Kedleston 1 Bargain Hunt


Kedleston 1

Antiques challenge. Mark Stacey and Jonathan Pratt lead two teams into battle at Kedleston Hall. Tim Wonnacott is spoiled for choice at the Fitzwilliam Museum.


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Transcript


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Ah, there you are!

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Ready for 45 minutes of fun and frolics with a smile on your face?

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No?

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Well, I'll put a smile on it for you! There you go!

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There you are!

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That looks better. Let's go Bargain Hunting!

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We're at Kedleston Hall in Derbyshire.

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The location might be stately, but the atmosphere is carnival!

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Mark Stacey gives us the laughs.

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I would have thought we're probably nearer 40 quid with this.

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Jonathan Pratt gives us the music.

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TUNELESS GROAN

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Maybe not!

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As always, the shop might overrun...

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-You've got 12 minutes left.

-Oh, no!

-That's all. 12 minutes.

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Oh, no! Seven minutes!

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Let's hope it's worth it!

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-Oh, yes!

-Yes, yes, yes!

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£105.

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Yes, get in there!

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You've heard the rules so many times in the past, I'll get through them as quickly as possible.

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Each team gets £300. They have one hour on the clock.

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They have to buy three items.

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Ooh, bit of a rush of blood to the head there!

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Let's meet today's teams.

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And here we all here. Patience, where did you and Anne meet?

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We met at a church 40 years ago!

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-You go off and sing in churches?

-We used to belong to the same choir.

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-Do you still sing?

-Not so much!

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What's funny about that?

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She's too busy renovating the barn.

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But one thing you are, Patience, is a practising Christian.

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-Yes.

-But you do have some oddball prayers!

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I do. I believe God believes in the little things in our life as well as the bigger things.

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So I pray for things like parking spaces and the weather.

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The sun's coming out today now.

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-Yeah.

-I find that whenever I go shopping, I'll pray for a parking space.

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Will this be the case on Bargain Hunt today? Are we beaming up a few?

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We've been very careful not to pray to win cos we didn't think that would be fair.

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-That's absolutely right.

-Yes.

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We can't have any external influences on us.

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-Anne, you're the wife of a former pastor?

-Yes.

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-And you were also a missionary?

-That's right.

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A lot of years now, we went off to Jamaica.

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And we built a church out there. Helped build a church for the people who were meeting in a little shop.

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-Right.

-That church is still standing. It's been through a few hurricanes.

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-When the village goes down, it's the only church still standing.

-Marvellous.

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-A testament to your building skills.

-A testament to God's building skills.

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-What do you collect, Anne?

-I collect thimbles.

-Do you?

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I have about 200 on show in my lounge.

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Not buying any thimbles today, I hope?

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-No, not today.

-Just resist, darling.

-Yes. I'll try to resist.

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On that happy note, we'll move on. Lovely. Thank you, girls.

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-Blues, you're lifelong friends.

-Yes.

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You've therefore known each other all your lives.

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-No, only for 36 years. We're older than that.

-A small slice of your life!

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We met taking the children to school.

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-Brenda, you're retired now?

-That's right.

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-What did you used to get up to?

-What did I used to get up to?

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I used to work. But now I do enjoy walking.

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-I took up Nordic walking a few months ago.

-Is that the one where you take your kit off?

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No. Unfortunately, no, Tim.

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-It's poles.

-That's Swedish walking, is it?

-No, get the Nordic bit right!

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But what it does is to remove your Bar Mitzvah wings.

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-Your dinner lady wings.

-Dinner lady wings.

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That sounds nice. Susan, you also are a collector.

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-Yes, I am.

-But it's not the most expensive of hobbies, is it?

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No. When I was younger, as a child, I used to collect spoons.

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-Spoons.

-But now I like to collect blue and white.

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Do you? Have you got a houseful?

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I have a houseful and a garage-full!

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-Have you ever found any bargains?

-Yes, I found two cranberry dishes in a stand.

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I paid five pence for it at a school fete.

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-That might be worth £100, mightn't it?

-It could be, yes.

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We're talking experience here. It's code for experienced buying.

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On that happy note, I'm going to give you £300.

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You know the rules. Your experts await.

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Off you go, and very, very good luck!

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Right. We've got Nordic walking and thimbles today.

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Lovely!

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Spotting a bargain for the girls today

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are Mark Stacey...

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It's got the Queen's head on it.

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..and Jonathan Pratt.

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The marks are completely obliterated.

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-Before the rain starts, what's our strategy? What are you after?

-Something quirky.

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-You've got me.

-I'd like silver.

-We've got you.

-Silver's a good idea.

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I'd like some blue and white.

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-Right.

-Some Poole pottery.

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-You've got a limited budget.

-I know, but we ought to spend it all.

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It's all done in mahogany. It's a 19th-century box.

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It was 15. I'll let you have it for 12.

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Thank you.

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Ten.

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Don't squeeze the dealers too hard, ladies.

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I've got one of those at home. You can have it for six.

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-It's ten.

-Nine.

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Now, Patience and Anne. What's that?

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Let's have a decent look at this now.

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First of all, the inlay.

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There's nothing much wrong with that, is there?

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-Just that bit of age.

-That's the age. Things expand and contract.

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I like these little age cracks

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because that shows it's authentic and right.

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This, of course, has been replaced. And the matching cartouche there.

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But all the little inlay around it is in good condition.

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What kind of wood is it, Mark?

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The main veneer is walnut.

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It's a lovely wood. When it's polished the grain comes up.

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-I really like the shape.

-It's a lovely shape.

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£35 is not a bad price.

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If we open it up, we've got this nice fitted interior.

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This, of course, would have been leather on here.

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This has all been replaced. There's veneer missing there but that isn't a problem.

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I think it's slightly unusual with this fitted interior

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-where you press this here, and then you lift...

-Oh, look.

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It brings it forward and stops it coming out.

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Then you can take your envelopes out. Lavender-scented, of course!

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But this is for doing up.

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And at auction, what people are looking for is things that look like they've just come out of a cottage.

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This looks like it's come from a deceased's estate.

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Now if we could get this for 30 quid, or 25 quid,

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I think that's a good bargain.

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Time to start negotiating, girls.

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-My girls like round figures.

-Round figures? Shall we say 40, then?

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You couldn't possibly do it at 30 for us, could you?

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-Of course he can! For cash.

-Go on, you can have it for 30 quid.

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-Thank you very much!

-Shake his hand.

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Thank you!

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That's a good start, reds. Can Brenda and Susan get on the score sheet with as little trouble?

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Jonathan, is this bone?

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"Sam Swinburn 1874". That's a sign of bone, not ivory?

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Yes, because it's tubular growth. So you can see these little spots.

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Bone. What do you think of that?

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It's a piece of scrimshaw.

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It would be great to think it was early 19th-century, if we wanted a fortune.

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-I'm not sure whether it's something...

-It says 1874 on there.

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The problem is it's a very grey area. There are lots of fakes of this.

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£30 on that.

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-That's quite good, actually.

-It's a decorative item.

-£30 is quite fun, isn't it?

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-If you like it...

-I'll hand that back to you.

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It has a use. It's a paper knife. People call them page-turners, the longer blade ones.

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It has that function. It's for when you've got your books out which you don't want to get your fingers on,

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-you turn the pages so you can protect the paper.

-30 is my best.

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-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

-You've got that twinkle in your eye.

-No, I haven't!

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You have. I can see it there.

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Oh, I don't know. Can we come back and see if we can have it for 27.50?

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You can come back, but it'll still be 30!

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OK, we'll see. OK, can we move along then?

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You can do what you like, Brenda!

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Yes, she's trying to get £2.50 off. Very funny.

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They're not afraid of making a decision, even though it takes them ten minutes to do it!

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I think it's a nice object. But you found it. It's not a lot of money.

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There's a chance, and I'd be very happy to walk away with one purchase being made.

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I'd say, if you're happy with it, go for it. That's all I can say.

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-Make a decision.

-Make a decision.

-I'll make a decision.

-The clock is ticking.

-OK, we'll have this one.

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Jonathan's right, girls. Time's a-ticking!

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And so is something else.

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So you're in the countryside, strolling around, minding your own business

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and you come across a galvanised tin box,

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and you think to yourself, "It's ticking, this box!"

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You might be tempted to open it up and fiddle around.

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Don't be!

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Because on this side of the tin cover,

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it says D-A-N-G-E-R.

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You've got it - "Danger"!

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Anyway, let's be naughty, shall we?

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We'll have a look inside and see what's going on.

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What we've got is a very crude clockwork mechanism

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with a built-in winding key

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that winds a valve that's regulated by this top-hung pendulum,

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which is making the tick, tick, tock.

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The idea being that you would load this separate chamber with 12-bore cartridges

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and as the clockwork motor works,

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it depresses this arm which raises the bar until it gets to the critical moment

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and then, "Donk!", down comes that bar

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which strikes the 12-bore cartridge through that aperture

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and "Boom!", the thing goes bang.

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The idea being the farmer would pitch up in the morning,

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arm it with half a dozen cartridges,

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every 37 minutes, or whatever the timing is,

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it would go boom, and you don't get the pigeons eating the corn.

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Perfect! There is another purpose, indicated by this hole.

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If you had a wood full of pheasants,

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what you wouldn't want is a poacher.

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So you could set this up on one side of a wood

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with a long piece of string coming out of that hole

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which acts as a trip wire so that when the poacher is walking along in the dark,

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he trips over the wire, pulls that cable and that sets off the device,

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alerting the gamekeeper that somebody is in that bit of woodland and he needs to investigate.

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It is, in short, an extraordinary gadget.

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I can see that in a rural bygone sale, this thing being rather collectible.

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So does the dealer. That's why he's asking £165 for it.

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-That's enough to scare a pigeon or two, isn't it?

-GUNSHOT

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Back to the shopping, and the reds have their eye on a chair.

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-Would that sell?

-It will at the right price.

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It's 120. That's a little bit much.

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I would have thought it's probably nearer 40 quid.

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I said I was going to be insulting, didn't I?

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-Do you want to ask him to keep it for us for ten minutes?

-Could you keep it for ten minutes?

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-The first person to give me money owns that chair!

-That's a real dealer.

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Watch out - blue team incoming!

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-Is it a nursing chair?

-Yes, it is.

-A nursing chair.

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What do you think? I don't know whether, but...

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I'm thinking it might be...

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-Needs a shampoo.

-You've got the water. Just needs the shampoo!

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I'm not a great fan of nursing chairs. I've nursed too many children...

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I've done more TV time this morning than you have, on this chair!

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-No way you're getting it for less than 60.

-I bet!

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Hmm. None of our teams will be nursing that chair to a profit.

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-Found everything we need, have you?

-No.

-Why not?

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Because all the little silver things are too cheap.

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-Too cheap?

-Yes.

-Nobody's ever said it's too cheap before!

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-We want something more expensive.

-You've got expensive tastes?

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Can I just remind you again about the time?

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-What about these?

-That's quite modern.

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They're very enthusiastic. One of them talks like there's no tomorrow,

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but then, I've been accused of that. They're great but I'm worried about time.

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Glad you're happy, Mark! What do you think about Brenda and Susan, JP?

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They're seeing everything and trying to muscle the money out on it

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to make a profit.

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Which is fine. I'll leave them to it.

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But I want to go and find something with a bit more substance.

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How about this?

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It's a trombone, yeah.

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HUMS OUT "76 TROMBONES"

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Goodness me! OK, well... I think I need to do some rescuing here!

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Now, they've found some modern glass. But so has someone else.

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-Let the lady do her deal! Carry on. Go on.

-I don't know if I want it now!

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Oh - she's gone!

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And Susan's taking charge.

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It's Ditchfield and it's signed.

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It may be not your field.

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When I buy glass, modern glass, it's always functional glasses and things.

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I tend to avoid the ornaments.

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It's a slightly more collectors' market.

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-But I don't know this Ditchfield.

-Oh, he's quite well known.

-OK.

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I think it will sell very, very well.

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-Bren?

-What?

-£90.

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-If you want it, Sue, buy it.

-Sold!

-You never objected to me having mine.

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Wrap it up well in bubble wrap, please.

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I'm very pleased with that.

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If we head down to the main concourse into the main tent, have a look round.

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-Could do, yeah, cos you did say...

-Fantastic.

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Did I hear a trace of sarcasm there, Jonathan?

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-Napkin rings.

-Napkin rings.

-They're really pretty.

-They are pretty.

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-Quite heavy, too.

-Quite a bit of weight there.

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The first thing that strikes me is the quality of the engraving.

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The scrolls are lovely, aren't they?

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-Beautiful.

-And there's nothing in there.

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The other nice thing is the hallmark itself.

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It's Chester. Chester closed down about 50 years ago.

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So it doesn't hallmark any more. There are specific collectors for Chester hallmarks.

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The price goes with the weight. £75. We need to get that down a bit.

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-Have you had a chat already or not?

-A little chat.

-A little chat.

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-Yes. What little chat have you had?

-This wonderful gentleman here

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said that he bought them for 50 and he'd give them to us for 55.

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-You believe this lovely gentleman?

-Well, he looked so honest!

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I think he does look honest, actually.

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Your eyes seem to be telling me something.

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-I like them.

-We like those.

-So you're going to have a punt on them?

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-I think so.

-I use silver napkin rings at home sometimes.

-I use them all the time.

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It's something useful and people will use it.

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-Have you made an executive decision?

-We have.

-Yes.

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-We'd like them, please.

-I've got no say.

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-Please may we? Please, sir?

-Of course!

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Tell you what, weren't they nice people?

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-They were nice.

-Really helpful. We could have been there all day.

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But I've got to bring you back down to earth.

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-You can slap me later.

-Oh, no.

-We've got 12 minutes left.

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-Oh, no!

-That's all we've got. 12 minutes.

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Come on, I want a Benny Hill run!

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As one team leaves the big tent...

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That one or that one?

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..another one arrives.

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£80 for a little bowl? I wouldn't get my peanuts in it!

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I've seen something at the other end. It's £20. I'll show it to you.

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You're going to hate it, but I'd be surprised if you lose money on it.

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-OK, then.

-We've got seven minutes.

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-We've got plenty of time.

-We've got seven minutes!

-Plenty of time.

-No! Seven minutes! Walk this way.

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He said, "Walk this way!"

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-You don't mind us having a look?

-No.

-Thank you so much.

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-That's silver plated. Lovely body.

-It is.

-Mmm.

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You know, it's nicely engraved with this design.

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And it's free cos it's got no price on it!

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-It's free!

-And the handle's nice as well.

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-How much is it?

-It's 200.

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200!

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-It is silver.

-Oh, it is silver?

-It's silver?

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-Put it back up.

-Oh, I'm so sorry.

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Oh, yes, it says something sterling.

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-Something and Co. Sterling.

-I do like it.

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Which means it's 925, the equivalent of British standard silver.

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What would it sell for in auction?

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Obviously people like an English hallmark. But it is sterling silver.

0:19:300:19:34

I love the body. It's very late Victorian in style.

0:19:340:19:37

I would have thought they'd put 150 to 200 on it.

0:19:370:19:41

Would you still make a profit on it if we had it at 150?

0:19:410:19:45

No!

0:19:450:19:46

170 cash?

0:19:460:19:48

I think we've got a chance with it.

0:19:500:19:52

Please? Pretty please?

0:19:520:19:55

-Please, sir!

-We'll both give you a hug.

0:19:550:19:57

Then he might put the price up!

0:19:570:19:59

You rotter, Mark! But at least you're done!

0:20:010:20:04

Come along, Jonathan. The fair's packing up!

0:20:040:20:07

I'll show you something else. If you don't like it, we're scuppered.

0:20:110:20:15

We'll have to run somewhere else and we've only got four minutes.

0:20:150:20:18

-Hello!

-While you were looking at something else, I snuck over here

0:20:180:20:22

to have a look and this is what I was looking at.

0:20:220:20:25

-Oh, that's nice.

-That's pretty.

-Little powder jar.

0:20:250:20:29

Cotton wool in the bottom with a little mirror.

0:20:290:20:31

-The piece de resistance...

-Ah!

0:20:310:20:33

Put make-up in there. Little bit like that.

0:20:330:20:36

It's hallmarked for Birmingham about 1920... a, b, c, d, 1923.

0:20:360:20:42

-Nice little object.

-How much is it, please?

0:20:420:20:46

It's £90, ma'am.

0:20:460:20:48

£90. Could you do a little bit better on that?

0:20:490:20:54

-Not an awful lot.

-I'm afraid my purse isn't that full.

0:20:540:20:58

Nor is mine!

0:20:580:20:59

I can do it for 85 for you.

0:20:590:21:02

-We'll take it.

-There we go. Job done. Thank you very much.

0:21:020:21:06

Our teams have spent their £300 on their three items

0:21:100:21:14

at this Jaguar antiques fair.

0:21:140:21:16

The big question is, who's going to make the biggest profit

0:21:160:21:20

and therefore the most bread?

0:21:200:21:22

Patience and Anne bought this Victorian writing box for £30.

0:21:260:21:30

You couldn't do it at 30 for us, could you?

0:21:330:21:36

Both were drawn to a pair of silver napkin rings for 55.

0:21:380:21:42

And Mark spotted the claret jug.

0:21:440:21:46

They paid £170. Wow.

0:21:460:21:50

Hello. You've been up to no good, you lot.

0:21:520:21:55

We've been spending the money!

0:21:550:21:57

Yes. How much did you spend overall? Cos this is a big buy.

0:21:570:22:00

-It is, yes.

-Yes.

-It was £170.

0:22:000:22:05

£170 for that. So overall, how much is your spend?

0:22:050:22:08

255.

0:22:100:22:12

Check. Everybody happy with that?

0:22:120:22:14

-Happy with that.

-I'd like £45 of leftover lolly, please.

0:22:140:22:18

-You don't like doing that.

-Why should I hand it over?

-Very good.

0:22:180:22:22

I'll hand you the £45, Mark. It's quite a responsibility.

0:22:220:22:26

It's quite a nice sum of money. It's not too much or too little.

0:22:260:22:30

-I've no idea what I'm going to spend it on.

-But you never do!

0:22:300:22:33

-I don't!

-How can you until I give it to you and you know the amount.

0:22:330:22:37

Good luck with that, Mark. Lovely to see you girls.

0:22:370:22:40

Meanwhile, why don't we check out how the blues are getting on, eh?

0:22:400:22:44

Brenda and Susan haggled hard to get this bone paper knife for £30.

0:22:470:22:53

Susan was determined to get the Ditchfield paperweight, and she did

0:22:550:22:59

for £90.

0:22:590:23:01

I'm very pleased.

0:23:010:23:03

And their last-minute purchase, Jonathan's powder jar for £85.

0:23:030:23:08

What was the total spend, then?

0:23:140:23:15

-£205.

-That's quite modest. £95 from somewhere.

-If you insist!

0:23:150:23:20

£95, that's very kind. Thank you, Bren.

0:23:200:23:23

I won't count it cos I trust you.

0:23:230:23:25

Straight across to JP.

0:23:250:23:26

Got a plan, Jonathan?

0:23:260:23:29

Uh... I don't know now. I'm exhausted!

0:23:290:23:32

I'll have a lie-down and have a think!

0:23:320:23:35

-Probably.

-Yeah...

-You'll be fine!

0:23:350:23:37

-Are you going to take him off for his lie-down?

-I suppose so. Thank you! Bye!

0:23:370:23:42

Meanwhile, we're heading off somewhere frightfully nice!

0:23:420:23:46

This is Cambridge University's very own museum,

0:23:510:23:55

named after this chap, Viscount Fitzwilliam.

0:23:550:23:59

He not only left a large collection of books and music to the university,

0:24:010:24:05

he also gave them the money to build this place.

0:24:050:24:07

With so much to see, where do I begin?

0:24:100:24:14

Isn't this the most extraordinary gallery?

0:24:190:24:22

I'll tell you, if you had to select two things to talk about

0:24:220:24:26

from the half a million or so objects in the place,

0:24:260:24:31

it ain't that easy!

0:24:310:24:33

But I've struggled away and have come up with these two jokers,

0:24:340:24:39

which do have a common theme.

0:24:390:24:42

That is that they're both plastered in silver.

0:24:420:24:46

Silver that's been gilt and silver that dates from roughly the same period,

0:24:460:24:51

around about 1570 to 1590.

0:24:510:24:56

This particular object which looks like a flagon and, indeed, is a flagon,

0:24:560:25:02

has some ceramic in it.

0:25:020:25:04

It was made in Turkey, in particular in a place called Isnic

0:25:040:25:08

and it's made directly in imitation of the more expensive Chinese porcelains.

0:25:080:25:15

What we've got here are stylised pomegranates,

0:25:150:25:19

and above, trails of foliage and flowers and this ceiling wax red

0:25:190:25:25

is peculiar to Isnic ceramics from the middle of the 16th century.

0:25:250:25:30

So precious was Isnic pottery from this period

0:25:300:25:34

that the silversmith then went on to show off

0:25:340:25:37

by mounting it with these delicious silver-gilt creations.

0:25:370:25:43

And of course, it is a practical object.

0:25:430:25:45

It's still got its hinged cover in working condition.

0:25:450:25:49

You could fill it with wine and use it at a banquet.

0:25:490:25:53

But what exactly you would have used this thing for, I cannot tell you,

0:25:530:26:00

cos it's just the weirdest and maddest creation

0:26:000:26:03

you could possibly imagine.

0:26:030:26:06

What we've got here is a Nautilus shell.

0:26:060:26:10

The shell was regarded as a great rarity.

0:26:100:26:14

Look carefully at the shell and it's been decorated.

0:26:140:26:17

It has scratched on designs showing palatial interiors.

0:26:170:26:23

But it's the silversmith who's gone to town on this thing.

0:26:230:26:26

His absolute imagination has run riot.

0:26:260:26:30

Look, over the top, in more ways than one,

0:26:300:26:33

we've got a crayfish which is clinging on to the top part of the shell.

0:26:330:26:39

On either side of him are a weird snail, crawling along at the back,

0:26:390:26:45

a merman with a wonderful six-pack tummy,

0:26:450:26:49

and the figure beneath that forms the stem is probably Neptune.

0:26:490:26:55

He's riding a mythical sea serpent over the ocean itself.

0:26:550:26:59

Look at the way the silversmith has rippled the surface of the plinth.

0:26:590:27:04

So what might the Tudor aristocrat have used this thing for?

0:27:040:27:10

Perhaps, on high days and holidays,

0:27:100:27:13

he filled it with wine, because you could pass it on a ceremonial occasion, around the table.

0:27:130:27:20

What gorgeous things!

0:27:200:27:22

The big question today is, of course,

0:27:220:27:25

for our teams at the auction, will their cup be overflowing?

0:27:250:27:29

12 at the back. 15. 20.

0:27:320:27:35

Well, it's lovely to be at Bamfords Auction House

0:27:460:27:50

on the outskirts of Derby, barely eight miles from where we did the shopping.

0:27:500:27:55

This is going to be fun!

0:27:550:27:57

-And we've got Annabel Lewis.

-Hello.

-Hello. First up

0:27:570:28:00

for the reds, Patience and Anne,

0:28:000:28:03

they've bought this banded walnut wee box.

0:28:030:28:06

It's not fantastic inside, is it?

0:28:060:28:09

No, it's a little bit tired.

0:28:090:28:11

It has got the rack for stationery. Do you like it?

0:28:110:28:14

It's a fairly standard model.

0:28:140:28:16

-So with the damage to the top, it's OK, but it's just normal.

-Normal.

0:28:160:28:22

What's the "normal" price for it?

0:28:220:28:25

-30 to £50.

-Is it? £30 they paid, so they'll be pleased about that.

-Not too bad.

0:28:250:28:29

Their second item, Annabel, are the two napkin rings.

0:28:290:28:33

-They look very bright and breezy.

-Nice clean lot. Unengraved.

0:28:330:28:37

When silver comes to the sale room, do you like it to come clean?

0:28:370:28:41

We generally leave it, unless it's for the fine art. Just so people know it's been in a drawer.

0:28:410:28:47

Occasionally give it a buff up, but nothing too much, really.

0:28:470:28:51

-What's your estimate on those?

-We did 20 to £40.

0:28:510:28:54

£55 paid. That could be a bit of a disaster, couldn't it?

0:28:540:28:59

Talking about disasters in the making, how do you rate this claret jug?

0:28:590:29:03

Shame it isn't English silver. It's just silver-coloured metal.

0:29:030:29:07

That's the problem. But it's got this lovely cut glass, though.

0:29:070:29:11

That's all pretty good condition.

0:29:110:29:13

It's nice and elegant. It would look good on any table.

0:29:130:29:16

Nice and clean, no chips or anything to it. So 100 to 150.

0:29:160:29:20

OK. 100 to 150. I have to say they paid 170.

0:29:200:29:24

So, what with the napkin rings and the claret jug not being so hot,

0:29:240:29:30

they definitely need their bonus buy. Let's have a look.

0:29:300:29:33

Now, Patience and Anne, you spent a magnificent £255.

0:29:340:29:38

You gave Mark Stacey £45. What did you spend the dosh on?

0:29:380:29:42

I spent it on...

0:29:420:29:44

-Ooh!

-A Royal Crown Derby - as we're in Derby.

-Oh, yes!

0:29:450:29:49

-A cabaret tray, transfer-printed in blue and white.

-Lovely.

0:29:490:29:53

If you're going to sell a piece of Derby, it's good to come to a sale in Derbyshire.

0:29:530:29:58

Strategic thinking, isn't it?

0:29:580:29:59

It might come back to haunt us. But I thought it was rather nice.

0:29:590:30:04

-How old is it?

-It's probably around 1900 or so. It's got a bit of age.

0:30:040:30:11

-And how much did you pay for it?

-Not quite all the money you left me.

0:30:110:30:16

I paid £40 for it.

0:30:160:30:17

-I really, really like the shape.

-There's no chips on it or anything.

0:30:170:30:21

-Good condition.

-Do you think you'll get a profit on it? Or we will?

0:30:210:30:25

You, hopefully! Unfortunately, if I do make a profit, I don't get it!

0:30:250:30:30

Super. OK, girls. Don't decide now. Decide later after the sale of your first three items.

0:30:310:30:37

But for the audience at home, let's find out what the auctioneeress thinks about your tray.

0:30:370:30:43

-So, Annabel, how do you rate that?

-He's thought about where he's selling it,

0:30:450:30:50

but unfortunately, it is missing most of its pieces.

0:30:500:30:54

-So it came with something else?

-It would have had a pot, cream and sugar, originally.

0:30:540:30:59

-Dates to 1901, so nice and early.

-Complete with its entire set, it's worth quite a lot of money.

0:30:590:31:05

-Just as a plain plate...

-50 to £80.

-Is that its value?

0:31:050:31:09

-Mmm.

-Mark will be delighted, cos he only paid £40.

0:31:090:31:12

-Jolly good.

-I can see him having a squiggle of glee at the thought

0:31:120:31:16

of it perhaps bringing 50 to 80. I'll shove it there for now.

0:31:160:31:20

Brilliant. Thank you.

0:31:200:31:21

Now, the blues. Brenda and Susan.

0:31:210:31:24

Their first item is this paper-knife. Or is it a dagger?

0:31:240:31:29

It's a bit of a weird thing, isn't it?

0:31:290:31:32

-It hasn't got a great deal of age.

-So this 1874 business is just nonsense?

0:31:320:31:37

-Absolute nonsense, yes.

-Fair enough. What is your estimate?

0:31:370:31:41

-My estimate is 20 to £30.

-OK. They paid £30. So it's not so far off.

0:31:410:31:45

But you're absolutely right. If that was a 19th-century piece of marine scrimshaw,

0:31:450:31:50

-it would be £400.

-I was thinking six, so...

-400 to £600.

0:31:500:31:55

So for £30 you get the look.

0:31:550:31:58

-But I'm not too sure it's the look I'd want.

-No.

0:31:580:32:00

Anyway, next up, on safer territory,

0:32:000:32:05

-is our Ditchfield and silver-mounted paperweight.

-Uh-huh.

0:32:050:32:09

-That's a pretty standard item, isn't it?

-It is.

0:32:090:32:12

They do well at the sale room. Always very popular with the people who come. Modern,

0:32:120:32:17

but it's a nice thing, really.

0:32:170:32:20

Not a lot to say about it, apart from it's Ditchfield glass.

0:32:200:32:23

-What is your estimate?

-40 to 60.

-OK. £90 paid.

0:32:230:32:27

And their last item is the powder bowl.

0:32:270:32:30

I don't know how many women still have powder bowls on their dressing tables.

0:32:300:32:35

-Not many I know!

-Not many I know!

0:32:350:32:37

Anyway, I suppose you could put bon-bons in it, couldn't you?

0:32:370:32:41

A little sweetie or something.

0:32:410:32:42

You could. The biggest problem with this bowl is that the lid doesn't shut properly. It smiles a lot.

0:32:420:32:48

-What did you call it?

-Smiling.

-Just show us, will you?

0:32:480:32:51

Something's not quite right there. It's probably been dropped and bent back.

0:32:510:32:57

-Somebody has to spend a bit on that.

-Yes. You want it to shut flush.

0:32:570:33:02

Yes. "Smiling"! There's a little term for you!

0:33:020:33:05

So...

0:33:050:33:07

how much for the "smiler"?

0:33:070:33:08

-40 to 60.

-OK. £85 they paid.

0:33:080:33:12

So, based on the estimates, they seem to be well awry here.

0:33:120:33:17

They won't be smiling when they see your estimates!

0:33:170:33:20

Anyway, they'll need their bonus buy, so let's have a look!

0:33:200:33:23

Now, Brenda and Susan,

0:33:230:33:26

you spent a magnificent £205, which is quite splendido.

0:33:260:33:29

And you gave Jonathan Pratt £95 to spend on your bonus buy. Jonathan, did you blow the lot?

0:33:290:33:37

-Ah, he has!

-It's not the sort of thing we were looking at.

-No, we weren't!

0:33:400:33:44

But I saw it on the shelf of a stall and I really liked it.

0:33:440:33:48

I like a bit of hand-made metalware.

0:33:480:33:51

It shouts out Arts and Crafts, late 19th-century.

0:33:510:33:55

It's a nice decorative tray. It might have been a stand for something, I suppose.

0:33:550:34:00

-How much?

-Well, I had £95, didn't I?

0:34:000:34:02

-Yes, £95 you had.

-£95.

-How much did you spend? We can't wait!

0:34:020:34:06

Twelve.

0:34:060:34:08

You were robbed! No, £12, I think that's quite good. Let's have a nose.

0:34:080:34:13

-£12?!

-I think that's quite good. It's not heavy,

0:34:130:34:17

but if you dropped it on your foot, you'd know.

0:34:170:34:20

I think Susan is clearly in love with it(!)

0:34:200:34:23

-Will it make a profit?

-Any profit?

-I reckon we've got a tenner in there.

-You do?

0:34:230:34:27

-Oh, well, then.

-What do you think?

-It's quite nice. I like it.

0:34:270:34:32

-Wait and see.

-That's not the point.

0:34:320:34:35

Don't decide now, cos you decide after the sale of your first three items.

0:34:350:34:39

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks.

0:34:390:34:44

-I think it's rather nice.

-I do actually quite like it. Very stylish.

0:34:450:34:49

A useful thing, as well.

0:34:490:34:51

-Do you think it's Arts and Crafts?

-A little bit later, probably.

0:34:510:34:54

-But it's definitely Arts and Crafts in its look.

-Yes.

0:34:540:34:58

I mean, it says, "Made in England"

0:34:580:35:01

in this little stamp here.

0:35:010:35:03

And there's a registration mark up here.

0:35:030:35:06

-Which is all a bit mass-produced sounding to me.

-Yes.

0:35:060:35:12

It's decorative. How much do you think it's worth?

0:35:120:35:15

-18 to £22.

-18 to 22. That's pretty precise.

0:35:150:35:19

Well, lovely Jonathan Pratt paid £12.

0:35:190:35:22

-Bargain.

-Not too bad, is it?

0:35:220:35:25

-Are you taking our sale today?

-I will be, yes.

0:35:250:35:27

We're in heaven!

0:35:270:35:30

-Patience, how are you feeling?

-A bit nervous. I didn't think I would be, but I am.

0:35:390:35:44

Why?

0:35:440:35:46

I think we spent quite a bit of money on our last item.

0:35:480:35:52

-Your claret jug?

-Yes.

0:35:520:35:54

It is your big ticket, isn't it? That cost you £170.

0:35:540:35:58

Her estimate is 100 to 150 on a good day with the wind up its tail!

0:35:580:36:02

Oh!

0:36:020:36:03

So that's a bit of a stinker, isn't it?

0:36:030:36:06

Anyway, first up is Patience's writing slope. Here it comes.

0:36:060:36:10

751 is the Victorian burr walnut rectangular writing box.

0:36:100:36:15

And five bids on this one and it starts with me at £38.

0:36:150:36:20

38 and 40, is it? 40 in the room.

0:36:200:36:23

38, then, on commissions. 40.

0:36:230:36:26

42. 45.

0:36:260:36:28

45. 48. 48, is it?

0:36:280:36:30

At £45.

0:36:300:36:31

Second row. At 45, are you all done?

0:36:310:36:34

-Well done, £45!

-Yes!

0:36:350:36:37

That is plus 15. Patience, you're in luck.

0:36:370:36:40

Napkin rings. Nice clean pair.

0:36:400:36:43

Chester, 1947. Lovely pair of nick-nack rings.

0:36:430:36:46

£20, please for them. 20. 20 is bid. 22.

0:36:460:36:50

22. 25?

0:36:500:36:52

25. No? 25 behind. 28?

0:36:520:36:55

-28 anywhere? 28? At £25, still cheap.

-A bit more!

0:36:550:36:59

At £25. 28, is it? At 25.

0:36:590:37:02

Uh-oh.

0:37:020:37:04

£25. That is minus £30. Which means that overall you're minus 15.

0:37:040:37:09

Now, it's the claret jug.

0:37:090:37:12

Lovely lot. Marked sterling.

0:37:120:37:14

And we have four bids on this and it starts with me at £130.

0:37:140:37:19

130. 140? 140, is it? 140 in the room anywhere? 140.

0:37:190:37:25

130 on commission.

0:37:250:37:27

140, surely?

0:37:270:37:29

At £130, then, on commission.

0:37:290:37:31

130. That's minus 40

0:37:310:37:33

which is minus £55.

0:37:330:37:35

Minus £55 overall. Oh, dear!

0:37:350:37:39

Oh, dear! Sorry, chickens. What about the bonus buy, then?

0:37:390:37:43

We'll definitely go for it. We really like it. We trust Mark.

0:37:430:37:48

-You want to blame me, don't you?

-No, I don't want to blame you!

0:37:480:37:51

-It's lovely.

-It's a lovely tray and if we'd been there, we'd have said yes.

0:37:510:37:57

-Fantastic.

-We're going with the tray. That's positive.

0:37:570:38:00

And here it comes.

0:38:000:38:01

The Royal Crown Derby porcelain cabaret tray, circa 1900 in date.

0:38:010:38:06

£30, please, for it. 30. £30, is it? Got to be worth £30.

0:38:060:38:11

30, surely? 30 is bid.

0:38:110:38:14

32. 32. 35.

0:38:140:38:16

38 and 40?

0:38:160:38:17

40, surely? 40.

0:38:170:38:20

And two. 42, for you?

0:38:200:38:21

-At £40.

-Go on!

-Two, is it?

0:38:210:38:24

Two, anywhere, please?

0:38:240:38:25

£40 it is, then. To the side, at 40.

0:38:250:38:30

Blast it!

0:38:300:38:31

£40. It might be funny to you,

0:38:320:38:35

but a tragedy for poor Mark!

0:38:350:38:37

You wiped your face. Listen, girls, you're minus £55.

0:38:370:38:40

-That could be a winning score. Don't say a thing to the blues.

-No.

0:38:400:38:44

How are you feeling, girls?

0:38:520:38:55

-All right?

-Fine, yeah.

0:38:550:38:56

-Do you know how the reds got on?

-No.

-No idea.

0:38:560:39:00

That's good. So how do you rate your chances now?

0:39:000:39:03

-Fair to middling.

-Yes.

-Fair to middling.

0:39:030:39:06

-Fair to middling. Are you as optimistic as you were, Susan?

-Yes.

0:39:060:39:10

I think you two girls are gorgeous.

0:39:100:39:13

The first thing up is your letter-opener. Here it comes.

0:39:130:39:17

773 is the bone scrimshaw letter opener.

0:39:170:39:21

And £20 for it? 20. £20 for the letter opener?

0:39:210:39:26

£20, surely. It's got to be worth £20.

0:39:260:39:28

Anybody want it? 20 is bid. Two for it? 22.

0:39:280:39:31

25. 28.

0:39:310:39:32

Surely. 28 to the side. 30. And two.

0:39:320:39:36

-35?

-You're in profit!

0:39:360:39:38

At 32, are you all done?

0:39:380:39:41

-£32 is a profit. Well done, Brenda.

-I didn't wipe my feet!

0:39:410:39:45

You didn't wipe your face, you wiped your feet!

0:39:450:39:48

John Ditchfield. Iridescent glass paperweight.

0:39:480:39:52

Again, three bids on this.

0:39:520:39:54

Start me at £50. 50 for the Ditchfield. And five.

0:39:540:39:57

At 50. Five. 60.

0:39:570:40:00

Five?

0:40:000:40:02

Are you sure? Surely? At £60.

0:40:020:40:04

Still on commission. Five is it, in the room? At 60.

0:40:040:40:07

£60.

0:40:070:40:10

All that rooting didn't do you that much good, did it?

0:40:100:40:12

-Minus 30.

-Disappointed.

-So am I, darling.

0:40:120:40:16

Lot 175, the George V cut powder bowl.

0:40:160:40:19

Birmingham, 1928. Nice little powder bowl.

0:40:190:40:23

And £40 for it? 40, is it? 40's bid. And five.

0:40:230:40:28

45. 50? 55?

0:40:280:40:31

At £50, standing further back.

0:40:310:40:33

Five, is it? At 50. Right at the back.

0:40:330:40:36

At £50. That's another £35 down the old proverbial!

0:40:360:40:42

-£35.

-That was worth the money.

-35. 55. That's £63. Minus 63.

0:40:420:40:48

-Dear, oh, dear!

-The bonus buy is next!

0:40:480:40:52

Your £12 copper tray. What are we doing with the tray, girls?

0:40:520:40:56

-We'll go for it.

-Going with that?

-We have to make a hefty sum on this.

0:40:560:40:59

779 is the Arts and Crafts circular copper dish.

0:40:590:41:04

Quite a good thing. £22 is bid on commission.

0:41:040:41:08

22. 25?

0:41:080:41:10

25 for you? 25.

0:41:100:41:11

28. And 30. 30. And two.

0:41:110:41:14

35. 38.

0:41:140:41:16

40. 40. At £38. 40, is it?

0:41:160:41:20

At £38 are you all done?

0:41:200:41:22

Yes, Jonathan. Well done.

0:41:220:41:24

Finally!

0:41:240:41:26

That is absolutely super.

0:41:280:41:31

That means you are minus £37 there.

0:41:310:41:35

That could be a winning score, girls.

0:41:350:41:37

Could be a winning score. Don't tell those reds anything.

0:41:370:41:41

-Chaps, have you been talking to one another?

-No!

-Not about the score, anyway.

0:41:500:41:54

-We've been talking.

-It's such a friendly programme, Bargain Hunt.

0:41:540:41:58

Remarkable. Even in glory and defeat,

0:41:580:42:01

everybody remains remarkably perky.

0:42:010:42:03

Today has been a particularly defeatist day, I have to say!

0:42:030:42:07

On Bargain Hunt, we don't have losers, we just have runners-up.

0:42:070:42:11

And the runners-up with a score of minus 55 are the reds!

0:42:110:42:15

What to say!

0:42:180:42:21

Patience, despite your brilliant profit of £15 on your writing box,

0:42:210:42:25

which was beezer,

0:42:250:42:26

not a lot else went in your favour, did it?

0:42:260:42:29

You've been a great team, but you're runners-up.

0:42:290:42:32

The winners today, who win by only losing £37,

0:42:320:42:37

as opposed to the £55 which you lost,

0:42:370:42:39

are declared the winners. How do you feel?

0:42:390:42:42

-Great!

-Great!

-Is that good?

-I predicted it!

-We can hold our heads up.

0:42:420:42:46

You predicted it, Susan. Well done.

0:42:460:42:49

But you could not have predicted the profit contributed by the bonus buy!

0:42:490:42:53

She didn't! I predicted that, Jonathan. I predicted that!

0:42:530:42:56

Top score of the day. Well done, Jonathan.

0:42:560:42:59

-We had a great day. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

-Yes!

0:42:590:43:04

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:240:43:28

At Kedleston Hall, the contestants, accompanied by experts Mark Stacey and Jonathan Pratt, negotiate to get the best bargains. It is a hard fought battle of wills, but all is revealed at auction. Tim Wonnacott is spoiled for choice at the Fitzwilliam Museum.


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