Stamford 10 Bargain Hunt


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Stamford 10

Antiques challenge. In Stamford, Lincolnshire, Catherine Southon gets in a pickle trying to get her team to buy something, while Nick Hall's team pick up a pickle 'dish'.


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Transcript


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Make the biggest profit or the smallest loss?

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Either way, you're still a winner.

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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We've raced along the A1 to the historic town of Stamford in Lincolnshire.

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I'm about to let two lads loose in this fair with £300 to spend.

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Their challenge? To find three items to take away and sell at auction for a profit.

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But don't worry, I've got their parents along to supervise. Here's what's coming up.

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Dad Terry takes charge of son Dan.

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We'll dismiss that straight away.

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Mum Dee gets to grips with son Neil.

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-Let's have a look at this one.

-It's time to go.

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And the Blue Team are off to a flying start.

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Thank you very much. Good luck.

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Unlike the Red Team.

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Thank you for your time. Shall we carry on outside?

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-Just have a go.

-I really think we should move away from it.

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Let's get on with the show.

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So, if you want to win at this game, would you enlist your father

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or would you enlist your mother? How sweet!

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-So you two are pretty close, aren't you?

-Yes, Tim, we are. Yes, yes.

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-You're active and sporty together?

-Yeah, we do a lot of cycling

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and Danny does a bit of running and swimming.

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Tell me about this cycling lark then.

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-Well...

-We've got a cycle tomorrow, 50-miler round Northamptonshire.

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-Have you?

-Yeah.

-Is that for a charity?

-It's for a local charity, yeah.

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-You like to help to care for people, don't you?

-Yes.

-It's your career.

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I first started off about 25 years ago and I bought a house.

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We decided we'd rent out a room, then we decided we'd rent out another room

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and all the people coming into the house had mental health problems.

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It took off from there and escalated.

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-You've made a business out of it?

-Yes.

-How nice to have a business that is caring in that way.

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-You have a passion for the job.

-I do. I still enjoy it after all these years.

-26 years?

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-That's right. Not long(!)

-It's a good old innings.

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But during your 26 years of caring for other people,

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-you've also done a fair amount of collecting, Tel.

-I have, yes.

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-I collect sovereign cases.

-How many cases have you got?

-220 altogether.

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-How much?

-220. All different and all British hallmarked.

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-Really?

-Yeah, I don't collect any...

-Any old rubbish.

-Any old rubbish.

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-They send them in from France in brass and Germany...

-Stick with the British!

-Too right!

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Danny, you've got an excellent team-mate here. Do you share your father's passion for collecting?

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I have miniature alcohol bottles in my room.

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Generally, full or empty?

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-Empty.

-Some used to be vodka, which are now water. Put it that way.

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You've just graduated or are about to finish the course?

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-Yeah, I did a Masters in Global Security.

-What does that mean?

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-Global terrorism, that sort of thing.

-Really? This is how to protect us or how to do it?

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-This is what we need protecting from.

-Good. I'm pleased to hear it!

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You've got climate change, terrorism, that sort of thing.

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-It all sounds a bit "James Bondy", but you don't get an Aston Martin with it.

-Unfortunately not.

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-This is going to start him off in the antique trade. It's a shove in the right direction.

-Yeah, lovely.

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-You're very competitive, you two, aren't you?

-Yes.

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-Are you in this to win it?

-Oh, yes.

-Definitely?

-Definitely, yes.

-Are you going to beat this family?

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-We'll leave 'em for dead.

-I love that fighting talk, Tel. Thank you very much.

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-So are you quaking in your boots, guys?

-Yes.

-No.

-I love it.

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You two have a lot in common, apart from mother and son?

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Yes, we both like heavy metal music.

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-Any particular group?

-Yes, Cradle Of Filth and Ozzy Osbourne.

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Cradle Of Filth?!

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-I'm afraid so.

-Do you mind my asking you how old you are, dearie?

-61.

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You're 61 and your favourite pop group is Cradle Of Filth?!

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-I'm afraid so, yes.

-What about your soft toys?

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Yes, I collect Steiff when I can afford it

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and anything else that's unusual.

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I don't have the normal, sort of teddy type things.

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I have anything that's slightly quirky, unusual, and I collect that.

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-Neil, you like to be in the driving seat.

-I do.

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-Ordinarily, on a bus?

-Yes, I used to be a bus driver. Last year, unfortunately, I lost my licence.

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-I was diagnosed with epilepsy at the end of last year.

-Oh, bad luck!

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So I lost my licence. I can't drive buses now for about 20 years.

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That's seriously bad luck, isn't it?

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-What's your career plan now then?

-It is to go back into security.

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I was a security guard before I was a bus driver.

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I had to go to college and get my SIA licence.

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I've passed all my courses and I'm now a fully qualified door supervisor.

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-Brilliant. That should help you get some pretty good deals today.

-Oh, yes.

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-You can always frighten them into submission.

-Absolutely.

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-Anyway, here's the money moment, £200 apiece. Here's your £200.

-Thank you.

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You know the rules, your experts await and off you go and very, very good luck!

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Oh, they're a bit rude.

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Oh, oh! Yes, erotic.

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Catherine Southon is keeping the Reds on the straight and narrow.

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-Poor chap, look at him. He's been through the wars.

-He's a bit threadbare.

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Nick Hall avoids the soft options.

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-£300 - what do you want to spend the money on?

-A nice, big fireplace.

-A fireplace?

-A big fireplace.

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That's very specific.

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-Look at this.

-It's certainly unusual.

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We spoke about period glass, but there is definitely a vogue for...

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-That's nice.

-..post-war studio glass by specific makers.

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-I don't know who that is by, but it's a striking bit of glass.

-It is.

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-I like that.

-Yeah.

-What do you think? Does it grab you?

-Yes, it does. I like that.

-It does.

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Jeepers creepers, she's not joking!

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-I like that.

-Isn't that unusual?

-That's lovely.

-Very unusual.

-I like that.

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I see and value and sell hundreds, if not thousands of pieces of glass.

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-I've never seen one structured like that before.

-That's lovely.

-It's unusual, very unusual.

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It's weird, isn't it? I can't quite make out if I love it or loathe it.

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-It's got...

-You could imagine that in a minimalist flat.

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-Yeah, very contemporary.

-Lovely.

-Contemporary chic, like yourself.

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Oh, thank you very much.

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What have we got? I can't find any maker's marks. There's no signature on the base.

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So it's hard to know exactly who made it and where.

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I don't know if there's any information on the ticket. It just says a "glass ball tower", 36 quid.

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-Would you be willing to take quite a sensible offer on it?

-I'd probably do that, yeah.

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-Like £30?

-Do you two like this?

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-I do.

-Yeah.

-Do you think it might be worth a punt?

-It would be, yeah.

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-How would £20 sound, to give us half a chance?

-Awful.

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-Go on.

-It's a cold, windy day.

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I'm an old-age pensioner and I'm cold, look!

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I can do 30 on it. I can't...

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-What if we met you in the middle? 25?

-Yeah.

-Yeah, go on.

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-Good man. Shake his hand.

-Thank you very much.

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Dee liked it and Dee got it. Have the Reds made any decisions yet?

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-I don't think that will fetch 50 quid.

-Can we have a think about that?

-Of course.

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-Which way do you want to go?

-Any way at all.

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We'll have a little think about that one.

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Uh-oh, Catherine! You've got some indecisive shoppers on your hands.

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-You like your blue and white.

-I do.

-It's a sweet little thing. Do you know what this is?

-A pickle dish?

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Spot on, a pickle dish. But what a quirky little antique, isn't it?

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-Yes, that's nice.

-A pottery and porcelain dish made just for putting your pickles in.

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Fantastic, isn't it? It's got a bit of age to it as well.

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It probably dates to the very early 19th century, the late Georgian era.

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-I know you like your blue and white.

-Yes.

-Definitely.

-That's lovely.

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-Neil, are you taken by the pickle dish?

-It is different.

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-OK. Is there a price on there?

-There is.

-How much?

-£40.

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£40 - that's what you expect to pay at a fair.

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-Bear in mind we've got to go to the auction.

-Yeah.

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-Do you like it?

-It's nice, yeah.

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-It's light.

-It's thinner than what I thought it would be.

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-It looks in good condition.

-It's remarkably in good condition.

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If the price was OK, how would you feel about it?

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-I would say yes.

-Yes, yes, I like it.

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-Would 26 buy it?

-I'll do 28.

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-28.

-That's not a bad price.

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-I think she's done us proud.

-Yeah.

-Are you going to shake her hand?

-Yeah.

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Thank you very much. Good luck.

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Item number two, a pickle dish, and they've preserved plenty of time for that last buy.

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That writing box, it's got the original leather cover,

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but I just think it's in probably very good condition

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because it's got this beautiful, old leather case.

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-It looks like burr walnut. It may even be rosewood.

-Right.

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-It's nice quality. It's lovely quality.

-Yes.

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Then you open this up...

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I think there probably would have been some sort of tray here.

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-That's right.

-You've got the bottles.

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What worries me is that they're not all the same tops.

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Then you press this button and that comes out.

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-OK.

-It looks pretty decent.

-It's a bit incomplete inside.

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This is £240? It is.

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What would be your best price?

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I know it has the tray missing which I took into account. They're £350 when they've got their leather case.

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They are rare. What price would you do it for us?

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We have a limited amount of money today.

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Could you do 180?

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I will do 185, but that is my bottom line.

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-Danny, what do you think?

-Go for it. We could talk about it for ten minutes. Just go for it.

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My thoughts exactly, Danny.

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-Are you happy?

-Yeah.

-Are you sure?

-Yes.

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I think he's happy, but it's a purchase anyway. Hurrah!

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-What do you think?

-I quite like that.

-It's very nice.

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It has all the pieces with it. They're nicely turned, lathe-turned,

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with some quality as well.

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Are they heavy? They're not that heavy.

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Some of them have got weighted bases, then you know they're from one of the top manufacturers.

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But they're a nice little set. Is there a price on them anywhere?

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£45.

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That doesn't sound too dear to me. What do you think?

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I don't know how much you like it, really.

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-What do you think?

-I like it. I do like it, yeah.

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-Do you like it enough to buy it?

-I think so.

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I would be happy with it if you think it's going to make us a profit.

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-I think the price isn't excessive at all.

-No.

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I thought they might have been asking more.

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-Could you tell us anything about the history of the chess set?

-I don't know anything about it at all.

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-You're as much in the dark as we are!

-You could tell me about it.

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Checkmate, Nick! You are the expert.

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My only thought was, do you think that has been later carved? I'm not sure that's an original.

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-To the other one?

-Yeah, they're slightly different.

-And the colouring is slightly different.

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-That was my only concern.

-Yeah. But it came from a good auction.

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I was thinking maybe about 30 quid.

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I don't think we could do it for 30. Not all of it.

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What about 28?

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-LAUGHTER

-Checkmate, yeah.

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My husband who's wandering around and he's disappeared a bit quick would be a little bit disappointed.

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-I've got a walkie-talkie.

-Do you want to give him a ring?

-Yes.

-Would you? Thanks.

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-Do you like it?

-That's unusual.

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Just a brush? What, for a horse or for a human?

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-Shall we pass on that one then?

-Pass, yeah.

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Yes, trot on.

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-Hello.

-Technology failed us.

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-Oh, no. You've got to make an executive decision.

-I have and I'm always used to making them.

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-I'm more interested in the chess set than the table.

-The chess set is more interesting.

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So, 35 and you get to keep the table.

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-I think 40.

-40 quid?

-40 for the pieces. I think they're good quality pieces.

-I do like it.

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It's nice to play with and it's also a good display because some of the display ones you can't play with.

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-But that one, I think, is worth that.

-It's good advice. I agree with all of this.

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-But it's if you like it or not, whether you want it?

-Yeah?

-I chose the blue. You...

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OK, yeah. We'll say yes on that then.

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-Shake this lovely lady's hand.

-£40. Thank you very much.

-Thank you very much.

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So Neil makes his move.

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£40 and it's game over.

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-Brilliant. That's the last one. All done and dusted.

-Yeah.

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And we've got half an hour left.

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Ooh, they are smug!

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-That's a nice little object.

-It's a good name.

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Mappin & Webb. It's not very old.

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That comes with the...? The little cream jug comes with it, yeah.

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-It's quite sweet, isn't it?

-It's very sweet.

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-'60s.

-It would be nice, wouldn't it?

-'60s?

-Yeah, you can tell by the thing inside there.

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What can you do on that?

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Again, I could do that for 60.

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-Do you want to have a think about that?

-What do you think, Dan?

-We could come back to it.

-OK.

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Sorry, Danny. Catherine's got her teeth into this.

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-Even more, 45?

-Oh, Catherine...

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If it's the difference between a sale and no sale, then all right.

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-45 then.

-I think you should go for it.

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-It's a good price.

-Are you sure?

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-Sure?

-Yes, go for that one then.

-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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-Thank you very much.

-Thank you.

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These boys could be on a roll.

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One to go, guys!

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-We've got £70 left.

-We've got £70 left now.

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-And about 40... I don't know.

-And about 20 minutes.

-20 minutes.

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-I love these things.

-Globes. Philips, great name.

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-What have we got? 70?

-Yes.

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If you could knock off a hundred, plus ten, we might be about there.

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< We can go to 170 if you like.

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-What about this then?

-What on earth is that?

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It's what you use for cutting the grass and things, Danny.

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-A lucky escape then for you, Danny.

-What price could you do on that?

-Or maybe not.

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You wouldn't just show us how it works, would you? Do the old...

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I'm not a farmer, you know. Go on.

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-He's asking quite a lot here.

-That's it, the long grass.

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-Do you really like that?

-I think it's absolutely fantastic.

-Do you?

-Yeah.

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It's a bit different from a sovereign holder, I suppose.

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-I think it's...

-Just have a go.

-No, thanks.

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-I think we should move away, but if you want to go for it, we can.

-Try it, Catherine. See what you think.

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-To get me really excited about it...

-Pretend you're cutting the lawn.

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I see you've never cut the lawn!

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-You are so right. You are completely right.

-It's great, isn't it?

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Oh, I could do with you in my garden, Catherine!

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On the scale of one to ten, I would say "one", but if you like it...

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-Only because it's not my...

-I'd say nine out of ten for that.

-Go for it then.

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We've got five or ten minutes. We'll have another look round.

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-I wouldn't even look at that, to be honest.

-I think it's useless, to be honest.

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£75, £100, easy, I'd say, at auction.

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-Really?

-Unless the Grim Reaper is going to be in the auction room, I can't see that getting £100.

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Do you want to get it? We've got ten minutes left. I know nothing about scythes.

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-Let's hope he hasn't sold it.

-I don't think you need to worry about that.

-LAUGHTER

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-We were panicking. We thought you'd sold it.

-I wasn't panicking.

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-I've never seen anyone quite so enthusiastic about a scythe. I think you should buy it.

-£20.

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Do we have a deal? We do. Thank you very much.

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Can I take it with me now? You can indeed.

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Come on then, gang. Let's go.

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-# Heigh-ho, heigh-ho

-It's home from the shop they go... # With a scythe!

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That's it. Time's up.

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Did Mum make all the right moves or did Dad do all the damage?

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Let's check out what the Reds bought, eh?

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Eventually, Terry and Danny bought a writing box and case

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for £185.

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Catherine got her teeth into a silver chocolate pot and creamer.

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£45 paid.

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-I think it's fantastic.

-I think you should buy it.

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And Terry did, for £20, the Grim Reaper!

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-You haven't bought the scythe?

-A lovely scythe, Tim.

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-Is this cutting edge or what?

-It certainly is.

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-Oh, Lordy! How much did you spend all round?

-250, wasn't it?

0:18:100:18:14

-250.

-£50 of leftover lolly. I'll have that.

0:18:140:18:17

-Thank you very much. How much did you spend on the scythe?

-£20.

0:18:170:18:21

-That's not too bad.

-A fantastic bargain. That's £100 of anyone's money, that scythe is, Tim.

-Oh, yeah?

0:18:210:18:27

-He is so passionate about that.

-And it's been restored as well.

0:18:270:18:31

Yes, lovely. Good. Sounds great.

0:18:310:18:34

-I think the scythe will be good, but I think the box, the first one we bought...

-You hated that.

0:18:340:18:40

You've convinced me that it's good.

0:18:400:18:42

-Don't fall out!

-I don't know much about antiques. These two know what they're talking about.

-Lovely.

0:18:420:18:48

-There's £50, Catherine.

-Thank you.

0:18:480:18:50

-Have you got a plan?

-I am going to buy something for Danny because he hasn't really liked anything so far.

0:18:500:18:56

-So it's all for Danny.

-It's all for Danny Boy.

-Danny Boy.

0:18:560:19:00

-We'll be breaking into song! Good luck, Catherine. Good luck, chaps.

-Thank you.

0:19:000:19:04

Why don't we check out what the Blues bought, eh?

0:19:040:19:09

Mum liked the colourful glass form. £25 paid.

0:19:090:19:13

-Does it grab you?

-Yes, it does. I like that.

0:19:130:19:16

And also getting the thumbs-up...

0:19:160:19:18

-Yes.

-Yeah.

-Yes, I like it.

0:19:180:19:21

..was the pickle dish, bought for £28.

0:19:210:19:23

And Neil paid £40 for a chess set.

0:19:230:19:26

Cash, not "check"-mate!

0:19:260:19:29

Hey, what's all this then? Too much relaxing?

0:19:290:19:32

What are you doing, Dee? Making a Harvey Wallbanger or a nice little margarita?

0:19:320:19:37

We've got to give him some sustenance.

0:19:370:19:40

-Did you have a good time?

-Fantastic.

-Yes.

-How much did you spend?

-£93.

0:19:400:19:45

-How much?!

-£93.

-That is a pathetic amount of money.

0:19:450:19:49

So I want £207 of leftover lolly.

0:19:490:19:52

-Which is your favourite piece, Dee?

-The glass.

0:19:520:19:56

-Which is yours?

-The chess pieces.

0:19:560:19:58

-Which piece is going to bring the biggest amount?

-The glass.

0:19:580:20:02

-I think the chess pieces.

-There we go. We've got family friction already.

0:20:020:20:07

-There's a wodge.

-Thank you, Tim. Wonderful.

0:20:070:20:10

-Will you do your sterling normal stuff with this and spend most of it?

-I'll spend the lot, hopefully.

0:20:100:20:16

Don't you love the man? That's absolutely superb. Have a great time, kids.

0:20:160:20:21

We're going to head off now to the flat plains of Cheshire.

0:20:210:20:25

Arley Hall was built around 1840,

0:20:270:20:31

but some of the materials used in its construction came from a medieval house

0:20:310:20:36

that had stood here for hundreds of years.

0:20:360:20:39

So it should come as no surprise to us that littered around the new hall

0:20:410:20:47

are items which had been around for a long time in the old hall.

0:20:470:20:52

But on the face of it, this piece of furniture is not at all special -

0:20:530:20:58

simple, nailed together planks of oak

0:20:580:21:03

with slightly oddball reproduction brass handles.

0:21:030:21:08

But as they say, you can never tell a book by its cover,

0:21:080:21:13

so let's have a go at peeling this back.

0:21:130:21:17

There we go.

0:21:170:21:19

The front flap rises up to reveal a keyboard.

0:21:190:21:23

Look at that. But this is very special, isn't it?

0:21:230:21:27

This is a keyboard, the like of which we have never seen before perhaps

0:21:270:21:32

because each of the keys at the front is veneered in pear wood

0:21:320:21:37

and behind, these are solid ivory tablets,

0:21:370:21:41

literally, little tusks from an elephant.

0:21:410:21:44

And the front board itself is naively painted

0:21:440:21:48

in a sort of Renaissance style,

0:21:480:21:51

but centred, where you'd expect to find the maker's name in a later instrument, with a Tudor rose.

0:21:510:21:58

Now...we've got the opportunity of revealing the interior.

0:21:580:22:03

Ka-boing!

0:22:050:22:08

What do you think about that?

0:22:090:22:11

Isn't that magnificent?

0:22:110:22:14

And just look how early it is!

0:22:140:22:16

1675.

0:22:160:22:19

1675 - so this thing is 335 years old.

0:22:190:22:25

Amazing.

0:22:250:22:27

The first thing that grabs me is the inside of the cover, look,

0:22:270:22:31

crudely painted, but with an aristocratic scene

0:22:310:22:35

with characters walking across a classical landscape,

0:22:350:22:39

the odd dog being sick,

0:22:390:22:43

a man over there fishing.

0:22:430:22:46

And the centre section, the sound board itself,

0:22:460:22:49

is overlaid with these strings,

0:22:490:22:52

plus, of course, the name and date of the maker.

0:22:520:22:55

An interesting story about this instrument is that a similar one was installed

0:22:550:23:01

about five miles that way, the other side of the M6,

0:23:010:23:05

in a place called Tabley House.

0:23:050:23:08

And the ladies in Tabley House, five years before this one was made,

0:23:080:23:12

were showing off their instrument.

0:23:120:23:14

Therefore, the ladies of Arley just had to have one too.

0:23:140:23:19

And for those of you who know about playing the piano,

0:23:190:23:23

you know that when you press the key, up comes the hammer

0:23:230:23:27

and it hits the string, hence you get the noise.

0:23:270:23:30

But if you come down here and have a look at those little fellows

0:23:300:23:35

just in there underneath that bar, they're called jacks.

0:23:350:23:40

And it's that rising jack with this sticking-out piece of quill

0:23:400:23:46

that plucks the note.

0:23:460:23:48

-Like this.

-PLAYS NOTE

0:23:480:23:52

Making that curious, tinny type of sound.

0:23:520:23:55

So what's it called?

0:23:550:23:57

Clearly, not a piano.

0:23:570:24:00

This instrument is called a virginal.

0:24:000:24:03

Yes, a virginal.

0:24:030:24:05

Why a virginal?

0:24:050:24:07

Well, it's supposed to date back

0:24:070:24:10

to the time that "virginalis...vox" sang.

0:24:100:24:16

And the voice of a virgin is supposed to have a special timbre to it

0:24:160:24:21

and hence, these early plucked string instruments are called virginals.

0:24:210:24:28

Now, I quite fancy myself as a bit of a pianist, so let's have a go.

0:24:280:24:33

You go round that side and I'll sit down here. Off you go.

0:24:330:24:36

MEDIEVAL MUSIC

0:24:400:24:42

Eat your heart out, Jools Holland!

0:24:520:24:55

We've motored 25 miles south to sunny Market Harborough

0:25:070:25:11

to be with Mark Gilding in the great family firm of Gildings Auctioneers.

0:25:110:25:15

-Lovely to be here.

-Good morning, Tim.

-Terry and Danny for the Reds, first up, went with this wee box,

0:25:150:25:21

described as "burr maple".

0:25:210:25:23

Yeah, I think it's burr walnut. Bit too dark.

0:25:230:25:27

Looks walnut, not maple, to me.

0:25:270:25:29

-It's got most of its fittings.

-It has, but a great-looking thing on the outside.

0:25:290:25:34

-I suppose that's why the box is in such good nick because it's got this tatty old leather thing.

-Yeah.

0:25:340:25:40

So, gird up your loins. What's your best estimate?

0:25:400:25:44

150 to 200.

0:25:440:25:46

-They paid £185, which is pretty well on the money.

-Yes.

-They'll be lucky if they get that back.

0:25:460:25:52

Next is the little chocolate pot and cream jug

0:25:520:25:56

which has to be one of the world's most useless objects.

0:25:560:26:00

Yes. At least it's by Mappin & Webb.

0:26:000:26:03

-How do you rate it money-wise?

-£30 to £40.

-£30 to £40.

0:26:030:26:07

£45 they paid, but you could be struggling, as it's in plate, for only £10 or £15 on that.

0:26:070:26:13

-We'll see what happens on the day.

-He's not going to be led.

0:26:130:26:16

Lastly, the Grim Reaper is around for all of us.

0:26:160:26:20

-How much for the scythe?

-I've said 30 to 40.

-Have you really?

-Yeah.

0:26:210:26:25

Well, happy days! £20 they paid. I mean, for £20, it's neither here nor there.

0:26:250:26:30

Somebody's restored it, they've varnished it,

0:26:300:26:33

they've painted the blade with silver paint,

0:26:330:26:37

so it's looking at its very best for television.

0:26:370:26:40

They've spent a lot of time for £20.

0:26:400:26:42

But I fancy they're going to need their bonus buy, so let's go and have a look at it.

0:26:420:26:47

Hi, guys. You did very well. £250 you spent. You gave Catherine £50 to buy the bonus buy.

0:26:470:26:53

-Let's find out what she bought. Tel, give that a bit of a pull, that rag.

-Right.

-Ta-da!

0:26:530:26:59

-That's a flourish.

-Lovely.

-We have a pair of copper water jugs.

0:26:590:27:03

-But if I give you one and I give you one, if you turn them up...

-Yes.

0:27:030:27:07

-You can see there a little name. What does it say?

-"Cunrad."

0:27:070:27:11

-Not quite "Cunrad". Cunard.

-Cunard, sorry.

0:27:110:27:14

-"Cunrad"?!

-Cunard White Star.

0:27:150:27:18

-Very nice, very nice.

-Now, Cunard White Star...

0:27:180:27:22

We know Cunard, associated with the Mauretania, the Lusitania.

0:27:220:27:26

-White Star Line we know, associated with the ill-fated Titanic.

-OK.

0:27:260:27:31

I think a name like that on the bottom, Cunard White Star Line, should attract interest.

0:27:310:27:37

-Are they for milk or water?

-Just water jugs.

-How much were they?

-£40.

0:27:370:27:42

-You don't look too impressed, Danny.

-We'll wait to see the other...

-That's OK.

0:27:430:27:48

Do you like them, Danny?

0:27:480:27:50

-They're OK.

-What about you, Dad?

-I'll go for them.

0:27:500:27:54

You don't have to decide right now. Pick them later if you want to,

0:27:540:27:58

but for the audience at home, let's see what the auctioneer thinks about Catherine's pair of...water jugs.

0:27:580:28:05

Mark, I have to be very careful what I say about jugs on this programme.

0:28:050:28:09

-There is something special about them.

-If we turn that up, both are stamped "Cunard White Star Line".

0:28:090:28:16

You can't say they were on the Titanic and floated away and were picked up by a lifeboat,

0:28:160:28:21

in which case they'd be worth about £200,000.

0:28:210:28:24

-Yes.

-But they are old, aren't they?

0:28:240:28:27

-They are old, yeah.

-They could date back to 1910 to 1920 very easily.

0:28:270:28:33

-Yes, they're of that period.

-I think quite a clever buy of Catherine's.

0:28:330:28:37

If they didn't have that, they'd be plain old copper jugs.

0:28:370:28:40

-What's your estimate on them?

-40 to 60.

-With the White Star connection, £20 each is not a lot of money.

0:28:400:28:47

-For the collectors, White Star Line is the magical phrase to attract them.

-It is.

0:28:470:28:53

Good. That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:28:530:28:57

Dee and Neil's first item is this, um...this, um...

0:28:570:29:02

glass thing, actually.

0:29:020:29:04

-Yes.

-Which is a kind of desk ornament, is it?

0:29:040:29:08

-It's a bit of an anywhere ornament, I think.

-It is just a bit of decoration.

-It is.

0:29:080:29:13

-What's the estimate?

-40 to 60.

-Great. £25 they paid.

0:29:130:29:17

It's a pretty good lump for £25, isn't it?

0:29:170:29:20

-It's good value.

-It is. Somebody else has made a profit out of that, so they've done well.

0:29:200:29:25

Next up is the sublime to the ridiculous in a way.

0:29:250:29:29

The most traditional form of earthenware is transfer-printed, right?

0:29:290:29:35

-It is.

-There we've got a charming little piece of pearlware

0:29:350:29:40

that would have had, I think, pickles in it around some smart, early Victorian table.

0:29:400:29:45

-I think that's great. Don't you?

-Yes, and there are specific collectors of pickle dishes.

0:29:450:29:51

-Yeah, they're all pickled.

-Yeah.

0:29:510:29:53

-So how much for that one, do you think?

-30 to 40.

-Great. £28 paid.

0:29:530:29:58

And lastly, it's the Edwardian chess set which is described as being complete.

0:29:580:30:03

-Yes, it's all there, but there is one replacement.

-Yes.

0:30:030:30:07

-If we look at these two horses, there is one here which is the original in boxwood.

-Ah, yes.

0:30:070:30:14

-And the replacement turned in beech wood.

-That beech wood one does look really rough.

-Well copied.

0:30:140:30:20

-But they could have used better material.

-Yeah, it's a shame.

0:30:200:30:23

-What do you think it will bring in the way of money?

-I've said £40 to £60.

-Good. They paid £40.

0:30:230:30:29

-Very good.

-So we are predicting with our Nick Hall a small profit on all three items,

0:30:290:30:35

-which is quite unusual.

-High hopes.

0:30:350:30:37

But it may go disastrously wrong, in which case they'll need their bonus buy, so let's have a look at it.

0:30:370:30:44

Now, Dee and Neil, you spent the most pathetic amount - £93. I mean, a shocker!

0:30:440:30:50

You gave the man £207. What did Nick do with it?

0:30:500:30:55

-Nick?

-Are you ready for this?

-Yes.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah... Oh!

0:30:550:31:00

-Oh.

-Nice.

-Do you like?

-I do, yeah.

-Rather smart, isn't it?

-It is.

0:31:000:31:05

-That's not all.

-No, no.

-Right.

-Ta-dum!

0:31:050:31:08

-Just when you thought it couldn't get any better, we have the stand as well.

-A lot better.

0:31:080:31:13

The tray itself is original George III. The stand is later. It's a Victorian replacement.

0:31:130:31:19

-But the tray is the key. It's original.

-What wood is it?

-Solid mahogany through and through.

0:31:190:31:25

-The big question is how much did you pay?

-I don't like to hold back. I spent the whole £207.

0:31:250:31:31

-What?

-Not a penny left, I'm afraid.

-The whole lot?

-The whole lot, yeah.

0:31:310:31:35

-Did you?

-We blew the budget, I'm afraid.

0:31:350:31:38

-These two carefully garnered the 300 and only spent 97.

-He spent it all!

0:31:380:31:44

-You went straight out there...

-Squandered the lot.

-It is very nice.

-Will we make any money on it?

0:31:440:31:50

-Good question.

-There should be a profit in it, but you never know with these things.

0:31:500:31:55

-I would think 200 to 300.

-There is potentially on a good day another £100 in this,

0:31:550:32:01

which is where it gets interesting and where it will be a mighty difficult decision

0:32:010:32:06

for you lot to have to make in a minute,

0:32:060:32:09

but right now, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Nick Hall's investment.

0:32:090:32:14

Well, look at this, Mark,

0:32:150:32:17

a really honest piece of Georgian mahogany.

0:32:170:32:20

It is. Very nice. It's nice to see an honest piece, actually.

0:32:200:32:24

It just makes a jolly good drinks table. Oh, yes.

0:32:240:32:27

And it comes complete with a stand, look, on which the thing, hopefully, neatly sits.

0:32:270:32:34

Yeah, look at that. Just the job. Do you fancy it?

0:32:340:32:37

I like it. Good shape, good colour.

0:32:370:32:40

What Nick's done is he's gone out and he has seriously blown a huge hole through the budget.

0:32:400:32:46

I mean, he's torpedoed the budget, so I want you to think brave.

0:32:460:32:52

150 to 200.

0:32:520:32:54

-£207 he spent.

-Right.

0:32:540:32:57

-Will he get there?

-There's a good chance. I think I've been a bit mean.

0:32:570:33:01

As long as we've got a couple of people here who like it, then...

0:33:010:33:05

-It ought to make £220.

-They should make a profit.

0:33:050:33:09

-OK, brilliant. Anyway, you're taking the sale?

-Yes, I am.

-We're in safe hands.

0:33:090:33:15

-Father-son combo, how is it working out on the nerves stake?

-I've been having to calm him down backstage.

0:33:220:33:28

-Have you?

-Very excitable, Tim.

0:33:280:33:30

I thought I would make a fortune on that scythe.

0:33:300:33:34

That scythe, which you paid £20 for, he has estimated at £30 to £40.

0:33:340:33:38

-Really? I knew it.

-Brilliant.

-I do find that pretty queer.

0:33:380:33:43

-It's French-polished and everything. It's lovely.

-Well, yes.

-I'm with you on that one.

-Anyway, he's done it.

0:33:430:33:49

-If the worst comes to the worst, you've got those copper jugs.

-Lovely jugs.

-Here comes Catherine's box.

0:33:490:33:56

Presentation box, part-fitted and in a leather carrying case.

0:33:560:34:00

And bidding opens me here at £85.

0:34:000:34:04

85. 90. 95. 100.

0:34:040:34:06

110. 120.

0:34:060:34:08

130.

0:34:080:34:11

At 130 here then. At £130 I'm bid. At 130.

0:34:110:34:14

140, new bidding there at 140.

0:34:140:34:16

150. Bid at 150 now. 150. 160 now.

0:34:160:34:18

160. 170. 180? Bid now at 170.

0:34:180:34:22

Shaking his head, it's 170. With the lady at 170. I'll take one more.

0:34:220:34:26

170 I'm bid. At 170. 180, thank you.

0:34:260:34:29

I'll wait for you this time.

0:34:290:34:31

I'm bid then at 180. 190. New bidding at 190. 190.

0:34:310:34:36

Still seated at 190. Gentleman at 190, away at 190...

0:34:360:34:40

-Well done, Catherine. £90.

-£5!

-We're in the money already.

0:34:400:34:45

-In the money already.

-Oh, dear, that was close.

0:34:450:34:48

Small, electro-plated chocolate pot and a cream jug. £10 I'm bid. 12.

0:34:480:34:53

15. 18. 20. 2.

0:34:530:34:55

£22 then. At 22. 5 to bid? At 22 in the room, at 22.

0:34:550:35:00

25, new bidding here. 28. 30. 32...

0:35:000:35:03

-It's worth double that.

-This side then at 32.

0:35:030:35:06

All out on my right at 32 and away at 32...

0:35:060:35:10

£32 is sadly minus 13.

0:35:100:35:15

-Is that all?

-Here comes the scythe.

0:35:150:35:17

A varnished ash handle. What do we say for this then?

0:35:170:35:21

This is it.

0:35:210:35:23

-You tell me. All I can do is start here at £5.

-No. Come on!

0:35:230:35:27

8. 10. 12. 15.

0:35:270:35:30

-18...

-Yes!

-This side then at £18.

0:35:300:35:34

-I'm bid at £18.

-It's really cutting edge, this, isn't it?

0:35:340:35:38

At £18 and selling...

0:35:380:35:40

£18 is minus £2. You were minus 8 before.

0:35:400:35:43

-You are minus £10 overall. No shame in that.

-Not a nightmare, is it?

0:35:430:35:47

-What about the jugs?

-We've got to go for the jugs.

-You don't have to.

0:35:470:35:51

-Those jugs are worth £100 at least.

-Well, no...

0:35:510:35:55

-Terry...

-Where does he get all these prices from?

0:35:550:35:59

-On the basis that everything else has struggled.

-Steady him down.

0:35:590:36:03

-How much did we get them for?

-£40.

0:36:030:36:05

They're worth at least £100. That's £60. We'll still make about 30, 40 quid.

0:36:050:36:10

-We're only here once. We might as well.

-I beg your pardon?

-We're only here once.

-On this Earth?

0:36:100:36:16

-We're going to live like lions.

-Are you sure?

-A pair of jugs like that?

0:36:160:36:20

-I know, but everything else has been a real struggle. Are you sure?

-Yeah, go for it.

0:36:200:36:26

-Terry is determined.

-I'm with him for once.

0:36:260:36:29

This is lovely. I love it when they're welded up from the hip.

0:36:290:36:33

Two lions going to the slaughter.

0:36:330:36:35

-Talk about the Christians! Here we go then. That's a decision?

-You're with me?

-Yeah.

0:36:350:36:40

-Are you doing it?

-Yes.

-We're going with the bonus buy. Here they come.

0:36:400:36:45

Cunard White Star Line, a pair of copper jugs.

0:36:450:36:49

-And bidding opens at £20. The pair of these at £20.

-Come on.

0:36:490:36:53

22. 25. 28. 30. 32. 35. 38...

0:36:530:36:56

-It's flying.

-42. 45.

-Look at this!

0:36:560:36:59

48 here.

0:36:590:37:01

-With the lady at 48. I'll take 50.

-Go on.

0:37:010:37:04

It's 48 here. Are you bidding? I'll wait all day.

0:37:040:37:08

At 48 and away at 48...

0:37:080:37:10

-That's brilliant. Good girl. That is plus £8.

-£8.

0:37:110:37:15

-How much did we win?

-You are minus £2.

0:37:150:37:18

Which is only £1 each.

0:37:180:37:20

I thought you knew something about antiques!

0:37:200:37:24

-That was a bit of a roller-coaster.

-That could be a winning score, so mum's the word for these Blues.

0:37:240:37:30

-No, I won't say a word.

-Go out looking rather depressed.

0:37:300:37:34

-Shouldn't be difficult for you, Terry.

-Shouldn't be difficult.

0:37:340:37:38

-So, Blues, do you know how the Reds got on?

-No.

-We don't want you to know.

0:37:450:37:49

-How are you feeling?

-Good.

-Feeling nervy?

-Nervous now.

-Looking forward to it.

0:37:490:37:54

You got some pretty good estimates, I have to say, on your £93-worth.

0:37:540:37:59

He is predicting a profit on every single item that you bought, which is lovely.

0:37:590:38:04

Anyway, first lot up is the Italian studio glass whatnot and here it comes.

0:38:040:38:09

Italian studio glass ornament. Bidding opens here at £22.

0:38:090:38:13

22 for the Italian glass here. At £22. 25. 28. Here at 28.

0:38:130:38:17

£30. Bid in the room at 30. I'm bid at 30.

0:38:170:38:20

£30. I thought this would make more, but £30 bid.

0:38:200:38:24

It's in the room at 30 and I have to sell here. At £30...

0:38:240:38:28

Well done. You made a £5 profit on that.

0:38:280:38:32

-Good start.

-Yeah.

-Next is the completely opposite end of the scale.

0:38:320:38:37

Staffordshire printware pickle dish, early 19th century.

0:38:370:38:41

Leaf-moulded form. And £18 opens the bidding.

0:38:410:38:44

£18. I'm bid at 18. 20. 22.

0:38:440:38:47

-25. This side then at 25.

-Come on.

-28 I'll take. 25 I'm bid.

0:38:470:38:53

On my right at 25 and selling to the room at 25...

0:38:530:38:57

Good Lord! £25 is minus £3. This is nail-biting, this is.

0:38:570:39:02

You are plus 2 at this moment. Now the chess set.

0:39:020:39:05

An Edwardian Staunton-pattern chess set.

0:39:050:39:08

What shall we say for this? £50, is it? £18 bid then.

0:39:080:39:12

20. 22. 25.

0:39:120:39:14

28. 30. 32.

0:39:140:39:17

-35. 38.

-Come on.

-40.

0:39:170:39:20

42. 45.

0:39:200:39:22

Standing then at 45.

0:39:220:39:25

Anyone else bidding? Right in the middle at £45...

0:39:250:39:28

£45, that's very good. That's plus 5.

0:39:300:39:33

God, he's sharp, this man.

0:39:330:39:36

Overall, it is plus £7.

0:39:360:39:38

-Hey, we're in profit.

-Listen, seriously, this could be a winning score, couldn't it? Yeah?

0:39:380:39:45

-It could be, yeah.

-It's very nice to have plus £7.

0:39:450:39:48

What are we going to do about the bonus buy, all £207-worth of it?

0:39:480:39:53

-I don't think we should go for it.

-Don't you?

-No.

-Wise words. Listen to him.

0:39:530:39:58

-Just walk away.

-Really?

-You've got a profit.

-Don't you chip in now.

0:39:580:40:02

Let Dee make her own mind up.

0:40:020:40:05

-Just her and the boy.

-I'll go with you both and stick with what we've got.

-Are you sure about this, Dee?

0:40:050:40:11

-Do you want to go for it?

-You only get one crack at this, you know.

0:40:110:40:15

It's got a lovely folding stand.

0:40:150:40:17

It's only £7, isn't it?

0:40:170:40:19

-Go on then.

-No, we'll go with it.

0:40:190:40:22

-You're going to go with it?

-We're going to go with it.

0:40:220:40:26

-You want to go with the bonus buy?

-Yes.

-You do.

-Really? Seriously?

0:40:260:40:30

It seems to me we've gone all round the houses here, one way or the other.

0:40:300:40:35

-You make the final decision.

-You've got to make your mind up.

-Go with it.

-Stick.

-Stick.

0:40:350:40:40

-Which is it?

-We'll stick.

-Stick.

-We're not going with the bonus buy.

0:40:400:40:44

You're not going with the bonus buy. That is a decision now. Anyway, here it comes.

0:40:440:40:50

George III mahogany butler's tray and a folding stand.

0:40:500:40:54

And lots of bids on the book here. 100. 110. 120. 130. 140. 150.

0:40:540:40:58

160. With me here at 160 now. At 160. 160.

0:40:580:41:03

170 do I see? 160 bid and selling on the book here at £160...

0:41:030:41:08

-Yes!

-£160. That is minus £47.

-Sorry.

-No, you did the right thing.

0:41:090:41:14

Eventually, you guys made exactly the right decision

0:41:140:41:18

and therefore, I congratulate you. That's really good.

0:41:180:41:22

-Now, you have £7 to go home with, all right?

-Yeah.

0:41:220:41:25

-Just don't tell the Reds a thing.

-No.

-Cos that could be a winning score.

0:41:250:41:30

Well, what fun we've had today! Absolutely superb.

0:41:360:41:40

-Now, have you been chatting at all?

-No.

-No.

-No.

0:41:400:41:43

So results are still secret between the two teams.

0:41:430:41:47

Well, I can reveal that the scores are remarkably low today.

0:41:470:41:52

Both teams are in single digits.

0:41:530:41:56

Just one of those single digits has a minus sign in front of it and that's for the Reds.

0:41:560:42:03

-Sorry about that.

-That's it, Dan.

0:42:040:42:07

Minus £2 is your score today

0:42:070:42:10

which normally on Bargain Hunt would be a winning score,

0:42:100:42:15

but it ain't good enough today.

0:42:150:42:17

-Have you had a nice time?

-Fantastic day.

-Danny?

-It's been great fun.

-We've loved having you on the show.

0:42:170:42:23

Well done, Catherine. But the victors today are actually going to go home with money - £7.

0:42:230:42:30

And you managed to keep it secret too, Dee, which is really very nice.

0:42:300:42:34

You didn't go with the butler's tray which was a very wise move and you preserved your £7 profit.

0:42:340:42:40

-You've had a good time?

-Smashing.

-And you, Neil?

-Brilliant.

-You want to come back for more?

-Definitely.

0:42:400:42:46

-Well done, Nick. Thank you very much. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

-Yes!

0:42:460:42:52

Subtitles by Subtext for Red Bee Media Ltd 2011

0:43:080:43:12

Email [email protected]

0:43:120:43:15

Bargain Hunt travels to Stamford in Lincolnshire, where Catherine Southon gets in a pickle trying to get her team to buy something. Nick Hall's team breeze through their shop and buy a pickle 'dish'. Tim Wonnacott explores a musical gem at Arley Hall in Cheshire.