Lewes 8 Bargain Hunt


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Lewes 8

Tim Wonnacott explores the Oriental delights of the Prince Regent's Brighton Pavilion. The red team find it hard to make choices, whilst the blue team just want to have fun.


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Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello, there. Just getting my bearings,

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because today's bargain hunters could be doing their hunting

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in an arcade up there. They could be going in here,

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or they could be down there! How confusing's that?

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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We're in Lewes today,

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where our contestants have £300 and one hour

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to find three bargains.

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But wherever our teams happen to go, will they be heading for trouble?

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Coming up, Catherine Southon struggles

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to get on the Red Team's wavelength.

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-Nice.

-That's quite spooky. SHE MAKES EERIE MOANING SOUND

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Not for me. Screams "Kinder Egg", to be quite honest.

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And Thomas Plant's team don't quite get the hang of teamwork.

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-If it goes wrong, it's all your fault.

-Exactly.

-That's a good way of looking at it.

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Let's have a look here.

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I'm just going in the corner to cry.

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-Hello, everyone.

-Hello.

-Lovely to see you.

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Now, John, you share a couple of passions with your nipper, Craig.

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What's the first passion you share?

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The first one is that we're both very keen Chelsea supporters.

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I've been supporting Chelsea for 40 years,

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and Craig comes with me on a regular basis,

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and we've been going for a long, long time.

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-It's fun, isn't it?

-Excellent fun.

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-The team is the team after all.

-Have a few drinks up there, as well.

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-Never hurts.

-And what's your second passion?

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We're both keen ghost-hunters, Tim.

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I'm quite sceptic, to be honest, but it's more a jolly boys' outing.

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But it's good fun, and when you're put in a dungeon at 4:00 AM

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on your own, and you don't believe in any of it,

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and you start to hear bangs and noises and knockings,

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it's, um... It can test the old scruples a bit.

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Yeah, I bet it does! But you do it deliberately to get scared,

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-don't you?

-That's what it is, just to prove that you're man enough,

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-and it's a load of rubbish.

-But we have a bellyful of beer, though.

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-That's half the story.

-It comes to drink again!

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-It does. Unfortunately it does.

-Have you ever been spooked?

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One time we was in Chillingham Castle up in Northumberland,

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and we had a dictaphone set on record,

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and all of a sudden it, like, got really, really, really ice cold,

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and it was quite spooky. There was a couple of taps

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and knocks and stuff, and it was really quite freaky.

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But it is true, then? You do believe?

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Well, sort of sceptic, to be honest,

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but that's always going to stick in my mind, that night.

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John, you're currently undergoing a bit of a modern professional stance.

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-What are you up to?

-I look after my two younger children

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from my second marriage, who are six and 12.

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My wife works full-time. They're growing up now,

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so it'll be back to painting and decorating soon.

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Would you prefer hanging wallpaper or looking after the little kids?

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Hanging wallpaper. TIM LAUGHS

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That's the honest answer to it, isn't it, actually?

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-And what do you get up to, Craig?

-I'm a self-employed electrician.

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-Oh, are you?

-Yeah.

-So you and your dad have got it covered,

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with you doing the sparks and him decorating?

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Yeah. We've worked before, haven't we?

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-We have worked together.

-A lot of paint flew about.

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Well, very, very good luck today. Now for the girls.

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-Tina, how did you two girls meet?

-We both met at work

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about three years ago, working for a very interesting financial company

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in the city.

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So you're producing information in a special way

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that's assimilated by the banking and investment industry.

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They make decisions based on that and they use the information.

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It's no more interesting than that, I'm afraid!

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-There's got to be something going on with it.

-The pay?

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-THEY LAUGH

-Oh, would it? Yes.

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But we almost lost you in the financial hierarchy,

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because you wanted to be on the stage.

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I've always wanted to be on the stage, since I was like that.

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-Yeah.

-And in my, um, middle years, I had a bit of a mid-life crisis

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-and decided to have a go at it.

-What did you do?

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Went to acting school for a couple of years,

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part-time, and worked full-time,

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and then went off and did a few bits and pieces, and...

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-Did you get anywhere with it?

-I decided it was too hard work!

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Now, Babs, your passion is not of the four-wheeled kind

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-but the two-wheeled kind, isn't it?

-That's right, yes.

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I have a Harley at home, a little 883 custom

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with various accessories on it, so it's quite blingy.

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-Is it?

-Quite chromey and quite shiny.

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And I do a lot of travelling in the UK on that,

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but then we also have a Goldwing at home.

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The thing that looks as if it's got two armchairs on the back.

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Exactly. And it's got a CD player in the back,

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and you plug the intercom in and you can chat to each other.

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So, Tina, how do you think you girls will get on as a team?

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-Barbara's going to be the sensible one.

-Yes.

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-Barbara's got the eye.

-Has she?

-Yeah. And she likes painting and art.

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Yeah. You've got the gift of the gab.

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Kind or. Or not. THEY LAUGH

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-You'll be in charge of marketing.

-I'll do the negotiations, possibly.

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-We're going to have some fun.

-There's a flaw in my plan.

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There is indeed. Now the money moment - there's your £300 apiece.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. And off you go!

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And very, very, very good luck. Wow!

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Right! Let's get down to business.

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-What will we do?

-Quirky.

-Something nice.

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-You up for this, girls?

-Definitely.

-Yeah?

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-Going to spend lots of money?

-Hopefully not.

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-In there?

-That's for me.

-Come on! In, in!

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-It's beautiful, isn't it?

-Yeah. I just looked at the price.

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Little Art Nouveau box with a Ruskin mount to it.

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-Circa 1910.

-I can't see any marks. Would it be marked?

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It actually lifts off completely.

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What's nice is you've got this revealed strap-work decoration.

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You see the way they've revealed the way it's been made?

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It's a real Arts and Crafts trait,

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very diagnostic of that period.

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Um, with very stylised floral top,

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inset with Ruskin mount.

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What's lovely again is that the copper hasn't been cleaned,

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therefore it's still got that good patination to it.

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-95, it is.

-That's a lot.

-I have a figure in mind

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which I feel it should be purchased for.

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OK!

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-Hi.

-What would be the best price on that?

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Um, 95... Would normally be 85 for trade,

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-but 75 for the bargain hunters.

-What about 65?

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That's a little bit tight. I think...

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-Go on!

-68?

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70. I'd say 70.

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68?

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-It's just a couple of pound off.

-OK.

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-Does that sound about right?

-That's not bad.

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You got a chance there. It's a £60 to £80 box.

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-Well done. Five minutes into shopping -

-Well done!

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-There you go.

-If it goes wrong, it's all your fault.

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-Exactly.

-That's a good way of looking at it, isn't it?

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'I was about to say, "Nice teamwork, Tina!"

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'Anyway, that's mighty quick work, girls.'

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Nice!

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Nothing that's getting you excited, boys?

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-Not at the moment.

-Not really.

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'Some people are just hard to please.'

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-Oh!

-THEY LAUGH

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Over my dead body are you buying that.

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-What about a dog's head?

-Hmm...

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-Nice.

-That's quite spooky. SHE MAKES EERIE MOANING SOUND

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'She's lost it, folks.'

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That's quirky!

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Not for me.

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OK, really interesting.

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William De Morgan, an Arts and Crafts potter.

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This tile here is a copy of a very famous De Morgan tile.

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-Oh, right.

-This is an original tile.

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This is a copy of a tile.

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So therefore, at £110,

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it's not worth even dealing with.

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-This one here, at 280, World's End Pottery...

-280!

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It's a lot of money for a tile, but it is De Morgan.

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-So it's the real thing.

-It is the real McCoy,

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and a popular collection.

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You have got a bit of a damage there,

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there and there.

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If it was in perfect condition, it's a £300 to £500 tile.

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-Wow!

-The other tile you looked at...

-It's more modern?

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No. This is a correct tile from the period.

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It's slightly later in date. This is Art Nouveau, British Art Nouveau,

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so more restrained. This is 1860s, 1870s.

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This is 1910.

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You can see the change immediately in the British Arts and Crafts.

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You've got an interesting history here of these things.

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-Well done!

-If we got a really good deal on that,

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-it's worth going...

-What would be a good deal?

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Well, I mean, a really good deal is £180.

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OK. Do you want to take the lead on that one?

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-I'll ask.

-OK.

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'The girls like beauty. The boys like creepy.'

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-What do you think of this?

-Um...

-It's a brooch, I take it. Yeah?

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Yeah. A lady's brooch. Not an awful lot, to be honest.

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I don't think it's particularly fine.

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It's not the best quality.

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-What do you think, Craig?

-Screams "Kinder Egg" to me.

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Looks like it's out of a cracker, yeah?

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I don't think that's...

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'If that was in my Christmas cracker, I'd send it back.'

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We've had 20 minutes? No!

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'Boys, you need to get your skates on.

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'How's the negotiation, Thomas?'

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-What's the deal?

-£200 is OK.

-Oh, really?

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-Yeah.

-Oh, that's very sweet. It is a good discount.

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-Oh, look who we've got.

-You should do it.

-You reckon?

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There's no point in life without taking a risk.

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-We're being nobbled. We're being nobbled!

-Hello!

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I'm being cheeky and seeing what you're buying.

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What do you think we're buying out of these two?

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-That's the nicer one.

-That's the one we're buying.

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-That's much better.

-That's horrible. We don't like that at all.

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-Is he telling you that one?

-Yeah.

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Is that the one we put aside earlier?

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-Oh, yeah. We've reserved that one!

-Off you...

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Off my patch!

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'Come on, teams! Concentrate on your own shopping.'

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-What do you want to do?

-Let's go for it.

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-£200...

-You're worried, aren't you?

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-We've got how much left?

-£32.

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32 quid left, and you've got a bonus buy to buy out of that.

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Yeah. You know, it doesn't matter. You could buy something for a fiver.

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You could buy something for £30 and leave me two.

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-I don't care.

-You could buy a new tie.

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-What is wrong with this tie?

-THEY LAUGH

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'Do you really have to ask?'

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'Now, John, Craig, there must be something you like in here.'

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That's a nicer spider. I prefer that one.

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People don't often wear these brooches. That's the problem.

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'Now, viewers, a word in your shell-likes.'

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How are you on conchology?

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Good? Well, marvellous!

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You can help me identify some of these shells I've found.

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What do you think about this fella?

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Just look at the colour!

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It's got that salmon-pink ground to it.

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It's a sort of shell from an exotic location.

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This one, pretty similar look,

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but with these scridgy-type lines on,

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and this fellow, he's got a bad attack of acne.

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Serious black and brown splodges all over his knobbly carcase.

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Now, all I've done is to come to Lewes

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to discover these three shells.

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It's cost me about £6.50.

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But just look what you can do with these shells,

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or at least what they did with them in the old days.

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Here we've got a perfectly straightforward little clam

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that some Victorian mother has stuffed with a piece of velvet

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to make it into an attractive little pincushion.

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Cost? £3 here in the market.

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And just look at the next little baby. See?

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It's a curlicue shell, and you've got a little handle on the side,

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and if I pull on the end,

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it reveals a gorgeous purple tape measure,

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and similarly we've got another bit of purple velvet

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to complete the pincushion effect.

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Cost? £6.

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And the last one is, I think, very special.

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Have you ever seen such a gorgeous thing?

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This fellow, £10.

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Look at that lot!

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A clutch on top of my teak-top telephone table.

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Perfect!

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'Right, back to the shopping! Time's marching on.

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'The Blues have two items,

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'the Reds...nothing.'

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-Are either of you whisky drinkers?

-No, but I could be.

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-You could be, at a price?

-Mm-hm.

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What do you think about this?

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Whisky decanter.

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This is a promotional piece that was make to promote John Haig whisky.

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-Are you familiar with the whisky?

-I am indeed.

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There's the name at the bottom. It's in great shape!

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What's nice, this one lifted up here,

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-and you've got the hallmark there. Can you see that?

-Yeah.

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-Oh, yeah.

-So that's Birmingham, and that's a K,

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so that's about '34, 1934, '35.

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I think that's quite nice, isn't it? It's a nice little thing.

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-I actually do like that.

-Could you become a whisky drinker?

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I could be. What would this be made of?

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I think we'd call it white metal. I don't think it is silver.

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That's been applied to the glass. Love the shape of it,

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love the thistle pattern. I wouldn't say it's of the finest quality,

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the way that this has been cut out, but at the end of the day,

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-it was made as a promotional piece.

-Do collectors of this...

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Oh, absolutely, yeah. So what do you think about this?

0:14:280:14:31

-I actually like it.

-Yeah?

-Do you like that?

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-I do.

-Can I ask you, sir,

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-how much do you want for this?

-The asking price is 85.

0:14:350:14:38

-We can do it for 65.

-65.

-Is the best.

0:14:380:14:41

How much do you think that could fetch at auction?

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I think they'd probably put that in at about 60 to 80.

0:14:440:14:47

-60 to 80?

-Yeah.

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-And I think it should make more.

-That sounds good.

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-Does sound good.

-I'm happy with that.

0:14:510:14:53

-Do you want to get that as your first item?

-Definitely.

-I think so.

0:14:530:14:57

-We'll have that. Thank you so much!

-'Hurrah!

0:14:570:14:59

'They're off the mark, and not a moment too soon.

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'But it's not time to relax yet, chaps. Oh, no!'

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I really feel this should be Tina's choice.

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-Leaving it up to me now?

-It's all up to you.

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I'm not looking.

0:15:120:15:15

Fire pump. You put your foot on there...

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-Underneath, and the hose there.

-Rubber hose in there.

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-And then you pump that and spray, yeah?

-I guess.

0:15:260:15:30

'I think I'd rather call the fire brigade.'

0:15:300:15:32

We've got 32, and you need some money left over.

0:15:320:15:35

-I do need a little bit of money.

-If he did it for 25,

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-would that give you enough?

-I don't mind.

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I'm not worried about what you leave me.

0:15:410:15:43

-Would you do it for 25?

-28's the best.

0:15:430:15:46

-28's the best, yeah.

-That leaves you with £4.

0:15:460:15:49

You'll never find anything for £4. You never know!

0:15:490:15:53

-Barbara, you're full of hot air.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:15:560:15:59

Couple of items might be more expensive.

0:15:590:16:02

Oh, I suppose if there's that for 12...

0:16:020:16:04

All right. You've blown my theory out of the water.

0:16:040:16:07

I'm just going in the corner to cry.

0:16:070:16:10

-Oh, what do I like, what do I like?

-'Bargains?'

0:16:110:16:14

-What is it actually made of?

-This is Black Forest.

0:16:180:16:21

-It's some sort of warrior.

-Hmm!

0:16:210:16:24

Do you like that? Quite nicely done, isn't it?

0:16:240:16:27

-What do you think?

-How much is he asking?

0:16:270:16:30

-45 on that.

-Hmm...

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The good side about it is, it is quite nicely carved.

0:16:310:16:35

Just the bottom bit, the condition's worrying me.

0:16:350:16:38

Would that clean up, if anybody wanted to...

0:16:380:16:40

-The top half is quite nice.

-You probably could,

0:16:400:16:43

but to be honest, I don't know that you'd really want to,

0:16:430:16:46

because people wouldn't collect it as a pen,

0:16:460:16:49

unlike they collect their Parkers and Mont Blancs and whatever.

0:16:490:16:53

You'd collect this more as a novel Black Forest object, wouldn't you?

0:16:530:16:57

-We've got 45 on this.

-45. Best price 35.

0:16:570:17:01

-30?

-If you ask nicely, 30's OK.

-I'll ask nicely.

0:17:010:17:05

-Go on, then. 30 quid it is.

-Thank you.

-Happy with that?

0:17:050:17:08

-Yes. More than happy.

-Happy?

-Yeah.

0:17:080:17:10

OK. Thank you very much. We'll take that as our second item.

0:17:100:17:13

'Yes! In a matter of minutes, the boys have caught up.'

0:17:130:17:17

-Blow torch. You like that, do you?

-It's too much.

0:17:170:17:20

-How much have we got?

-32.

0:17:200:17:22

32. Tall order, isn't it, for you?

0:17:220:17:25

-Let's not fret.

-OK. Not fretting. This is the face of not fretting.

0:17:280:17:32

-Can I put one swerve ball in?

-Go.

-OK.

0:17:360:17:39

This is a sweetheart brooch. It's in silver, Birmingham.

0:17:390:17:44

And it's obviously a cavalry regiment,

0:17:440:17:46

because we've got a horseshoe. Let's see what regiment it is.

0:17:460:17:50

It's the Queen's Own Hussars, so it's Victorian,

0:17:510:17:55

and you've got the Crimea Wars,

0:17:550:18:00

and you've got the Napoleonic Wars as well here.

0:18:000:18:04

It would have been worn by an officer's wife...

0:18:040:18:07

-Oh, really?

-..as her husband was in the Hussars,

0:18:070:18:09

for a regimental dinner, or out and about with her coat, etc.

0:18:090:18:14

It's within your budget, it's silver...

0:18:140:18:16

-Do these holes mean they could turn it into a necklace?

-Probably.

0:18:160:18:20

It could have been mounted on something

0:18:200:18:22

and then converted into a brooch. I know it's something I spotted.

0:18:220:18:26

Military items are quite popular. It's in silver.

0:18:260:18:29

We can catalogue it correctly - the Queen's Own Hussars,

0:18:290:18:33

-Fourth Regiment.

-OK. You've sold it to me.

0:18:330:18:36

And me.

0:18:360:18:38

-What price would you give us on that?

-Er, 18.

0:18:380:18:42

-18. If I gave you 15?

-I can't do it.

0:18:420:18:46

-You won't go any lower than 18 at all?

-No.

0:18:460:18:48

-Shall we do it?

-Yeah, we can do it.

0:18:480:18:51

That leaves us... That leaves you with plenty of money!

0:18:510:18:54

-Well, I wouldn't say "plenty".

-In comparison to what you expected.

0:18:540:18:58

-It's over a tenner.

-OK. Let's do it. Yeah.

-We'll do it.

0:18:580:19:02

-£18. Thank you very much.

-Well done, girls. Well done.

0:19:020:19:05

-Three items.

-I'm so glad I picked that.

0:19:050:19:07

-THEY LAUGH

-'Not quite your find, Tina,

0:19:070:19:11

'but close enough. The girls are done.

0:19:110:19:14

'Let's remind ourselves what they bought.

0:19:140:19:17

'First, Barbara got Arts and Crafty with the Ruskin box for £68.

0:19:170:19:23

'Thomas was impressed with £200 worth of William De Morgan tile.

0:19:240:19:29

'And for £18, Tina marched to Thomas's drum

0:19:290:19:33

'with the silver regimental brooch.'

0:19:330:19:36

-Done and dusted.

-Congratulations.

-Thank you.

0:19:360:19:39

-Literally with minutes...

-Not long to spare.

0:19:390:19:41

-Not long to spare.

-And not much money to spare.

0:19:410:19:44

No. What's your overall total?

0:19:440:19:45

Er, 286.

0:19:450:19:49

286. That means I want £14 of leftover lolly.

0:19:490:19:52

-That's about what you've got.

-Where is it coming from? Well done.

0:19:520:19:55

£14 of leftover lolly. How exciting!

0:19:550:19:58

Anyway, good luck with your £14, Thomas, and good luck, girls.

0:19:580:20:02

-Chaps, do you like your cheeses?

-Not particularly, but carry on.

0:20:060:20:10

-Depends which one.

-Do you like Stilton?

-No.

0:20:100:20:14

-Not personally, no.

-So you wouldn't have a nice dinner party

0:20:140:20:17

-with a big lump of Stilton?

-Definitely not.

0:20:170:20:19

You won't like this, then. I think this is rather nice.

0:20:190:20:23

Stilton scoop. Nice ivory handle there.

0:20:230:20:26

Lovely thing! Dated 1908.

0:20:260:20:30

It's got a maker's initials as well.

0:20:300:20:33

Ticket price, 23.

0:20:340:20:36

-I've had a word. 15.

-Really?

0:20:360:20:39

I think that's a nice little thing.

0:20:390:20:41

-How often do you see your Stilton scoops?

-This is true.

0:20:410:20:44

-SHE LAUGHS True.

-Do you not like it?

0:20:440:20:47

I'm happy to go with that if you are, Craig.

0:20:470:20:49

-I'll trust your judgement.

-Oh, Craig! Do you like this, though?

0:20:490:20:53

No, because I don't like cheese, but...

0:20:530:20:55

-THEY LAUGH

-It's not about me.

0:20:550:20:57

We could use it is a kind of ice-cream scoop, maybe.

0:20:570:21:02

-THEY LAUGH

-A very...

-We could do, I suppose.

0:21:020:21:04

I'm getting desperate here.

0:21:040:21:06

Maybe, like, pickle...

0:21:060:21:09

-Pickles! Pickles. Like it.

-Yeah. I trust your judgement.

0:21:090:21:13

-Do you?

-Yeah. More than happy.

-Definitely.

0:21:130:21:15

I do like this, and I do think that...

0:21:150:21:18

-Do you know who'd like this? Tim.

-Really?

-Tim would like this.

0:21:180:21:22

'I'll be the judge of that, thank you!'

0:21:220:21:25

-Tim would probably buy this.

-Could we sell it to Tim?

0:21:250:21:27

Sadly not, but I think he might like something like that.

0:21:270:21:31

-I think it's good, for £15.

-Yep. I'm happy.

0:21:310:21:33

-Yeah. You can't go wrong with it.

-Final item?

-Final item.

0:21:330:21:36

-Final item.

-Done.

-Done!

0:21:360:21:39

'And that's the Red Team finished, too.

0:21:390:21:42

'So, what did they buy?

0:21:420:21:45

'After 40 minutes, the Reds went for the whisky bottle at £65.

0:21:450:21:49

'John went quirky with the £30 Black Forest carved pen.

0:21:520:21:56

'And at £15, the Stilton scoop is anything but cheesy!'

0:21:560:22:02

-Ah!

-Have you finished yet?

0:22:020:22:05

-We have.

-Just finished.

-Well done. Isn't that lovely?

0:22:050:22:08

-How much did you spend overall?

-110?

-110.

0:22:080:22:11

£110? That's pathetic, isn't it? I mean, that's no money!

0:22:110:22:15

So, £190 of leftover lolly, please, wherever that is.

0:22:150:22:20

-Have to dig deep.

-You don't like this, do you?

0:22:200:22:22

-There you go.

-There we go. What are you going to do with £190?

0:22:220:22:26

-Haven't the foggiest, Tim, actually.

-Have you not?

-No.

0:22:260:22:29

But I will find something that will bring a smile to your face.

0:22:290:22:33

I think she's got something up her sleeve.

0:22:330:22:35

-You had a great time, though?

-Really did.

0:22:350:22:38

And good luck, Catherine.

0:22:380:22:40

Good luck indeed! Now, come with me to Brighton.

0:22:410:22:44

In 1786, George, Prince of Wales, visited Brighton

0:22:470:22:51

to escape the stresses of London.

0:22:510:22:54

When he got here, he needed a palace, so he built this!

0:22:540:22:58

He was broke and in debt, but it didn't stop him spending.

0:23:020:23:06

At one end of the Royal Pavilion is the banqueting room.

0:23:080:23:13

George sure enjoyed his food!

0:23:130:23:16

He also enjoyed building onto Brighton Pavilion.

0:23:160:23:21

This place simply got bigger...

0:23:220:23:25

..and bigger...

0:23:260:23:28

and bigger...

0:23:280:23:29

until we arrive here

0:23:290:23:32

in the magnificent music room.

0:23:320:23:36

Is this not the most extraordinary,

0:23:360:23:40

fantasy-land-type room?

0:23:400:23:43

Alongside his great passion for food,

0:23:460:23:49

the Prince Regent absolutely adored music.

0:23:490:23:54

In 1823, he enjoyed in this room

0:23:540:23:57

a performance by the great Italian composer, Rossini.

0:23:570:24:02

The most extraordinary feature has to be this dome.

0:24:020:24:07

Just look at that! It makes you feel quite dizzy

0:24:070:24:10

just looking up.

0:24:100:24:13

The whole thing proportionally takes your eye

0:24:140:24:18

to the centre, which of course is the pendant boss

0:24:180:24:22

supporting this massive and just extraordinary central chandelier.

0:24:220:24:28

Completely mad!

0:24:280:24:31

What intrigues me is, how do you achieve

0:24:330:24:36

this incredibly rich internal decorative effect?

0:24:360:24:41

Well, the Prince Regent spotted a young man

0:24:410:24:44

called Frederick Crace.

0:24:440:24:47

Crace he had noticed in his London home in Carlton House Terrace

0:24:470:24:52

as an expert gilder and decorator,

0:24:520:24:55

and indeed, it was Frederick Crace

0:24:550:24:58

who essentially came up with the decorative scheme

0:24:580:25:01

for this, the music room.

0:25:010:25:03

The walls themselves are a series of painted canvasses

0:25:030:25:09

which have been painted almost in imitation

0:25:090:25:12

of Chinese lacquered screens,

0:25:120:25:15

hence the really deep, almost lacquer effect

0:25:150:25:18

of the red and gold in combination.

0:25:180:25:23

The whimsical, fun part of it, though,

0:25:230:25:26

is illustrated by the dragon at the top

0:25:260:25:29

that seems to spew forth an immense conger eel

0:25:290:25:33

which is entwined behind the fake column.

0:25:330:25:37

The focal point on this side of the room, though,

0:25:370:25:40

is the fireplace itself, which is a reproduction,

0:25:400:25:44

because when Queen Victoria sold Brighton Pavilion,

0:25:440:25:48

she thought it was going to be demolished,

0:25:480:25:50

and she removed a number of the internal fittings,

0:25:500:25:54

and the original today is at Buckingham Palace.

0:25:540:25:59

What I think is completely killing in this space

0:25:590:26:02

is that Frederick Crace, the man who's created all these images

0:26:020:26:08

of China, never went any further east

0:26:080:26:12

than Dover.

0:26:120:26:15

Of course, the big question today is,

0:26:150:26:17

where exactly are our teams going to be sent -

0:26:170:26:20

north, south, east or west, or simply bust?

0:26:200:26:24

Can you think of a better place to be? In the middle of West Sussex,

0:26:350:26:39

Wisborough Green, Bellmans saleroom. Jonathan Pratt, our host.

0:26:390:26:43

-How are you, JP?

-Very good, Tim.

-Excellent. It's lovely to be here.

0:26:430:26:47

And John and Craig have gone with

0:26:470:26:49

-this dimple-shaped Haig whisky bottle.

-Yeah.

0:26:490:26:52

And then of course they've onlaid this silver pattern on it,

0:26:520:26:55

-full of thistles, which is very nice.

-Yeah!

0:26:550:26:58

And whacked on a stopper. How do you rate that?

0:26:580:27:02

It's quite a nice object, really. Decanters aren't easy to sell,

0:27:020:27:06

but it's got more of a story about it.

0:27:060:27:09

-Yeah.

-So I quite like it, really.

0:27:090:27:11

-What's this worth?

-£20 to £30.

0:27:110:27:13

Is that all? They paid £65, our lads.

0:27:130:27:15

-It's a come-and-get-me estimate.

-Oh, I see.

-Maybe.

0:27:150:27:19

One of your tempters.

0:27:190:27:21

Now, what do you make of this thing, this wee pen?

0:27:210:27:23

-Well, it's really nice quality.

-Seriously well detailed, isn't it?

0:27:230:27:28

It's the typical output of the Black Forest.

0:27:280:27:31

They made an industry out of souvenirs with these.

0:27:310:27:34

The quality's very good, and that would suggest less commercial.

0:27:340:27:37

You wouldn't spend as much time on it to sell as a souvenir.

0:27:370:27:40

-What do you think it's worth? Guesstimate?

-£20, £30.

0:27:400:27:43

£30 paid. And lastly, the cheese scoop,

0:27:430:27:47

-which is only plate, isn't it?

-Yep. Only plate.

0:27:470:27:50

And if you were selling this, it would go in a box with about, er...

0:27:500:27:54

A million other things, yes.

0:27:540:27:56

-I mean, who uses those any more?

-Christmas.

0:27:560:27:59

-Half a Stilton, have a dig.

-Do you still?

-Yeah.

0:27:590:28:02

Bung a bit of port wine in the middle.

0:28:020:28:04

Lasts you over the Christmas break.

0:28:040:28:06

Get bored with it, make it into soup.

0:28:060:28:08

It's difficult, a one-off piece like that. Is it worth a fiver?

0:28:080:28:12

-Is it worth £10?

-Our minimum bid's £10, and I've stuck it there.

0:28:120:28:15

OK. They paid £15, so there's not a lot in that, either.

0:28:150:28:18

Anyway, if the decanter does badly, they're sunk,

0:28:180:28:23

in which case they'll need the bonus buy. Let's have a look at it.

0:28:230:28:27

OK, John and Craig. This is the bonus-buy moment.

0:28:270:28:30

Catherine's going to reveal what she spent your £190 on.

0:28:300:28:33

-Are you ready for this, chaps?

-Ready.

0:28:330:28:35

I bought you this...

0:28:350:28:37

-What's that?

-..which is...

0:28:370:28:39

a little ivory Victorian propelling pencil.

0:28:390:28:43

-Mm-hm.

-So you turn this here,

0:28:430:28:45

and then the lead comes out there. That's all ivory.

0:28:450:28:50

And it's quite nice cos we got the maker's name here,

0:28:500:28:53

-Mordan, as in Sampson & Mordan.

-How much did you pay for this?

0:28:530:28:57

I did actually pay quite a bit for it.

0:28:570:28:59

-I paid 50.

-50?

-I know. It is quite a nice sun,

0:28:590:29:03

but I just thought it was quite a cute little pencil.

0:29:030:29:05

What do you think we can make?

0:29:050:29:07

I'd like to see it make a few pounds, maybe - five, ten.

0:29:070:29:11

It might just take off.

0:29:110:29:13

-Hope it does.

-I actually quite like it.

0:29:130:29:15

Oh, do you? Oh, I am pleased. What do you think?

0:29:150:29:18

-I trust your judgement.

-Do you?

-Yeah.

0:29:180:29:21

-Thousands wouldn't.

-SHE LAUGHS

0:29:210:29:24

But Sampson Mordan are the big name...

0:29:240:29:26

-Absolutely.

-..in 19th-century pencil makers.

0:29:260:29:29

We had no biros. There's no easy writing system

0:29:290:29:33

in the 19th century. You got a pen and ink,

0:29:330:29:36

which you can't be carting around with you.

0:29:360:29:39

How do you make a note about anything quickly?

0:29:390:29:41

You can only use a pencil,

0:29:410:29:43

and the propelling pencil was kind of the ultimate

0:29:430:29:47

-in writing utensils. And he's a big name, isn't he?

-Absolutely.

0:29:470:29:51

-Are we looking at 1880, 1890?

-About that sort of time, yeah.

0:29:510:29:55

-Oh, I like that.

-OK. Make a note of what Catherine's told you.

0:29:550:29:58

-THEY LAUGH

-Because you don't have to pick now.

0:29:580:30:01

You pick after the sale of your first three items.

0:30:010:30:04

Let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Catherine's little pencil.

0:30:040:30:08

There we go. Look at that.

0:30:090:30:11

Looks as if it's 1930s, but it can't be, can it?

0:30:110:30:14

I've described it as late Victorian, but it might be early 20th century.

0:30:140:30:18

Sampson Mordan started about 1840s, I think.

0:30:180:30:20

And the patent was the propelling pencil.

0:30:200:30:23

Yeah, a silver one. The silver ones are two a penny.

0:30:230:30:27

If you're going to buy one, maybe this is more attractive.

0:30:270:30:30

But it's ivory again. People do turn their noses up a bit

0:30:300:30:33

to this sort of thing. But it works.

0:30:330:30:35

-How much?

-£15. £15 to £20.

0:30:350:30:38

Catherine will be disappointed. She paid £50 for that.

0:30:380:30:42

-Let's hope it makes £50, for her sake.

-Yeah.

0:30:420:30:45

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:30:450:30:47

First up is the Arts and Crafts Ruskin-mounted little box.

0:30:470:30:52

-That's charming.

-Isn't it? Just the business, really.

0:30:520:30:55

It's one flat piece of metal, folded,

0:30:550:30:57

and these joins just riveted in.

0:30:570:30:59

This turquoise cabochon of pottery by Ruskin, or Ruskinesque, anyway,

0:30:590:31:04

but very typical of Arts and Crafts. Great shape.

0:31:040:31:08

-Nice colour.

-Yeah! It's a great thing.

0:31:080:31:11

-How much?

-£60, £90.

0:31:110:31:13

Perfect! £68 they paid.

0:31:130:31:16

I thought for a minute there it was going to be Thomas spending £150!

0:31:160:31:20

No. Thomas went really strongly on the De Morgan tile.

0:31:200:31:24

Not quite sure what that is, really. It's a sunflower, is it?

0:31:240:31:27

It's in the De Morgan book. It's called KL Rose pattern.

0:31:270:31:31

Good for you. You've done some research on it.

0:31:310:31:34

And what sort of value would you put on a De Morgan tile like that?

0:31:340:31:38

On a good day I think it would make £100,

0:31:380:31:40

but I put 60 to 90, trying to lead to it.

0:31:400:31:43

-Yes. Thomas paid £200.

-That is a lot of money.

0:31:430:31:46

-It is.

-I mean, it can make lots of money.

0:31:460:31:48

Gosh, it can make money, and it is a name

0:31:480:31:51

-that draws collectors very strongly.

-Oh, yeah.

-Well, we'll see.

0:31:510:31:55

-What about the brooch?

-Regimental brooch

0:31:550:31:58

for the Fourth Queen's Own Hussars.

0:31:580:32:01

It's not completely hallmarked,

0:32:010:32:03

which makes me think it might have been altered very slightly.

0:32:030:32:07

If you're regimentally inclined, that is a little peach.

0:32:070:32:11

But it's not... No-one's going to part with £50 for it.

0:32:110:32:15

-No, no. What's your estimate?

-Ten to 15.

0:32:150:32:18

OK. They paid 18. It's a nice little brooch.

0:32:180:32:20

It's got its regimental interest,

0:32:200:32:22

and somebody might have a poke at it.

0:32:220:32:25

But what's going to let them down, I fancy,

0:32:250:32:28

is old William De Morgan and his tile,

0:32:280:32:31

in which case they'll need the bonus buy,

0:32:310:32:33

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:32:330:32:35

-Right, then, Tina and Babs. This is your bonus-buy moment.

-OK.

0:32:350:32:39

You gave the boy £14. What did he spend it on? Thomas.

0:32:390:32:44

This is quite an interesting jug. It's about 1909,

0:32:440:32:47

Koloman Moser for Loetz. Loetz, which is a glass manufacturer...

0:32:470:32:52

-OK.

-..in Bohemia, Austria,

0:32:520:32:55

and Koloman Moser a seminal designer

0:32:550:32:59

from the Vienna Secession period, and this is a crackle-glaze jug

0:32:590:33:04

in the larger format. You get the smaller-format one.

0:33:040:33:06

-I have sold these for about £80.

-Really?

-Wow!

-Yes.

0:33:060:33:10

-And you paid...

-£14.

-Watch his lips.

0:33:100:33:13

-Yeah.

-So this could do quite well if the right people are here for it.

0:33:130:33:18

-That design is quite "moderne".

-You could use it today.

0:33:180:33:22

And it would look lovely with a beverage in there.

0:33:220:33:25

-And what could be nicer than that, Babs?

-Exactly.

0:33:250:33:27

Now, this looks as if it's badly cracked.

0:33:280:33:31

-Yes.

-It's quite a clever technique, though - the crackle finish.

0:33:310:33:36

Yeah. It's very interesting. I like the integral hand.

0:33:360:33:40

-It's very functional.

-Almost like a tankard.

0:33:400:33:43

-Have a drink out of it rather than pouring.

-Well, why not?

0:33:430:33:45

-THEY LAUGH

-Greedy-guts!

0:33:450:33:48

I rather like it, actually. I mean, it doesn't scream...

0:33:480:33:52

Koloman Moser was, like, a Vienna Secessionist designer.

0:33:520:33:57

It doesn't scream out that sort of...

0:33:570:34:00

-the typical design you see for that period.

-No.

0:34:000:34:03

But it looks up, and one or two examples have solid auction bids.

0:34:030:34:07

-Right. And what do you think it might bring?

-£20, £30.

0:34:070:34:09

-Great. £14 paid.

-Very good.

-Thomas has done well.

0:34:090:34:12

-Yeah.

-Good. Well, we're almost ready for the off.

0:34:120:34:15

-Cheers.

-And excited about it! Thank you, Jonathan.

0:34:150:34:19

-OK, John and Craig. How you feeling?

-Excited.

0:34:250:34:28

This is just the moment, isn't it? To be here,

0:34:280:34:31

on the edge of the auction, and nobody knows how it will go.

0:34:310:34:35

We've got a crowded room. That's good.

0:34:350:34:37

The first item is going to be your decanter.

0:34:370:34:40

£65 you paid for that, and here it comes.

0:34:400:34:43

Lot 1780A, and I've got lots of interest in this lot.

0:34:430:34:47

-Oh, good.

-That would be nice.

0:34:470:34:49

-£65.

-20. 25.

0:34:490:34:51

30, 30. £40. Straight in at 40.

0:34:510:34:55

-Come on. Keep going, Jonathan.

-£40. Who'll bid me five?

0:34:550:34:58

-Back of the room gets it at 45. Do I see 50?

-Come on.

0:34:580:35:00

-Bit more.

-With you, sir, at 45.

0:35:000:35:02

50 anywhere else? At £45. I shall sell at £45.

0:35:020:35:06

-Trouble!

-Straight in, then, at £45...

0:35:060:35:10

-£45.

-Never mind.

0:35:100:35:12

That is minus £20. I don't believe it.

0:35:120:35:15

That is ridiculous. £45, and it's a lovely thing, that!

0:35:150:35:18

-And he said "lots of bids".

-Well, he had got lots of bids.

0:35:180:35:21

-They got a bargain.

-Lots of low bids.

0:35:210:35:23

Well, between 20 and 45.

0:35:230:35:25

Lot 1781A, Black Forest carved-wood pen

0:35:250:35:28

with figure or finial. £10 I'm bid. Straight in at ten.

0:35:280:35:32

-Who'll bid me 12? 12.

-Keep going.

-Stopping at £15.

0:35:320:35:36

-18. 20.

-Yes.

-£22 gets it now. At 22.

0:35:360:35:39

Do I see 25? 22 with you, sir. £25 anywhere else?

0:35:390:35:43

-Come on!

-It's £22. On the left at 22.

0:35:430:35:46

Do I see 25? Are we all done? It's yours, sir. At £22 it's going.

0:35:460:35:50

At £22.

0:35:500:35:52

They're sitting on their hands!

0:35:520:35:55

-Nothing.

-Oh, dear.

0:35:550:35:57

Next up is the Stilton scoop. I love a bit of Stilton, me.

0:35:570:36:01

-Me, too!

-So does Catherine.

0:36:010:36:03

It's dated 1933. Um, tenner? Someone start me at £10.

0:36:030:36:06

Thank you. Ten at the front here. Do I see 12?

0:36:060:36:10

-12 is bid. 15, sir?

-Come on!

0:36:100:36:14

-15.

-Yes!

-18.

0:36:140:36:16

-18 is bid.

-Oh, well done! That's a profit!

0:36:160:36:19

-£20 gets it.

-Yay! And you were worried about my Stilton scoop!

0:36:190:36:22

-At £20. It's going. Selling at £20.

-HE BANGS HAMMER

0:36:220:36:26

-Plus £5. Well, that's very fair.

-We all like a bit of Stilton.

0:36:260:36:30

28 minus five is minus 23.

0:36:300:36:32

What you going to do about the propelling pencil?

0:36:320:36:35

Are you going to stick? Cos 23 could be a winning score.

0:36:350:36:38

If I were you I might kind of quit,

0:36:380:36:41

because the other pen didn't do brilliantly.

0:36:410:36:43

-I'm thinking pencils...

-I think we should override Catherine.

0:36:430:36:47

-I think we should go for it.

-Two against one.

0:36:470:36:50

-Oh!

-You've had it.

-Had it!

0:36:500:36:52

You tried to put them off pretty big-time there,

0:36:520:36:55

-but they're not having any.

-I have faith, Tim.

0:36:550:36:58

We're going with the bonus buy.

0:36:580:37:01

A late-Victorian ivory Morden Everpoint propelling pencil.

0:37:010:37:05

-Think I might run away now.

-Bids on this to £25.

0:37:050:37:09

With me at £25. I'll take 28 now. It's £25. Do I see 28?

0:37:090:37:13

-28. 30.

-Come on!

0:37:130:37:16

32. 35. £35. Against you, sir, at £35.

0:37:160:37:20

Who'll bid me 40 now? It's £35. Against you all at £35.

0:37:200:37:23

-Come on!

-It's going at £35.

0:37:230:37:25

-And selling...

-£35 is 15, 23,

0:37:250:37:29

-28...

-It's only money.

0:37:290:37:31

-It's minus 38, anyway.

-Not so bad.

0:37:310:37:34

Minus 38 overall, which is not so bad, actually.

0:37:340:37:37

-It's only money, Tim.

-I know. Bad luck on that,

0:37:370:37:40

but it could be a winning score, so don't talk to the Blues.

0:37:400:37:44

Now, Tina and Babs, do you know how the Reds got on?

0:37:540:37:57

-No. No idea, Tim.

-Not a dicky of an idea?

0:37:570:37:59

-No.

-Right. That's the way we like to keep it.

0:37:590:38:02

First up is the box, and here it comes.

0:38:020:38:05

And Arts and Crafts copper and Ruskin-mounted box.

0:38:050:38:08

-I'm excited about this.

-I'm excited!

0:38:080:38:10

And I have commission bids to 40... 60... 70.

0:38:100:38:16

-SHE LAUGHS

-Well, you're in profit. That's good.

0:38:160:38:19

75, 80. 85, 90.

0:38:190:38:22

-95, 100.

-Look at this go!

0:38:220:38:24

One more might do it. It's £100 against you. And ten!

0:38:240:38:27

-£110!

-Well done!

-At £110.

0:38:270:38:30

Do I see 120? Selling for £110, if you're all done. It's going at...

0:38:300:38:34

You both together? £110!

0:38:340:38:36

-THEY LAUGH

-Nearly took another one there.

0:38:360:38:38

That's two shy of 70, so that is plus 42!

0:38:380:38:41

Look at that! Straight up, £42. You got the eye, doll, haven't you?

0:38:410:38:46

-I have.

-You have got lovely eyes.

0:38:460:38:49

I mean, you found that in a shop, effectively,

0:38:490:38:52

and turned it round in an auction for £42 profit. It's brilliant,

0:38:520:38:56

-so well done for that.

-Thank you.

0:38:560:38:58

Are we going to be able to say the same thing for the De Morgan tile?

0:38:580:39:02

-Let's see what happens.

-Late 19th-century

0:39:020:39:05

William De Morgan Sands End pottery tile

0:39:050:39:07

in the KL Rose pattern. There she is.

0:39:070:39:10

And I have...£65.

0:39:100:39:13

-Oh!

-£65. Who'll bid me 70 now? Who'll bid me 70?

0:39:130:39:15

At £65. I'll take 70, though. With me at 65.

0:39:150:39:19

-I don't believe this, Thomas.

-70. And five?

0:39:190:39:22

-It's £75. One more if you like.

-Oh, dear!

0:39:220:39:25

On the book still at £75. I shall sell, then,

0:39:250:39:29

-if you're all finished, at £75.

-That is minus £125.

0:39:290:39:34

That is the cheapest William De Morgan tile I have seen sold

0:39:340:39:37

at auction in the last 20 years.

0:39:370:39:40

And when you think how much money he got for it...

0:39:400:39:42

I mean, the price it was in the shop...

0:39:420:39:45

-Someone's just got a deal.

-Yeah. So there we go, girls.

0:39:450:39:49

That's the lap of the gods. Next up is the regimental hat badge.

0:39:490:39:53

-How much for this?

-A silver regimental brooch

0:39:530:39:55

for the Fourth Queen's Own Hussars. Someone start me at £10.

0:39:550:39:59

£10 is bid. 12, sir? 12? 15, Jill?

0:39:590:40:03

No? £12. With you, sir, at 12. Surely worth 15?

0:40:030:40:06

-Come on!

-Any further interest? At £12.

0:40:060:40:08

15.

0:40:080:40:10

-Go on!

-18. 20.

-You're in profit.

0:40:100:40:13

-One more! 22! £20 at the back there. Two anywhere else?

-Go on!

0:40:130:40:17

£20 it is, then, at the back. Any more? At £20.

0:40:170:40:21

He's given up now. £20 and selling. All done.

0:40:210:40:23

Well, that's marvellous, Tom. That's plus £2.

0:40:230:40:26

You were minus 83. You've just got two back.

0:40:260:40:29

You are currently minus £81, all right?

0:40:290:40:31

-£81 down the proverbial.

-What are you going to do?

-Yeah.

0:40:310:40:35

-You going to go with the bonus buy?

-We've got to go with the bonus buy.

0:40:350:40:39

-You're going with that jug?

-Yeah.

-Lovely. All right. Decision made.

0:40:390:40:42

Now you've decided, I can tell you the auctioneer estimated it

0:40:420:40:46

-at £20 to £30.

-So we could make a little.

0:40:460:40:48

And you only paid £14, so you should claw a bit back on that.

0:40:480:40:51

-Here it comes.

-This wonderful jug, Koloman Moser,

0:40:510:40:54

textured-glass jug, by Hoffmann for Loetz,

0:40:540:40:57

-and I have £28. With me at £28.

-Doubled your money, Tom.

0:40:570:41:01

£28, and I'll take 30. It's surely worth 30.

0:41:010:41:04

£30. 32.

0:41:040:41:07

-Look at this. Go on!

-Go on!

0:41:070:41:10

35! Thank you. At £35.

0:41:100:41:13

I'll take 38, though. It's £35, with the lady in the front here.

0:41:130:41:16

At £35 and I'm selling. All done? Selling, £35.

0:41:160:41:20

That is plus £21, Tom. You can't do better than that,

0:41:200:41:23

my dear friend. Plus £21.

0:41:230:41:26

Which means overall you are minus £60.

0:41:260:41:31

-OK?

-It's a shame about the tile. We'd have done well without that.

0:41:310:41:35

-I know.

-All right, all right!

-We got some fantastic results there.

0:41:350:41:39

It's a roller coaster, isn't it? You're minus 60.

0:41:390:41:42

-It might be a winning score. Don't talk to the Reds!

-We won't.

0:41:420:41:46

-So, teams - been chatting?

-No.

-Not comparing notes at all?

0:41:530:41:56

-No.

-It should come as no secret to you

0:41:560:41:59

that both teams sadly are not going home with any money today.

0:41:590:42:03

-Oh!

-So it's simply the scale of the losses

0:42:030:42:07

which is going to determine who is ahead today.

0:42:070:42:10

And the runners-up, I'm afraid to say, are the Blues.

0:42:100:42:13

-THEY GROAN

-That's a bit of a shock!

0:42:130:42:16

This is a team that made a profit on three of the four items.

0:42:160:42:20

-Yeah.

-And they still lost?

-And they still lost.

0:42:200:42:23

You have to hang on to the fact that, morally,

0:42:230:42:26

you did achieve a great victory here, but financially, sadly,

0:42:260:42:30

it went down the old proverbial, so bad luck.

0:42:300:42:33

The victors, however, the father-and-son combo,

0:42:330:42:37

have won by only managing to lose £38.

0:42:370:42:39

THEY LAUGH

0:42:390:42:40

But the Stilton scoop made you, strangely enough,

0:42:400:42:43

-the only profit of the day, so well done.

-Always had faith.

0:42:430:42:47

Always had faith! Anyway, have you had a nice time?

0:42:470:42:49

-Brilliant time.

-Well, congratulations on being our winners today,

0:42:490:42:53

and join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes? Yes!

0:42:530:42:57

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:42:570:43:01

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:010:43:05

Tim Wonnacott explores the oriental delights of the Prince Regent's Brighton Pavilion.

Catherine Southon's red team find it hard to make any choices, whilst Thomas Plant's blue team just want to have fun.