Norfolk 24 Bargain Hunt


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Norfolk 24

Antiques challenge. Two teams go head-to-head at Norfolk antiques fair, with experts Paul Laidlaw and Jonathan Pratt. And Tim Wonnacott is at Peckover House in Wisbech.


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It's 12.15, nearly lunchtime, so let's go bargain hunting!

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With a budget of £300, our teams have one hour to find three bargains to sell at auction.

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It's not easy, so they'll need a little help from our friends.

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That's Paul Laidlaw for the Red Team.

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I suspect we've got to be really cautious here. Ah, I've seen it.

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-It's plate.

-It's plate.

-Oh!

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And Jonathan Pratt for the Blue Team.

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-What about that?

-Come on, ladies! Come on!

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-Come on!

-Sorry, Jonathan.

-Sorry, Jonathan.

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So today for the Red Team, we have the father and son combo of John and Paul.

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-Hi, Tim.

-Hi.

-Very nice to see you.

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John, your job is all about keeping an eye on the cash. Is that what you'll do on the programme today?

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Well, yes, I think so. I'll hold him back rather than spending and running away with the money.

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-Cos you're actually a banker?

-Yes. 34 years of it I've done now.

-So that keeps you out of trouble?

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Absolutely. I don't have enough time for trouble.

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-Now, Paul, it says here that you pull your weight in the office. Is that right?

-You could say that, Tim.

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Being the epitome of fitness, I'm a sales and marketing manager for a well-known health chain.

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-And probably clear to see that I preach rather than practise.

-Yes.

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So how are you, a team of business professionals, going to manage, do you suppose, in Bargain Hunt today?

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I think it's all about maybe taking a bit of a risk and spending a bit of money

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because you've got to speculate to accumulate.

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-I think that's a way to go, don't you?

-Do you agree with that, banking dad?

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No, I'm more conservative than that. I'm going to be the one that holds him back rather than let his...

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-Youthful enthusiasm, yes.

-I'll be more conservative.

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-I can feel a bit of tension building up already between you. Anyway, very good luck.

-Thanks.

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Now, for the Blues,

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identical sisters, Geri and Wacky... I'm sorry, Jackie.

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Now, you've lived your lives separately, most of your lives.

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-But now you're living back together again.

-Yeah.

-Is that a scream?

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-We get on 95% of the time.

-Yes.

-The other 5% we're shouting at each other. But we have a laugh, anyway.

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-Well, that's nice, isn't it?

-Yes, it's very good.

-But identical twins is unusual, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

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-Do you have the same thoughts?

-Often.

-Sometimes.

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-Often. Sometimes.

-So, Jacks, is there anything in particular that you like to collect, darling?

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Well, I collect Murano glass. And I also collect swans, all different colours.

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-And I think they're...what I call bon-bon dishes.

-Oh, lovely.

-Yes.

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-Geri, what do you collect, darling?

-I've got a lovely collection of scent bottles, perfume bottles.

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-And crystals is my main one.

-So how are you going to work as a team, though? Have you got a special plan?

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-We will do and see what we will see.

-Great.

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I think we're going a long way here. This is very exciting. Now the money moment. £300 apiece. Here you go.

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£300. There's your £300. You know the rules. Your experts await. And off you go!

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And very, very, very good luck! Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear.

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-We can hear the rain outside, so it's probably best to start in here.

-Yeah, absolutely.

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-Lots of stalls here. What's going to catch your eye?

-Something silver?

-So lots of things?

-Anything, really.

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-Remind me - what are we looking for?

-Not really got much of an idea about what we're looking for.

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-But if we like it, and it's a good price...

-Which is the bottom line.

-Absolutely.

-Let's do it.

-OK.

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-That's absolutely beautiful.

-Have you got any of those at home?

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Yes. I've got teddies, trains, the penguins and the birds, and things like that.

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-They're very expensive, new, from Swarovski.

-Yeah. But that is absolutely a dream.

-That dragon?

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-Yeah.

-You can always buy it and take it home with you.

-It's absolutely gorgeous, that is.

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'But I don't think Jonathan's a fan, Geri.'

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-What about the screen here? The Japanese screen?

-We can't afford it. I know the price of that.

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It's a '70s affair. And it's quite cool in the right quarters. It's not for you.

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-I like this.

-Oh, look at this.

-Can I?

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-Jackie?

-Just a minute.

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Oh, wow! That's beautiful. I love that.

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Glass is all about personal taste. If you like it,

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-then you would hope that people in the auction room would like it as well.

-Yeah.

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-But who wouldn't like something like that?

-Where's this made?

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-Where's Zareh from?

-I don't know.

-Never heard of them.

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No, it says on the bottom. You're buying a piece of glass that's got a name to it,

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which is always a better investment. There's a bit of workmanship gone into it.

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-I'd like to buy that piece.

-You've made your mind up?

-Yes.

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-You've got to negotiate before you say things like that!

-If the price is right!

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-What have I got?

-£42.

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Well, 38. 35?

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No. 38. Please? It's got to be 38. I'm sorry.

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-You really like it. You decide.

-All right then.

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-Yes.

-I'll wrap it up.

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'One in the bag. But you do have an hour, girls.'

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-What do you think of that traction engine up there?

-What are we looking at?

-1960s traction engine.

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The nicest thing about that one is the box, in all honesty.

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Mamod steam traction engines I see one a week. It's worth maybe £70 with that box.

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-And is there a price on it?

-95.

-I mean, if you could buy it for 60,

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you can't go wrong. But no harm in asking. See how long he's had it.

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-Hi. Is this yours?

-No.

-Is he talking to someone?

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This side is. Danny's on that side. What's up?

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-Just the traction engine. Is there anything you can do on the price of that?

-For you...

-Special deals?

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-What are you going to offer me?

-Well, round about the £60 mark.

-He's going to start crying.

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'You're supposed to be helping, Paul.'

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-£75. I'm knocking 20 off.

-60 is more than I'd have offered.

-It's a nice box.

-It's the best thing about it.

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-Because you know you can buy the traction engine any day of the week.

-A bit dog-eared, though.

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-I know, but...

-Surely for each corner we could knock another tenner off?

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-We're going down!

-Just a little bit.

-Where are we at at the moment?

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£65. That's my very best. That's so you can earn some money.

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-Is there any way for another fiver just to give them a...

-Fighting chance.

-Go on.

-Cash?

-Cash.

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Right there in your hand.

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Lovely. Go on then.

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-I hope you do well, boys.

-Thank you very much.

-Thanks for the sentiment.

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'Sentiment indeed(!)

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'Toys for the boys, more like it.'

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-That's quite cute actually.

-It's got that nice effect.

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-OK. Are you meant to have a bowl sat in there?

-Here it is.

-Exactly.

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Well, that's not... Look - £28.

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I mean, there's not a great deal of age to it.

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It's a centrepiece to put on the dining table. A flower arrangement in it? £28.

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-Again it's quite fun for that, isn't it?

-Yeah. I'd go for it.

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Let's not sound too keen. We like to negotiate these things. I'll just see if there's anything...

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-I'd offer 20 quid for it. It'd be a nice talking piece.

-It's unusual.

-It is, absolutely.

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-That's why I picked it up because it's something that I haven't seen before. It's different.

-Exactly.

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It's crudely modelled. As far as toes are concerned, that's like a bunch of sausages.

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-There aren't any "toos" there, particularly.

-Any what?

-"Toos".

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-Toes.

-Oh, toes. I was saying...

-"Toos".

-Oh, toes. "Toos".

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-Um...

-I told you he was posh!

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Thank you very much. I'm a comprehensive schoolboy, I'll have you know.

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-You speak posh anyway.

-I know. I hang around with the wrong crowd. That's the problem. There's no mark on it.

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-It's probably made in the Far East or something.

-Yeah.

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It's decorative. If you got that for £20, you'll probably do well.

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# Too much monkey business

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# Too much monkey business Too much monkey business... #

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This is black lacquer abalone, sometimes mother-of-pearl inlay,

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little stationery box there. Lovely form.

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This almost inverted Bombay form and then this serpentine slope in front.

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Once upon a time, really valuable. Today, not quite what it was.

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But it's fundamentally a good thing.

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It opens to reveal a not unattractive and arguably useful interior.

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-Not you guys, though.

-Well, sort of letter writing is not really as common.

-No.

-It's all emails.

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'The Blues are still monkeying about, though.'

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-Your maximum price? You're...

-20.

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You're saying, "I don't want to spend more than £20 on an object", you know, which...

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-She said 24 would be the least she would take.

-We'll have a think about it.

-Have a think about it.

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'Don't think for too long, Jackie!'

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-It's a tenner, isn't it?

-If it was worth £50, it wouldn't still be sitting there at a tenner.

-No.

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'If only they could accurately predict how things were going to turn out.'

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So what's the weather doing outside?

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These days we watch the BBC weather forecast and we know exactly what's going on.

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In the old days, they used one of these, a mercury stick barometer.

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You can tell it's a mercury stick barometer because it's got a hollow glass tube visible at the top.

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And either side of that glass tube are some silvered brass dials which have been engraved

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with the prediction "very fair, fair, much rain" and so forth.

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On the other side is something called a vernier scale.

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And if I twiddle that knob down below,

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you can see the scale goes up and down.

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And you adjust that depending on what the movement of the mercury is

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with the rising pressure or the falling pressure.

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But the interesting thing about this mercury stick barometer

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is the inscription at the top.

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You can see inscribed the maker, F Molton, Dove Street, Norwich.

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So how far is Norwich from us right now? From the showground, it's about three miles.

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And the dealer who's brought this barometer into the fair

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found it in a house clearance in Cromer, which is about 25 miles from Norwich.

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So I reckon that since this thing was made, around about 1840, 1850,

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it has travelled in its lifetime no more than, say, 30 miles,

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which is nothing.

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It's a fine example with this nice, cut mother-of-pearl inlay.

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Further down the trunk you've got a thermometer

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with matching silvered registers to the barometer part.

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And then underneath is the reservoir for the mercury itself.

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And the ugly reservoir is normally covered

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by this finely-turned reservoir cover, which sits on like that.

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So when you look at the thing complete, just how handsome is that?

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Now, I'm going to take the vase cover off because it's loose

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and I don't want to drop it. So I'll put it to one side while we re-hang.

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So, 1840, 1850, what's it worth?

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Well, the dealer's asking £1,200 for it.

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Do you feel the pressure rising or falling?

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# I don't need this pressure on I don't need this pressure on

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# I don't need this pressure on... #

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-What have you found this time? Nothing?

-No.

-All right.

-I thought I did, but I've not.

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# I don't need this pressure on... #

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Look at that!

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-It's a handsome painting.

-Come on, ladies!

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-Come on!

-I'm sorry.

-Come on.

-Sorry, Jonathan.

-Sorry, Jonathan.

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'Keep them under control, JP.'

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What is she asking? £65. If that were silver, that's a gift. That's worth £80 to £120 of anyone's money.

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I suspect we've got to be really cautious here.

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I've seen it. It's plate.

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-Plate.

-Oh!

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-No, no.

-No?

-Close. It's a nice thing, but I can't encourage you to buy plate.

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'Lucky escape there, guys. Now, the Blues still have that monkey on their back.'

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-Do you want to go back and get it now? Would you be happier to get it now?

-No.

-You would.

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I would because once we've got it... We've told that lady to keep it.

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Then we've got the rest of the time to find our last piece.

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Why don't you go and say that we'll have it?

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-Can we have it?

-Yes.

-Because we've only got 25 minutes left to get some more things.

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So if you keep that for us, we'll be back. Thank you.

0:13:380:13:42

That is quirky, isn't it?

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Do we know what this is for?

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-Oil and vinegar.

-Oil and vinegar. It's a diamond of a thing.

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There's not a lot of precious material to it. But you've got stoppers there.

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-And I'm absolutely sure they'll be right to it. It's silver.

-Yes, there is a mark on it.

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It's not a startling thing, but it's subtle. It's delicate. I think that is all right.

0:14:010:14:07

-And what do you think we'd...

-But what's it worth? About £50.

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-Priced at £65. Can you do us anything on price?

-50.

-50.

0:14:110:14:15

-I don't see it making much. I think you're in that 40-60 bracket.

-Can I feel it?

-Yeah, absolutely.

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-It's quite a tactile thing as well, isn't it, you know?

-Yeah.

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It is nice, isn't it?

0:14:250:14:28

He's saying 48. That's his price. It's up to you.

0:14:280:14:31

I think maybe win a little, maybe lose a little, but I like it.

0:14:310:14:35

-Let's go for it.

-Do you want to buy it? 48 quid? We need to buy something.

0:14:350:14:40

-Yeah.

-48 quid.

-Go on then.

-It's interesting, isn't it?

-Shake the man's hand.

-Job done.

0:14:400:14:45

-£48.

-OK. Lovely.

0:14:450:14:47

-Cheers.

-Thanks for that.

-Nice one. Cheers.

-There you go, guys.

0:14:470:14:51

-Two things down and we're probably near enough on track now.

-That's about 100.

0:14:510:14:55

'You're doing well. But the Blue Team are racing ahead.'

0:14:550:14:59

-This is something that I wouldn't scrap.

-Yes.

-It's a lovely old brooch.

0:15:000:15:04

You've got a cabochon garnet in the middle.

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Thank you.

0:15:070:15:09

You would've had like a hair panel in the back.

0:15:100:15:13

Yes, like a mourning brooch or even a miniature portrait.

0:15:130:15:17

And you've tested it as 18?

0:15:170:15:19

It's high-carat, yes. It tested over 15 carat.

0:15:190:15:22

Well, that's a really nice piece of Victorian jewellery.

0:15:220:15:25

It's the sort of thing I'm hunting for as an auctioneer all the time.

0:15:250:15:30

-It came in yesterday.

-How much is this?

0:15:300:15:32

I'm doing it for 230.

0:15:320:15:34

The gold value is just about that as these could be pyrope garnet.

0:15:340:15:38

And these could be almandines.

0:15:380:15:41

Whoever's made it has put a lot of time and effort into it.

0:15:410:15:44

It's got a replacement pin

0:15:440:15:46

or hinge at least, anyway, because it's come out on the side there. £230.

0:15:460:15:51

If I honestly say that we're close... If you're feeling really bold and brave, go for it.

0:15:510:15:57

-Shall we have that then, Jackie?

-Yes.

-We'll make a deal on that then.

0:15:570:16:01

-Good luck.

-We shall see. We shall see.

0:16:010:16:03

-It's a very bold move.

-Yes.

0:16:030:16:06

-Oh, well.

-We saw a rainbow this morning and we thought it might've landed just about here.

0:16:060:16:11

Gold. Oh, yes. That's our pot of gold.

0:16:110:16:14

'Now, you can never say our Blue Team are indecisive. Oh, no.

0:16:140:16:18

'Over to you, Red Team.'

0:16:180:16:20

It's a nice piece. There has been engraving on it at some time.

0:16:200:16:24

-And on the bottom. But you've got the cup.

-Yeah.

0:16:240:16:28

So I'll have a look while you have a look. How about that?

0:16:280:16:32

-Very classy. Gentleman's silver hip flask. Integral cups.

-It's engraved 1915... 1926 engraving on here.

0:16:320:16:39

Is the engraving charming you or is it boring you?

0:16:390:16:42

-Because that's important.

-I'd like to know what it means. It's clearly used. It's dented.

0:16:420:16:48

Looks like it's awarded for something.

0:16:480:16:50

So you've got the years 1913, '26, '36, '37, so there are gaps there.

0:16:500:16:55

Yeah.

0:16:550:16:56

-I should say to you - I hadn't priced it, really, to sell because of the sustained damage.

-I understand.

0:16:560:17:02

-It wouldn't appeal to the purest collector, but it's a functional piece.

-Yeah.

0:17:020:17:07

-It's something somebody would buy as a gift or a Christmas present...

-Yeah.

0:17:070:17:11

You can use it. I tell you what - I'll do 110.

0:17:110:17:15

-OK.

-It's the best I could go. It's giving me a little return.

-OK.

0:17:150:17:19

You're very kind. Thank you. Can we just have a wee confab about that? Yes? That's excellent.

0:17:190:17:24

-Can I have a look, Paul?

-Right, decision time for you guys

0:17:240:17:28

-because this is a charming little flask. It's worth 80-120.

-Let's go for that.

-You want that, don't you?

0:17:280:17:35

-He said he'd do it for 110.

-You've got to ask the question again.

0:17:350:17:39

-I'll give it a go.

-Yeah.

0:17:390:17:41

Are we doing a deal, gentlemen?

0:17:410:17:43

-Just want to go a little bit more, if you can, on the price of it.

-I can't find anything else.

0:17:430:17:49

I think he's saying no and I think we should respect that. I think it's all right.

0:17:490:17:54

-Should we go for it?

-Go for it.

0:17:540:17:56

-Go on. Go on. It's a deal.

-OK.

-Thank you.

-You're most welcome.

0:17:560:18:00

-Thank you, gents. Good luck.

-Thank you very much indeed.

0:18:000:18:04

'That was cheeky, Paul, but nice try.'

0:18:040:18:07

Time's up. The job's done.

0:18:070:18:09

Now, let's see how the Red Team spent their cash.

0:18:090:18:13

'Paul steamed in to buy the 1960s toy traction engine for £60.

0:18:130:18:18

'And they bought the oil and vinegar

0:18:190:18:22

'for a piquant £48.

0:18:220:18:24

'And they'll need a shot of something strong

0:18:240:18:27

'after spending £110 on a silver hip flask.'

0:18:270:18:31

-Good spend.

-Good, yeah?

-Absolutely, yeah.

0:18:310:18:34

-OK, JPP.

-Hello.

-Hi.

-That was good fun, wasn't it?

-It was good fun, yes.

-Perfect.

0:18:340:18:39

-So what's your end tally for money then? How much did you spend overall?

-We spent £218.

-£218.

0:18:390:18:46

So what do I want? £72 back, don't I?

0:18:460:18:50

-Have you got 72?

-You can have 72. We'll keep the tenner.

-OK. 82 then.

0:18:500:18:54

Cor, they're sharp, aren't they?

0:18:540:18:56

No wonder you're in business. Well-qualified lot. Here we go then. £82.

0:18:560:19:01

-82.

-Thank you very much. Here we go, Paul Laidlaw. You got 82 in the end.

0:19:010:19:06

-You almost only had 72. What are you going to spend it on?

-Um... I have my eye on a couple of things.

0:19:060:19:12

It all boils down to the price. You've had a great time. Thanks, chaps. Good luck, Paul.

0:19:120:19:18

Why don't we check out what the Blues have bought?

0:19:180:19:21

'Jonathan loved the Zareh vase,

0:19:210:19:24

'bought for £38.

0:19:240:19:26

'They went bananas over the silver monkey at £24.

0:19:260:19:31

'And they're pinning their hopes on the £230 Victorian brooch. Wow!'

0:19:310:19:37

You are adorable, you two, I tell you. What's your total again?

0:19:370:19:41

-£292.

-£292. Isn't that magnificent?

-Absolutely.

-Terrific twins.

0:19:410:19:46

-Mostly on one object, Tim!

-Don't worry, it's the total that we like being spent.

0:19:460:19:51

Anyway, £8 of leftover lolly, please. That's very kind.

0:19:510:19:55

I like the blue nails. That's all sweet with the team colours, isn't it?

0:19:550:19:59

-Absolutely.

-Now, this could make all the difference, Jonathan, your big expenditure of £8.

0:19:590:20:05

So it's a modest amount, but a lot is weighing on your shoulders here.

0:20:050:20:09

Well, I think with £8... I should be able to at least double it.

0:20:090:20:14

-Good. That's what I like...

-And we could need it, mightn't we?

-Yes.

-We might need it at the end.

0:20:140:20:20

-Yes.

-Well, I think you've been stupendous as a team. And I congratulate you.

0:20:200:20:25

But for the rest of us, we're heading off now to Wisbech.

0:20:250:20:29

That's it. In Cambridgeshire. Have you never been there before?

0:20:290:20:33

Well, it's marvellous. As you're about to find out.

0:20:330:20:37

The North Brink here in Wisbech is a stunning streetscape,

0:20:410:20:47

a testament to the prosperity of the Fenlands of yore.

0:20:470:20:52

At its heart is Peckover House,

0:20:520:20:56

home to a family of Quaker collectors and philanthropists

0:20:560:21:00

for 150 years.

0:21:000:21:02

In May 1877, Alexander, later Lord Peckover,

0:21:020:21:07

inherited Peckover House from his bachelor Uncle William.

0:21:070:21:12

Now, we don't have all that much stuff in this house

0:21:120:21:16

that dates from Alexander's time when he was head of the family.

0:21:160:21:21

But we are certain that this little cabinet did belong to him.

0:21:210:21:25

Now, on the face of it, this is rather a boring, walnut-veneered, miniature cabinet,

0:21:250:21:32

the sort of thing that's described as an apprentice piece

0:21:320:21:36

by a cabinetmaker who had aspirations for making the full-size variety.

0:21:360:21:41

That is until you start taking it apart.

0:21:410:21:45

Now, if we open the hinged top,

0:21:450:21:47

you see an amazing miscellany of family-related objects,

0:21:470:21:52

including this, a serrated, edged, single sheet of paper cut in a circle.

0:21:520:21:59

And within the inner circle, written out with pen and ink,

0:21:590:22:02

we have in miniature, "Our Father, who art in heaven."

0:22:020:22:08

It's the Lord's Prayer and dated at the bottom, 1823.

0:22:080:22:12

All within a hand water-coloured border.

0:22:120:22:16

So what's going on here? Well, if you were religious, this little piece of paper

0:22:160:22:21

you'd have nestling inside your silver pocket watch outer case.

0:22:210:22:26

It's just a little token of your religious affections.

0:22:260:22:30

If we open up the doors at the front,

0:22:300:22:34

it reveals a series of slightly graduated trays.

0:22:340:22:37

And if I take these out, we begin to reveal an extraordinary collection.

0:22:370:22:44

The bottom drawer is full of natural history specimens,

0:22:440:22:48

largely seeds applied to cards, like this one, look.

0:22:480:22:51

Wild liquorice from Madagascar.

0:22:510:22:55

And a whole host of other things.

0:22:550:22:58

The second tray, which is quite weighty, but relates to antiquities,

0:22:580:23:03

pieces of terracotta, Greek and Roman oil lamps.

0:23:030:23:08

Look at this. A bit of wooden comb.

0:23:080:23:12

In ancient times, if you wanted a comb, you took a piece of wood.

0:23:120:23:16

And you cut that piece of wood literally thousands of times to form the teeth.

0:23:160:23:20

And this little fragment of comb could be more than a thousand years old.

0:23:200:23:28

The next tray has in it things relating to Egypt.

0:23:280:23:32

These are called shabti or ushabti figures.

0:23:320:23:35

They're funerary figures and they would have been placed in a deceased person's tomb.

0:23:350:23:42

And they're supposed to accompany the deceased into the afterlife.

0:23:420:23:47

The next tray contains some nice polished examples of minerals.

0:23:470:23:54

The next contains stones, but I think quite interesting.

0:23:540:24:00

For example, this slab, in its own right, not worth much.

0:24:000:24:05

But it's got a little label on it, look, that says, "Porphyry from Rome."

0:24:050:24:10

And dated 1824.

0:24:100:24:12

And of course, porphyry was a most desirable material

0:24:120:24:17

for the Romans who ventured to Egypt.

0:24:170:24:21

This mineral was taken back to Rome and then turned into all sorts of vases and precious objects.

0:24:210:24:27

And it's a gorgeous stone because until the 19th century,

0:24:270:24:31

the only known source for porphyry was in Egypt,

0:24:310:24:35

and it was incredibly rare.

0:24:350:24:38

In the next drawer, we've got a whole series of envelopes

0:24:380:24:43

and objects relating to travel,

0:24:430:24:45

for example, this, which is a little Hebrew prayer scroll,

0:24:450:24:50

contained within an olive wood box,

0:24:500:24:53

and probably acquired from the Holy Land.

0:24:530:24:57

The next drawer contains a collection of shells,

0:24:570:25:01

carefully gathered by various members of the family,

0:25:010:25:05

no doubt on their travels. And look, a sweet little bottle, dated 1925.

0:25:050:25:10

And it's inscribed,

0:25:100:25:13

"Water from the famous River Gangites, old Philippi,"

0:25:130:25:17

which, of course, is in Greece and has its religious connotations.

0:25:170:25:23

What is the purpose, therefore,

0:25:230:25:25

of this collection of oddball objects gathered together in this cabinet?

0:25:250:25:30

Well, in the old days, these things were referred to as cabinets of curiosities.

0:25:300:25:37

Wherever you went with an enquiring mind,

0:25:370:25:40

you would collect and put together little groups of things, bring them home,

0:25:400:25:46

and then place them in a little cabinet like this

0:25:460:25:50

where succeeding generations would learn something, whatever it might be,

0:25:500:25:55

from the little objects that had been collected by earlier ancestors.

0:25:550:26:00

Great, isn't it?

0:26:000:26:02

The big question today is, of course,

0:26:020:26:05

will our teams over at the auction be collecting any lucre?

0:26:050:26:09

That's "cash" to you and me.

0:26:090:26:12

Well, we've come battling through the snow in inclement weather

0:26:240:26:29

to be at Abbotts Auction House at Campsea Ashe in Suffolk, and with our auctioneer Geoffrey Barfoot.

0:26:290:26:35

-Geoffrey.

-Good morning.

-First item for John and Paul is this Mamod traction engine.

-A traction engine.

0:26:350:26:42

-Did you ever have one of these as a boy?

-No, I didn't.

-But you wanted one?

-I probably did, yes.

0:26:420:26:48

-It's a good survival, isn't it?

-Yes, I see it as a collectable, but not a particularly valuable collectable.

0:26:480:26:54

No, quite. They made too many of them.

0:26:540:26:56

-We do get them in quite often.

-What's it worth?

0:26:560:26:59

-Well, I've put it in at 20 to 40.

-Oh, dear. £60 was paid.

0:26:590:27:03

-Bit too much then?

-Could be a bit of a struggle.

-Yeah. OK. Fine. What about this oil and vinegar cruet?

0:27:030:27:09

-It's quite fun, isn't it?

-Mm-hm.

0:27:090:27:11

Hallmarked round the rim. Yeah, that's quite fun.

0:27:110:27:15

-Somebody has cleaned all that up with a Brillo pad.

-Very over-cleaned.

-So what's it worth?

0:27:150:27:20

-I've got it in at 20 to 40.

-£48 paid.

0:27:200:27:23

-So they've paid a bit too much for that.

-Yes, that's going to be really uphill.

0:27:230:27:27

And then the last item is this incredibly bashed hip flask.

0:27:270:27:31

Interesting little lot. A bit battered and dented

0:27:310:27:34

and with these rather faint inscriptions along the top.

0:27:340:27:40

Probably a deerstalker

0:27:400:27:42

with these Scottish dates and inscriptions, places where he stalked, possibly.

0:27:420:27:47

-But as I say, very battered.

-What's it worth?

-I've got it in at £60 to £80.

-£110 they paid.

-Right.

0:27:470:27:54

-Could be a bit of a struggle because of the condition.

-Yes. OK.

0:27:540:27:58

I think they'll need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:27:580:28:02

-Well, we've got depleted numbers.

-Yes, just me.

-What happened to John then?

-Weather conditions.

0:28:030:28:09

He's been snowed in. He couldn't even get the car up the hill home.

0:28:090:28:13

-Oh, Lord.

-Yeah, not good.

-Best to stay at home and be safe.

0:28:130:28:17

-Anyway, you and your dad spent £218.

-Yeah.

0:28:170:28:20

You had £82 of leftover lolly, which you gave to the ever reliable Paul Laidlaw.

0:28:200:28:26

-What did you spend it on, Paul?

-Ah!

0:28:260:28:29

-Ring a bell?

-Yeah, absolutely!

0:28:290:28:31

-We cast an eye over this.

-We did, didn't we? Yeah.

-And it was enough money.

0:28:310:28:37

But you know how I felt about it. A very, very elegant stationery box for a good desk.

0:28:370:28:43

How much did you get it for? We looked at this and we were like, "I don't know."

0:28:430:28:48

Well, I couldn't afford it initially with my £82.

0:28:480:28:53

-OK.

-But literally at the end of the day with the chap in his van,

0:28:530:28:58

-it was £80.

-80 quid.

0:28:580:29:01

-I mean, it's quite attractive, isn't it?

-It's smart.

-It's got this nice inlay bit on the top.

0:29:010:29:06

-Yeah. I trust you, Paul.

-But look, I'm going to be frank with you.

0:29:060:29:10

There's maybe more risk in that than some things I buy.

0:29:100:29:14

-Well, you and your father don't have to decide...

-I know, it's just down to me. Wish me luck, Dad, yes.

0:29:140:29:21

It'll be up to you, but after the sale of your first three items.

0:29:210:29:24

But right now for the viewers at home,

0:29:240:29:27

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Paul's stationery box.

0:29:270:29:31

There you go, Geoffrey. Standard piece of Victorian papier-mache, I fancy.

0:29:320:29:38

Nice, little Victorian papier-mache and shell-inlaid stationery box

0:29:380:29:42

-with its original interior. Pretty little piece.

-It's nice, isn't it?

0:29:420:29:46

When you look at these interiors, so often they're not there, as they've been broken.

0:29:460:29:51

-It's got a bit of ripped paper, but by and large, it's all there.

-Yes.

0:29:510:29:55

-And condition is a big factor with papier-mache.

-The main problem is around the base.

-Oh, yes.

0:29:550:30:01

-Not easy stuff to restore.

-No.

-Oh, dear.

0:30:010:30:04

Anyway, there it is. It is what it is, even with its damage. What do you think it's worth?

0:30:040:30:09

-60 to 80.

-£80 paid.

-Right.

-Paul will be disappointed with that.

0:30:090:30:13

But they may not go with it. Who knows? That's the joy of the game.

0:30:130:30:17

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues, Geri and Jackie.

0:30:170:30:21

First up is this trumpet-shaped vase.

0:30:210:30:24

Very heavy. Bold in colour.

0:30:240:30:27

-Some would say hideous.

-Hideous, possibly! I can't see that being a big hit in a country saleroom.

0:30:270:30:33

-It looks like Bulgarian glass from the 1990s to me.

-Yeah.

0:30:330:30:37

-But one's been wrong before with modern glass, so...

-It's always possible.

0:30:370:30:41

-Perfectly happy to be proved wrong again. What's your estimate?

-I put it in at 20 to 30.

0:30:410:30:47

Very sensible. £38 paid. So they didn't pay a big price. It is a perfectly jolly lump of glass,

0:30:470:30:52

-but of no great quality.

-Yes.

-Good. Now, the centrepiece. Your monkey nut dish. Do you rate that?

0:30:520:30:58

-Not very highly.

-No.

-No.

0:30:580:31:00

-I don't think there's a great deal of age to that.

-Like brand-new?

-I'd say certainly within the last ten.

0:31:000:31:06

-Yeah. I rather agree with you.

-A bit quirky and a bit decorative and it's a bit of fun.

0:31:060:31:12

-So just a novelty item, really.

-Yeah.

-Yeah.

0:31:120:31:15

-And what sort of money, do you think?

-40 to 60.

-£24 paid.

0:31:150:31:19

-So they paid the right price.

-Could make a profit.

-No monkeying around with this, you know.

0:31:190:31:25

OK. 40 to 60 is a nice estimate. £24 paid.

0:31:250:31:28

-Yes.

-And last is the cabochon garnet brooch.

-Yeah. Not marked.

0:31:280:31:34

-But almost certainly gold.

-And that kind of Celtic look.

0:31:340:31:38

It is rather Celtic in design. It's in good order.

0:31:380:31:41

-And typical late Victorian?

-Yes, typical late Victorian.

0:31:410:31:44

-What's it worth?

-Well, I've got it in at a rather conservative 40 to 60.

0:31:440:31:48

-How much?

-40 to 60.

-You're joking, aren't you? No, you're not joking!

0:31:480:31:53

Well, they all went for this equally strongly.

0:31:530:31:57

They loved it at £230!

0:31:570:32:00

-I'll be delighted to be proved wrong. But it could be a big ask.

-There's a great chasm opening up here, I feel.

0:32:000:32:07

And not much money left over for the bonus buy. Only £8, in fact.

0:32:070:32:12

-Right.

-So let's see how Jonathan Pratt invested his £8 in the bonus buy.

0:32:120:32:17

-You spent, you naughty girls, £292.

-Yes.

0:32:190:32:24

You gave £8 only to JP. What did you spend your £8 on, Jonathan?

0:32:240:32:28

-Oh!

-A little inkstand, OK? Lovely brass, Art Nouveau inspired.

0:32:280:32:32

And I paid the princely sum of how much?

0:32:320:32:35

-£8?

-Fiver!

0:32:350:32:37

-Oh, brilliant!

-I think that's a nice little object for £5.

0:32:370:32:41

So, late 19th-century brass inkwell, in the Art Nouveau style - £5. Thank you very much.

0:32:410:32:46

-Profit?

-Absolutely.

-Will we make money on that?

-You'll make a tenner at least.

-Brilliant.

-Handle it.

0:32:460:32:52

-Handle it.

-Maybe more. It's the sort of sale that I think it'll do rather well in.

-You don't like it?

-I do.

0:32:520:32:58

-I love anything Art Nouveau.

-Yes.

0:32:580:33:01

-What do you think, Geri? Are you happy, darling?

-Yes. It's lovely.

-It's quite simply made.

0:33:010:33:07

-It's just stamped out of a piece of metal, basically.

-Yes, but look at the shape.

-That's lovely.

0:33:070:33:12

You can decide later. But let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Jonathan's five pounds' worth.

0:33:120:33:19

So, if you've only got £8 to spend on a bonus buy,

0:33:200:33:24

-hasn't he done well spending five on that?

-Yes, exceedingly well.

0:33:240:33:28

To go out and spend a five-pound note and buy something

0:33:280:33:32

of some quality that's likely to appeal, that's just brilliant.

0:33:320:33:36

-A nice little Art Nouveau inkwell.

-Isn't it just?

-Yes. Very stylish.

0:33:360:33:40

-What's it worth?

-I've put it in at 40 to 60.

-Paid £5.

0:33:400:33:44

-He'll be really chuffed.

-Whatever happens, he'll get a profit.

0:33:440:33:47

-It'll make up for the disappointment with the brooch, if indeed there is a disappointment.

-Yes.

-We'll see.

0:33:470:33:54

-Geoffrey, you've been very kind. Thank you.

-Thank you.

0:33:540:33:57

How do you see that one then? Put me in at £100 surely?

0:33:590:34:03

-OK, Paul, Paul?

-Hi.

-All right?

0:34:050:34:07

-No John-John? Just Paul-Paul, Paul-Paul.

-Paul-Paul and Paul-Paul.

0:34:070:34:11

-Feeling nervous at all, Paul?

-A little bit apprehensive.

0:34:110:34:15

But confident. It looks like a sort of nice few people about.

0:34:150:34:19

-So hopefully they will be keen to bid on our items. What do you reckon, Paul?

-Wait and see.

-Yes!

0:34:190:34:25

-He's confident.

-Well, John is responsible for the first item, the steam traction engine.

-He is.

0:34:250:34:30

-And here it comes.

-OK.

0:34:300:34:32

1960s Mamod toy steam traction engine.

0:34:320:34:37

There we are. All complete with its spirit burner and box etc.

0:34:370:34:41

Put me in at £20 to start? I'm bid 20 already, commission bid.

0:34:410:34:45

At £20 I'm bid. And five on the counter now.

0:34:450:34:48

At 25. 30.

0:34:480:34:50

At 30. Here at 30. Was there another bidder? 35.

0:34:500:34:53

-40. 40 is on the left-hand side here.

-(Come on.)

0:34:530:34:57

At 40 for the Mamod. Are we all done then at 40? And I sell at 40...

0:34:570:35:02

£40 is minus £20. Bad luck, John.

0:35:020:35:05

-Bad luck that you're stuck in that snowdrift.

-We'll blame it on him.

0:35:050:35:10

Anyway, here comes Paul Laidlaw's cruet.

0:35:100:35:12

Oil and vinegar cruet, hallmarked Birmingham 1922.

0:35:120:35:16

There we are. Nice little lot.

0:35:160:35:18

How do you see that one? Put me in at £20? 20 I'm bid in the front row.

0:35:180:35:22

-Come on.

-At £20 straight in.

0:35:220:35:24

£20 I'm bid. Do I see two anywhere?

0:35:240:35:26

At £20. 22. 25.

0:35:260:35:29

28.

0:35:290:35:31

30. And two.

0:35:310:35:33

32, seated on the right-hand side. At 32. Was there another bidder? 35.

0:35:330:35:38

Are we all done then at 35? And I sell...

0:35:380:35:42

£35 is, I'm afraid, minus 13.

0:35:420:35:47

It's a rather nice, little Edwardian silver hip flask

0:35:470:35:51

by James Dixon and Sons, Sheffield.

0:35:510:35:53

There we are. Inscribed with various Scottish locations.

0:35:530:35:57

Put me at £100 for it? For the hip flask, 100?

0:35:570:35:59

Well, 50 to start then surely?

0:35:590:36:01

Come along. With a bit of history. 50 I'm bid in the room now. At 50.

0:36:010:36:05

At £50 I'm bid on the counter. Five. At 55.

0:36:050:36:09

On the left here at 55. You're out on the counter at 55. 60.

0:36:090:36:13

Five.

0:36:130:36:14

-It's cheap, isn't it?

-70. £70 is on the right now.

0:36:140:36:19

At 70. Still cheap at £70.

0:36:190:36:21

-That's cheap, yeah.

-Are we all done then at 70?

0:36:210:36:25

I shall sell away then at £70.

0:36:250:36:27

Minus £40 on that, I'm afraid, lads.

0:36:270:36:29

-40. 60. 73. You're minus £73.

-Right.

0:36:290:36:34

-What are you going to do about the stationery box?

-There's no question.

0:36:340:36:38

-We'll go with the stationery box.

-You're not going to ring your father then?

-No.

-No?

-Definitely not.

0:36:380:36:43

-Let it be on your shoulders then.

-On my shoulders be it.

-Are we not in freefall?

0:36:430:36:48

A rather nice Victorian papier-mache,

0:36:480:36:51

gilt lacquer and shell-inlaid stationery box.

0:36:510:36:54

Nice shape. How do you see this one then? Put me at £100?

0:36:540:36:58

50 to go then? Come along, do,

0:36:580:37:00

for the stationery box. Well, 30 and up we go then. Come along. 30.

0:37:000:37:04

35 in front. 40 is in the middle.

0:37:040:37:07

It's a cheap little lot still at £40.

0:37:070:37:10

45 to the hand. 50 seated.

0:37:100:37:13

Five. A brand-new bidder at 55.

0:37:130:37:16

60. Do you want to be five, sir? 65 in front.

0:37:160:37:20

70 in the middle.

0:37:200:37:22

At £70 then seated in the middle.

0:37:220:37:24

Seated at £70. Right in the middle of the room then at 70. And I sell...

0:37:240:37:28

So bad luck, Paul. That's minus £10. And overall you're minus £83.

0:37:280:37:32

-Don't tell your dad. And don't tell the Blues, eh?

-No-one's going to be knowing about this.

0:37:320:37:38

-Now, Geri and Wacky...I mean, Jackie, how are you? OK?

-Fine.

0:37:480:37:51

-OK. Good. Not nervous at all?

-No, excited.

-Excited. Geri, you're not nervous at all?

-No. No.

-No.

0:37:510:37:58

-Anything you wish you hadn't bought?

-No.

-No.

-No. They're quite confident, these girls.

0:37:580:38:04

Well, first up is your glass vase.

0:38:040:38:06

And here it comes.

0:38:060:38:08

This very colourful glass vase, stamped "E Zareh" to base.

0:38:080:38:12

Handsome-looking vase there. Very colourful. Put me in at £20 to start?

0:38:120:38:16

-20 I'm bid. Seated at 20.

-Come on.

0:38:160:38:19

25. 25 is seated down here. At 25.

0:38:190:38:22

-Do I see eight anywhere?

-30!

0:38:220:38:24

25 is seated down here. It's not dear for a big vase.

0:38:240:38:27

-Up, up, up!

-Are we all done then at 28? A brand-new bidder. 30 seated.

0:38:270:38:32

-One more!

-Still with the original bidder.

-Up!

0:38:320:38:35

-Up!

-At £30... Thank you.

0:38:350:38:38

-OK.

-£30.

-That was...

-Never mind!

0:38:380:38:41

Well...

0:38:410:38:42

Minus £8.

0:38:420:38:44

That interesting silver-plated table centrepiece,

0:38:440:38:47

modelled as the seated monkey. And the glass bowl. Super quality lot.

0:38:470:38:51

-Put me in at £100?

-There he is.

-50 to go then, surely?

0:38:510:38:55

Well, 30 and up we go then? Come along, do.

0:38:550:38:58

Start me at 30? 30 seated. 35 with you.

0:38:580:39:00

-What did he say?

-You're in profit, girl.

0:39:000:39:04

40 seated. Do I see five anywhere?

0:39:040:39:06

Cheap little lot at 45.

0:39:060:39:08

-50 seated.

-£50!

0:39:080:39:11

50 seated right in the middle of the room. Do you want to be five, sir?

0:39:110:39:15

-Come on! Come on!

-50 seated then.

0:39:150:39:18

Are we all done at 50? 55.

0:39:180:39:20

-Oh, yes!

-Brand-new bidder down here at 55.

0:39:200:39:24

At 55. In front here at 55. You're out in the middle at 55...

0:39:240:39:28

-Hey!

-55 is plus 31.

0:39:280:39:31

The Victorian cabochon garnet circular brooch, circa 1870.

0:39:310:39:36

Where do you want to be on this one? Put me straight in at £50 to start?

0:39:360:39:40

-50?

-(Come on.)

-Well, 40 then, surely?

0:39:400:39:43

Nice Victorian brooch. Must be worth 40. 30 and up we go then?

0:39:430:39:47

-It's not looking good, this.

-No. Never mind.

0:39:470:39:50

At 30. Do you want five anywhere? 35 is at the back. 40. Five.

0:39:500:39:54

Back at the room at 45. Are you out on the counter? At 45 at the back.

0:39:540:39:58

At 45 at the back of the room then. At 45 and I shall sell.

0:39:580:40:02

50. Brand-new bidder at 50.

0:40:020:40:04

At £50 then. Are we all done at 50...

0:40:040:40:07

-Oh!

-Minus 180.

0:40:070:40:10

It doesn't sound too bad if you say it quickly.

0:40:100:40:13

Which means overall you are minus £157.

0:40:130:40:17

So that means between you, you owe £70 each nearly, just over £70 each.

0:40:170:40:23

-That's tough.

-It's not so good, that, is it?

-Tough!

-And you can help.

0:40:230:40:28

Well, I'm sorry about that, girls.

0:40:280:40:30

-So what are we going to do with the inkwell? Going with that?

-Yeah, we'll go with that. Might as well.

0:40:300:40:36

-Might as well.

-You're never going to lose on that.

-No.

-We'll have that.

0:40:360:40:41

The German, brass, Art Nouveau design inkwell

0:40:410:40:43

with the pear-shaped borders. How do you see that one?

0:40:430:40:47

Put me in at £40, surely?

0:40:470:40:48

Nice little inkwell. 40? Well, 20 to start then and up we go.

0:40:480:40:52

-Art Nouveau inkwell for 20?

-Up. Up.

0:40:520:40:55

I'm bid, sir, at 20. At £20 here on the left. At 20.

0:40:550:40:58

Do you want to be two? 22 seated. 24.

0:40:580:41:01

(24.)

0:41:010:41:02

26. 28.

0:41:020:41:04

30. And two.

0:41:040:41:07

-Jonathan!

-Keep going.

-Come on.

0:41:070:41:09

At 32. Are we all done then at 32...

0:41:090:41:12

£32 means you are plus 27,

0:41:130:41:17

which reduces your losses to only £130!

0:41:170:41:22

-Oh! Not bad at all.

-That could be a winning score. So don't say a word to the Reds.

-No.

0:41:220:41:29

Are we all done then?

0:41:310:41:33

-So, teams, have you been chatting?

-No.

-No? Not been chatting? No.

-Not to him anyway.

0:41:380:41:45

-And you've rung the old man?

-Rung the old man.

-Told him the score?

-Absolutely.

-He's in snowy Kent?

-Yes.

0:41:450:41:51

And I do have to reveal that on today's show,

0:41:510:41:54

we have had some of the most appalling losses I have seen for some years. Right?

0:41:540:41:59

-So there's nothing between either of these teams to be particularly proud about.

-Oh, dear!

0:41:590:42:05

Heavy, heavy minus scores.

0:42:050:42:07

-And the team with the most substantial losses just happens to be the Blues.

-Yeah, we thought that.

0:42:070:42:14

You are minus £130...

0:42:140:42:16

LAUGHTER

0:42:160:42:18

-..which is a bit of a cracker, isn't it?

-It's gutting.

0:42:180:42:21

But, you know, it's just down to one incredibly bad luck piece.

0:42:210:42:25

-But you've given us a great show. We had a real laugh.

-Fantastic laugh.

-That's what it's all about.

0:42:250:42:31

Thank you very much, girls. And the victors today who managed to win by losing only £83...

0:42:310:42:37

-On everything!

-..who didn't manage to make a profit on any item at all,

0:42:370:42:42

-but they nevertheless are the victors today...

-At least we're consistent!

0:42:420:42:47

I'm so sorry that John can't be with us. Great show, though.

0:42:470:42:51

-Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:510:42:54

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd - 2011

0:43:070:43:11

Email [email protected]

0:43:110:43:14

The teams go head-to-head at Norfolk antiques fair. Guided by expert Paul Laidlaw the reds opt for a bit of nostalgia, whilst the blues run Jonathan Pratt ragged. Tim Wonnacott finds something curious at Peckover house in Wisbech.