before we've had our auction!

-Oh, no.

-Oh, no.

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We don't want that to happen. To help you on your way, we'll invest £300 apiece.

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-There you go, £300.

-Thank you.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go! And very, very good luck.

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Giddy up!

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'They have their money and an hour on the clock. Now all they need is their experts.'

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It's best to stay indoors. It looks a bit grey out there.

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James Lewis is a big softie. He's indoors because it's too cold.

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-What do you want to buy?

-Something sporting maybe?

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-A bargain.

-Bargain.

-One hour to find the items. Let's go. Go, go, go!

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-It's a stationery box, isn't it?

-This is more Nobby's...

-Come on, Nobby. Tell us all about this.

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This is a fabulous piece, actually.

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'Hang on a minute. Who's the expert here then?'

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It's got original leather or original material.

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-The whole thing moves out. You've got somewhere where you'd file away your letters, you've got a bureau.

-Yeah.

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-You've got somewhere where you can advertise maybe, your correspondence as well.

-How much is it?

-95.

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I think we might struggle, guys.

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-I think the condition is putting me off.

-OK. Is it putting you off as well?

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-All right.

-That's a shame.

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'Right, James, a starter for ten.'

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-These are Worcester.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

-18th century, but they're cracked.

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-Worcester collectors are very fussy.

-There's quite a bit of damage, isn't there?

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That's chipped and cracked as well. Worcester is so difficult to sell at all when they're damaged.

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But they're early.

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The blue mark on the back denotes an early one, does it?

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Worcester, Dr Wall period. These are 1775.

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The crescent mark is used on Caughley and on Worcester.

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-OK.

-Worcester was one of the first factories that made porcelain in England.

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This is 25 years after we started making porcelain in this country, so they're nice and early.

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-What do you think?

-What would be your best on those?

-50 for the two.

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I don't think they'd make 50.

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Will you take 40 quid for them?

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-Then I'll go for it, but that... Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-Deal?

-Deal.

-Deal.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-That's fine.

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Deal. Thank you very much.

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-£40, brilliant. 20 quid each. There's got to be a break-even, slight profit in them.

-Sounds good.

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'That's a classic buy, team. Now are you feeling traditional, boys?'

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-That's a tractor seat, isn't it?

-It is, yeah.

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-That's an unusual thing.

-# How bizarre, how bizarre... #

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-What are you looking at now?

-I just saw a pig on a tractor.

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-A pig on a tractor really appeals to you, Tom?

-Well... Is it a pig?

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-It looks like a pig.

-Again it's quite unusual.

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It's quite sweet. These things can do really well.

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-I'm not too sure about the age on that.

-Still quite modern?

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-I think it could be.

-Just in poor condition?

-No, but made to look like it's in poor condition.

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These 1920s, '30s cast toys are just fantastic news.

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They are just brilliant to buy and sell,

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but the worry is that copies are made and that may well be one.

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But it's a great stall. This is really quirky.

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-Some great stuff here.

-I like it.

-Do you like it?

-Yeah.

-Which one?

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-You like that?

-I like the pig. It's got to be...

-Where is she? What have we got on piggy on a tractor?

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-25.

-25!

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-Could you do 10?

-No.

-Look at these two! Young bucks, I'm sure they could woo you.

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# Je t'aime, je t'aime... #

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'Young bucks indeed!'

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# Moi non plus... #

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'Feeling queasy?'

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If he chucked another couple of quid in, would that help?

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Well, 15 is my best price.

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-15.

-Do you think he's got a chance?

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-Tom, this is all about what you feel.

-Go on, go for it.

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-I think piggy should go to auction.

-Piggy's going to auction.

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'But will the little piggy go wee-wee-wee all the way home?'

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It's a desk weight. It's practical. It was made in Ashford in Derbyshire. Ashford marble.

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See that little stone with the purple stripes?

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-Blue John. Blue John Cavern.

-Yeah.

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So it's fairly local.

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But there's not a lot of profit in it. But it's a nice thing.

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-Very Deco.

-A panther?

-It could be a panther if you want it to be.

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Looks female.

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What do you think about this, James?

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-He's quite nice, isn't he?

-Hmm.

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-Eye appeal.

-Yeah.

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He's nicely cast.

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-He's got some age to him as well, I think.

-Is it solid?

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-It's hollow. If you...

-Right.

-OK.

-It's hollow-cast.

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But it is bronze.

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I think he's nicely cast.

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-You think it's a polar bear?

-I do. He's got a very big back end.

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'Not the only one, James!'

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-He's smaller at the front.

-Yeah.

-And he's long.

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-The patination of it is nice.

-Very defined.

-It looks like it's been handled a lot.

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-Because of the shiny bits and...

-Yeah.

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The stallholder just said 55 for it. So do you think that's worth...?

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-I like him.

-I like him too.

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-Whether there's a profit in it...

-Go with your gut instinct. Would it be OK to get that?

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I think you've picked up a really lovely object.

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And I think... It's got quality.

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-I like it.

-It's got an appeal.

-It's a gut instinct thing.

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-Shall we?

-Yes.

-Let's go for it.

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'That's two items in 30 minutes, Blues.

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'James must be pleased.'

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What a pleasure to deal with these guys! Jane and James are a perfect pair for bargain-hunting.

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They both have a really good eye.

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That polar bear? If I'd spotted that, I'd have been thrilled.

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'A very happy chappy.

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'Are there any more thrills in store, I wonder?'

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-Bend over.

-What?

-Hello!

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-'James!'

-Do I want to?

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-Have you got a bad back?

-'Ah, a back massager! Phew!'

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-How does that feel?

-Yeah, that's working. That's good.

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Keep going. Keep going.

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You've hit the spot.

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-Stop it!

-LAUGHTER

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-How did that feel?

-That was good for me.

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'I'm sure it was, Jane. Now I've found something thrilling too.'

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What do you know about Japanese martial arts?

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Not a lot? Well, stand by

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because this is a most peculiar object.

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What we've got here is a plate of bronze or copper

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and on to it has been applied a cut-out in silver

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in the form of somebody practising kendo.

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Now, kendo is a form of samurai exercise between friends

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where you get hold of a shinai, which is a length of bamboo,

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and you wear a costume which is called a bogu.

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This has been beautifully made and if you look at the bottom of the cut-out silver,

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it says "sterling".

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This is not something that was hallmarked in Britain, otherwise it would have a British hallmark,

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but "sterling" would indicate that it might perhaps have been made in America.

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But if you look at the colour of the silver and the colour of the copper,

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this thing has been hanging around for ages.

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On the back side, it's got a strange clip arrangement,

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so behind the tongue of the hanger is a clip,

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which if I raise the bar behind, it grips with its teeth inside,

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so that if I was to put it on a garment like that,

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that thing is not going to fall off.

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You could wear it as a piece of jewellery.

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All in all, this is a very, very odd object.

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It could be yours for £80.

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No ken-do?

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'OK, OK, I know. Over to you, Red Team.'

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That would fit on the front of a car bumper. Or what they call the bar.

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-The chrome bar at the front?

-Yes.

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-The badge bar.

-You see a lot of people with the "AA".

-Yeah.

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There's the old one. It fits on to a proper bar in front of the grille,

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to put your roadside assistance badge or something you're connected to like the Royal Air Force.

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-That's good.

-It is beautiful.

-1950s, I'd have thought.

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It's enamel, a bit knocked about, but we're all interested in cars.

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You've got the Air Force connection in this part of the world. Possible? I don't know.

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-There's lots of RAF bases. It's a nice piece.

-I like it.

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Someone's going to go, "Yeah, that's something for me."

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-If you put one of those on your car, everyone would think you were...

-A good driver. It's all smashed up!

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"I am a rubbish driver," that says(!)

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-What sort of money is that?

-It can be 20 quid.

-20 quid.

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If you wanted the two, 25 quid on the two.

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-Can you do 18 for both?

-No.

-20?

-Yes.

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He's really suffering, this one, now. Poor bloke!

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-We'll take the two for 20.

-Yeah? Lovely. Thanks a lot.

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'You boys have picked a right bunch of odds and sods. Cor!'

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The great thing about this business is you have no idea what's going to crop up.

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Come on, a cast-iron pig on a tractor? And the motoring signs are just fantastic.

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So really quirky, out of the ordinary, and that's perfect for me, so absolutely delighted.

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Not exactly antiques. Who cares? They're novelty.

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Hello, you two. Aren't you just lovely, eh?

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'On that note, let's catch up with the Blues.'

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Are you lot stopping for tea then?

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-You've got your tea caddy.

-Yeah, unfortunately, empty.

-Yes.

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-Do you quite fancy that as an object?

-Yeah, I think it's a good example.

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It's a nice, clean one. The inlays are period. The handle's there.

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-It just needs a bit of...

-Fixing.

-Fixing up.

-A bit of tickling up.

-But it's a good object.

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What I like is where you get this 3D effect where sand has been put on there, red-hot sand,

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to burn that leading edge of that piece of wood. How much is it?

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It's coming down slowly.

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-You're not going to reveal. You're obviously in mid-point...

-We're in negotiations.

-I will shove off.

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-Good luck.

-Thanks, Tim.

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OK, so Tim likes it. I love it.

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I think it's a very simple, nice-looking piece.

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How much was it?

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She's come down to, I think, £65.

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I would put 120-180 on it as an auction estimate.

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-I would hope on a good day it might make two.

-Yeah.

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-Oh, go for it then.

-Let's go for it.

-And it's 65 quid.

-Let's go for it, shall we?

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-Yeah?

-Yeah.

-I'll see if it's the best price.

-Work your magic.

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-That's a ship's compass there. Does it work?

-Of course it works.

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-Would you trust it in mid-Atlantic?

-I have done.

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LAUGHTER

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That should be at New York's Antiques Festival(!)

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-Do you want the good news or the good news?

-The good news.

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-The good news is I bought it.

-OK.

-Excellent.

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-The good news is she also glued the handle in for me.

-Brilliant.

-How much?

-65.

-OK.

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-Doesn't it look great?

-It does.

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-I'm so pleased with that.

-Very effective. Very nice piece.

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If that doesn't make a profit, I quit. I quit!

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'Promises, promises, James.

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'Ah, the Reds are coming in from the cold.'

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-What do you want to do?

-We want silver, a nice piece of silver.

0:16:500:16:55

We've got a lot of money to spend, so let's find something quite good.

0:16:550:16:59

So you two are good friends, aren't you?

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It's a loving cup. You share it.

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Put a bit of wine in there, invite some girls round, and the pair of you have a sip out of there.

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-The girls then suddenly run away.

-Mm-hm.

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But it is a nice thing. A London maker, I think.

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1931.

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-It's a loving cup, sometimes called a porringer.

-A porringer. OK.

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It would be nicer in a box, ideally. It's a good weight. Feel the weight.

0:17:300:17:35

-Oh, yeah.

-Being assayed in London, it's nice. It's rarer than the standard Birmingham thing.

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Good condition.

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That's a lovely piece.

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It is a lovely piece. It's £80. That is the trade price.

0:17:470:17:51

It's worth £80 all day long.

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It's not going to make you a load of money, but it's not going to lose a load either.

0:17:530:17:58

-What else have you got silver-wise?

-The only thing is this nice little coffee set made by Mappin & Webb.

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-How much is it?

-I can let that go for 80.

-OK.

0:18:040:18:07

Mappin & Webb, really good, high quality.

0:18:070:18:10

That's got a real Art Deco look to it.

0:18:100:18:13

-So that will date it to about 1930, am I right?

-Yes, 1930, yeah.

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-What do you reckon?

-Hallmarked.

0:18:180:18:21

I like that, but it is only silver plate.

0:18:210:18:24

The cup's silver, isn't it? The cup is silver.

0:18:240:18:28

Let's have a look at this one again.

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-£80...

-That's quality.

-£80.

0:18:300:18:32

For me, although I'm not a big silver plate lover, I adore that because it's Art Deco.

0:18:320:18:38

But that is pure silver and you'd be getting the silver buyers and dealers wanting that.

0:18:390:18:44

-Shall we go for...?

-I think so.

-We'll go for the loving cup.

-You want to go for the loving cup?

-Yes.

0:18:440:18:51

-Are you sure? And is that the death, 80 quid?

-Yes, I'm afraid so.

0:18:510:18:55

You'll have to have the loving cup.

0:18:550:18:57

That's it. Time's up.

0:18:570:18:59

So how much leftover lolly is there going to be to give the experts?

0:18:590:19:04

First up, the Reds.

0:19:040:19:06

Tom and Nobby plumped for this perky, porky pig for £15.

0:19:070:19:12

They drove a hard bargain for these two motor car badges at £20.

0:19:120:19:17

And they were united over the silver "lurving" cup for 80.

0:19:170:19:22

-So what did you spend overall then, Tom?

-We spent £115.

0:19:240:19:29

115. That's not a huge amount. What's going on here, Nobby?

0:19:290:19:33

-We tried our very best. We just couldn't get the high prices.

-Could you not?

-David magicked them down.

0:19:330:19:39

They were even saying, "We want something more expensive. It's too cheap. Can we pay more?"

0:19:390:19:45

This is going to be your role now cos there's a lot of leftover lolly.

0:19:450:19:49

-There's £185 of leftover lolly. Have you got that, Tom?

-Yes.

-Here we go.

0:19:490:19:53

-What are you going to do with all that dosh?

-I'm going to buy these boys something manly and virile.

0:19:530:20:00

That'll get our lunchtime ladies going! Good luck. Why don't we check out what the Blue Team's bought?

0:20:000:20:06

Jane and James snapped up this pair of 18th century Worcester plates

0:20:070:20:11

at £40.

0:20:110:20:13

Jane found the bronze bear for 55.

0:20:150:20:18

And their final buy was this George III tea caddy for £65.

0:20:210:20:26

-Would you rather be on Bargain Hunt or would you rather be in your stables?

-Bargain Hunt.

-Bargain Hunt.

0:20:260:20:32

No greater tribute have we got from our equestrian team than that!

0:20:320:20:37

-Anyway, how much did you spend all round then, Jane?

-£160.

-160.

-£160.

0:20:370:20:42

That's a respectable amount.

0:20:420:20:45

I'd like the leftover lolly, please. You spent 160, so there's £140 there. Very good.

0:20:450:20:50

You're a bit of a brute when it comes to this bonus buy lark, James.

0:20:500:20:54

You've got a very good reputation with finding things, sourcing it.

0:20:540:20:58

-It's not easy, this job, from now on in, is it?

-No, it's the end of the day. People have started to pack up.

0:20:580:21:04

-But there still should be something out there.

-Yes, with £160 burning a hole in your pocket. Very good luck.

0:21:040:21:11

And while our experts scour the fair for their bonus buys,

0:21:110:21:16

let's, you and I, go to London together, shall we?

0:21:160:21:20

I've come to take a peek at this place,

0:21:230:21:26

Number 18, Stafford Terrace.

0:21:260:21:29

It's the well-preserved home of Victorian cartoonist Linley Sambourne

0:21:300:21:36

who drew political sketches for the satirical magazine Punch.

0:21:360:21:40

The problem for Linley Sambourne and the other artists employed by Punch magazine was that it was a weekly.

0:21:410:21:49

That meant that usually on a Wednesday,

0:21:490:21:53

the editorial decisions as to what the drawn satirical content was going to be would have been decided

0:21:530:22:00

and that just left two short days for the artists to create their images.

0:22:000:22:07

And when you consider how densely illustrated with drawings the Punch magazine used to be,

0:22:070:22:14

that would have been a considerable pressure point.

0:22:140:22:18

And the method that he used to overcome all these logistical problems

0:22:250:22:31

was photography.

0:22:310:22:33

And this is his stand camera.

0:22:330:22:36

Some purists would say that it's all wrong

0:22:360:22:41

for an artist to have photographic assistance

0:22:410:22:45

to enable him to rapidly transfer the form of an image

0:22:450:22:51

from a photograph into a pen-and-ink, hand-drawn, satirical cartoon.

0:22:510:22:58

Like this, a classic piece of Linley Sambourne Punch artwork.

0:22:580:23:04

What we've got are three attractive women on a bicycle made for three

0:23:040:23:09

with Punch at the front there giving a sly sideways glimpse

0:23:090:23:16

to illustrate the frontispiece of Volume 109 of Punch.

0:23:160:23:22

What Linley Sambourne actually did was to employ a professional model,

0:23:230:23:30

Miss Cornwallis, and here you see her gripping a piece of bent iron

0:23:300:23:35

as if she's getting hold of the handlebars.

0:23:350:23:39

And I suppose Miss Cornwallis is the lady that you see here in profile.

0:23:390:23:46

But in his photographic sessions,

0:23:470:23:50

he also liked to introduce the female form

0:23:500:23:56

for artistic purposes only, you understand,

0:23:560:23:59

so that he could understand the curve of a lady's back,

0:23:590:24:03

were she leaning forward to mount a bicycle.

0:24:030:24:07

At the time of his death,

0:24:070:24:10

some 20,000 photographic images were here in this house

0:24:100:24:16

in his archive.

0:24:160:24:18

Just before we leave Sambourne's studio,

0:24:180:24:21

there is something rather ingenious I want to show you.

0:24:210:24:26

One of the methods that Linley Sambourne used to take his subjects unwittingly

0:24:260:24:32

was using a device like this - a so-called detective's camera.

0:24:320:24:37

It's got a pair of eyepieces here and, apparently, a pair of lenses here.

0:24:370:24:43

What this clever camera does

0:24:430:24:46

is to turn the light at right angles inside

0:24:460:24:50

because the photographic lens is there.

0:24:500:24:53

So if I spot an attractive subject that I want to take a snap of,

0:24:530:24:58

I don't point the camera at her, I point the camera over here,

0:24:580:25:02

but I take the picture of her at right angles.

0:25:020:25:06

Clever stuff, eh?

0:25:060:25:08

Of course, the big question today is,

0:25:080:25:11

what are our teams' kit going to be worth over at the auction?

0:25:110:25:16

'We're off to Grantham where auctioneer Colin Young is going to give us the lowdown on our bargains,

0:25:180:25:24

'but first up, let's see what David Harper bought with his pile of leftover lolly.'

0:25:240:25:30

Now, Tom and Nobby, you spent £115.

0:25:310:25:34

You gave David Harper £185, a considerable wodge.

0:25:340:25:39

-What did he blow it on? David?

-Something very manly, boys, very manly indeed.

0:25:390:25:44

-A stag?

-Yes.

0:25:440:25:47

-I recognised the antlers.

-Well done!

0:25:470:25:50

You are the David Attenborough of Bargain Hunt.

0:25:500:25:53

-Isn't he a beauty? Isn't he a fine specimen?

-He is. Is he brass?

0:25:530:25:58

-He's bronze.

-He's bronze? Even better.

-It's cold-painted.

0:25:580:26:01

-How old is it?

-Early 20th century. German or Austrian. It's cold-painted bronze.

0:26:010:26:06

He's got a bit of damage. Will that affect the value?

0:26:060:26:10

You noticed that, did you?

0:26:100:26:12

The ear has been off, but it's now on, not particularly well, and it's quite obvious.

0:26:120:26:18

-So that will, you know, reflect, I suppose.

-What did you spend?

0:26:180:26:22

-A £10 note.

-A £10 note?

-OK.

0:26:220:26:26

Is that a laugh of being deeply impressed or...?

0:26:260:26:29

-I'm deeply impressed.

-You didn't spend all £185?

-No, I didn't. I ran off with the rest(!)

0:26:290:26:35

-How much is he going to make?

-He'll make profit. In mint condition, these things make up to 100 quid.

0:26:350:26:42

With a bit of damage, I think he might just...

0:26:420:26:46

You always try and make me fall into the trap.

0:26:460:26:49

Go on, make a prediction. You're an expert!

0:26:490:26:53

-Two to three times its purchase price.

-Does that mean £30?

0:26:530:26:57

-Ish.

-Ish. You watched his lips, all right?

0:26:570:27:00

-He only paid £10 and he's predicting 20 or 30. Just hold that thought.

-OK.

0:27:000:27:06

Because right now, for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Dave's stag.

0:27:060:27:12

There we go, look - Bambi's dad.

0:27:120:27:15

Well, the first thing I see on it is the repaired ear.

0:27:150:27:20

-Looks to me as if it's been in rut.

-It may have been in full rut.

0:27:200:27:24

-And yeah, just lost the ear.

-What's it worth?

0:27:240:27:28

Probably £30 to £50 with that level of damage.

0:27:280:27:32

-30 to 50?

-Hmm.

-Well, David Harper only paid £10, so he's absolutely delighted.

0:27:320:27:37

Now, Tom and Nabil's first item is this little cast-iron toy.

0:27:370:27:41

-How do you rate that?

-Not greatly. There's plenty of them out there.

0:27:410:27:45

-These cast things have been coming in from the Far East for the last 20 years.

-It's modern rust, is it?

0:27:450:27:51

Modern rust, yeah. It's not got a great deal of age. It's probably been aged, rather than having any.

0:27:510:27:57

All right. On that jolly note, what's it worth?

0:27:570:28:00

£10 to £30 as a piece of fun.

0:28:000:28:02

-That's a good estimate - £10 to £30.

-Yeah, it's quite wide, isn't it?

0:28:020:28:07

-Might it only bring a £5 note?

-It may well do, so it might be quite wrong.

0:28:070:28:12

OK, Tom paid £15, so there it is.

0:28:120:28:15

-Next up are the two car mascots.

-Yeah.

-Both of which have seen better days.

0:28:150:28:22

-A lot better days.

-Will anybody buy these things, Colin, in that state?

0:28:220:28:26

They will. I mean, we've put an estimate of 10 to 30 on.

0:28:260:28:31

Will the serious collectors be looking for them? No.

0:28:310:28:35

Will anybody be bidding for them because they appear to be cheap?

0:28:350:28:39

Yes. And I suppose all we can do is just wind up the enthusiasm when the auction starts.

0:28:390:28:44

-Yeah, well, good luck with that. £10 to £30 estimate?

-Yeah.

0:28:440:28:48

-So they could just make a £5 note.

-That could happen as well.

-Our guys paid £20.

0:28:480:28:54

Their last item is this so-called loving cup. It looks like a golf trophy.

0:28:540:28:59

-Or a darts trophy.

-Yeah.

-Some kind of trophy, isn't it?

-Or a quaich that's a bit saggy at the bottom.

0:28:590:29:05

-Yeah, a thirsty Scotsman.

-Could be.

-Perfect.

0:29:050:29:08

-How much?

-I think 50 to 80. I don't think it's going to be a large one.

0:29:080:29:13

-No. £80 paid. So that could be their loser.

-Yeah.

0:29:130:29:17

And that is it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:29:170:29:21

And their first item are these two Worcester bowls.

0:29:210:29:26

-Shallow dishes, plates.

-Nice cabinet plates.

-OK.

0:29:260:29:30

And date-wise, you're looking probably about 1770.

0:29:300:29:34

Lovely cone pattern on them. Quite a common pattern,

0:29:340:29:38

so collectors will certainly want to add into their groupings and their collections

0:29:380:29:43

-with one of the more common patterns that they'll find.

-You are such an enthusiast.

-I love Worcester.

0:29:430:29:50

So what are they worth?

0:29:500:29:52

£30 to £50 for something of that quality and of that age.

0:29:520:29:57

-That's a dirty shame, though. Weren't they worth £100 each?

-Easily. Easily over that.

0:29:570:30:02

They've got some cracks and hairlines in them,

0:30:020:30:05

so again, even though people want them to add to services,

0:30:050:30:10

they won't be putting them at the top of the shopping list.

0:30:100:30:14

-Next up is the Japanese bear. It's not very well cast, is it?

-No, it's not.

0:30:140:30:19

Fairly poor. We've put 30 to 50 on it, which reflects that lack of quality in the casting.

0:30:190:30:25

-So they'll be lucky if they get 55?

-They'll be lucky, yeah.

0:30:250:30:29

Jane will be disappointed with that.

0:30:290:30:32

They're all pinning their hopes on the little Sheraton tea box.

0:30:320:30:36

-Two division tea box.

-Yeah.

0:30:360:30:38

Got a messed-up lock, but apart from that, it's pretty clean, isn't it?

0:30:380:30:43

Yeah, there's a bit of splitting round the back and I think it's been through the mill

0:30:430:30:49

because some of the cross-banding doesn't follow all the way round,

0:30:490:30:53

so I think at some stage there's been some damage on the lower edge

0:30:530:30:57

which has been covered over by cross-banding, but it's still a good-looking lot.

0:30:570:31:02

-We've put an estimate of 50 to 80 on it which reflects all of those points.

-OK, £65 paid.

0:31:020:31:08

-I think they'll be fine with that.

-Jolly good.

0:31:080:31:11

If all else fails, they can fall back on the bonus buy. Let's go and have a look at it.

0:31:110:31:16

J, J, J - Jane, James, James...

0:31:170:31:20

-You spent £160.

-Yes.

-Happy team.

-Hmm.

-Yes.

0:31:210:31:24

You gave James...James £140. What did you spend it on, James?

0:31:240:31:30

-Well, there we are. What do you think to that?

-OK...

0:31:300:31:34

-What is it exactly?

-It is known... It's a rather unfortunate name. It's known as a dump.

0:31:340:31:39

Most people call them paperweights. They're easier to sell that way.

0:31:390:31:43

But it's a north of England Stourbridge glass dump

0:31:430:31:46

and these centres come in various forms.

0:31:460:31:50

Some of the more extravagant ones have sulphur inclusions

0:31:500:31:53

with flowers and sometimes portraits of Victoria and that sort of thing.

0:31:530:31:58

They were used either as a paperweight or as a doorstop.

0:31:580:32:02

-It's a big lump of green glass, but they are quite sought after.

-How much did you pay for it?

0:32:020:32:07

-What do you think it's worth?

-Really?

-Yeah.

-Ten quid.

0:32:070:32:10

-Ten quid. Yeah?

-Yeah.

-I'm glad you're not bidding today

0:32:100:32:15

because I paid 25 for it.

0:32:150:32:17

-Oh, well...

-OK.

-You thought it was worth £10. Don't say, "Oh, well..."

0:32:170:32:22

-Anything less than a tenner would have been all right.

-They were worried you'd spent £140!

0:32:220:32:28

-That's what they were really worried about.

-Will it make a profit?

-It should make £60.

0:32:280:32:33

-Paperweights are quite collectable.

-Especially dumps.

-You pick after the sale of your first three items.

0:32:330:32:39

But for the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about James's...paperweight.

0:32:390:32:45

-There you go. That's what you've always wanted, Colin.

-Indeed.

0:32:450:32:50

A very fine piece of Victoriana. Plenty of people will go for that.

0:32:510:32:55

I think that's going to be a bit of a winner. What was paid for it?

0:32:550:32:59

-£25.

-That seems very good. We've put an estimate of 30 to 50.

0:32:590:33:04

Glass dumps or end-of-day glass pieces like this are often well-received at sales

0:33:040:33:10

-and I think we'll have them queueing up for it.

-Good.

0:33:100:33:13

-As long as they don't dump on you.

-Let's just hope they're feeling a little bit flush.

0:33:130:33:19

Thank you, Colin(!)

0:33:190:33:21

-So how do you rate your chances then, Jane?

-Hopeful. Hopeful.

0:33:280:33:33

-We'll keep our fingers crossed.

-What about you, James?

-Sceptical.

0:33:330:33:37

-Are you?

-I'm forever the sceptic.

0:33:370:33:39

-You always failed at the examination until the results came out?

-That's right.

-I'm slightly that way too.

0:33:390:33:45

First up are the Worcester plates.

0:33:450:33:48

1191, there we go, a lovely pair of Worcester plates

0:33:480:33:51

in the pine cone decoration and palette.

0:33:510:33:54

And a lot of interest in these already. Who will start me at £50?

0:33:540:33:59

30 to go then? Who's coming in? I'll take the room first.

0:33:590:34:02

30 bid. 32? At £30 bid. 2 may I say?

0:34:020:34:05

At £30 bid. 32 bid. 35 bid. 38.

0:34:050:34:08

40 bid. 42. 45.

0:34:080:34:10

48.

0:34:100:34:12

50? 50 I have in the room.

0:34:120:34:14

At £50 bid. Any more now?

0:34:140:34:17

Any more bids? 55 bid. 60.

0:34:170:34:20

At 60. 5 or not? All done and finished at £60...

0:34:200:34:24

Well done. Well done. £60 is plus 20. Excellent.

0:34:240:34:28

There is some justice.

0:34:280:34:30

The early 20th century bronze model of a bear.

0:34:300:34:33

Brown patination, possibly Japanese. Who will start me at 80?

0:34:330:34:37

80? 50 to go then? 50?

0:34:370:34:39

30 will do then. £30, anybody?

0:34:390:34:41

20? £20? 10. 10 bid. 12 anywhere? It's your bid at 10.

0:34:410:34:45

Anybody else going to join in? At 10. Everyone now. 12 bid. 15 bid.

0:34:450:34:49

18 bid. I have 20 in the middle. 22 bid. 25 bid. At £25...

0:34:490:34:53

-I love that bear.

-I love that bear.

0:34:530:34:55

28 on the internet. Another new bidder. 28.

0:34:550:34:58

They're coming from everywhere. That's good news, Mrs Knowles. 30.

0:34:580:35:02

32 now. Trust me, I'm an auctioneer.

0:35:020:35:05

35 now do I see? 35 in the middle of the room. At 35. 38 now do I see?

0:35:050:35:09

-38 bid. 40?

-No.

0:35:090:35:12

I shan't ask you again. That was a definite "no". 38. 40, last call?

0:35:120:35:17

We sell at £38...

0:35:170:35:19

That is minus £17. You were plus 20, which means you're plus 3.

0:35:190:35:25

1193 is the George III, inlaid, mahogany, rectangular tea caddy.

0:35:250:35:30

A very nice one with the oval shell patera.

0:35:300:35:33

We've got multiple bids and we start the bidding at 30. At 30. And 5?

0:35:330:35:38

35. Bid 40. 45. 50. And 5?

0:35:380:35:41

At £50 bid. This is nowhere yet. At £50 bid. And 5 surely?

0:35:410:35:44

-55.

-Go on!

-60.

0:35:440:35:47

-And 5. 65.

-Go on!

-70?

0:35:470:35:50

65 bid. 70 is the last call. At 65. 68 as the last shout?

0:35:500:35:54

68, fresh bidder anyway. 68. 70. Have another one? No.

0:35:540:35:58

68 bid. 70 or not? 68 bid. 70 is the last call.

0:35:580:36:01

Second row has it at £68...

0:36:010:36:04

-Look at that, plus 3.

-Stumbled at the last...

0:36:040:36:07

Yes, plus 3, so overall you are plus 6. How about that?

0:36:070:36:12

-Plus is better than minus.

-You're absolutely right.

0:36:120:36:15

-On this programme, we know all about pluses.

-I'm gobsmacked at the bear.

0:36:150:36:19

-What are you going to do about the dump?

-I think we'll go with the dump. We'll take your advice.

0:36:190:36:25

-£25?

-We'll have the dump, yeah.

-You're going to risk the £25?

-May as well.

-You'll chance the £25?

0:36:250:36:31

-Go for it.

-OK, here it comes.

0:36:310:36:34

The Victorian, green glass dump weight. Good little lot.

0:36:340:36:38

Start me at £50? 50? 50?

0:36:380:36:40

30 to go then, surely? £30? 20? 10?

0:36:400:36:43

10. 12. 15. 18. 20. 2 bid. 5.

0:36:440:36:47

28. 30. 32. 35. 38. 40.

0:36:470:36:49

2. 5. 48. At 48 bid.

0:36:490:36:52

50 now surely? 50? No? At 48 bid. 50 again now may I say? At 48.

0:36:520:36:57

We're selling, make no mistake, at £48...

0:36:570:37:00

£48 is plus 23,

0:37:000:37:04

is plus 29 overall.

0:37:040:37:07

-£29 profit is very respectable.

-Well done, James.

-Well done, James.

0:37:070:37:11

-Good choice there with the dump.

-That was excellent.

0:37:110:37:15

-Don't say a word to the Reds.

-Not a word.

-Mum is the word.

-Yeah.

0:37:150:37:19

-How are you feeling?

-Nervous.

-Nervous.

-Why?

0:37:310:37:34

-We've got high expectations.

-Have you?

-We've already spent the money.

0:37:340:37:38

You've spent the profits. I love it!

0:37:380:37:40

Anyway, here comes the Looney Tunes tractor.

0:37:400:37:44

A very sweet little lot. Who's going to start me at £30?

0:37:440:37:47

30? £10?

0:37:470:37:50

-No? £10. 10 on the net.

-Yes!

-10 bid.

-On the net!

-12 bid.

0:37:500:37:54

At 12 bid. 15 now do I see?

0:37:540:37:57

-12 bid. 15 now anywhere else?

-Go on, break even.

0:37:570:38:00

Any more bids? 15 bid.

0:38:000:38:02

15 bid. Anybody in the room going to join in?

0:38:020:38:06

At 15 bid. Any more now? At £15. It's the last call then.

0:38:060:38:10

-It goes then at 15.

-£15, you wiped its face. That's all right.

0:38:100:38:14

Now here comes the mascots.

0:38:140:38:16

Two mid-20th century enamel car badges this time.

0:38:160:38:19

One is for the Royal Air Forces Association.

0:38:190:38:22

The other one is for the Institute of Advanced Motorists.

0:38:220:38:26

Who's going to start me at £30? 30? £20 to go then, surely?

0:38:260:38:29

£20? 20? £10, anybody?

0:38:290:38:32

-Thank you. 10 at the back. 10 bid. 12 anywhere else?

-Come on.

0:38:320:38:36

At 10. Who's going to join in now? 12 bid. 15 bid.

0:38:360:38:39

18 bid now? 18 surely? I have 15 at the back of the room. At 15.

0:38:390:38:44

I'll take 16... because they're desperate.

0:38:440:38:47

-15...

-Thank you!

-16 now? 15 bid.

0:38:470:38:49

16 or not then? 16 bid. 17.

0:38:490:38:52

18? 18. 19? At 19 bid. 20 anywhere else now? At £19.

0:38:520:38:57

We're selling at the back of the room. It's yours at 19.

0:38:570:39:01

Bad luck. That's minus £1.

0:39:010:39:03

All that bartering!

0:39:040:39:06

The George V, silver, two-handled, pedestal loving cup.

0:39:060:39:10

-Multiple bids on the book.

-Oh, good.

0:39:100:39:13

-And we have to start the bidding at £5.

-What?!

-5 bid.

0:39:130:39:17

Any more bids? 8 bid. 10 bid. 12 bid.

0:39:170:39:19

15. 20. 5 bid. 30. And 5 bid. 40.

0:39:190:39:22

And 5. 50. And 5. 60. And 5.

0:39:220:39:25

-65 bid.

-Come on.

-At 65. Any more now? 65. 68. 70.

0:39:250:39:30

2. 75. 78 bid. 80? 80 do I see?

0:39:300:39:34

-It's worth that in weight.

-Oh, come on.

0:39:340:39:37

-80 over there, fresh bidder.

-We need one more pound.

-82. 85.

-Profit!

-88.

0:39:370:39:41

90? £90 then? No. 88 on the edge of the row.

0:39:410:39:44

90 is our last call. Sells at £88...

0:39:440:39:47

'It's not enough, boys.

0:39:470:39:49

'Any hope of victory now rests with that broken-eared stag.'

0:39:490:39:54

-What are you going to do about the stag face?

-I reckon we have to unleash the secret weapon.

-Yeah.

0:39:560:40:02

-Unleash him.

-Unleash him.

-Set him free.

-You're going to go with the bonus buy?

-Yeah.

0:40:020:40:08

They want to go with the stag and here it comes.

0:40:080:40:11

Lot 1175 is an early 20th century, continental,

0:40:110:40:14

cold-painted model of a stag.

0:40:140:40:16

Possibly Austrian. When I spoke to it earlier, it was speaking German.

0:40:160:40:21

Who's going to start me at £30? 20 to go then? £20 is no money for it. £20?

0:40:210:40:26

-£20?

-Yes, come on.

-£20 bid.

0:40:260:40:28

At 20 bid. 2 now? 22. 25 now? I've got 22 in the room. 25 bid.

0:40:280:40:33

28 bid. 30 now.

0:40:330:40:36

30 bid. 32. 35 on the net. 38 on the net.

0:40:360:40:38

-Yes!

-40 now...

-This is the net.

0:40:380:40:41

42 now? At 40 in the room. At 42.

0:40:410:40:44

45 now? 45 bid.

0:40:440:40:46

At 45. 48 now do I see?

0:40:460:40:49

48 bid. They're having a good old rut on here!

0:40:490:40:52

At 48 bid.

0:40:520:40:54

50 bid. 5 anywhere else now? £50 bid. 5 now surely?

0:40:540:40:58

Very good, Dave.

0:40:580:41:00

At 50. 55. Any more bids? 60.

0:41:000:41:03

And 5 now. 70. £70 bid. We're done.

0:41:030:41:06

-We're finished... No, we're not. 75.

-My goodness!

0:41:060:41:09

80 bid. 80 bid. And 5 now.

0:41:090:41:12

Just talk amongst yourselves for a while. 90 bid.

0:41:120:41:15

The suspense is killing us.

0:41:150:41:17

£90!

0:41:180:41:20

There we go. £90.

0:41:200:41:22

That is plus 80.

0:41:220:41:24

-That's a bit of luck.

-Saved your bacon, hasn't it?

0:41:240:41:27

So, overall, chaps, you are plus 87 smackers.

0:41:270:41:31

-Don't say a word to the Blues.

-I can't believe it.

-Not a word to the Blues. Go out looking miserable!

0:41:310:41:37

So, chaps, what a spectacular day we have had!

0:41:440:41:49

I mean, Bargain Hunt with double profits is phenomenal.

0:41:490:41:53

It's just a question of scale, though, isn't it? Yes?

0:41:530:41:57

I mean, there was one pound between these teams at half-time

0:41:570:42:02

until along came the bonus buys.

0:42:020:42:06

And as a result, well, the runners-up today, I'm afraid, are the Blues.

0:42:060:42:11

Nevertheless, the Blues are going to take home £29. Better than a kick in the old proverbial!

0:42:140:42:20

-Thank you.

-Did you have a good time?

-Yes, fantastic.

0:42:200:42:23

-Was it good for you, James?

-Brilliant.

-Was it good for you, James?

-It was.

-For you, Jane?

-Yes.

0:42:230:42:28

-It's a triple J show! Anyway, the victors who are going to go home with £87...

-Wow!

0:42:280:42:35

-Thank you very much.

-Did you see your way to 87 notes today? Not really, frankly.

0:42:350:42:41

There's your seven. Congratulations, team, cos that's a big old score.

0:42:410:42:45

-Anyway, join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:450:42:50

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:43:050:43:10

Email [email protected]

0:43:100:43:13

The teams are feeling the pressure in Lincoln. James Lewis has to give the blue team a massage while David Harper's red team buys the oddest things. Meanwhile Tim Wonnacott casts an eye over a Victorian spy camera.