Edinburgh 1 Bargain Hunt


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Edinburgh 1

Antiques challenge. Tim Wonnacott takes the teams to an antiques fair in Edinburgh, and Charles Hanson and David Barby guide them towards potentially profitable purchases.


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There are thousands of antiques and collectables here, waiting to be discovered.

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So, what are you waiting for?

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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Today, we're at the...

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..on the outskirts of Edinburgh, it's a real family day.

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Will our teams find three quality items in an hour? Let's find out!

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'They've got bucket-loads of enthusiasm...'

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I've never ever come across a stallholder who wasn't prepared to come down a wee bit.

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'..but very different styles.'

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Don't look at me like that! Definitely.

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'I think it's time to be introduced.'

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So, Brenda and Nora,

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you're two sisters and you come from a big family.

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Absolutely, there was eight children,

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my mum and dad, animals and pets.

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Nora and I are in the middle.

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-You're retired now?

-Yes. Uh-huh.

-What did you do as a job?

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Well, I started off as a nurse, a theatre sister for 18 years.

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Then I became a midwife and knew that's what I should have been doing for ever. Loved it!

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-How many years were you a midwife?

-About 22.

-22 and 18....?

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Don't do this!

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My dear girl, you worked for the Health Service...

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-Yeah.

-..for a long time! 40 years!

-40 years.

-That is amazing.

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-Did you get a medal?

-No. I got a thank you and a wee tea.

-Wee tea?

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You should have had an enormous gold medal. So, Nora - or flaming Nora?

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-Well...

-It's better than the other one. But, Nora, you've got a story about Blackie?

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-Oh, good. Blackie.

-Tell me about Blackie.

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-We found Blackie, a crow with a broken wing, a wee tiny thing.

-When you were babies?

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-We were about eight or nine.

-Yeah.

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My mum put him in the oven... Not to cook!

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-LAUGHTER

-Short of food, were you?

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She stayed up all night and fed this wee bird and he survived.

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He lived with us for five years.

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-He could count.

-How many could he count to?

-I figured up to four. She says ten!

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-What did he go?

-SQUAWKS:

-One! Two! Three!

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-He did.

-I must be blessed with second sight with you two.

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We're going to have lots of fun, and very good luck, girls. Now, the father-and-daughter combo.

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-Eric and Kathryn, welcome.

-Hello.

-Very nice to see you.

-Thank you.

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-Are you looking forward to it?

-Yes.

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-What made you want to come on Bargain Hunt?

-I was dragged round antique shops as a child.

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I used to hate it but now I love it, so just a real passion for antiques.

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Did you pick up knowledge when you were a nipper?

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-Yeah. I'm a novice compared to Dad but I'm learning.

-You never stop.

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One learns every day for the rest of your life.

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-Which is good fun.

-Yeah.

-Now, Eric.

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Tell us about your experiences with these antiques.

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I've always been interested in antiques but my latest incarnation

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is browsing internet sites, hunting for Arts and Crafts jewellery.

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-Finding things very reasonably?

-Absolutely.

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A couple of years ago...

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Obviously, you're looking all over the world, and I spotted this piece

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in British Columbia in Canada, and I recognised it instantly

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as a piece of Dorrie Nossiter jewellery.

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So I put a bid on, was the only bidder, £45.

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I had it valued about three months ago at £1,200.

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-That's a pretty good bargain.

-£45 to £1,200!

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You're my man on this programme! Brilliant!

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A tremendous show today! First, the money moment.

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Here's your £300.

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You're ready for that! Get our mitts off for this!

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-Thank you very much.

-£300 for you, darling.

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You know the rules. Your experts await and off you go, and very, very, very good luck.

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Cor! £45 to £1,200, eh? We're in for a bit of fun today!

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'And so are our experts.

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'Ever-ready David Barby is helping the red team.

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'And bright-eyed Charlie Hanson's taking on the blues. Woof!'

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-I like quality, well-crafted

-Unusual objects as well.

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-Yeah. Love quirky.

-I like quirky.

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-What's the plan?

-Um... Just buy low, sell high.

-Fine.

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Whatever you see, don't be afraid to ask,

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because the art is in the asking.

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Absolutely.

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'Come on, Charles. Show us how it's done.'

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-May we look at your stand? Do you mind?

-Not at all! >

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'Such a well brought-up boy!'

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Oh, yeah. That looks nice.

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-Wood violet? For a chemist?

-Can you smell anything?

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-It's a chemist's bottle!

-Let's smell it.

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-Very faint.

-Let me smell.

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Is there a stopper for it?

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Is it the original stopper? The original stopper.

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-How old would you say that is?

-About 1900.

-I like that.

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I like the plainness and it's functional. What is wood violet?

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It's a perfume. It's an essence.

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-Remember Mum used to send us down to the chemist?

-That fits beautifully!

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You've got opaque glass applied onto the clear glass in its molten form.

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Then it's been engraved, in other words, cut away.

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Gilded - you can see the traces of gilding.

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People buy these now, put them in the bathroom.

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I think that's lovely.

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-I love it.

-How much?

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I'll come down to 28. Maybe 25?

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24. 24.

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24. Is that...?

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-I think, if you can get it down...

-To about 20?

-Yes.

-Yeah.

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20 would be good.

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20 would be good. Yes. All right.

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£20. Well spotted.

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'Well, you girls aren't wasting any time!'

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-That's Arts and Crafts, isn't it?

-Yeah.

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Small agate there, and the lapis.

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Nice Edwardian piece for only £28.

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What do you think, Kathryn?

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-It's not my kind of thing.

-I'm looking for a bit of style...

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-You're not seeing it?

-No.

-Let's move on.

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-Time is ticking.

-Thanks, but no thanks.

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'Looking for style takes time, guys.

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'Meanwhile, the reds are speeding through the fair.'

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Very cheaply made.

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-Do you like that?

-No.

-No!

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A catfish, £100. It sits very well.

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It probably is 1890.

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But you want that extra...

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I'm looking for something that sings to me. It's not doing it.

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-Your dad's got it.

-Yeah.

-But that hasn't!

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'You want it all, don't you?'

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Could we have a look at the vases, please?

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Thank you.

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I'll just point out, this one's got a flaw, but it's not through.

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-I think that's a firing...

-In manufacturing?

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Yes. It's a Midland company. I think it's a Henry Tooth.

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He produced..."economical artware",

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but he produced it for the middle classes.

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-These, I think, are so stylish.

-They are!

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In the Arts and Crafts manner. To have a pair is very nice.

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-What age is on these, then?

-Let's look at the mark.

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About 1905, 1910.

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-To be on a mantelpiece?

-But just imagine...

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A white painted room, a white mantelpiece and these two vases.

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-I love them.

-I really like them, David.

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There's a wee crack there.

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It doesn't go all the way through, but it is a problem.

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-They're 135 the pair.

-135 the pair.

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When I first saw them, I thought about 100, but I think,

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with that slight defect - which isn't too detrimental.

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Can we just point out, there is that there and that there.

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-Yes.

-What's the best you can do?

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I actually missed that one. I would come down to 90 in that case.

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-Can you tuck them under that?

-We had 80 in our head.

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Um... We were thinking 80.

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Yes. OK.

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-And that is the lowest?

-Definitely.

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Don't look at me like that. Definitely.

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Super.

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'Well done, you girls. Two down.'

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-Novelty's always great to see!

-We think it's American. >

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-Do you think it's quite new?

-I don't know. >

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Do you like it?

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-I don't want to live with it!

-What's it worth?

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About £35.

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And between friends?

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The same. >

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-35, yeah.

-You won't take 30?

-No.

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I quite like that. Have a feel.

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-It's heavier than it looks.

-Good quality.

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I might be "quackers",

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but for the first time ever, I might say it could be a bargain.

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For Hanson to say that, it's not a frequent occurrence.

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Do you think it would fetch that at auction?

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If it came into my sale tomorrow,

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in the heart of England, where things are a bit more expensive,

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I would say it's worth between...

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-50 and 70.

-I was going to say 60.

-There you go.

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-Right, that's a good...

-I quite like it.

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Madam, the absolute best?

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-Yes.

-The absolute best.

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I've never, ever, ever come across a stallholder who wasn't prepared to come down a wee bit.

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It's cheap!

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-I'm a Scotsman. Please?

-It's a silver top. Come on.

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If it's not very old, it might only be worth £40 but to me...

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We're still ahead, then.

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OK. Yes.

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-Shall we buy him? Yes, we should.

-LAUGHTER

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We'll take it, then.

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-WHISTLES

-'They've broken their duck!

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'Now, I've found something simply divine.'

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What we've got here is,

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surprise, surprise, a preacher.

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This is a representation of John Wesley,

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founder of the Methodist Church.

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Here he is, wearing his surplice,

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with a white long cravat.

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And he's holding up his arms,

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going "Praise! Praise! Praise to the Lord!"

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The most inspirational open-air preacher of the 18th century

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is doing his stuff in this object.

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It's been knocked about a bit, but is pretty well complete.

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Put it simply, the thing looks a bit wacky.

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But if I turn it up, you get the idea as to what this might be.

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What you've got underneath there

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is the socket of a joint.

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And what you've got here

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is the other end of that joint.

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In other words, a series of these joined together

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would go to make up the spine of an old horse.

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It's the fourth vertebra from a horse.

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Back in 1800, when this was created,

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you threw nothing away.

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And because it looks like a preacher standing up and exalting God,

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the farmers turned them into little religious icons.

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What will a collector pay

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for a fourth vertebra from a long-since dead horse?

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It could be yours for £200. Oh, do stop nagging!

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-HORSE NEIGHS

-'Let's get back to the teams.'

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I can't believe, you're such whirlwinds, we got two items in 17 minutes.

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-What core thing do you want?

-I would like to get a piece of jewellery.

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We'd end up buying something that we liked, but that's kind of what I know, kind of, a little about.

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'Blues, you kind of need to get a move on.'

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I recognise these immediately. These are Doulton.

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This is quite good. This is my taste and I must not influence you.

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-I wouldn't be drawn to them.

-I can't see that selling in Glasgow.

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Right. Lead on, Macduff.

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-Kathryn, why do you like it?

-I love seed pearls.

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-I love the shape. It's so delicate.

-So romantic.

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Your daughter's, "Dad, I want it!" What's it worth?

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-What are you asking for it?

-330. >

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-It's a lot of money.

-It's a lot of money.

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-What's the appeal for you?

-I know what it is.

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-I use a thurible in church.

-Do you?

-I do.

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I look after the alter servers, who use thuribles,

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so I know how it works.

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You have a chain that goes through here.

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The alter server holds it with a chain,

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lifts the chain up, it hangs, and you have charcoal inside.

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Then you put the incense inside.

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I used to be an alter boy!

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You know about that, then.

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Then you stand and pretend that it's making you cough!

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We're more of a secular society.

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-I know.

-What use would you find it today? Would you use that?

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I would use it with a candle.

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-I can see this more secular use.

-Yes.

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I can see a candle in there,

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either a sweet-smelling one or just to flicker away at a meal time.

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The light would come out nicely.

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-The thing I like is its gothic quality.

-You're right.

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-How much?

-Hundred.

-£100. I'll see if I can negotiate another figure.

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We haven't got the chain, although I don't think that really matters.

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-Good luck.

-I like it.

-It's lovely.

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'David, you've pulled off a minor miracle.

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'£65 for a thurible, and they're all done.

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'Catch up, blues!'

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-This jewellery here.

-I love that.

-Look at this, Eric.

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-Have you got any lipstick? >

-That's really stylish.

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It's from New York. 1930s. >

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-Is it hallmarked sterling?

-I think it's Continental. >

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It doesn't have a maker's mark on it. >

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-That's quite nice.

-I really like that sort of thing.

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It's got a wee mirror, for applying your lippy.

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< For a dressing table or something.

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Would it sell?

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It's...different.

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It is really quite compact and very novel.

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-It would be what age? 1930s? '50s?

-I think earlier.

-'30s.

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It is really, really attractive.

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-The best price would be...?

-Well, probably, 65.

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-Do you like it, Kat?

-I do. I like Deco things, so...

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-High-brow 1930s living.

-No initials on it.

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So it's really clean to a collector. We've seen how it operates.

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-Hm.

-65 your best?

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-I could squeeze you down to 60!

-You could squeeze me to 60.

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-A gamble.

-Do you think it'd be a gamble?

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Yes, I do.

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My auction guide price would be a bit less, but it's quite different.

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'Be brave!

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'The red team finished ages ago. They're window shopping.'

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-I remember them.

-Look at this! It still works!

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-What's that?

-A wee sewing machine. Still works. Look.

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-You'd need to be a dexterous child.

-You would.

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'Come on, Charlie boy.

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'Give your team a hand.'

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-Time is ticking, OK?

-Right.

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A lipstick, yay or nay?

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For £60?

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I think it's worth between £30 and £80.

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-LAUGHTER

-I'm sitting on the fence.

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Knowing Anita Manning's increments of £10, it could make 100.

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But it could make 40.

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I like it. It's unusual.

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-Kathryn likes it.

-Yeah. Let's do it.

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-For £60, is that right?

-£60?

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I'll do 55.

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-55? Fabulous!

-There you go.

-Even better. Thank you.

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-Have you shaken hands yet?

-Shaken hands! 55!

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Aren't you a good sport?

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-Is it a bulldog or a boxer?

-LAUGHTER

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-Isn't that a really cool clock?

-Yeah.

-It's really stylish.

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-It's from Glasgow.

-Isn't that lovely?

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A really nice mahogany and boxwood-strung mantel clock.

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-It's so Art Nouveau it almost melts.

-And it's Glasgow.

-Absolutely.

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I think it's really stylish.

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Enamel dial, Arabic numerals, nice convex glass.

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What I like so much is its form. It's almost melting.

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It's SO Art nouveau. It's 1910.

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-It's at 150. To go to auction...

-120.

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I would say between 100 and 150, but I really like it.

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-It's quality.

-Could you do it for 100?

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-£100 is a nice reduction.

-Let's do it.

-You're so decisive.

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We've bought it. Thanks, sir.

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-'Better late than never, eh?'

-Thanks very much, mate.

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'Now, let's recap.

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'The reds hope the wood violet bottle will blossom in the saleroom.

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'They LOVE the vibrant colour and smooth lines of the Bretby vases.

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'And they hope that bidders warm to the gothic style incense burner.'

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-That's a good shop.

-It was great.

-Did you enjoy it?

-Loved it.

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-What did you spend, overall?

-165.

0:19:590:20:03

165? I'd like 135 of leftover lolly, please,

0:20:030:20:06

to give to our number-one man.

0:20:060:20:09

What are you going to spend all that cash on, boy?

0:20:090:20:13

-Probably something Scottish.

-Oh, good.

-Something Scottish.

0:20:130:20:17

-To play to Anita's audience with, perhaps.

-And to Anita herself.

0:20:170:20:22

Good luck, David. Good luck, girls.

0:20:220:20:25

Why don't we check out what the blue team bought, eh?

0:20:250:20:28

'The silver-mounted duck decanter

0:20:280:20:30

'became dish of the day for Kathryn and Eric.

0:20:300:20:34

'They were charmed by the lipstick compact with its green stone.

0:20:340:20:40

'And they didn't waste a second

0:20:400:20:43

'in picking out this lovely Art Nouveau mantel clock.'

0:20:430:20:48

How lovely to see three such happy people. It's a little miracle!

0:20:490:20:54

-You had a good time, Eric?

-Absolutely.

-Kathryn?

-Brilliant.

0:20:540:20:58

-You spent not quite £200.

-Hundred and...?

-90.

-190, yeah.

0:20:580:21:03

-So who's got the £110?

-I have.

0:21:030:21:06

-Old money bags over here.

-Yeah.

0:21:060:21:09

£110, which is lovely, going across straight to Charles.

0:21:090:21:13

-Good amount of cash, man.

-It's been a great pleasure with these two.

0:21:130:21:17

Enthusiasm and passion for antiques. It's been great.

0:21:170:21:21

It's going to be a serious challenge to find something they're going to like and rate!

0:21:210:21:27

Long may it continue, Tim, is all I'll say!

0:21:270:21:30

'Well, it's been a blast.

0:21:300:21:33

'But it's time to leave bonnie Scotland behind.

0:21:340:21:37

'I'm visiting a London gallery

0:21:370:21:40

'dedicated to the Arts and Crafts movement

0:21:400:21:44

'and the designer William Morris.

0:21:440:21:46

'Morris inspired his fellow artists

0:21:460:21:49

'and craftsmen to promote themselves and their work through groups

0:21:490:21:53

'called guilds.

0:21:530:21:55

'The Century Guild is the most famous.'

0:21:550:21:59

This gallery has been specifically reserved and set up

0:21:590:22:02

with the production of one of those guilds, the Century Guild,

0:22:020:22:07

which was begun in 1882.

0:22:070:22:11

The principal founder of the Century Guild was Arthur Heygate Mackmurdo,

0:22:110:22:17

who had met William Morris

0:22:170:22:20

and had become, as a result, inspired for works of art.

0:22:200:22:26

Mackmurdo, for example, designed this candle sconce.

0:22:260:22:30

What he's done here

0:22:300:22:32

is to produce two candle holders with a back plate

0:22:320:22:36

that's been organised with lots of shiny reflective surfaces.

0:22:360:22:41

So that the candlelight is reflected back into the room.

0:22:410:22:46

But those candles sit beneath

0:22:460:22:49

an intriguing embossed image, typically Arts and Crafts,

0:22:490:22:53

of the Sun itself, with a happy smiley face.

0:22:530:22:58

The top band of this frieze

0:22:580:23:01

has been raised in repousse with moons interposed by stars.

0:23:010:23:08

All very jolly and amusing for a wall lighting sconce.

0:23:080:23:13

Mackmurdo was something of a polymath.

0:23:140:23:18

He was able to turn his hand

0:23:180:23:20

not only to architecture, not only to metalwork,

0:23:200:23:24

but to furniture and all the decorative arts.

0:23:240:23:27

This is a piece that he designed,

0:23:270:23:31

a simple oak writing table with pigeon holes.

0:23:310:23:36

Incredibly simple and typical Arts and Crafts in design.

0:23:360:23:41

But with these block type chimneys at the back

0:23:410:23:45

and simple rectangular feet, it does have an architectural integrity.

0:23:450:23:51

One of my favourite pieces is this chap, a cast bronze paperweight

0:23:510:23:57

in the form of a Jenny wren that's been given a peacock's tail!

0:23:570:24:03

Mackmurdo also designed this mirror for one of his rooms.

0:24:030:24:09

Instead of having a long, rectangular landscape plate,

0:24:090:24:13

what you'd expect in an over-mantel mirror,

0:24:130:24:17

he's divided that plate up into a series of smaller plates

0:24:170:24:21

and then indented.

0:24:210:24:24

The idea being, when you put your favourite object

0:24:240:24:28

on the shelf between the mirrors,

0:24:280:24:30

you can see Jenny wren paperweight from the front and the sides.

0:24:300:24:37

All very clever.

0:24:370:24:39

The big thing today is,

0:24:390:24:41

are our teams going to be equally clever at the auction?

0:24:410:24:46

On reflection, I think not.

0:24:460:24:48

'A-ha! Now we're back in Scotland, at the Great Western saleroom.'

0:24:500:24:55

So, we've slipped across from Edinburgh to Glasgow

0:24:590:25:02

to be with Anita Manning, charming as ever.

0:25:020:25:06

Welcome, Tim.

0:25:060:25:08

First up for the reds, we go with this perfume bottle.

0:25:080:25:11

I do like this.

0:25:110:25:13

I think the enamelling is good on the wood violet.

0:25:130:25:17

I particularly like the fact that it is wood violet,

0:25:170:25:21

because that's a flirtatious type of scent.

0:25:210:25:25

Really?

0:25:250:25:27

This fragrance was reputed to come and go.

0:25:270:25:32

-What's your estimate?

-20 to 30.

0:25:320:25:35

-Is that a "come-and-go" estimate?

-Might be come-and-buy!

0:25:350:25:39

They paid £20, so that should do pretty well.

0:25:390:25:43

What about the Bretby pots? We're a long way from Derbyshire.

0:25:430:25:48

Glasgow loves Art Nouveau.

0:25:480:25:51

We see the influence of Henry Tooth, who worked at the Linthorpe factory.

0:25:510:25:57

These designs were based on some by Christopher Dresser,

0:25:570:26:03

and this monochrome glaze takes us back to the Linthorpe factory.

0:26:030:26:09

-I like these.

-What's your estimate?

0:26:090:26:11

-80 to 120.

-Brilliant, £80 paid.

0:26:110:26:14

We're looking good with this team. How do you go with thuribles?

0:26:140:26:18

Well, it's nice to look at.

0:26:180:26:21

It has architectural qualities.

0:26:210:26:24

-Fine, and it's got everything that's spiky and gothic!

-Yes.

0:26:240:26:28

For this gothic revival business, I think it's got its charm.

0:26:280:26:32

You could use it as a room perfumer.

0:26:320:26:35

-It has a functional use as well.

-I agree.

0:26:350:26:38

I like it for that. There are several aspects we like. How much?

0:26:380:26:43

-50 to 80.

-Good, £65 paid, so that's very fair, isn't it?

0:26:430:26:48

I think this team have done incredibly well.

0:26:480:26:51

They probably won't need their Bonus Buy, but let's have a look anyway.

0:26:510:26:56

Brenda and Nora, you spent, darlings, £165.

0:26:560:27:00

You gave David Barby £135. What did you spend it on, David?

0:27:000:27:04

I wanted to buy something that was Scottish and slightly feminine.

0:27:040:27:08

So I bought Scottish silver.

0:27:080:27:11

-An agate bracelet.

-How much?

0:27:110:27:14

-I paid £60.

-It's really nice.

-I love this carved section.

0:27:140:27:18

It's typical of well-produced Scottish jewellery.

0:27:180:27:22

Popular from the middle of the 19th century

0:27:220:27:25

into the 1920s, and still produced now.

0:27:250:27:28

-Is this silver?

-Yes. Do handle it.

0:27:280:27:30

I love the combination of semi-precious stones and silver.

0:27:300:27:35

-I love the colours.

-You could pick these stones up from beaches.

0:27:350:27:41

Have them polished up. I think it's going to make about 80 to 100.

0:27:410:27:46

-I'd like to see it go over 100.

-Really?

0:27:460:27:49

This is a nice quality piece of Scottish jewellery.

0:27:490:27:52

You don't pick it now, you pick it later.

0:27:520:27:56

For the viewers, let's find out what the auctioneer, wee Anita, thinks about David's pebble bracelet.

0:27:560:28:03

-Now, Anita, how glorious is that?

-I love this type of thing.

0:28:040:28:09

I love these agates. Every single agate is unique.

0:28:090:28:16

These wonderful colours remind me of the landscape -

0:28:160:28:20

the skies, the lochs, the mossy hills - of Scotland.

0:28:200:28:24

They're very fashionable in today's market.

0:28:240:28:27

I seem to have lit the blue touch paper there! That's got the Scotsman pulsing through her veins!

0:28:270:28:34

-There's one thing that I'm a wee bitty worried about.

-Oh, yeah?

0:28:340:28:39

One of the communion florets is damaged. There's a split in that.

0:28:390:28:44

-It's difficult to see.

-Old hawk-eye spotted it!

0:28:440:28:49

-What's your estimate?

-80 to 120.

-Well, that's brilliant.

0:28:490:28:53

-£60 was paid by David Barby.

-I hope this will do well.

-So do I.

0:28:530:28:59

That's it for the reds. Now for the blues.

0:28:590:29:02

Their first item, which Kathryn and Eric agreed on,

0:29:020:29:06

was this novelty claret jug.

0:29:060:29:08

Well, it's great fun.

0:29:080:29:10

It's a 20th-century example of an earlier type of claret jug.

0:29:100:29:15

It's sterling silver, so that's good.

0:29:150:29:18

I love these wacky wings!

0:29:180:29:20

Which go to make the handle.

0:29:200:29:23

I quite like it, but it is modern.

0:29:230:29:26

Be nice to have a glass of claret out of it! I'm beginning to feel thirsty!

0:29:260:29:32

-How much?

-I've put 60 to 80.

0:29:320:29:35

I might have been a wee bitty generous, but it is fun.

0:29:350:29:39

I don't think so. They paid £35.

0:29:390:29:41

I bet you, er...a small dram...

0:29:410:29:45

No! A wee dram! ..it'll make the ton.

0:29:450:29:48

-With your persuasive tongue, it'll make the ton, I bet ya.

-I will do my very best.

0:29:480:29:54

I don't wear lipstick. Much! But clearly you do!

0:29:540:29:58

-How do you rate the lipstick case?

-I absolutely love it.

0:29:580:30:03

I think it's very glamorous.

0:30:030:30:05

I love this little cabochon stone.

0:30:050:30:08

When we open it up,

0:30:080:30:11

we have a little mirror here, and I tested it out...

0:30:110:30:15

It would make your lipstick perfect!

0:30:170:30:19

Well, you'd use it. How much would you pay for it?

0:30:190:30:23

-I put 40 to 60.

-They paid 55, so it's in the right ball park.

0:30:230:30:27

-Yeah. And it could go more.

-Yes?

-Yeah.

-Good. We're reassured.

0:30:270:30:32

Excellent. And lastly, we've got the mantel timepiece.

0:30:320:30:36

I think the shape of this is very appealing.

0:30:360:30:39

It's by Robert French of Glasgow, a good clock maker.

0:30:390:30:44

It reflects what was happening in interiors in Glasgow at that time.

0:30:440:30:49

-How do you rate it, as far as cash is concerned?

-I've put £50 to £80.

0:30:490:30:54

You need to give it a nudge cos they paid £100.

0:30:540:30:58

Anyway, what will be will be and if the worst comes to the worst,

0:30:580:31:02

they've got their Bonus Buy to fall back on. Let's have a look at it.

0:31:020:31:07

Now, Kathryn and Eric, you spent a magnificent £190.

0:31:070:31:12

You gave Charles £110. Charles, my boy, what did you spend it on?

0:31:120:31:16

Well, Tim, they say small is beautiful. Home is at the heart.

0:31:160:31:21

Look at that!

0:31:220:31:24

This is a small, I suppose, little souvenir book of Glasgow,

0:31:240:31:29

-from the year 1901, the year Glasgow host the wonderful Exhibition.

-Yeah.

0:31:290:31:34

Inside are delightful monochrome views from that exhibition.

0:31:340:31:39

The Great Hall, the Russian street. It's superb. What do you think?

0:31:390:31:44

-I like it.

-It's cute.

-Often, things that are local,

0:31:440:31:48

they sell well in their home town.

0:31:480:31:50

-How much was it?

-It cost me £50.

0:31:500:31:53

OK, I can see it making between £50 and £100.

0:31:530:31:59

-It's lovely.

-Nice one.

-Happy with it?

-You get it back now.

0:31:590:32:04

-Do you like it, Tim?

-I do. It's a very nice little collectable. Hold that memory.

0:32:040:32:09

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Charles's little book.

0:32:090:32:15

-There we go, Anita. That's small enough for you.

-Yes.

0:32:150:32:19

I think this is a lovely little item.

0:32:190:32:24

This was made for the Great Exhibition of 1901.

0:32:240:32:29

A splendid exhibition. This little collectable is reflecting that.

0:32:290:32:35

-It's the first one that I've seen.

-Is it?

-Yes, it is.

0:32:350:32:38

Do you think that cunning man, Charles Hanson, has been clever to buy that in Edinburgh

0:32:380:32:45

-and send it to Glasgow?

-He's a clever boy.

0:32:450:32:49

-Anyway, what's your estimate?

-I put it 30 to 50.

-Charles had to pay 50.

0:32:490:32:54

He's paid the top end.

0:32:540:32:56

If you can't do better than that, Anita, in your heartland, with a Glasgow-related object,

0:32:560:33:02

about which you are passionate, I would be very surprised.

0:33:020:33:06

I would have paid £50 for it.

0:33:060:33:09

And that's saying something.

0:33:090:33:11

Anyway, we look forward to seeing you, darling, on the rostrum.

0:33:110:33:16

-Brenda and Nora, how are you, girls?

-Good.

-Feeling nervy?

-Excited.

0:33:220:33:27

Not nervous, just excited.

0:33:270:33:29

It is exciting because this room is stuffed with people,

0:33:290:33:34

Anita is hammering away for Scotland, and we're hoping for the best.

0:33:340:33:39

First lot.

0:33:390:33:41

Lot 51, ladies and gentlemen, a perfumer's bottle,

0:33:410:33:45

with these lovely faceted shoulders

0:33:450:33:48

and the enamelled label for wood violet.

0:33:480:33:52

Start me at £20. £20. 20 bid.

0:33:520:33:56

< With you, madam, at 20. 25.

0:33:560:33:59

30? With you, madam, at £30.

0:33:590:34:03

Are you flirtatious at £30?

0:34:030:34:05

LAUGHTER Oh, 35!

0:34:050:34:08

35, he's back in. 35. 40.

0:34:080:34:12

With the lady at £40...

0:34:120:34:14

You've doubled your money.

0:34:140:34:16

..All done at £40? BANGS GAVEL

0:34:160:34:19

So good. £40 is plus 20, girls. That's a very good start, isn't it?

0:34:190:34:24

Here comes the Bretby.

0:34:240:34:26

A superb lot.

0:34:260:34:28

Will you start me at £50? Start me at £50.

0:34:280:34:33

50 bid. 60.

0:34:330:34:37

70. 80.

0:34:370:34:38

90. 100.

0:34:380:34:41

-110 back in. 110.

-Oh, lordy!

0:34:410:34:44

-There she goes.

-120. 120.

0:34:440:34:47

All done at 120...?

0:34:470:34:50

130...!

0:34:500:34:52

Every time she stands up she gets another bid.

0:34:520:34:56

..140. 150.

0:34:560:34:59

160. 170. £170.

0:34:590:35:03

All done at 170? 170...

0:35:030:35:08

Plus £90.

0:35:080:35:10

You are, at the moment, £110 up. Next is your thurible.

0:35:100:35:15

The 19th-century silver-plated thurible.

0:35:150:35:19

A rare item and visually exiting.

0:35:190:35:23

Start me at 30.

0:35:230:35:25

30 bid. 40. 50.

0:35:250:35:28

60. 70. 80...

0:35:280:35:30

-You're in profit.

-..90 on the phone...

0:35:300:35:33

-She's standing up again!

-A telephone bid as well.

0:35:330:35:37

-..110. 120.

-Phone bid...

0:35:370:35:40

All done at 120? 120...

0:35:410:35:44

£55. That is £165 worth of profits!

0:35:450:35:49

165, how about that, kids? What are you doing about the agate bracelet?

0:35:490:35:54

-Are you going to park...?

-We both really like it.

0:35:540:35:59

-We've decided we're going to go...

-What do you think?

0:35:590:36:03

-I think it's very nice, but you've made a very good profit.

-We won't go for it.

0:36:030:36:09

-On the other hand...

-She's a good auctioneer.

0:36:090:36:12

-She is.

-She is going to powerfully present this Scottish bracelet.

0:36:120:36:17

-If she stands up, she'll frighten them into bidding!

-We'll go for it.

0:36:170:36:22

We are going for the Bonus Buy.

0:36:220:36:25

Lot 57 is this 19th-century Scottish silver and agate bracelet.

0:36:250:36:30

And I can start the bidding at...

0:36:300:36:34

-£40. It's with me at 40.

-40 only.

0:36:340:36:38

50. 60. 70.

0:36:380:36:41

-80. 90.

-You're in profit. Well done, David.

0:36:410:36:44

100.

0:36:440:36:46

-Any adva... 110.

-She's standing up!

0:36:460:36:50

120. It's with you, sir, at £120.

0:36:500:36:54

Any advance on 120? All done at 120? 120...

0:36:540:36:59

You doubled your money, you cunning old fox!

0:36:590:37:03

-Well done.

-So, £225 worth of profit.

0:37:030:37:07

You girls have to promise me you won't say a word to the blues.

0:37:070:37:12

-No.

-This could be ruinous to them.

0:37:120:37:14

-Been chatting to the reds?

-No.

-You don't know how they got on?

-No.

0:37:280:37:33

-They came out right by you. Did they look happy?

-I didn't look.

-Poker faces.

-Poker faces!

0:37:330:37:39

They're a couple of players, those two girls!

0:37:390:37:43

Anyway, first up is the "quackers" claret jug. Ha. And here it comes.

0:37:430:37:48

Lot 73 is this charming claret jug in the form of a duck.

0:37:480:37:54

Start me at £30. 30 with you, sir.

0:37:540:37:57

40. 50. 60. 70. 80.

0:37:570:38:02

-Doubled your money.

-90. 100.

0:38:020:38:05

110. 120.

0:38:050:38:08

130. 140.

0:38:080:38:10

150. 160...

0:38:100:38:12

That's more like it!

0:38:120:38:14

Any advance on 160? All done at 160?

0:38:140:38:17

160...

0:38:170:38:19

£160! How about that?

0:38:190:38:23

£125 profit. What's going to happen with your lipstick holder, lovey?

0:38:230:38:27

The lipstick holder. It has a wonderful cabochon set stone

0:38:270:38:33

and a little integral mirror.

0:38:330:38:35

It's absolutely lovely. Start me at 50. £50?

0:38:350:38:40

30, then? 30 bid.

0:38:400:38:42

With you, sir, at 30. Any advance on 30?

0:38:420:38:45

40. 50. 60...

0:38:450:38:48

You're in profit, girl.

0:38:480:38:50

..70. It's on the phone at £70.

0:38:500:38:53

Any advance on £70? £70...

0:38:530:38:57

-£70. That is plus 15, kids.

-Great! Wow!

-Now, the clock.

0:38:570:39:02

Lot 75, the Art Nouveau mahogany and satinwood inlaid mantel clock.

0:39:020:39:09

I'll start the bidding at £60.

0:39:090:39:11

70. 80. 90.

0:39:110:39:14

100. 110.

0:39:140:39:16

120. 130. 140.

0:39:160:39:20

£150. 160.

0:39:200:39:22

170. 180.

0:39:220:39:24

190.

0:39:240:39:27

200. 210.

0:39:270:39:29

We have a phone.

0:39:290:39:31

-It's on the phone!

-220 on the phone. 230.

0:39:310:39:35

No. All done at 230? 230...

0:39:350:39:39

-I told you!

-Well done, that man!

0:39:390:39:42

That is plus £130.

0:39:420:39:45

That means you are plus £270.

0:39:450:39:49

-Isn't that fantastic?

-I'm so happy!

0:39:490:39:51

Hang on. What are we going to do about the book?

0:39:510:39:54

-Let's do it.

-Are you sure?

-Yeah.

0:39:540:39:58

-We'll go for it.

-What excitement!

-It's my best ever result!

0:39:580:40:02

You know!

0:40:020:40:04

Can't believe it, Tim. The thrill of an auction.

0:40:040:40:09

-I had faith in you all these years.

-In nine years, my best ever.

0:40:090:40:13

-The decision is made, then?

-Yes.

0:40:130:40:16

Lot 79, ladies and gentlemen, another charming wee item.

0:40:160:40:22

I'll start the bidding at...

0:40:220:40:25

£40.

0:40:250:40:27

50. 60. 70.

0:40:270:40:30

You're in profit, Charles.

0:40:300:40:33

Any advance on 70 for the little pendant?

0:40:330:40:36

Any advance on £70? All done at 70...

0:40:360:40:38

-Bid there!

-80, fresh bidder.

0:40:380:40:41

LAUGHTER

0:40:410:40:44

Oh, it's so exciting, isn't it?

0:40:440:40:47

80. 90.

0:40:470:40:49

100...

0:40:490:40:52

-You've doubled your money.

-..With you, sir, at 100.

0:40:520:40:55

All done at 100? 100... BANGS GAVEL

0:40:550:40:58

£100! Well done! That's good. So, plus 50 on that.

0:40:580:41:03

Which means, you are £320 up.

0:41:030:41:05

-How good is that?

-That's pretty good.

-Pretty good, isn't it?

0:41:050:41:10

Well, there we go. Plus 320.

0:41:100:41:12

-Don't say a word to the reds.

-No!

0:41:120:41:15

We will reveal all once we've been to the cash machine...later!

0:41:150:41:20

Now, for those Bargain Hunt viewers who watch avidly,

0:41:300:41:34

it is very rare to see two teams looking quite so pleased with themselves.

0:41:340:41:41

This can only mean one thing. Both teams have made profits.

0:41:410:41:45

EVERYONE: Yes!

0:41:450:41:47

-Both teams have made substantial profits.

-Oh, really?

0:41:470:41:52

Both teams have nearly produced record profits on Bargain Hunt.

0:41:520:41:57

The team that is running-up today...

0:41:570:42:00

-is the reds.

-GROAN

0:42:000:42:03

-Despite making £225 profit!

-That's brilliant!

0:42:030:42:09

There you go, girls. I congratulate you.

0:42:090:42:12

Today, we have the incredible privilege of presenting £320...

0:42:120:42:17

APPLAUSE AND LAUGHTER

0:42:170:42:20

There we go, Kathryn. That is what they call folding money.

0:42:200:42:24

And, of course, any team that makes a profit on all three of their items is entitled

0:42:240:42:30

to another special privilege,

0:42:300:42:32

which is a lapel pin to wear with pride.

0:42:320:42:36

-Pick one, Kathryn.

-Thank you.

0:42:360:42:38

-There you go, Eric. Charles.

-It's taken me nine years, Tim.

0:42:380:42:43

Here we go. You're going to have one, Nora. Well done.

0:42:450:42:48

-Thank you.

-And you, Brenda.

0:42:480:42:51

I've got a loose one... Give it a good old pull.

0:42:510:42:54

A loose one for David Barby. What about that?

0:42:540:42:59

We've had a phenomenal day today.

0:42:590:43:01

Join us soon for some more bargain hunting. Yes?

0:43:010:43:05

ALL: Yes!

0:43:050:43:07

Subtitles by Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:210:43:24

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:240:43:27

Tim Wonnacott takes the teams to a gigantic antiques fair in Edinburgh. Experts Charles Hanson and David Barby are in fighting form, trying to guide the red and blue teams towards potentially profitable purchases. When they get to Anita Manning's auction house in Glasgow, the results are anything but predictable.