Edinburgh 2 Bargain Hunt


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Edinburgh 2

Bargain Hunt visits Scotland's capital, where two teams compete to see who can make the most money at auction. Their experts are Charles Hanson and David Barby.


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Today we've got two sets of friends going head-to-head.

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So, what are you waiting for? Let's go bargain hunting.

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NEIGH!

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Welcome to Scotland!

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There's no time to lose, our teams have to source

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three quality items to sell on at auction and hopefully make a profit.

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Will they make it? Well, stay tuned to find out.

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Charles Hanson is taking charge of the men.

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We don't want to leave you very much money at all.

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David Barby is looking after the girls.

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Well, she touches everything, but she hasn't touched me.

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And Anita Manning's looking after us all at the auction.

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Sorry, sorry!

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-So, Carol, you are cat-obsessed, right?

-That's true, I am.

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-Why's that?

-Because I love them, I think they're wonderful.

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-And we've got a cattery.

-You've got your own cattery?

-Yes.

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How many cats have you got in your cattery?

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Well, we can take about 60.

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-60? That's a lot of cats. Do they make a lot of a racket?

-No.

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They're all quiet.

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Apart from looking after all these cats, what do you get up to?

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Well, we go to the hospice on Thursday, that's my day off.

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-So, we go to the hospice on Thursday and we do gardening and work in the craft room.

-At the hospice?

-Yes.

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-Now, Pearl, you're best mates, yes?

-Yes.

-And you met through the hospice, is that right?

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Yes, through a mutual friend when we all went up to the hospice.

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-And these hospices are very special places, aren't they?

-Yes.

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-They are very, very happy, aren't they?

-And they're not sad places.

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Don't be under the illusion that they're sad, because they're not, they are very happy places.

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I think the whole hospice thing - it's a phenomenal effort,

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keeping them all going, so well done to you two for doing that.

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Now, I've got an important question for you, Pearl.

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What is your strategy? What are your tactics today?

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Well, we are going to rely very heavily on David Barby, because he's our expert.

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-That could be your first mistake.

-Do you think so? Oh, no.

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No, he's very good. I'm only joking, I think.

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We're going to look for small, I think.

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Is that what you're going to go for?

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Well, we'll see how that works out in a minute.

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Now, to the boys, Mark and Steven. So, Mark how did you two meet?

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We met at work.

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We both work for a leading metals distribution company.

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It says here that you're a systems engineer. Tell me about that.

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It's a techy geeky job - I manage computer networks and make sure

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all computers are talking to each other across the world.

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-Are you a hacker?

-Not at all, absolutely not.

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That's a pity. I've longed to meet a hacker.

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It sounds like interesting work, but you've got another passion, haven't you?

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I'm absolutely obsessed with the game of golf.

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I adore golf.

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Play every day during the summer.

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Travel round Scotland, playing in open competitions.

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-You're in a great place, here, though, aren't you?

-Absolutely.

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Wonderful.

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Stephen, you have a sporting hobby about which you're passionate too.

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When I was younger, I played volleyball but, as you can see,

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I didn't quite reach the sort of height that is needed for the game.

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So I got more involved in the refereeing side of it.

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I'm one of the top qualified referees in Scotland.

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So it keeps you out of mischief then?

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-They try to keep me out of mischief.

-Do you have time for any other hobbies?

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I do a bit of fishing, a bit of trout fishing.

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And do you eat the fish that you catch?

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Yes, that's the best bit of it, eating the fish.

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Do you like it hot and spicy?

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Yes, what we do is, um...

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I do travel to the US, and Mark and I have both got a passion for hot sauces,

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so out in Louisiana, which is where the Tabasco sauces...

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I bring back some sauces,

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-and we have a sort of a...

-Sauce fest.

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Well, you're the wrong colour to have red-hot tactics, but what are your tactics today?

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To not rely on Charles Hanson.

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I think we're the exact opposite of the ladies here - not rely on our expert and to spend big.

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Look at that. We've got a split of opportunity here. There you go, there's your £300.

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One team are going to trust their experts and the other team aren't.

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Here you go, Pearl, there's the money. You're the COMPtroller.

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You know the rules.

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Off you go, and very very very good luck!

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Red hot chillies, hey? Red hot teams, I'd say.

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-What's the plan of action?

-I think we need to go for good-quality items.

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Maybe some silver.

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This is a huge affair.

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There are loads and loads of stores.

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-Down here?

-Yep.

-Great.

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Carol, what are you going to look for, what are you aiming for?

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-Cats...

-And?

-..Bronzes...

-And?

-..Smelter.

-And smelter.

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Cor, you've got all the bases covered there then!

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Let's get started, I think we'll go up that avenue. Come on.

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There is so so much to take in.

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Don't be worried, because an hour is an hour.

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-What is that glass at the top?

-To my way of thinking, it looks like a specimen jar.

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THEY LAUGH

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This is wonderful, isn't it? Look at that.

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It's hand-painted porcelain - The Swing (After Fragonard). A very rococo scene.

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Today it's not so fashionable, a bit Victorian.

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-It's a bit dusty. Do you like it?

-No, not really.

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I prefer something like this, Charles.

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This is a bit more practical. What do you think of that?

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What would you use it for? When you say practical...?

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A fruit bowl, a decorative piece on a dining table, maybe.

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It's in good condition. It is about 1900.

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Where were you then?

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It is extremely attractive. Look at that gilding there.

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-Isn't that wonderful?

-Beautiful.

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What about all the marks that are around?

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It might be dirt.

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Sorry, hope it's not dirt.

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It's dirt. So that's OK. It might put a few buyers off,

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but it could be an attractive proposition.

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Why do you rate it? You picked it up.

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Beautiful colours, definitely a nice decorative piece.

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And made by Doulton, of course,. Doulton Burslem who,

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at this time, were the main manufacturers in Staffordshire.

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I don't see why that wouldn't make £100.

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Yeah, well...

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it might make £100, but to me there isn't a margin in it. If you like it, Mark...

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-Why don't we just remember?

-I think we can remember it.

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And maybe come back if we are really struggling.

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We like it but we'll think about it.

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< All right fine, thanks very much.

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-Agreed.

-Yeah.

-OK, thank you.

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Here, we've got a typical

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collector's plate, the Beswick Bunnykins, Doulton figurines.

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Again, in the current market, they're fairly well-priced at a retail level.

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Looks great, but not for us.

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Right, anything that takes your fancy.

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What's this made of?

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-Horn.

-Is it?

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What is so nice is that you get a lot of objects in Scotland made out of horn with a silver combination.

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So, these would be... Oh, egg cup.

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So, you've got one for a large egg and probably a little egg...

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-Duck egg.

-These are lovely, aren't they?

-They are nice.

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They've got little shields on where you could put your family initials.

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Is there any mark on what price they are?

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-No. What price?

-110. >

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Ohhh!

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Good, I like to see that look of shock. >

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What do you think we could maybe achieve for this?

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Well, I don't think there's a huge profit margin in them, with all due respect.

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What's that object next to them.

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The barrel-shaped thing.

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-Isn't that lovely?

-It is quite...

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quite sweet, isn't it?

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-Do you like that?

-Yeah, I like it.

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Can we do a deal on the three?

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We could do, yes. £140. >

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-I think it's quite nice.

-Yes, I think they are too. I think they're lovely.

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-I really like them.

-Let me see if I can have a word with him.

-OK.

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Good luck, David.

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Now, Blues are you playing the game?

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Gents, what's your sport up here in Scotland?

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Ah, well...

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Is it Scottish?

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Curling.

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These are very nice, because what the market likes when it comes to

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antiques and collectables, there's a big factor today...

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..A factor I've learnt on Bargain Hunt is novelty.

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OK, novelty meaning - what are they used for? Have a guess.

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-Mustard.

-I've got the open salts.

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-I've got the pepper.

-You've got the mustard and that's the pepper.

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So, they've got a function, but they're also novel.

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Novel with your sports.

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What do you think? Are they silver or plate?

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-They're plate, you're right.

-What would you price these at?

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If these came to auction, I would value them between £40 and £60.

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So, what is the bottom price on these, the best price?

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-What is the price on them?

-£75.

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£35?

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I could do them for £45.

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45.

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-Would you do them for £40?

-If you twist my arm.

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Stephen's our muscle man.

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Yeah, I think we should do it.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Very happy.

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£40, thank you very much.

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Thank you.

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Well-negotiated, boys.

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Everyone happy?

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-Well, I'm really happy.

-Yeah.

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-I quite like them.

-You are as well.

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-You look quiet.

-On Stephen's head be it.

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Ladies, are you equally in tune?

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I really like those. I really really like those.

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I like them, but we won't make a profit.

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They might just fly.

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Pigs might fly.

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Carol, Pearl...?

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-Let's have a conflab.

-Yes.

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The gentleman will take £135 for these.

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These egg cups, which I think we agreed we like, £90.

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This little barrel-shaped pepperette, which I think is lovely,

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-is at £45. Shall we go for it?

-Yes.

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-Yes.

-Both of you in agreement?

-Yes.

-Yes.

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Right, I'll go and clinch the deal.

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Well, that's excellent. Both teams off to a suitably Scottish start,

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speaking of which, just look what I've found.

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It seems to be most appropriate to be standing in the Highland Centre

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on the outskirts of Edinburgh, where I've discovered this.

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What is it? Well, it's a quintessential piece of Scottish pottery.

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It's a portrait plaque that's been moulded in relief in clay, and then crudely coloured.

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But, the really interesting thing is the picture itself, because it depicts,

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as you can see on the scroll underneath, King George IV.

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King George IV visited Scotland in 1822.

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It was THE big event in Scotland in 1822.

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..And a potter in Fife created this framed pottery picture

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around 1823, 1824 to commemorate the King's visit.

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The King arrived at Leith, just outside Edinburgh, from the Royal Yacht,

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and when he stepped ashore there were a series of massive receptions to greet him.

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At one, King George IV had to kiss the cheek of 457 ladies.

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Apparently, it took him two and a half hours.

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Pretty good.

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I really love this little thing. I love it for its crudeness.

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I love it for the fact that it's got its frame moulded out of ceramic and that's covered in this brown glaze.

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The only thing I don't like about it is the price,

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because this thing is on a stall across the way, and it's just sold for

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£550,

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which is quite a regal price.

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Look at all the fairies.

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-Do you like fairies?

-Charles, what are you trying to tell us?

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Look at this, isn't that nice?

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Intense concentration going on here, David.

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-Hello.

-What are you up to?

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You've bought one item, two items?

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-We've got two items.

-Two items.

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One's quite an interesting piece, a barrel-shaped pepperette, Chester.

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The other one... Well, it's a pair of horn and provincial silver Scottish egg cups.

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-Sounds like Anita's bag to me.

-I would have thought so as well.

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A bit of strategy going on, I love it.

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-One more item to go, and what have you got on your mind?

-The comb, but it's no use to me.

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Oh, I don't know, you're not doing too badly.

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Do you fancy that comb?

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-No.

-It looks more like a nit comb.

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No good for any of us, you know.

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No. You've got about 20 minutes...

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25 minutes left. Good luck, chaps.

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Bye.

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We're going looking for bronzes.

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She touches everything, but she hasn't touched me.

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Could you tell us a bit about this Masonic gavel?

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I don't think there's any serious age to it.

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It's more a presentation-type thing.

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It's a very nice gavel.

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Is it olive or yew wood?

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I think it's olive wood. I think it's olive.

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It's lovely quality, isn't it? Look at that lovely vein there.

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It's obviously Masonic, are you a Mason?

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-No, I'm afraid not.

-It's a secret.

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I think it has got some age. I don't think it's, um...new.

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-It's about 1910.

-Do you think so?

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I think so, 1920. Good thing to spot.

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-They're quite collectable, aren't they?

-They are collectable.

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What's your absolutely best price, sir?

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£65.

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How would you see it at auction?

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Across my fertile lands, it would make between £50 and £80.

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Would you come down to the half century?

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Yeah, if I could do it for £50, I would.

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-I need £55.

-It's up to you, Mark. I pick the first item. I think you make the call on that one.

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And gents, time is ticking.

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-Decision, go for it.

-Are you for it?

-Let's do it.

-OK.

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We're buying it.

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Thank you very much.

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Thanks. Just put the hammer on it.

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Sold to the blue team.

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Well, that's the hammer down on your second buy, so what's the strategy for item number three?

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Look, we want to keep it sensible, in my opinion, leave me lots of money left over

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-to find my big find.

-That's the problem. We don't want to leave you very much money at all.

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-Why not?

-Because it's our programme, we want to do it.

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-Yeah, but don't you trust me?

-No.

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OK, then. Best foot forward.

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Lads, that's not very nice.

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Looks...

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Looks what?

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-Looks rude.

-Looks like a sampler.

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Is it a ladies' loo.

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There's 10 minutes to go.

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Better get your skates on, then.

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That's right, ladies, sprint.

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-There's your Moorcroft.

-It's lovely, actually.

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That's lovely. I've not seen it with the white background.

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It's a dealer he's bought off before.

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£125 off it.

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-That's about 1956...

-1950s.

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But the pattern..

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The colouring is extraordinary.

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It's lovely, this is nice too. Even the back's nice, isn't it?

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The only thing wrong with it, is the colour ground it's on.

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It's the painting that collectors go for.

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I can do you that for £100.

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That's pretty, isn't it?

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Which do you like out of the two?

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I like that, but I like that as well.

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I like both of them, but I do like the irises,

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but this is Carol's choice.

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That one cost me £125 and that cost me £90. They are both £100.

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Go for that one?

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We'll probably go for that.

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-Have you made a choice?

-Yes.

-Yes!

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Finally, a decision - £100 for the bowl. Well done, girls.

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Now, you wanted an antique.

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Handle it and believe it.

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This is English Delftware of about 1730.

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1730.

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1730... Now, we've got five minutes to go,

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price...£25 over there.

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It can be ours for £20.

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I've got to say, it's not buying me.

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We said quality.

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This is the best part of 260 years old, 270 years old...

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£20.

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It's a toss-up between this and the fruit bowl.

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I think the fruit bowl that we saw at the start.

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I think we go back for the fruit bowl.

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If the fruit bowl's not there, we'll come back and get this.

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I'm saying buy this and you've got guaranteed profit.

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You've got one minute. You either go down there now or we take this.

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The fruit bowl.

0:18:340:18:35

-The fruit bowl. What was the best price?

-£105.

0:18:470:18:51

£105? Call it a round hundred?

0:18:510:18:54

-Yeah.

-OK. We'll deal.

0:18:540:18:58

-Thank you very much.

-Well done.

0:18:590:19:01

-Good luck with it.

-Thank you.

0:19:010:19:04

-Charles, thanks very much.

-It's been a great day.

-Thank you.

0:19:040:19:06

Highs and lows.

0:19:060:19:08

Hello. Yes.

0:19:120:19:14

What do you mean, reverse the charges?

0:19:140:19:16

The nerve. They've stopped shopping? Right. Good. Thanks.

0:19:160:19:21

Why don't we check out what the Red Team bought?

0:19:210:19:23

The girls started well, two items in one.

0:19:230:19:26

A pair of silver-horn egg cups for £90.

0:19:260:19:29

And not to be sneezed at, a Chester silver pepperette for £45.

0:19:290:19:34

Finally, they went potty over a 1940s Moorcroft bowl and cover.

0:19:340:19:39

You are phenomenal, you lot.

0:19:410:19:43

I tell you. You've nearly spent the lot.

0:19:430:19:47

-What's your total again?

-£235.

-£235, so £65 leftover lolly.

0:19:470:19:54

-You've got £65.

-Yes, I have.

0:19:540:19:56

Which is your favourite piece?

0:19:560:19:59

-I like the horn and silver egg cups.

-What's your favourite piece?

0:19:590:20:03

The little barrel.

0:20:030:20:04

-Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

-The barrel.

0:20:040:20:07

-I think the barrel, yeah.

-It's lovely.

0:20:070:20:11

£65 to David Barby.

0:20:130:20:15

He's the maestro. You got anything that's going to grab you?

0:20:150:20:19

There's so much here. As long as I don't take as long as these girls deciding what they wanted.

0:20:190:20:25

It's kind of maturing process.

0:20:250:20:27

I know, but I was so worried at one point whether we were going to get anything.

0:20:270:20:31

-Yes, we were.

-You were late starters.

0:20:310:20:33

Well, lovely finishers.

0:20:330:20:36

Good luck, David. Have a great time, we'll catch up with you later.

0:20:380:20:42

Why don't we check out now how the Blues got on?

0:20:420:20:45

They got off to a sporting start with a 1920s novelty condiment set.

0:20:450:20:51

They struck a deal with an olive-wood gavel

0:20:510:20:54

and in the dying minutes, the boys got their own way

0:20:540:20:58

and a fruit bowl for £100.

0:20:580:21:01

We've done it, we've bought three good items but the bowl I'm nervous about, very nervous about.

0:21:010:21:05

-Are you nervous, Charles?

-I'm always nervous.

0:21:050:21:07

That's an unusual statement.

0:21:070:21:09

-Are we quite confident?

-Very happy.

0:21:090:21:12

-Had a good shop?

-Good look round.

0:21:120:21:14

Well, you took it almost to the line and what was the total in the end?

0:21:140:21:18

We spent £195.

0:21:180:21:20

£195. I'd like £105 leftover lolly, please. Who's got that?

0:21:200:21:25

There's £100 there...and five.

0:21:250:21:29

£105, boy. Something to look forward to there.

0:21:290:21:34

I think we brought three nice collectables, and I think I've said the capital definition of an antique

0:21:340:21:39

is something pre-1910 so I'm going back in time and pre-1910.

0:21:390:21:44

-Are you?

-Yes.

-Good, lovely. Good luck, Charles, and good luck, chaps.

0:21:440:21:48

Charles is not the only one going back in time.

0:21:480:21:51

I'm off to see a remarkable collection.

0:21:510:21:54

Water House in London was the home of artist and designer William Morris

0:21:580:22:02

in the 1840s.

0:22:020:22:03

Today, it's full of works by Morris and his contemporaries.

0:22:030:22:09

I can't begin to tell you how much I like this house.

0:22:090:22:13

I like the scale of this landing. I like this sage eggshell-coloured wall system

0:22:130:22:20

and, of course, I love the objects.

0:22:200:22:24

Here we've got the settee that's upholstered in a quintessential William Morris material.

0:22:240:22:30

This is hand printed onto cotton, and it includes a design

0:22:300:22:35

of honeysuckle, tulip and borage in this lovely shade of blue.

0:22:350:22:41

The piece of furniture itself was designed by Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo,

0:22:410:22:47

and is typical of that late-1880s neo-Japanese design.

0:22:470:22:54

You've almost got a simple pagoda top to each of these uprights.

0:22:540:22:59

It's the sort of piece with this tall rail, with its curtaining, that you'd either be able to

0:22:590:23:05

have an intimate conversation with nobody seeing you or,

0:23:050:23:09

if you lived in a draughty house, you'd sit in it and you wouldn't get a draught going down your neck.

0:23:090:23:16

Next door, we've got another piece of furniture designed by Mackmurdo.

0:23:160:23:20

This side cabinet is made of gorgeous honey-coloured satinwood, but what I like about it,

0:23:200:23:26

and this is where Mackmurdo's so clever, he's introduced dark Cuban mahogany panels

0:23:260:23:33

that contrast with the blonde satinwood, and then he's had painted

0:23:330:23:38

a line from Shelley's poem Prometheus and running up the panels themselves are painted decorations.

0:23:380:23:48

In 1900, when the house had been donated, it came only

0:23:480:23:52

partly-furnished, and Mackmurdo ran around his artistic friends

0:23:520:23:57

persuading them to donate things relating to Morris so that the place could be properly furnished.

0:23:570:24:02

But, Mackmurdo wasn't completely alone in this quest.

0:24:020:24:07

Well, the connection is, of course, via the artist Sir Frank Brangwyn, who started his career in the 1880s

0:24:150:24:23

as a draughtsman working in William Morris's workshop.

0:24:230:24:27

He specialised in the expansion of small-scale drawings into

0:24:270:24:33

large-scale works, and by the 1890s had become a successful artist in his own right.

0:24:330:24:41

And it was he in 1900, alongside Mackmurdo, who went out there

0:24:410:24:47

persuading folk to donate objects to the William Morris Gallery.

0:24:470:24:52

Indeed he himself left several hundred of his paintings and works of art on display.

0:24:520:24:59

It's a process that is ongoing, because the William Morris Galleries, like so many,

0:24:590:25:06

have plans to expand and improve,

0:25:060:25:09

rather like us, really - plans for expansion and improvement today, over at the auction.

0:25:090:25:16

Well, we've come the 40 miles from Edinburgh to Glasgow to the Great Western Auction rooms

0:25:240:25:31

in Dumbarton Road to be with Anita Manning, charming as ever.

0:25:310:25:35

-Welcome, Tim.

-Thank you very much.

0:25:350:25:37

Now, Carol and Pearl, first up, have gone with these horn and silver jokers.

0:25:370:25:45

Now they've called them two-way egg cups.

0:25:450:25:47

I don't think they have anything to do with eggs at all, for me these are napkin rings.

0:25:470:25:53

Where do you come from with them?

0:25:530:25:55

Well, always the diplomat, multi-purpose.

0:25:550:25:59

There we go - you pays your money and takes your choice.

0:26:000:26:04

-How much for the pair?

-Well, I quite like these.

0:26:040:26:06

Aberdeen maker, Edinburgh hallmark, good provincial stuff. £80 to £120.

0:26:060:26:12

They paid £90 for that, that's very fair, they should make a profit.

0:26:120:26:18

Next is the little barrel-shaped pepper, which is lovely quality, isn't it?

0:26:180:26:24

Yes, and people collect these little pepperettes.

0:26:240:26:27

Often they made them in novelty form, so you get lots of variety. And this is quite a sweet little one.

0:26:270:26:33

-What's your estimate?

-£40 to £60.

0:26:330:26:35

Great, they only paid £45, so that's pretty good.

0:26:350:26:37

And then lastly the hibiscus Moorcroft salt-glazed covered pot.

0:26:370:26:46

Odd in salt glaze, isn't it?

0:26:460:26:48

I'm not a big fan of that type of thing, but it is a wee bit rarer and the Moorcroft buyers will like that.

0:26:480:26:54

A little subtler.

0:26:540:26:57

How subtle is your estimate?

0:26:570:26:58

I would say £100 to £200.

0:26:580:27:01

I've been quite wide on that.

0:27:010:27:03

I'm pleased you are wide.

0:27:030:27:04

£100 they paid, actually.

0:27:040:27:06

-So, quite a subtle estimate, we should be delighted to get £200 for that.

-Maybe being a bit generous.

0:27:060:27:13

I don't know. They are probably not going

0:27:130:27:14

to need the Bonus Buy, but let's go and have a look at it anyway.

0:27:140:27:19

Now girls, you spent £235 -

0:27:190:27:22

you gave David Barby, the maestro, £65. What did you spend it on?

0:27:220:27:27

I think something rather nice. I wanted to buy some porcelain.

0:27:270:27:32

Derby from Barby.

0:27:320:27:34

-..19th-century Derby porcelain.

-It's lovely.

0:27:340:27:38

And this is in a sort of Imari palette and it's a little sugar box.

0:27:380:27:43

It's in lovely condition.

0:27:430:27:45

It's marked on the bottom there, the date of that mark is round about 1880, 1890.

0:27:450:27:50

It think it's quite nice, not just for having on a table with sugar in,

0:27:500:27:54

you can use it for other things like bonbons, sweets.

0:27:540:27:58

-Are we allowed to eat them?

-Earrings.

0:27:580:28:01

If you wanted to use it for earrings, yes.

0:28:010:28:03

Earrings, what are you like?

0:28:050:28:08

It needs a wash. It's nice though, isn't it?

0:28:080:28:10

It's beautiful, yes.

0:28:100:28:12

-How much did you pay for it?

-£40.

0:28:120:28:15

-That's not bad, is it?

-And how much will it go for, do you think?

0:28:150:28:18

Well, I'm hoping that it might make something in the region of about £80 to £100.

0:28:180:28:24

-Do you like it yourself then, Pearl?

-Yes, I do, I think it's nice.

0:28:240:28:28

Well, treasure that moment, because, for the viewers at home,

0:28:280:28:30

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Barby's box.

0:28:300:28:33

One Royal Crown Derby wee covered box.

0:28:330:28:37

I like it, it's very colourful.

0:28:370:28:39

The best of the factories and this Imari palette, which I like...

0:28:390:28:43

with the rust red, the blues and the gilt decoration.

0:28:430:28:47

It's in good condition, it's absolutely fine, a good little piece.

0:28:470:28:52

-How much?

-£50 to £80.

0:28:520:28:54

-Brilliant. £40 paid, now that is a good bonus buy.

-Good buy.

0:28:540:28:56

That's a typical David Barby outing.

0:28:560:28:59

That's it for the reds, now the blues.

0:28:590:29:03

First up, we've got the silver-plated Scottish interest curling set,

0:29:030:29:09

which is really strange, isn't it?

0:29:090:29:11

I think these are lovely and they will appeal to the buyers.

0:29:110:29:15

There are many fans of the curling game in Scotland,

0:29:150:29:21

and these will find themselves in the premises of a curling champion or at least a curling enthusiast.

0:29:210:29:29

-Pity they're plate.

-Yes, but they are by a good maker.

0:29:290:29:33

-How much?

-£40 to £60.

0:29:330:29:35

Great. £40 paid. So, that's pretty cool.

0:29:350:29:38

Next is the olive-wood gavel, Masonic connection.

0:29:380:29:42

How much for that, do you think?

0:29:450:29:46

Well, there will be interest because of the Masonic connection, but I think £20 to £30.

0:29:460:29:52

Is that all? £55 paid.

0:29:520:29:55

You're going to have to hammer on here, you know?

0:29:560:29:58

Well, let's hope there are some budding auctioneers in the customers.

0:29:580:30:01

Who happen to be Masons?

0:30:010:30:02

Now, moving on then.

0:30:050:30:06

This footed bowl. Do you rate that?

0:30:060:30:09

Yes, it's a wonderful big piece of Doulton, lots of colour. I love the cobalt blue.

0:30:090:30:16

I love these blue full-blown roses in the centre and the pattern is called Gloire de Dijon.

0:30:160:30:23

Oh!

0:30:230:30:25

Doulton went to France.

0:30:250:30:27

Is it worth much?

0:30:270:30:29

Well, I've put it £70 to £100.

0:30:290:30:32

£100 was paid, whether that was a tad too much we'll find out in a moment.

0:30:320:30:37

Of course, if it drags them down, they're going to need their bonus buy. Let's go and have a look at it.

0:30:370:30:42

Now, Mark and Stephen you spent the magnificent £195,

0:30:430:30:47

that's a good score, you gave Carlos £105.

0:30:470:30:51

-Charles, what did you spend it on?

-Sometimes you've got to speculate,

0:30:510:30:54

and think big and maybe it's not the most fashionable of items, but it's got a fine quality.

0:30:540:31:02

Look at that.

0:31:020:31:03

I bought it as a cigarette case,

0:31:040:31:07

having seen it again today, I just wonder whether it's a cigarette case.

0:31:070:31:11

-Could it be a card case?

-It could be a card case. It cost me £100.

0:31:110:31:16

-Look at his face.

-You must remember the market for silver, the market for quality, is untainted.

0:31:160:31:23

OK, the condition isn't fantastic, but it's not far off.

0:31:230:31:28

So, Mark are you a bit sceptical about this?

0:31:280:31:30

I just think it's quite a high price.

0:31:310:31:33

I think this could be another Charles Hanson special.

0:31:330:31:36

For the right reasons.

0:31:360:31:39

Well done, Charles. You seem to have made quite an impression on your team.

0:31:390:31:42

Right now, let's find out from the auctioneer what she thinks about Charles's little box.

0:31:420:31:49

Here we go Anita, that's very smart, isn't it?

0:31:490:31:53

Yes, very, very stylish.

0:31:530:31:55

It's from the 1930s.

0:31:550:31:57

It has this wonderful combination of engine turned silver, marquisette and this black vitrolite.

0:31:570:32:05

And, it was made by Mappin & Webb, so it has quality.

0:32:050:32:10

I like it, bags of style.

0:32:100:32:12

Is it going to make loads of money?

0:32:120:32:14

-I would like to think so.

-How much?

0:32:140:32:16

I've estimated £70 to £100.

0:32:160:32:19

OK, well, it's Charles Hanson's bonus buy, as you know.

0:32:190:32:22

He sets great store by it.

0:32:220:32:24

He paid £100. A bit tight, isn't it?

0:32:240:32:27

-Might go there.

-You never know, the teams might not go with it...

0:32:270:32:31

if they're sensible. There we are.

0:32:310:32:33

Thank you very much, Anita.

0:32:330:32:35

We look forward to seeing you on the rostrum in a minute.

0:32:350:32:37

Mark and Stephen, how are you feeling?

0:32:450:32:47

Well, mmmm....hopeful.

0:32:470:32:49

What do you mean, "Mmm"? What does that mean, Mark?

0:32:490:32:51

-Unsure.

-You're unsure.

0:32:510:32:53

I have to tell you, this saleroom is fair humming today.

0:32:530:32:56

Just look at all these people in here and they've all come to buy your lots.

0:32:560:33:00

-Let's hope so.

-Let's hope so.

0:33:000:33:03

Here comes your novelty set.

0:33:030:33:06

Very good luck, chaps.

0:33:060:33:07

Lot 117 is a George IV silver-plated

0:33:070:33:12

novelty condiment set, cast in the form of little curling stones.

0:33:120:33:16

I can start the bidding at £20... with me at 20... 30...

0:33:160:33:24

I'll take it from the floor first.

0:33:240:33:26

40...50...60...70...80...

0:33:260:33:29

80... With you, madam. 80.

0:33:290:33:32

Any advance on 80...

0:33:320:33:35

With you at 80... 90...100...110...

0:33:350:33:40

Not finished yet.

0:33:400:33:41

120... Back in. 120...

0:33:410:33:45

With the lady... 125...

0:33:450:33:48

I'll take five... 125...

0:33:480:33:52

130... 135...

0:33:520:33:54

£135...

0:33:540:33:57

All done at £135... 135...

0:33:570:34:00

-Yes!

-Very good.

0:34:000:34:01

You've made a profit of £95.

0:34:010:34:06

£95 up on that.

0:34:060:34:09

Now, the Masonic gavel.

0:34:090:34:11

We have this early-20th-century olive-wood gavel. Can we say £80...

0:34:110:34:17

60... start me at £20... 20...

0:34:170:34:21

20 bid... 30...

0:34:230:34:24

40...

0:34:240:34:26

50... 60...

0:34:260:34:27

£60...

0:34:290:34:30

..For the olive-wood gavel. £60...

0:34:310:34:34

It is a good result, it is plus £5.

0:34:350:34:37

Marvellous, that is a good result, boys.

0:34:370:34:40

Mark, you spotted this bowl.

0:34:420:34:43

I would have paid £100 for it myself.

0:34:430:34:46

A fine piece of Doulton circa 1900.

0:34:460:34:51

Start me at £50... 50...

0:34:510:34:55

Any advance on 50... 60...

0:34:550:34:58

70... 80... 90...

0:34:580:35:00

With you, sir, at £90...

0:35:020:35:04

All done at £90... £90...

0:35:040:35:08

-She's done very well.

-She has.

0:35:090:35:11

£90. That's minus £10.

0:35:110:35:13

You had £100, you've now got £90.

0:35:130:35:15

Plus £90 is a very good result, lads. Congratulations.

0:35:150:35:18

Now, coincidentally, £100 was spent by Charles on the old black card case, what are you going to do?

0:35:180:35:26

Are you going to twist or stick?

0:35:260:35:29

-Bank the £90.

-Go with it.

0:35:290:35:31

-Could be a winning score, £90.

-Let's sell it.

-Sell it.

-Could be a winning score, £90.

0:35:310:35:39

-Stick.

-I don't know. I don't know.

0:35:390:35:43

Our strategy was if we were in that position...

0:35:430:35:48

-Stick. Not sell.

-We're finally sticking, yes?

-Stick.

0:35:480:35:52

Fine, we're not going with the bonus buy but we're going to sell it

0:35:520:35:55

just for the hell of it. Here it comes.

0:35:550:35:57

Is a 1930s Art Deco engine turned silver, marquisette box. £200...

0:35:590:36:04

for the Mappin & Webb box, 200...

0:36:040:36:07

150... 50...then 50...bid, any advance

0:36:070:36:11

on 50...60...70...80...

0:36:110:36:16

90...100...

0:36:160:36:19

110...

0:36:190:36:20

120... 130... 140...150

0:36:220:36:25

150... It's with you, sir, at £150.

0:36:250:36:30

Any advance... 160!

0:36:300:36:33

160...

0:36:350:36:37

Fresh bidder at 160... Oh, it's great fun, isn't it?

0:36:370:36:39

160... With you, madam, £160...

0:36:390:36:43

-£160.

-Well, done, Charles.

-Guys, thank you very much.

0:36:430:36:46

I have to shake you by the hand, matey, because that is a result.

0:36:460:36:50

Two chips on the outside edge of that thing, but it still made £160.

0:36:500:36:56

It's a triumph, Charles. Well done.

0:36:560:36:58

Bad luck, lads.

0:36:580:37:00

The pressure was on you to bank your £90 and I don't blame you at all in

0:37:000:37:03

banking your money because it could easily have gone the other way.

0:37:030:37:06

But there you go, he's your man.

0:37:060:37:08

Well, done, Charles. The thing is don't say a word to the reds.

0:37:080:37:13

Now, you kids, are you feeling nervous?

0:37:170:37:20

No, beside you never.

0:37:200:37:22

Oh, Pearl, you're such a singer.

0:37:220:37:26

-What about you, Carol, how are you feeling?

-Terrified.

0:37:260:37:27

-You're feeling terrified.

-Absolutely.

0:37:270:37:29

-You look dead cool to me.

-Do I?

0:37:290:37:31

What are you terrified about?

0:37:310:37:33

-In case we don't win.

-Oh, it's her competitive nature.

0:37:330:37:36

First up are the so called egg cups-cum-serviette rings.

0:37:360:37:42

I'm holding bids on this lot and I can start the bidding at £50...

0:37:420:37:48

60... with me. 70... 80... 90...

0:37:480:37:51

100... 110...

0:37:510:37:53

-You're in profit girls.

-120...

0:37:530:37:55

I'm out. With you sir at £120...

0:37:550:37:59

130...

0:37:590:38:01

140...

0:38:010:38:03

150... 160...

0:38:030:38:06

£160... All done at 160...

0:38:060:38:10

That's what I love, plus £70.

0:38:100:38:13

Now, what's going to happen with your pepperette? Here it comes.

0:38:170:38:20

£80... 80... 60... Start me at £20...

0:38:200:38:24

20... bid 30... 40... 50...

0:38:240:38:27

£50...

0:38:270:38:30

60... fresh bidder 70... £70...

0:38:300:38:32

Look at this you only paid £45.

0:38:320:38:36

-All done at £70...

-It's a profit. That is plus £25.

0:38:360:38:43

Now, the Moorcroft bowl.

0:38:450:38:47

Is she going to be right here? Is it going to double its money?

0:38:470:38:51

A rare piece of Moorcroft, ladies and gentlemen.

0:38:510:38:56

I'm holding bids.

0:38:560:38:57

I can start the bidding at £80...

0:38:570:39:01

90... 100 with me. 110... 120...

0:39:010:39:06

-You're in profit.

-130... 140...

0:39:060:39:07

150... 160... 170... 180...

0:39:070:39:12

£180... 190... Fresh bidder. 200...

0:39:120:39:19

-Look out.

-The bid's with me at £200...

0:39:190:39:25

Any advance on 200?

0:39:250:39:27

All done at 200...

0:39:270:39:31

That is plus £100. Hey, hang on

0:39:310:39:36

a minute you've got plus £195.

0:39:360:39:39

You're nigh on £200 in profit.

0:39:390:39:43

-Are we going for it?

-We have to, yeah.

0:39:430:39:45

The Royal Crown Derby sugar bowl.

0:39:450:39:47

It's not much to lose, even if it loses the whole £40.

0:39:470:39:49

We'll go with you. It's a lovely thing.

0:39:490:39:52

-Are you going to go with it?

-Yes.

0:39:520:39:55

-Yeah.

-You're happy with that.

-Derby from Barby.

0:39:550:39:57

Barby from Derby.

0:39:570:39:59

-OK. We're going to go with it? That's the decision.

-Yes.

0:39:590:40:02

-Yes.

-OK, we're going with the bonus buy.

0:40:020:40:04

Here comes the Royal Crown Derby sugar box.

0:40:040:40:06

Start me at £50,

0:40:060:40:08

ladies and gentlemen. Start me at £50 in the Royal Crown Derby.

0:40:080:40:12

20 bid. I'll take 20.

0:40:120:40:14

Any advance on 20?

0:40:140:40:16

30... 40... 50...

0:40:160:40:17

The lady at 50...

0:40:170:40:19

With you madam at £50...

0:40:190:40:21

60...

0:40:230:40:25

All done at £60.

0:40:250:40:29

A profit of plus £20, thank you very much. That's £215.

0:40:290:40:36

Well, done David, that's very nice.

0:40:360:40:38

That's the business, David.

0:40:380:40:39

Hey! Hey!

0:40:390:40:41

I don't know what you were worried about.

0:40:410:40:43

Don't say a word to the blues, everything is sealed.

0:40:430:40:48

Well, what a phenomenally successful programme we've had today.

0:40:520:40:56

What fun! Have you been chatting to one another?

0:40:560:40:58

-No.

-I wouldn't talk to them.

0:40:580:41:00

-You wouldn't talk to them.

-Oh.

-Oh.

0:41:000:41:02

I can reveal that both teams have made substantial profits today.

0:41:020:41:10

And it's all a question of scale and of course strategy.

0:41:100:41:14

Go with the bonus buy, trust your expert and you can win out big time.

0:41:140:41:20

Distrust him and sadly you can finish up as being

0:41:200:41:24

runners up, which is what happened today with our blues.

0:41:240:41:29

A very respectable profit score of plus £90.

0:41:290:41:33

So £90 coming your way, which is folding money in this business, I can tell you.

0:41:330:41:38

That is the most brilliant score and congratulations.

0:41:380:41:41

-Did you enjoy it?

-Had a great time.

0:41:410:41:43

-Did you, Mark? Very good Stephen, I'm glad you enjoyed it. Thank you, Charles.

-Pleasure as always.

0:41:430:41:46

For your dynamic contribution.

0:41:460:41:50

But the victors today, who have won by taking away £215 in cash.

0:41:500:41:57

There's £210 and here comes your 15 in little squits.

0:41:570:42:02

There's your £215, which is amazing, isn't it?

0:42:020:42:06

-It's fabulous.

-Just amazing.

0:42:060:42:08

And over all I have the additional pleasure of presenting the red team today with the award

0:42:080:42:16

of the golden gavel, what never gets presented on Bargain Hunt.

0:42:160:42:21

For avid fans, they know the golden gavel award

0:42:210:42:24

goes to the team that makes a profit on all three of their items.

0:42:240:42:27

An event that never happens on Bargain Hunt, except that today it has.

0:42:270:42:31

Therefore please take your pin, which is the successor to the golden gavel,

0:42:310:42:36

but its still called the golden gavel award because we're a pretty eccentric programme.

0:42:360:42:43

LAUGHTER

0:42:430:42:44

Well, done, wear it with pride.

0:42:440:42:47

-We shall.

-Congratulations there aren't very many of them around.

0:42:470:42:50

We've had a super day. Join us soon for some more bargain hunting, yes?

0:42:500:42:53

-ALL:

-Yes!

0:42:530:42:55

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:150:43:16

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:160:43:18

Bargain Hunt visits Scotland's capital, where another pair of teams compete to see who can make the most money at auction. Their experts are Charles Hanson and the maestro, David Barby.

Presenter Tim Wonnacott pays a visit to London, and explores the wonders of the William Morris Gallery.