Newark 30 Bargain Hunt


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Newark 30

Bargain Hunt visits Newark Antiques and Collectors Fair, where a pair of farmers take on a couple of West Country girls, with help from Paul Laidlaw and Jeremy Lamond.


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Ha-ha! We're at the biggest fair in Europe.

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Just as well I've got transport. Let's go bargain hunting!

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With over 2,000 stalls for our teams to choose from,

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they're going to be spoilt for choice.

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How will they cope?

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How indeed?

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'Luckily, our teams have some expert guidance today.'

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'Paul Laidlaw's being tactful with the Reds.'

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-What about this?

-It's...

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About as unfashionable as you're going to pick up today. I hope!

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'And Jeremy Lamond's performing for the Blues.'

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'So, let's meet the teams.'

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Well, well, well, here we are.

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Two teams of firm friends. Hello everybody. Now, Susan and David.

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You've known each other for absolutely yonks, haven't you, Sue?

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We have, yes. We first met at infant school

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in the village where we lived on neighbouring farms.

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-Right.

-And then joined up again in Young Farmers.

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How do you keep up now, then?

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-My job is as a milk recorder.

-What's that mean?

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Well, I go to nine dairy farms in the area where I live

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and one of the farms I visit is where David milks.

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How long has he been in this business?

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I've been milking cows since I was 10, so well over 45 years now.

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-And how many cows do you milk, David?

-180.

-180 lactations?

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Because it's quite complicated.

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You're doing the nine or ten farms and there's 180 in all of them?

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The majority of them. There's no more small farms left.

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So, 1,500 of these girls, all milking as hard as they can.

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And they do not go to finishing school, the young ladies.

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No, quite. So to day's going to be a walk in the park, isn't it?

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What are your tactics, you two?

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We're not going to spend a lot of money on one particular item.

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-No, we're not, we're farmers!

-Very tight!

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Very tight!

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-You know why farmers are mainly bald?

-Why's that?

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Because when they're told the price of something they go, "How much?!"

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It's true!

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-Very, very, very good luck.

-Thank you.

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Now, for the Blues, our wee girls, who must be

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quaking in your boots, having heard all this chat from the Reds, right?

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-I mean, it's quite frightening, with these two in full flight.

-Yes!

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Kelly? How did you two meet?

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We met when we were 11 at secondary school.

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We've just been friends ever since,

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we've had lots of girly holidays, lots of drunken nights out

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and on another night out, we both met our husbands, on the same night.

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What happened with these boys, then? They spotted you?

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I don't know. I think it was about ten to two

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and there was a bit of desperation setting in at the end of the night!

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Kelly went to the toilet and Matthew, Kelly's husband now,

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came over and said, when your friend comes back,

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will you ask her if she will dance with me?

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This, at ten to two?

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It was quite late. So he didn't have to buy any drinks!

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So, she ended up dancing with Matthew, and I ended up

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dancing with his friend, and they were actually ex-brother-in-laws.

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What an extraordinary thing.

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Two ex-brother-in-laws pick up two chicks in some clubs somewhere,

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-and finish up by marrying them?

-Yep.

-Amazing.

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So, which of you two is going to be in charge of the bargaining today?

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Well, we're both quite tight, but Kelly's tighter than I am.

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She's taken after her husband. That's a shocker!

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Well, anyway, I'm not tight, because here comes £300. Look at this.

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Look at this, lighting up of faces, £300.

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You know the rules, your experts await, and off you go!

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And very, very good luck. I hope they're not going to be too tight.

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'Tight or not, it's the farmers versus the West Country girls,

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and they're off!

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-Guess who's got the compass!

-We'll certainly need one, it's huge!

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I've got the Sat Nav, is that any good?

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Anything in mind?

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Anything a bit quirky, really, a bit different.

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Well, you've got me, so... that's a good start.

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'You said it, Jeremy!'

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You see these quirky-looking vases? What do you think of those?

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Ugh, I don't really like them.

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They're different!

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Or that sort of flying-saucer-shaped glass dish,

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probably by a factory like Vasart or Monart, it's Scottish.

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The Ysart Brothers made this sort of thing.

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And what you want to check for, especially with glass,

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is that it's not chipped or cracked.

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So if we give it a quick ding, it sounds like a bell, doesn't it?

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How old do you think it is?

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It could be 1930s, '40s.

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There's a little bit of a mark on there,

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is that going to affect the value?

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-Somebody's been painting.

-Or, is it glass?

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No, it's a bit of a firing flaw.

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Makes it a bit more unique, I suppose.

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Yeah, but it's unusual, isn't it? I think that's worth a go.

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But it's your day, ladies.

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I like the colour as well.

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It's interesting, isn't it? So, shall we go and negotiate?

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Yeah! If we get it at a good price, yeah.

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-Oh, hiya, what's the best price you can do on this?

-25, that one.

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Is there any way you could do 20?

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I can't do 20, I'm sorry.

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-What about 23?

-24?

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-Yeah?

-24?

-Brilliant, yeah!

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Thanks very much. I'll put some paper around it.

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'Cor, you don't waste any time, girls!'

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'Sue and David, are you having as much success?'

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It smacks of old fashioned. It's not odd.

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What about this?

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Ah, it's...

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About as unfashionable as you're going to pick up today,

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I hope!

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-Does it have wow factor?

-No.

-Why are you looking at it?

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What are we doing here?

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'Bargain-hunting, I hope!'

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'Come on, Reds, get with the programme!'

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-For those, it must be in great condition.

-I don't like it.

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I know you didn't, because when I said about it,

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I could see your face.

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Maybe something we can come back to.

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-Yeah!

-Let's do the blue bowl.

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-No, no, no.

-No go?

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-That's unusual, isn't it?

-Yeah, it is unusual.

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Quite a rare thing, £70 on it.

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That's really weird, isn't it?

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A little wind-up, there.

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That's fantastic. It's quirky, isn't it?

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-Is it a bit damaged?

-There's a little bit of the leg's been renewed.

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Reflected in the price, really.

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It's lithograph tinplate, isn't it?

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-I'm not sure exactly what it is.

-Does it say underneath? 1895.

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-What do you think?

-I think it's worth having a go at.

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It's got some slight damage - will that affect the value?

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I think, to some collectors, it will do.

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-There are collectors of that kind of thing, aren't there?

-Yes.

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I will take a vote on that, because it is so unusual.

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We can do it for 60, if you like it.

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-Can you do it for 50, or is that...?

-Because it's a bit damaged.

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-I can do 55, meet in the middle.

-Yeah, all right then.

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Happy with that, thank you. Cheers.

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'Wow! Two already!'

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Now, David, have you finally found something to tempt Paul?

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What you seeing, Dave?

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Do you know anything about that?

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I know we're back where we started.

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Victorian pots!

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'That will be a "no", then!'

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We could pick up Victorian china till we're sunburnt to a frazzle

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and we'll not find anything worth selling.

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If I'm being honest, I think they're picking up the wrong material.

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It's pieces they like, and that's fair enough,

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but they're unsaleable at auction.

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I've got to steer them, I suspect, towards things they don't like.

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And that may be a problem.

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The programme's not called Buy Something You Like And Lose Money,

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it's called Bargain Hunt!

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Argh!

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'You said it!'

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'Time for a team talk, I'd say.'

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We need to focus here. I think the china, we've got to start ignoring.

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Different. Out of the box. Something that grabs you.

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Not something you'd like on the mantelpiece, something that, "wow!"

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OK, so, 12 minutes, two lots, we've got one more to get

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and we're squeezed into a 48-minute time window.

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'Nobody likes a braggart, Jeremy!'

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'You have been pretty snappy, though!'

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'And look, I found something pretty snappy, too.'

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Have you had your lunch?

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I do hope so, because I don't want this to upset you.

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What do you think about him? How spooky is that?

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It's a type of crocodile called a garvial.

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G-A-R-V-I-A-L.

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Spelled a variety of ways, but a type of crocodile

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that's typically found in India, and this is a fellow who likes

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to swim around, in deep rivers, because he's a fish eater.

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He flips around very efficiently and digs up lots of fish.

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And my theory with this is,

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that some British administrator in India, round about 1880-1900,

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nabbed this as a trophy,

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because it's been most expertly mounted by a taxidermist.

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We've got a panel of pine here at the back

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that provides the support for the skin

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that the taxidermist has overlaid on the top,

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and then, the taxidermist has done the amusing thing

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of taking a couple of his child's marbles -

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this is the bit where you need to have had your lunch -

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and he's stuffed the marble inside the skin

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to give this protuberant eye, which is what the species actually has.

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And what I like about this particular example,

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the quality of the mount itself and the fact,

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as a furnishing piece, you can see it in some baronial hall.

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If we put it there, as if it was mounted on a wall,

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you get to see the scale of this extraordinary snout

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to anybody who's walking by underneath.

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What's this handsome piece of taxidermy worth?

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Well, the dealer wants £100 for it.

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Seems to me it's a bit of a snip!

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Snap!

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# But the biggest kick I ever got, was doing a thing... #

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-Shall we press on?

-Yep.

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# While the other kids were rocking round the clock

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# We were hoppin' and boppin' to the crocodile rock, well... #

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What do you think about the accordion - is that a collector's?

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I can't judge it as an instrument.

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We are perfectly at liberty to embarrass ourselves

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by picking it up and squeezing it,

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but if said, can you sell that?

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I'd say, yes. What's it going to make? Possibly £80.

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-I quite like that...

-Then ask the question!

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Excuse me, how much is the accordion?

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The accordion is 65.

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Is in good working order?

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The irony is that I haven't, I've had a go at it,

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but all the notes work, and all the buttons work.

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There we go.

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Oh, you've done this before!

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I've played the piano, but that's usually down here!

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I don't pick a piano up and play it like this.

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What did you say the price was?

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I'll only go what I always get for them which is 50 quid.

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Yeah, I think you would. Italian, German, I don't know.

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They live in attics, they get damp and they start to peel.

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Now, there has been moisture and a wee bit of oxidation to the plating there

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but the good news is, it's all there and none of that, we'll call it veneer, has lifted.

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This is all good. You've checked the bellows, it's a working instrument.

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-No damage on it at all.

-It's got mileage.

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-I like it.

-That's the case?

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The back bit's a bit...

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So it's probably the original case, Paul?

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Oh, yes. It's been used.

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I see it as a gamble at 50 quid

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because I've said it's worth £40 to £80.

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Anywhere on God's earth today, 40 quid?

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No, no. Because I will get 50 quid for that today.

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That's fair enough. The guy's being straight. Let's take it or leave it.

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-I like it.

-Yeah? Go for it.

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-Yep, number one.

-First one.

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Thanking you.

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Thank you very much.

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Looks like that pep-talk worked, Paul. One down.

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You've picked up the pace. Unlike those Blues.

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Are you dithering, chicks?

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What about a piano? A lovely arts and crafts piano?

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What is that?

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Her you are, ladies. An adding machine.

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No? Not for you?

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No, not for me. No.

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I've got a calculator!

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Silver, no?

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Keep a hold of that before you do anything.

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Not a fantastic age but a bit of quality.

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What's the hallmark, Paul?

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-Birmingham.

-Sheffield.

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Birmingham.

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Is it Birmingham? I can't remember.

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Dear though.

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Well, when they were bought, they were 200 quid apiece.

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That's the way the world is.

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You buy it today, it's worth a tenth of that tomorrow.

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Sorry, how much did you say for them?

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90 quid, the pair.

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To take them home, you're spot on. But you know the game we're playing.

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It's got to be a trade purchase and that's not a trade price.

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It's a good retail price.

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400 quid's worth, down to...

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No, it doesn't work like that!

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What's the death? They like them and they're the bosses.

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80 quid.

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The problem with them is, they're second hand.

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Not antiques, not collector's items, they're second hand glass,

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with a wee bit of silver on the top.

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Right. It's a possibility.

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60 quid. All right?

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-I like them.

-I think they're stylish.

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Yes.

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Good. Shake the man's hand. Thank him.

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Thank you very much.

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Good haggling, Paul.

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But, teams, you both still need to find that elusive third item.

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1777. I mean...

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-That's collectible.

-Yeah.

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-It's a lovely shape.

-How much?

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190.

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Thank you very much.

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Right, thank you.

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It's harder than it looks, isn't it?

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I like that. Being in the farming community,

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we're attracted to cows, but they're not black and white ones.

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We've seen a couple of things in here that we quite like the look of.

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-Do you want to have a look?

-Yes, can we?

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-It's a champagne tap.

-Ooh, is it? Even better!

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-Is it a marked silver at all?

-No.

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What do you think it will be made of?

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It will be electroplated.

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The champagne tap at £55.

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Do you think the case would have been made for it?

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Well, yeah, it's a very good fit. It looks like a little coffin case.

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I don't know that as a plated one you'd make much on that.

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I can do it for 35.

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Well, that's tempting, isn't it?

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That is tempting.

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What do you think?

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I think it's nice the way it comes in its original case.

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-You like the case?

-Yes.

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How much did you say?

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-35.

-35? What do you think?

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I think, yeah. I really like it. I think it suits us both.

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For our drinking days!

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That would be the last thing.

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35, it's good, isn't it?

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Plenty of money for you to spend.

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-I think we are popping corks at that.

-Yeah!

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Oh, Jeremy!

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I know it's marked, it's damaged.

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-What's the base like?

-It looks a bit...

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It's just a nice wee box. 20 quid wouldn't buy it? Wee box?

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No, thank you.

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Fair enough. Any compromise at all?

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No, not at all.

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The cogs are going, I can see them.

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Um...

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..it's the First Lancashire Fusiliers,

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but will you be able to sell it?

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Buy it.

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Yeah?

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Aargh!

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That's what a soldier kept his bits and bobs in

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and there's a market for that,

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a regimental collector would pay you £80, £120 for that,

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no trouble at all.

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But in this auction, I'm worried that it's going to be overlooked. But it's got to make 30 quid...

0:17:120:17:17

Buy it and take a gamble that there's a military specialist there.

0:17:170:17:20

That's a good thing. If you don't buy it, I'm buying it.

0:17:200:17:23

What date-wise are you putting it at? Victorian?

0:17:230:17:26

It's 1890, it's Sudan War, it's Boer War.

0:17:260:17:29

The only thing I'm concerned about is, will they pick out the damage?

0:17:290:17:33

It's a soldier's box. That's what it is.

0:17:330:17:36

It's seen a campaign.

0:17:360:17:37

It's not about the inside. It's had tools in it.

0:17:370:17:40

Lovely, original, painted finish. That's our man there.

0:17:420:17:46

Mick McEwan, First Lancashire

0:17:460:17:50

F-U-S, Fusiliers.

0:17:500:17:53

Lovely little thing. Yes?

0:17:530:17:55

Yes, we'll go for it.

0:17:550:17:57

A man's life was in that.

0:17:570:17:58

Yours might be if it doesn't make a profit!

0:17:580:18:03

Now, finally, the teams can rest their old legs because time's up.

0:18:060:18:11

What exactly did Sue and David buy?

0:18:110:18:14

You've done this before!

0:18:150:18:17

An accordion for £50 was music to their ears.

0:18:170:18:21

The accordion should do 40 to 80

0:18:210:18:23

so they're in with a shout, that's fair enough.

0:18:230:18:27

They got the deal they wanted

0:18:270:18:28

for the pair of glass and silver decanters.

0:18:280:18:32

And the military box grabbed Paul and wouldn't let him go...

0:18:330:18:37

You've got a deal. Thank you.

0:18:370:18:39

..making a grand total of £140 spent.

0:18:400:18:43

-Kids, how was that?

-Wonderful.

0:18:430:18:45

You've finished?

0:18:450:18:46

-Yes, we have. It's been brilliant.

-What fun!

0:18:460:18:49

-Please may I have 160 of leftover lolly.

-You may, reluctantly.

0:18:490:18:52

There's the 160, straight across to Paul, very, very cunning man.

0:18:520:18:56

Anyway, you go and have a cup of tea. You go on your trawl.

0:18:560:18:59

Meanwhile, we're going to find out what the blue team bought.

0:18:590:19:03

They raced off the starter's blocks with a glass bowl for £24.

0:19:050:19:09

Unusual was the order of the day when it came to the clockwork bug.

0:19:110:19:16

I think it's fun and quirky. I think it'll sell well

0:19:160:19:19

and it might be just the one that saves the day for us.

0:19:190:19:24

And they finished with an electro- plated champagne tap for £35,

0:19:240:19:30

leaving them with £186 of leftover lolly for Jeremy.

0:19:300:19:35

Which is your favourite piece?

0:19:350:19:38

I think the clockwork bug.

0:19:380:19:40

Yeah, the wind-up beetle thing. I really like that.

0:19:400:19:42

-Which piece is going to bring the biggest profit?

-Hopefully that.

0:19:420:19:46

-There you go, J. Including your last pound.

-Lovely.

0:19:460:19:49

How do you feel about this shopping expedition?

0:19:490:19:52

I think I'm in the right shop.

0:19:520:19:54

It's a fantastic place, isn't it?

0:19:540:19:56

The variety of objects are unbelievable.

0:19:560:19:58

It's huge, yeah.

0:19:580:20:00

So, girls, you go and relax up. Your task lies ahead of you, Jeremy.

0:20:000:20:03

Meanwhile, we're going to head off to Sulgrave Manor

0:20:030:20:06

and it's fab.

0:20:060:20:09

This is Sulgrave Manor in Northamptonshire.

0:20:170:20:21

It was built between 1539 and 1560 by Lawrence Washington.

0:20:210:20:27

Washington made his money in the wool trade

0:20:270:20:31

and in the 1920s, the manor was restored to give a glimpse

0:20:310:20:34

of what life would have been like for a Tudor farmer.

0:20:340:20:37

And this room is called the Great Hall.

0:20:410:20:44

In the Tudor period, the Great Hall was still a communal space.

0:20:440:20:50

A space where the entire household would eat.

0:20:500:20:54

The master might be at one end of the table

0:20:540:20:57

and all the servants below the salt at the other.

0:20:570:21:02

And it's appropriate that this refectory table has in the centre

0:21:020:21:08

a bowl which reflects that communal sense of eating and celebration.

0:21:080:21:13

This is something called a wassail bowl

0:21:130:21:18

and this single block has been mounted on a lathe,

0:21:180:21:21

a pretty big lathe, I have to say, and then spun.

0:21:210:21:23

The idea of a big communal drinking vessel like this

0:21:230:21:27

is that it would be used to celebrate perhaps the harvest coming in or a wedding.

0:21:270:21:33

The ingredients used for wassail aren't precisely recorded

0:21:330:21:38

but there'd definitely be alcohol in it, probably mead,

0:21:380:21:42

various sweetenings like honey and essence

0:21:420:21:46

all blended together into the wassail bowl,

0:21:460:21:51

out of which the hooch would be ladled and passed around the table.

0:21:510:21:56

Next door, we've got a group of objects

0:21:560:21:58

which can be directly linked to this Tudor Great Hall.

0:21:580:22:03

These two coins, a shilling, dated 1572

0:22:030:22:08

and a sixpenny piece, dated 1567,

0:22:080:22:11

were discovered in the ceiling above this room

0:22:110:22:16

during the 1920s restoration.

0:22:160:22:18

And down below, even more poignantly, I think,

0:22:180:22:24

is this a little Tudor leather child's shoe.

0:22:240:22:28

Perhaps kicked off by some petulant infant

0:22:280:22:33

which somehow found its way behind the wainscoting and into the ceiling void.

0:22:330:22:38

But look at how beautifully it's made.

0:22:380:22:40

Fine leather, as you'd expect in Northamptonshire,

0:22:400:22:44

and stitched with practically invisible tiny little stitches.

0:22:440:22:48

Extraordinary.

0:22:480:22:50

Of course, the big question today is,

0:22:500:22:52

will our teams be finding any booty over at the auction?

0:22:520:22:56

Which today is at Golding Young Thomas Mawer in Grantham

0:22:590:23:03

where auctioneer Colin Young hopes to get the best possible prices for us.

0:23:030:23:08

But first, let's see what Paul found for his bonus buy.

0:23:100:23:14

Now, here we come with the bonus buy. You gave him £160.

0:23:140:23:18

Did you spend of the lot, Paul?

0:23:180:23:20

-I feel slightly dirty about this.

-I beg your pardon? Dirty?

0:23:200:23:24

-I'm not proud of this.

-Oh, come on!

0:23:240:23:28

I do strive to pick things that haven't been seen before.

0:23:280:23:31

In this instance, I just took the money and ran.

0:23:310:23:35

Behold! Another piece of Moorcroft.

0:23:350:23:38

It could have been a tea caddy.

0:23:380:23:40

It could have been a tortoiseshell card box.

0:23:400:23:43

But no, it's Moorcroft.

0:23:430:23:46

-You know what that is. You know the world loves it.

-Yes.

0:23:460:23:49

You take it from me, that is worth certainly £50, £60.

0:23:490:23:53

-And you paid how much, Paul?

-£28.

0:23:530:23:55

SHE GASPS

0:23:550:23:56

I just had to grab it.

0:23:560:23:57

Do you like Moorcroft?

0:23:570:23:59

I love Moorcroft.

0:23:590:24:00

You love it, Sue?

0:24:000:24:02

I do. It's hibiscus as well.

0:24:020:24:04

Hibiscus! She knows her patterns.

0:24:040:24:06

It's even got its original trade label on it.

0:24:060:24:08

That's amazing, isn't it?

0:24:080:24:10

-Is that not amazing?

-It's gorgeous.

0:24:100:24:12

Don't bang yourself up about getting an piece of Moorcroft if you can buy it half-price.

0:24:120:24:17

It was a no-brainer, as they say.

0:24:170:24:19

Treasure those thoughts. Your choice will come after the sale of your first three items.

0:24:190:24:24

Right now, for the viewers at home, let's find out

0:24:240:24:27

what the auctioneer thinks about Paul's Moorcroft pot.

0:24:270:24:31

-There's a little sweetheart, look.

-It's a pretty little thing.

0:24:310:24:34

Not one of the biggest pieces of Moorcroft I've come across but...

0:24:340:24:37

Size isn't everything, Colin.

0:24:370:24:39

No, it's the pattern that's important.

0:24:390:24:42

We've got a good hibiscus pattern.

0:24:420:24:44

I would have thought, even on the scale and size,

0:24:440:24:47

we are looking at £50 to £80 for it.

0:24:470:24:50

That's brilliant. £28 was paid by Laidlaw. That's a good buy?

0:24:500:24:54

Yeah, absolutely.

0:24:540:24:56

Next is the accordion. I've never played one of these things, I don't know whether you have, Colin?

0:24:560:25:01

I've had a bash at a couple of these over the years.

0:25:010:25:05

It's what they used to call lavatory seat mother of pearl, isn't it?

0:25:050:25:08

Yes, it is.

0:25:080:25:09

Where you get this finish that looks like mother of pearl, but it's just plastic actually.

0:25:090:25:14

This was made in Germany, I suppose, in the 1950s, something like that.

0:25:140:25:19

So how do you rate this thing?

0:25:190:25:21

-We've placed an estimate of £25 to £40 on it.

-Is that all?

0:25:210:25:24

£50 they paid for it and they really quite rate it.

0:25:240:25:29

Next are these modern decanters and stoppers, Royal Brierley,

0:25:290:25:35

still got the label on, given as a wedding present in 1972, no doubt.

0:25:350:25:39

Never been used, hence the original labels.

0:25:390:25:42

What do you think they're worth?

0:25:420:25:43

They still make £30 or £40 apiece

0:25:430:25:46

so we've put an estimate of £60 to £80.

0:25:460:25:48

£60 our team paid. So that's all right. 60 to 80, we like that estimate.

0:25:480:25:53

Lastly it's the regimental tuck box.

0:25:530:25:56

Paul Laidlaw loves this, of course, because it's military. Do you rate it?

0:25:560:26:00

I do and I think he's going to have a wry smile on his face when he sees

0:26:000:26:04

the rest of the militaria in the sale that will go nicely with it.

0:26:040:26:08

So it's in good company today.

0:26:080:26:10

We've put an estimate of 25 to 40 and if it's going to make its money, it'll make it today.

0:26:100:26:15

Well, it's got to make more than 30. Is that a deal?

0:26:150:26:18

No deals to be done with the auctioneer, I can tell you.

0:26:190:26:22

No, that's up to the buyers.

0:26:220:26:24

Anyway, that's it for the Reds, now for the Blues.

0:26:240:26:27

First up for them is the posy vase.

0:26:270:26:30

It's quite a big posy to go in there.

0:26:300:26:32

It's a good centrepiece. It'll certainly be a statement on anybody's dining table.

0:26:320:26:37

-Do think it's Scottish? It looks Scottish.

-Undoubtedly.

0:26:370:26:40

As for value on it, we see a lot of these things that are unmarked,

0:26:400:26:43

and they generally make mid-tens, £40, £60, that sort of range.

0:26:430:26:48

£24 our team paid. So that was the right price to pay.

0:26:480:26:51

Next is that clockwork bug, call it a beetle if you like.

0:26:510:26:57

How do you rate those?

0:26:570:26:59

Oh, I like those sort of things.

0:26:590:27:00

There's always a lot of in toys in the sales.

0:27:000:27:03

And tin plate, in particular, is doing very well at the moment.

0:27:030:27:06

-And what's it worth?

-Well, the condition isn't great.

0:27:060:27:09

So, something like that which should be worth well over £100,

0:27:090:27:12

I've put an estimate of 30-50, which I think reflects the condition.

0:27:120:27:16

-Oh dear, £55 they paid.

-They stand a chance.

0:27:160:27:19

Well, still a chance.

0:27:190:27:20

And lastly, we've got the champagne tap, here.

0:27:200:27:24

That's a nice example, isn't it?

0:27:240:27:26

It is a nice example, it's generally not the sort of thing that you would put as a single lot, though.

0:27:260:27:32

It just seems fairly low in value.

0:27:320:27:35

We've put an estimate of £10-20 on it.

0:27:350:27:38

Not something that really excites me and I think it may not do that well.

0:27:380:27:43

£25 paid. If it was made of silver it would be helpful.

0:27:430:27:46

-But it's just mixed plate, or whatever it is.

-Yeah, that's it. Yeah.

0:27:460:27:50

So, I think this is a risky group for the Blues.

0:27:500:27:54

So risky, in fact, they're likely to need their bonus buy.

0:27:540:27:57

So, let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:570:27:59

Now we're going to find out what Jeremy Lamond spent your £186 on.

0:28:010:28:05

Well, I thought, "What would we need for the winners' party?

0:28:050:28:09

"We'd need a jug, from which we could drink."

0:28:090:28:11

So, I bought you a Doulton Blackjack,

0:28:110:28:16

which is a copy of a leather jug made in the 17th century.

0:28:160:28:19

And it's mounted with silver in the Victorian period.

0:28:190:28:23

And just so we don't get too rowdy it says, "Drink fair, don't swear."

0:28:230:28:28

DAVID LAUGHS

0:28:280:28:29

-So, there we are.

-Well, that's the motto for BBC, isn't it, really?

0:28:290:28:32

Have a look.

0:28:320:28:33

-It's certainly unusual.

-So, what date was it made, then?

0:28:350:28:38

It's about 1895, or so.

0:28:380:28:41

It's not something I would personally buy but, um, it's unusual, I think.

0:28:410:28:46

Would you drink out of it personally?

0:28:460:28:48

I'd drink out of anything.

0:28:480:28:50

And what are you going to pay for something that's silver mounted,

0:28:500:28:53

complete, a bit quirky, three figures?

0:28:530:28:56

-That means you didn't pay.

-Probably a lot?

0:28:560:28:58

THEY LAUGH

0:28:580:28:59

-I don't know, what about, umm...£80?

-£90.

-£90.

0:29:000:29:04

-How much will it make?

-Well, I hope 100-150.

0:29:040:29:07

Anyway, you girls treasure those thoughts because right now, for the viewers at home,

0:29:070:29:12

we're going to find out what the auctioneer thinks about J's jug.

0:29:120:29:15

-Isn't it clever, Colin? I mean, looks like leather.

-Yep.

0:29:170:29:21

-Almost feels like leather. Except it's too heavy.

-Yeah.

0:29:210:29:24

What I like about it is, though,

0:29:240:29:26

the way the pottery has been moulded with these little rivets

0:29:260:29:29

and then the rivets are coloured as if they're copper.

0:29:290:29:33

You know, you've got a really realistic effect there.

0:29:330:29:36

They are, they're really popular at auction, these Blackjack jugs.

0:29:360:29:39

As far as this model's concerned, being fairly restrained

0:29:390:29:42

in its silver mounting, we've placed 60-90 on this one.

0:29:420:29:46

£90 paid by Jeremy who rates it.

0:29:460:29:49

-Yeah.

-He's clearly thinking that he's going to make a profit on it

0:29:490:29:52

if the team decide to go with it.

0:29:520:29:55

That's sometimes the million dollar question.

0:29:550:29:57

You standing by?

0:29:570:29:58

Good in voice and fine fettle.

0:29:580:30:00

Strong in gavel.

0:30:000:30:02

This is an unusual object, you know.

0:30:130:30:15

For a kick-off, just have a look at the size of this ceramic dish.

0:30:150:30:21

It probably dates from around about 1850

0:30:210:30:25

and this thing has been made entirely for ornamental purposes.

0:30:250:30:30

And it's something that's called faience.

0:30:300:30:34

Now, faience is just tin-glazed earthenware, like majolica.

0:30:340:30:39

And if you look here, you can see where it's had a chip.

0:30:390:30:43

The area underneath is pale yellow earthenware

0:30:430:30:47

that's had a very thin layer of tin glaze put on the earthenware to seal it.

0:30:470:30:54

It's then been decorated on top of the tin glaze

0:30:540:30:58

and the artist, whose name I can't quite make out in the grass here

0:30:580:31:03

at the bottom but I can definitely make out Napoli,

0:31:030:31:06

so it comes from Naples.

0:31:060:31:10

This is a scene from Greek mythology.

0:31:100:31:13

We've got the most beautiful girl with most of her kit off,

0:31:130:31:19

taking centre stage.

0:31:190:31:20

And that's the figure of Europa.

0:31:200:31:23

And it's the moment where Zeus, who has developed an incredible

0:31:230:31:28

passion for Europa, has disguised himself as a bull

0:31:280:31:33

and it's Zeus that's rather enjoying having Europa sitting on his back.

0:31:330:31:39

According to the legend, she patted him

0:31:390:31:43

and after a bit he simply roared to life, so as to speak,

0:31:430:31:48

and ran off with her, galloping into the water down below.

0:31:480:31:52

What's it worth?

0:31:520:31:54

Well, according to the auctioneers estimate, £1,000-1,500 pounds.

0:31:540:32:00

I fancy that might be just a tad bullish.

0:32:000:32:03

What do you think?

0:32:030:32:05

130, 140, 150, 60...

0:32:050:32:08

..170, 180, 190, 200.

0:32:080:32:10

HE BANGS THE GAVEL

0:32:100:32:11

-So, guys, how are you feeling?

-OK.

-Great, can't wait.

-Yes.

0:32:110:32:16

No regrets about anything you've bought, Susan?

0:32:160:32:18

-The accordion, maybe...

-The accordion.

-..slightly, I should think.

0:32:180:32:22

Just depends on whether there are any street traders or hawkers

0:32:220:32:26

who want to set themselves up in business, really.

0:32:260:32:29

-Cos it's all set up, isn't it?

-It is.

0:32:290:32:31

Lot number 92, then, is the mid-20th century piano accordion by Pietro.

0:32:310:32:37

There we go, who's going to start me at £50 for this? £50, anybody? 50?

0:32:370:32:40

40 to go if we have to. £40...

0:32:400:32:42

-They don't look very musical, do they?

-They don't.

0:32:420:32:44

£30, I'll take anything. 10? £10? £10 bid.

0:32:440:32:48

12 bid, 15 bid, 18 now, 18 do I see?

0:32:480:32:50

18 bid and 20, at £20 bid,

0:32:500:32:52

22 now, 22 bid.

0:32:520:32:54

25 bid.

0:32:540:32:56

-Come on.

-28 now.

0:32:560:32:58

30 now. 30, 32 now. 32, the music's getting sweeter.

0:32:580:33:03

35, 38 bid. 40.

0:33:030:33:06

-42 now. 42, bid.

-Get in there.

0:33:060:33:09

45 bid.

0:33:090:33:11

48 bid.

0:33:110:33:12

-Yes!

-It's the internet.

-50.

0:33:120:33:14

And five, now, do I see?

0:33:150:33:16

-Not such a bad buy after all.

-Extra five has scared them off.

0:33:160:33:19

Oh, we've got 55! They like 55.

0:33:190:33:22

-What do you think of that?

-Thank you.

0:33:220:33:24

That's £60 bid, any more now?

0:33:240:33:26

At £60 bid, it's in the room, it's a lady's bid at 60.

0:33:260:33:28

Last call, then, selling at £60!

0:33:280:33:32

-Very well done, £60...

-Oh, brilliant!

-..is plus £10.

-Brilliant.

0:33:320:33:35

Well, that's marvellous, isn't it?

0:33:350:33:37

And next up are the two Royal Brierly decanters. Here they come.

0:33:370:33:40

Start me at £80 for them. 80! Got to be worth £40 each.

0:33:400:33:43

50, £50. 30.

0:33:430:33:45

THEY GASP

0:33:450:33:48

£30 bid. Your bid at 30, and five now do I see?

0:33:480:33:49

At 30 bid, five, surely? 35, 35, 40, 45, 50. 50, 55? No.

0:33:490:33:54

55, now, do I see any more, now?

0:33:540:33:56

At 50 bid, two if it's going to help anybody else. Two now, may I say?

0:33:560:34:00

At £50, 52, fresh bidder. 55, now.

0:34:000:34:03

52, second row has it, at 52 and five is the last call.

0:34:030:34:07

Then we're selling, make no mistake at £52.

0:34:070:34:09

£52, you are minus eight on that.

0:34:090:34:11

Overall, you are plus two. 0h, gosh!

0:34:110:34:13

-That... That's disappointing.

-Very.

-This is getting fine.

0:34:130:34:16

-Here we go.

-Now, the kit box.

0:34:160:34:18

First Lancashire Fusiliers' kit box,

0:34:180:34:21

this time with carrying handles.

0:34:210:34:22

There we go, a decent little box there.

0:34:220:34:24

Who's going to start me with £50 for it? 30 to go, surely, £30 anybody?

0:34:240:34:26

-Oh no.

-£10, anybody? 10.

0:34:260:34:29

10 bid, 10, 12, 12, 15, 15, 18, 18, do I see 18?

0:34:290:34:32

18, 20, £20 bid, 22 bid, 25 bid, five bid now, 25.

0:34:320:34:37

28, bid 30, £30 there, 30 bit, 32? No.

0:34:370:34:40

-At £30 bid, 32 anywhere else now?

-Cheap.

0:34:400:34:42

£30 bid and two is the last call.

0:34:420:34:43

At 30, front row has it at 30 bid, two or not now,

0:34:430:34:46

selling all done at £30.

0:34:460:34:48

-Wiped its face. Well, there we go, I don't believe this.

-Unlucky.

0:34:480:34:52

-You are plus £2. You have a profit of a pound each.

-Yes!

0:34:520:34:57

David, you were saying there could be a drink in this.

0:34:570:34:59

-There could be a drink.

-A lemonade!

-I think it's likely to be fizzy water.

0:34:590:35:02

-Are you going with the bonus buy or not, quickly?

-Yes.

0:35:020:35:06

The decision's made, we're going with the bonus buy and here it comes.

0:35:060:35:09

Lot number 98 is a Moorcroft pottery small baluster vase, there.

0:35:090:35:13

With the hibiscus pattern.

0:35:130:35:14

Who's going to start me at £100 for it? 100 for the Moorcroft. 80 then?

0:35:140:35:18

50 to go then, 50.

0:35:180:35:20

-50, straight in at 50, five now?

-Oh, brilliant.

0:35:200:35:23

Well done, Paul.

0:35:230:35:25

And £50, maiden bid has it, at 50 bid, and 55 bid, 60 now, £60 bid.

0:35:250:35:29

60, 65? 65, 65,

0:35:290:35:31

70 now, 70 bid,

0:35:310:35:32

-75 now. 75 do I see?

-Look at this.

0:35:320:35:35

-80 bid, 85 now? 85 surely?

-It's a pretty little vase.

0:35:350:35:40

At £80 I have down here.

0:35:400:35:41

Two is the last call! We're done, we're finished and going 82.

0:35:410:35:43

Internet comes back.

0:35:430:35:44

85. 85, 88? 88 bid. £90 then.

0:35:440:35:49

-90. 92 now. 92.

-Paul Laidlaw!

0:35:490:35:53

At £90 bid, back in the front then at 90, all done and finished

0:35:530:35:56

and selling at £90. Thank you, madam.

0:35:560:35:59

-Well done, Paul.

-Well done.

-Brilliant!

0:35:590:36:02

£62 plus the £2 you had before, makes you plus £64.

0:36:020:36:08

-So we get to drink after all?

-How about that?

-Wonderful.

-Brilliant.

0:36:080:36:12

Absolutely brilliant. Thanks to our man here.

0:36:120:36:15

And just a shame the box didn't make a bit more,

0:36:150:36:18

cos you'd got a lot of faith in that, hadn't you?

0:36:180:36:20

-Yeah.

-Doesn't matter, it wiped its face. Didn't lose you any money.

0:36:200:36:23

-No.

-Anyway, congratulations on that.

-Thank you very much.

0:36:230:36:25

-Don't say a thing to the Blues.

-Wouldn't dream of it.

-No.

0:36:250:36:28

Congratulations, wow!

0:36:280:36:30

Next up is the faience platter,

0:36:420:36:44

estimate £1,000-1,500.

0:36:440:36:46

Magnificent object, here it comes.

0:36:460:36:48

There we go, wonderful, painted Italian faience oval charger, this time.

0:36:480:36:53

Who's going to start me at 500 and we count on?

0:36:530:36:55

£500, straight in for it, 500. £500 bid. At 550 now, 550.

0:36:550:36:58

600, 650, 700 now, 700 bid. 700, 750,

0:36:590:37:05

800, 850,

0:37:050:37:09

900, 950.

0:37:090:37:12

1000 now, surely. At 950. I'll take another bid at 75 if it's going to help. As 950. 975.

0:37:120:37:18

At 975. Top it up. 1,000 now, surely. 1,000. 1,000 bid.

0:37:180:37:22

At £1,000, are we all done and finished?

0:37:220:37:25

-Going this time, then, at £1,000. Thank you very much.

-£1,000 and sold.

0:37:250:37:30

Not bullish at all.

0:37:300:37:31

-So, girls, how are you feeling?

-Yeah, quite excited.

-Confident?

-Yeah.

0:37:390:37:43

-Do you know how the Reds got on?

-No.

-No, we don't want you to know that.

0:37:430:37:46

Any particular item that you wish you hadn't bought, Kristen?

0:37:460:37:50

-That champagne tap, I think that's a dud.

-It's a bit of a...

0:37:500:37:53

It is a bit dodgy, that thing, isn't it?

0:37:530:37:55

First up, though, is the posy vase. And here it comes.

0:37:550:37:58

The Scottish turquoise art pottery posy vase this time.

0:37:580:38:02

-Who's going to start me at £80 for it?

-80.

-50 to go then...

-Come on.

0:38:020:38:07

-£30. 20 to go, then. 20.

-Oh, dear!

0:38:070:38:11

At £20 bid. Two now. Two, five.

0:38:110:38:15

-28, back with you.

-You're in profit.

0:38:150:38:17

-30. £30 I'm bid.

-It's better than 20.

0:38:170:38:20

-32 anywhere else? Lady's bid, then. You're all out.

-Oh, no! Internet, isn't it?

0:38:200:38:25

-£30.

-Well done, Jeremy. That is plus £6. To make a profit is an achievement.

0:38:250:38:31

Next is the clockwork beetle.

0:38:310:38:33

Lot 114 is a German lithograph tinplate clockwork beetle by Lehman,

0:38:330:38:38

as opposed to the other Beatle by Lennon.

0:38:380:38:41

Who's going to start me at £50 for it? £30, anybody? 30.

0:38:410:38:46

£30, what a fun object. Its 30 at the back of the room.

0:38:460:38:49

30 bid. Five now. I've had it working during viewing. At £30. Two now if it helps.

0:38:490:38:52

It does. 32, 35, 35, 38. 38 bid. 40. £40 I'm bid.

0:38:520:38:56

42, 45, 45. 48 on the internet. £50. 50, and five now. £50 bid.

0:38:560:39:02

Back in the room at 50. Five, surely.

0:39:020:39:04

At £50 bid, are we going to creep into another bid now? No.

0:39:040:39:07

-At £50, all done and finished.

-No, just a bit more.

-All done at £50.

0:39:070:39:11

Bad luck. £50 - that's minus £5, which means, overall,

0:39:110:39:15

you have a profit of a pound.

0:39:150:39:18

50p each. After all this effort.

0:39:180:39:21

OK. Now we have the champagne tap.

0:39:210:39:24

It should be £30 of anybody's money. 30 pounds, anybody? 20 to go then, surely.

0:39:240:39:29

-£20, anyone? 20.

-Uh-oh(!)

0:39:290:39:31

£10. Thank you. Ten bid.

0:39:310:39:33

12, 15. 15, do I see? No, wasn't quick enough then.

0:39:330:39:37

At 12 bid, 13 do I see now? £12 I'm bid. 13 now do I see? At 12 bid.

0:39:370:39:42

It's lost its fizz very quickly. 13, back in. 14. 15, do I see? 15. 16.

0:39:420:39:48

He's such a good auctioneer.

0:39:480:39:51

-15 at the back of the room. Last call, sells at 15. 16.

-Oh! 16.

0:39:510:39:56

17 now, sir. 17, do I see?

0:39:560:39:58

No, the lady's bid at 16 bid. Any more now? Going, then, at £16.

0:39:580:40:03

You are minus £19 on that wretched tap.

0:40:030:40:06

You had a pound before, so that means you're minus £18.

0:40:060:40:09

-What about the bonus buy? Minus £18 could be a winning score.

-I think we'll go for it.

0:40:090:40:13

-We like it. It's unusual.

-I think we're going to have to.

0:40:130:40:16

-Do you trust in Jeremy?

-Yeah.

-Drink fair, don't swear.

-Yeah, we like that.

0:40:160:40:20

There could be a certain amount of swearing if it doesn't do too well, J.

0:40:200:40:24

There we go, 119 is a blackjack jug this time. Who's going to start me at 100?

0:40:240:40:29

£100, anybody? 80 to go, then, surely. 80. 50. £50, anybody? 50. £50. 30.

0:40:290:40:35

-Oh dear!

-£30. At £30 bid, five do I see? At 35, 40. At 40 bid.

0:40:350:40:39

45 now do I see? 45 I've got. At 45 bid, 50 bid. 55 now.

0:40:390:40:44

I've got 50 in the room. 55, 60. No, 55. Net bidder has it at 55.

0:40:440:40:49

Any more now? At 55. I'll take eight as a last call.

0:40:490:40:52

-58 now, is it going to help you? It does, 58 bid. At 58 bid. 60.

-I don't think it'll get there.

0:40:520:40:56

60 do I see? No, he's gone for a cup of tea.

0:40:560:40:59

At £58 bid. 60 anywhere else now? 58 bid. Last call at £58.

0:40:590:41:04

-Oh!

-That is minus £32. I can't believe it. 32. You are minus £50.

0:41:040:41:11

-Very disappointing.

-You are minus £50. I could burst into tears for you.

0:41:110:41:15

Poor baby. It's not right, is it, eh?

0:41:150:41:19

-No.

-That blackjack should have done a lot better.

0:41:190:41:22

Listen, it could be a winning score. Be optimistic.

0:41:220:41:25

Minus £50, the programme could be yours.

0:41:250:41:27

-Just don't say a word to the Reds.

-We won't, we won't.

0:41:270:41:30

-We'll reveal all and put you out of your agony in a minute.

-OK, then.

0:41:300:41:34

Oh, poor chickens!

0:41:340:41:36

Well, it's not so often that we get two teams who are so completely

0:41:430:41:47

poles apart, but we have got a pole apart between our teams today.

0:41:470:41:53

I'm afraid the runners-up by a long chalk are the Blues.

0:41:530:41:57

-Minus £50 is not a great score, is it?

-Not really.

0:41:570:42:01

-But you were robbed a couple of times. But you had a good time.

-Yes, it was brilliant.

0:42:010:42:05

I'm so glad about that.

0:42:050:42:07

You've been very sporting to take it all on the chin.

0:42:070:42:10

But I have to turn to the Reds with a degree of congratulations, because you need to

0:42:100:42:14

look at your leader here because, without him, you would be up a gum tree.

0:42:140:42:20

He's the man.

0:42:200:42:21

The profit on the Moorcroft pot means that you will walk away

0:42:210:42:24

with £64 today. £64. There's 60 in there in a paper clip, which is nice.

0:42:240:42:30

-And you get the £4 coming up here, look, which is folding money, isn't it?

-It's wonderful.

0:42:300:42:34

-And congratulations.

-Thank you.

0:42:340:42:36

I hope you're going to pay your expert a commission.

0:42:360:42:39

THEY LAUGH

0:42:390:42:41

He gets that!

0:42:410:42:42

-Anyway, brilliant. Have you had a nice time?

-Wonderful time.

0:42:420:42:46

-Beats milking, doesn't it?

-It does, yes.

0:42:460:42:49

We thoroughly enjoyed having you. In fact, so much we'd like you to join us soon

0:42:490:42:52

-for more bargain hunting. Yes?

-ALL:

-Yes!

0:42:520:42:55

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:070:43:10

Bargain Hunt visits the enormous Newark Antiques and Collectors Fair, where a pair of farmers take on a couple of West Country girls. Expert advice comes in the form of Paul Laidlaw and Jeremy Lamond. Tim Wonnacott heads off to Sulgrave Manor and takes a look at the Great Hall.