Peterborough 22 Bargain Hunt


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Peterborough 22

The antiques challenge comes from Peterborough. One team buys an item without the advice of an expert, but will it make a profit or loss at auction?


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Stopwatch? Check. Cash? Check.

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All we need now is somewhere to go shopping.

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Ah, look at that! Perfect!

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Let's go bargain hunting!

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The stage is set for a shopping extravaganza here in Peterborough.

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Do you fancy a quick sneak preview?

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With only £300 and one hour to shop, things get too much for David.

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We know what you've been doing!

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The pressure gets to the Red Team.

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We need Nick first.

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-Have you found anything?

-We've got a confession to make.

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But it's at the auction where they can find a profit.

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Today for the Reds, we've got Claire and Pete.

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And for the Blues, we've got Jan and Elaine.

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-Welcome. Lovely to see you.

-ALL: Hello.

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Now, Pete, you had a lucky job interview that got you two both together, right?

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That's right, I did. I was working at a college for learning difficulty students,

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and we were interviewing for a lecturer

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for the post of performing arts,

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and Claire came for the interview.

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-So you gave her the job and then you married her.

-Not married as yet!

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-But that is on the cards!

-I see!

-Jumping ahead slightly!

-OK!

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But we became really good friends and things progressed from there.

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-Apart from Claire, the other love of your life is sport.

-That's right.

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I've always been interested in sport ever since I was at school.

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And then went to university to do a degree in sport.

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And all my jobs have been involved in sport.

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And recently, I've completed a few triathlons.

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Right. So, Claire, your big passion is the theatre.

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Yes, it is. I started dancing at the age of three.

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I performed regularly in summer and Christmas seasonal shows.

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I performed a few times at the London Palladium.

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In between all that, I got my teaching qualification.

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I teach young people with learning difficulties, and associated disabilities, performing arts.

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I suppose my big ambition is to have my own performing arts school.

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-Well, we'll watch this space.

-Definitely.

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-Have you got any strategy?

-Er...

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-We need to be decisive.

-Definitely need to be decisive.

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Are you going to spend a lot of money or a little money?

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We'll have to see how we go.

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-I think we need to look for something that we like the look of and, hopefully, others will.

-Yes.

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-Because you've got very good taste!

-Of course.

-Of course!

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-Well, good luck.

-Thank you.

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Now, you two bluebirds, you met thanks to the game of cricket.

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We did, yes. About 30 years ago,

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we met when our husbands were playing cricket together,

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and so we carried on going to matches

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and found we enjoyed cricket.

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Now, Elaine, we've got a sport-loving couple of teams today,

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because in an earlier life, you were a PE teacher.

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A long time ago. In my previous life, yes!

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-Did they call you a games mistress?

-Yes.

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-That shows you how long ago it was!

-It does!

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Yes, when they did what they were told and they all wore gym kit.

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Jan, you're also a rowing coach. Tell us about that.

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That's right, Tim. I followed my sons along to the local rowing club,

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they joined when they were about 12 years old,

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and I just joined in with them and took it up.

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You don't do that thing, rowing up the towpath shouting through a megaphone?

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-That's me! That's the one!

-You don't! Do you really?

-Didn't you recognise me?

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You're two clearly extraordinarily well-organised girls,

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-so you'll have some strategy, won't you?

-Mm...!

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-I think we've kind of decided to do exactly what our expert tells us to!

-Seems a good idea!

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That is what you call a cop-out!

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The money moment... £300 apiece. There you go.

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A crumpled wodge.

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You know the rules. Your experts await. Off you go. Very, very, very good luck.

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Well, what charming teams.

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And we also have some charming experts.

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For the Red Team, it's Nick Hall.

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And leading the Blues is David Harper.

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-Here we are at Peterborough on this fantastic day.

-Fantastic.

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Spoilt for choice for stuff!

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I suggest we get stuck straight in and see what we can find.

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-One hour is all we've got.

-Let's go.

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-Morning.

-Morning!

-That's a little sweetie! Aww!

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I didn't realise you were such a softie, David.

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-Is that spelter?

-I think that is a bronzed effect.

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-So that is absolutely brand-spanking new.

-Oh, right.

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Look, girls, why not try something with a bit of age?

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What do you think? Do you like this?

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If I'm being honest, not really my taste.

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Not something we'd have ourselves. However...

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I tell you what drew me to them, it's this classic Arts and Crafts shape.

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Hold one. Let's have a look round. Ideally, with this sort of thing,

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what you want is to be able to attribute it to one of the great designers.

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We're looking for W.A.S. Benson, Christopher Dresser.

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Something of that ilk. Gimson, of course.

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Nice mixture, as well - the copper, brass and ebonizing on the handles.

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But it has got a few dints in it.

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-Is that going to affect the price?

-Probably not.

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-It would date to 1880, 1890. Late Victorian.

-OK.

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-They're not broken. They've just got signs of wear and tear.

-Yeah.

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I think they're a really smart design.

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I'm just a little disappointed that there's no makers' marks on them.

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He's asking £148 for them.

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I think at around £100, they probably wouldn't be a bad buy.

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It's not my taste, but if you think it's popular at the moment, it will sell well at the auction.

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-Shall I have a chat with the dealer, see what he says?

-OK.

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You have a look at those, have a chat. I'll go and find him.

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The Reds are straight in to some bargain-hunting action.

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If that was a Ming Dynasty pot for £45, I'd be running out of here, leaving you two alone!

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-We'd be right behind you!

-Following you!

-Chasing me!

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Now, what price has Nick got on those candlesticks?

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They've got to be 140.

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Now, for me, I still think that's worth a punt.

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If they were stamped with Benson on them,

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that dealer would be asking five or six hundred quid.

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But they're not stamped, which gives us a chance.

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-Shall we give it a whirl?

-OK, let's go for it.

-Yeah?

-Yeah.

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-Be brave!

-OK!

-Come on, let's go and give him some money.

-OK.

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That's one item down for the Reds and we've only just started.

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Elsewhere, some Delft tiles have caught the eye of the Blues.

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I think they're rather nice, actually.

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You know what you could do? You could put a little collection together.

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-Yes.

-A little cheeky auction lot.

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Maybe four Dutch Delft tiles,

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all with a similar theme, a boating theme,

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and put them in as one lot.

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I'm concerned about the damage on them. That's very damaged.

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But you could use that as a coaster. I think it's been used as a coaster!

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So someone would buy this purely because they think it's sweet

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and, you know, it would look nice in their house?

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-What are you laughing at?

-Because I wouldn't buy it!

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The trick with auctions is to create something of real interest.

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I think if you put four Delft tiles together, 18th or 19th century,

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somebody might just think, "They could be quite special and they're worth a punt."

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Let's remember those.

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-All right. Come on, you two!

-You can come back.

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Still nothing for the Blue Team.

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Now, would you believe that that is a biscuit tin? But look.

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-Oh, wow.

-Huntley and Palmers.

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It's 45 for that one.

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If it was in perfect condition, it's £100.

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So the price reflects the condition.

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-You've gone very quiet on me.

-I know!

-Sorry!

-Is that a good sign?

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-We're thinking.

-We're looking.

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Just consider, how upset would you be if it had gone when you came back?

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-I wouldn't be that upset!

-No!

-Fair enough. Let's go.

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Hang on. Looks like David has convinced the Blues to go not for four

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but eight of those tiles.

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-What kind of deal?

-Can you give me a price on all of the Delft tiles?

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Erm... Six each... They've got to be five each on them.

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Five each.

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-Oh, we're missing one, are we?

-Just sold it.

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-You haven't? The one with the chips?

-Yes.

-That was my favourite!

-Oh, no!

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That one was the one with the coaster mark.

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-Could there be 30 for the seven?

-They've got to be a fiver each.

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-What's that, 35?

-Yes. That's the best.

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-OK, girls, I think you should have a go.

-We'll take them, then.

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-Thank you very much.

-We'll have them all.

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And stop messing about, you two! Get spending money quicker!

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Lesson learned, hopefully.

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What's this, Reds? More biscuit tins?

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-Can I ask how much it is, please?

-It's 24.

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What about if you gave him 18 and a biscuit? How would that...

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The Blues have got their eye on some glassware.

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-I'm going to move round here.

-Look at this junk. We love this.

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There are two pieces of Murano here, David.

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Lovely quality. There's no damage on these.

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-I think they're both absolutely lovely.

-What's your thoughts?

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I like them. I think they're quite fresh.

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-They're reasonably new.

-They're modern.

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-There's not a great deal of age in them, is there?

-No.

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-You know the story of Murano? Little island just off Italy.

-Right. No.

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There's, potentially, or has been, hundreds of glassmakers for hundreds of years,

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-maybe even a couple of thousand years.

-Really?

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Even though there's no age in them, someone would say, like we have,

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"Gosh, that's really beautiful."

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-Let's talk about figures. What kind of money could we have one of these for?

-It's 58.

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-Out of the two, I prefer the jug, Jan.

-Do you?

-Yes.

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You spotted the jug straight away from across the other side.

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-Will you be able to do 50 on the jug?

-Best - 55.

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-55 or...

-I think it's 55 or you don't have it.

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-Do you want it?

-Yes.

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OK, we'll have that.

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That's much more decisive. Good.

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It's a little Edwardian lady's glove box. Isn't that sweet? Where do you keep your gloves?

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-In my drawer, but if I have one of those...

-That's where you'd keep them.

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-Let's get outside.

-Yes, into the sunshine.

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-15 minutes and you've bought two things. I'm impressed.

-We've done well!

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While they're all shopping outside, come and have a look at what I've found.

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How's your sight getting on? Are you seeing me at all blurry?

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If you are, you'll need a pair of glasses.

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In the old days, you would be presented with a nice green leather case like this.

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And inside, you'd find a solid silver-framed pair of specs.

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And this is what they look like.

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I think these spectacle frames are just lovely.

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Look at the way the slides pull out on each of the arms,

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so that when you put them on,

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they literally wrap round the side of your head,

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and you've got the lenses presented

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in whatever adjustable position you want to keep them on your hooter!

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Which is what it's all about.

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Now, if you look carefully at the frames,

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you can see that they're fully hallmarked.

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You've got P&T for the maker

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and on the other side, you've got the anchor for Birmingham.

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As far as dates are concerned, I would guess something around 1810, 1820.

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Now, they're without the lenses,

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but to the spectacle collector, strangely enough,

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that doesn't matter all that much.

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It's the frames that they're after and the fact that they're solid silver.

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What would a pair of spectacle frames like this, early 19th century, cost you?

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The price here is £115.

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Is that good value or not?

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Well, it all depends on your vision of these things.

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Back to our teams.

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-The Blues have lost their expert.

-Where's he gone?

-We've lost him.

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-Sorry, girls.

-THEY LAUGH

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Come on, David. You know you have to spend more than a penny to make a profit on Bargain Hunt.

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-Looks like a proper pirate's chest.

-It does, yes.

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-For 60 quid, there's nothing wrong with it, but it's not good enough.

-Not what we're after.

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It's getting really crowded now. All the buyers are pouring in.

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-Goodness me.

-Oh, I say!

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NICK: We've got a lot of competition around.

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Keep those eyes peeled.

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They're nice. See those shell casings?

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-Aren't they?

-Yes. Vases made out of shell cases from the First World War.

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-Do they appeal or are you just looking?

-A bit...

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-I'm a bit iffy on those.

-Oh, right.

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-Guys.

-Yes?

-What do you think about this jug?

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It's Victorian. It's salt-glazed stoneware.

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They literally threw salt into the glaze when it was being fired and you get this lovely finish.

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Has he got something in his mouth? Is it meant to be an instrument?

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-It's bagpipes, isn't it?

-Yes.

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-Probably dating to the early-to-middle 19th century.

-OK.

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I'm just going to check if there's any obvious restoration.

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The rim is the usual... That has been restored.

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Can you see the way the colour gets very dark

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and very thick around there?

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That's because, when that was restored in the 20th century,

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nobody threw glaze into it.

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They're asking 63 quid.

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-What do you think?

-With the decoration round the outside, it's quite interesting.

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We're debating the jug.

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Would something round the £40 mark be acceptable?

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45. With the restoration.

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If we said 42, are we getting close? What do you think?

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43 and it's yours.

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Right, we're not going to go any lower.

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-Shall we go for it?

-I think... Yeah, I would say so.

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-Are you happy with that?

-Yes.

-It's an interesting thing. It's a bit different, quirky.

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At last, they've bought their second item.

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Just as well, because time is running out.

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We've got nine minutes left.

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We've got plan A and B to fall back on, the biscuit tins, erm...

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Why don't we split up? See if we can find anything else.

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I'll meet you at the biscuit tins and we'll make a decision.

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-OK.

-Yes? I'll see you there.

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Splitting up? Things must be getting desperate for the Reds.

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The Blues have just one more item to find.

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-I think it's absolutely gorgeous.

-Why? What's making it so gorgeous?

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It's Georgian. It's a proper Georgian candlestick.

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-It's in the silver shape, yes?

-OK.

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So you would've found these things, made about 1770, in solid silver.

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This, I think, is Sheffield plate, which is the earliest form of silver plating.

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It's, effectively, rolling real silver on top of copper so many times

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that you end up with something that looks very much solid silver,

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but with a thin layer of copper.

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It's a cheaper, a cheating way, of making something look like silver.

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If I can just look at those markings.

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Because it's very unusual to have silver plate marked.

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RH, which is the maker.

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And then I think that must be a Sheffield plate marking.

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-I love the column.

-Yes.

-I absolutely love that.

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-An acanthus leaf carved into it.

-BOTH: Yes.

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And what looks like maybe bamboo, possibly.

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It's an exotic thing.

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If that was a pair, Sheffield plate, Georgian,

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they're going to be five, six hundred pounds a pair.

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But a single is dramatically reduced in price.

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-What do you think? I don't think we've got much time.

-I'm excited about this.

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-I love this. Good.

-I'm glad you've found something.

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-It's good to excite you, finally! On something!

-Yes!

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-You've done it.

-Let's get a price on that.

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-Can we get it for 20 quid?

-Let's have a look for you.

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It says it's only 28.

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-Stop saying "only"!

-Well, for something that old...!

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-20 quid, it's yours.

-Really?

-Good man. Thank you.

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-I think that's a yes, Jan.

-That's good! Thank you.

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-That's your third item.

-We've done it.

-Lovely!

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-I'm going to buy you two a lovely cup of tea.

-Excellent!

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Well done, team.

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Only five minutes left for the Reds and they're considering an impulse buy.

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What will they do?

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-Do you like it?

-It's interesting, isn't it?

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-Do you think people will buy it, though?

-Well, potentially.

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-They might do.

-OK.

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-We haven't got a lot of time.

-No.

-Shall we ask the gentleman his best price?

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It's only got that bit there. Is it all right everywhere else?

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Excuse me. Hello there.

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Would you mind if I asked you what your best price is on this one?

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-48.

-48?

-OK.

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-I'm quite tempted, to be honest.

-I know. It's...

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-I'm thinking of the time.

-There's a couple of marks, but you'll not see that.

0:17:430:17:47

It's unusual, isn't it? The shape of the whole thing...

0:17:470:17:51

-I quite like it, actually.

-Yes?

0:17:510:17:54

-I think we should do it.

-We've got no time.

-Let's do it. Hopefully, Nick will like it.

0:17:540:17:59

48? Is that final? Shake your hand.

0:17:590:18:03

-OK.

-Thanks very much.

-Thank you.

0:18:030:18:06

Done now!

0:18:060:18:08

Will it turn out to be a panic buy? They'd better find their expert.

0:18:080:18:14

-It's this piece of furniture here.

-You bought this?

0:18:140:18:17

-We bought this.

-Yes.

-It says £58, but we got it for £48.

0:18:170:18:22

-We just liked the look of it!

-What do you think?

0:18:240:18:26

-You done all right.

-BOTH: Yes?

0:18:260:18:28

-What drew you to it? Why?

-We both looked at it and we both quite liked it.

0:18:280:18:33

We like the detailing.

0:18:330:18:35

Er, it's probably made around about 1910, 1920.

0:18:350:18:40

So it's got age, it's an antique. It's just a functional thing.

0:18:400:18:44

-Well done, you two.

-BOTH: Thank you.

0:18:440:18:47

Great stuff. Brilliant.

0:18:470:18:49

So after striking out on their own,

0:18:490:18:52

the Reds got the last item in the nick of time. Without Nick!

0:18:520:18:55

They quickly bought the candlesticks,

0:18:550:18:57

but Nick didn't get the price down as much as he'd have liked.

0:18:570:19:01

Next was the 19th century salt-glazed jug.

0:19:020:19:06

And with no time to spare, they took a punt on a pedestal cabinet.

0:19:070:19:12

Tell us about this exciting find of Nick's.

0:19:140:19:17

Nick just happened upon a couple of candlesticks,

0:19:170:19:20

-and you think they're by Benson.

-Mm.

0:19:200:19:22

So there's going to be a bit of researching going on?

0:19:220:19:26

-Yeah. Hopefully, the auctioneers will...

-Exciting!

0:19:260:19:29

-How much did you spend overall?

-£231.

0:19:290:19:32

-Now that is a proper amount of money!

-Good spend.

0:19:320:19:36

-So I want 69 smackers, please.

-There we go.

-Lovely.

0:19:360:19:39

£69 goes straight to Nicholas. You've got a nice wodge there.

0:19:390:19:44

-Yes.

-Any ideas what you're going to spend it on?

0:19:440:19:46

Some Arts and Craft candlesticks reference books!

0:19:460:19:50

Good idea! Anyway, very good luck.

0:19:500:19:52

Why don't we check out what the Blue Team bought?

0:19:520:19:55

They bought seven Delft tiles. Not the eight they'd hoped for.

0:19:560:20:02

They haggled for the Italian Murano glass.

0:20:020:20:06

And not to be outdone by the Reds, they bought their own candlestick.

0:20:070:20:11

-Overall, you spent how much?

-BOTH: £110.

0:20:120:20:16

-Well, that's not much, is it?

-No! We tried.

0:20:160:20:18

-I thought you were going to go out and spend big bucks.

-We're were.

-What happened to that resolution?

0:20:180:20:23

David kept pointing us to other things.

0:20:230:20:25

-Did he?

-Nothing to do with antiques!

0:20:250:20:29

-Always blame him!

-Yes!

-Yes! We've got the hang of it.

0:20:290:20:32

-Please may I have my £190?

-You may.

-£190...

0:20:320:20:36

-I can hardly bring myself to hand it over.

-I know!

0:20:360:20:38

But is going to safe hands and I know it's going to a good cause.

0:20:380:20:41

-The David Harper pension fund!

-Thank you, Tim. I'm going home!

0:20:410:20:45

-What are you going to buy?

-I'm loathe to leave these two. We had such a nice time.

0:20:450:20:49

-They're glamorous, good company.

-You have to unglue yourself.

-I know!

0:20:490:20:53

-Detach and get on with it!

-I'll do my job.

-Go and do your job.

0:20:530:20:56

Very good luck, girls. Thank you.

0:20:560:20:58

Meanwhile, we're heading off to sunny Oxfordshire.

0:20:580:21:01

We're going to go to Stonor Park, and it is fab!

0:21:010:21:06

In the 1970s,

0:21:110:21:14

most of the contents of this stately home were sold

0:21:140:21:18

and the For Sale signs on the house itself followed shortly thereafter.

0:21:180:21:25

Times were hard for the Stonor family,

0:21:250:21:28

who'd lived here for nigh-on 800 years.

0:21:280:21:32

But Thomas Stonor, 7th Lord Camoys,

0:21:340:21:39

secured a deal and saved the day.

0:21:390:21:43

Cor, this is my type of house. Absolutely crammed with treasures.

0:21:490:21:54

A lot of which were given to the current Lord Camoys

0:21:540:21:58

by his cousin, Francis Stonor,

0:21:580:22:01

who was a passionate collector.

0:22:010:22:04

Francis Stonor was a frequent visitor to London auction rooms.

0:22:040:22:08

He only bought what he liked, which was often out of fashion.

0:22:080:22:13

He adored extravagant Baroque furniture,

0:22:130:22:15

pictures and bronzes.

0:22:150:22:19

It's perhaps in this room, the study,

0:22:210:22:25

that we get the best impression

0:22:250:22:27

of Francis Stonor's collecting tastes.

0:22:270:22:31

He was very interested in old, traditional art.

0:22:310:22:37

Hence, the room is, in part, lined

0:22:370:22:41

with delightful pencil and crayon Old Master drawings.

0:22:410:22:46

It wasn't only paintings that Francis Stonor enjoyed.

0:22:460:22:50

He also liked bronzes, particularly old Italian bronzes.

0:22:500:22:56

This inkwell was made in Venice in the 16th century,

0:22:560:23:01

around about 1580,

0:23:010:23:02

with these Baroque, muscular men supporting a central dish

0:23:020:23:08

that originally would've had a liner to it for holding ink.

0:23:080:23:14

But by far the most important and eye-catching objects in this room

0:23:140:23:18

are the pair of globes.

0:23:180:23:21

A terrestrial globe, showing the then-known continents

0:23:210:23:25

and a celestial globe, showing the stars in the heavens.

0:23:250:23:30

What's nice about these is, they're early,

0:23:300:23:33

they date to about 1699,

0:23:330:23:37

and what I like is the stands,

0:23:370:23:39

supported by four freeform pieces of sculpture.

0:23:390:23:45

They have everything that a Baroque piece of sculpture needs to offer -

0:23:450:23:51

swirling robes, lots of movement and drama.

0:23:510:23:57

Francis Stonor wasn't shy of a bit of drama in other objects either,

0:23:570:24:02

as evidenced by this pair of cast-metal pineapples.

0:24:020:24:09

In the 18th century, the pineapple was the emblem,

0:24:090:24:13

the motif, of good hospitality.

0:24:130:24:17

Originally, in my view, these were a pair of brule-parfum,

0:24:170:24:22

dating from the Louis the 16th period.

0:24:220:24:25

You simply had some shallow dishes here

0:24:250:24:28

that would've held incense.

0:24:280:24:30

If there was a bad smell about, you light the incense

0:24:300:24:33

and the brule-parfum would spread a good smell about a room.

0:24:330:24:38

But somebody in the 19th century, I guess, has decided to jolly them up,

0:24:380:24:44

and have cast these gilt pineapple

0:24:440:24:47

and applied all this serrated, rather spiky, pineapple foliage,

0:24:470:24:53

simply to make up a more decorative and furnishing object

0:24:530:24:57

to have in your dining room.

0:24:570:25:00

The big question today is,

0:25:000:25:02

will our teams over at the auction be bearing fruit?

0:25:020:25:07

What a joy this is to be in the cathedral city of Lincoln with Colin Young.

0:25:160:25:21

Pleasure to have you here.

0:25:210:25:23

First up for our teams are these so-called Arts and Craftsy candlesticks.

0:25:230:25:28

-Very stylish, aren't they?

-They are. Very much a statement piece.

0:25:280:25:33

We see plenty of pieces from the Arts and Crafts period of lower quality.

0:25:330:25:39

What we've got here is something that's well constructed and well designed.

0:25:390:25:42

-What do you think they're worth?

-We've put an estimate of 75 to 100.

0:25:420:25:46

-Is that all?

-Yes. Is that not enough?

0:25:460:25:50

-Not half good enough.

-Oh.

-£140 they paid.

0:25:500:25:54

-What about this salt-glazed jug?

-It is one of those areas that,

0:25:540:25:57

overall, the market has gone down for them,

0:25:570:26:00

but we still have fairly positive results.

0:26:000:26:02

-Yes.

-Estimate-wise, we've put on it 40 to 70.

0:26:020:26:06

Wow, that's super.

0:26:060:26:07

£43 paid. They'll be delighted with that. Well done, Colin.

0:26:070:26:11

-Now, the last item...

-Yes.

-..does, I have to say,

0:26:110:26:15

fail to get my pulses racing.

0:26:150:26:18

It's described as a "stripped and waxed pedestal cupboard".

0:26:180:26:22

Yes. I think probably that's good cataloguing.

0:26:220:26:25

Minimalistic cataloguing, not really saying too much about it.

0:26:250:26:30

No. Where do you think it comes from?

0:26:300:26:33

It's highly likely to be Continental. It may well be French.

0:26:330:26:37

The extra moulding that's been applied to it

0:26:370:26:40

sort of looks like it covers a multitude of sins.

0:26:400:26:43

Er... The only positive I can give is that it's got concave sides.

0:26:430:26:47

-Yes. If that's the best you can say, I think we'll stop there.

-OK.

0:26:470:26:51

-What's your estimate?

-We've put 30 to 50 pounds on it.

-OK.

0:26:510:26:55

£48 paid. Which is, in my view, about £47 too much.

0:26:550:27:01

Anyway... Almost certainly, they're going to need their bonus buy,

0:27:010:27:05

so let's go and have a look at it.

0:27:050:27:07

Now, Claire and Pete, what do you suppose Nick Hall spent your £69 on?

0:27:080:27:14

-Do you want to find out?

-Definitely.

-OK. Bonus buy, show us all, Nick.

0:27:140:27:18

Are you ready? Are you sure? Because if all else fails...

0:27:180:27:22

we can go busking...

0:27:220:27:23

BOTH: Oh!

0:27:230:27:25

-..down Bombay way.

-Yes.

0:27:250:27:28

-It's very...

-Not what I had in mind, but...

0:27:280:27:31

-Not something you see everyday, is it?

-No.

0:27:310:27:33

Which is the reason behind it. It's unusual.

0:27:330:27:36

-How much did you pay for it?

-Ooh, £45.

0:27:360:27:39

-What do you think it might make at...?

-I've no idea!

0:27:390:27:43

I've not a clue.

0:27:430:27:44

-It's a proper instrument, isn't it, Nick?

-Yes.

0:27:440:27:47

-Not a toy. It'd play if you gave it a tweak.

-It would've been made to have been used.

0:27:470:27:52

It's not an early one. It's 20th century.

0:27:520:27:54

-I actually quite like it.

-Do you?!

0:27:540:27:57

What you've got is, basically, a calabash, which is a natural gourd.

0:27:570:28:03

This thing was once growing in an Indian field, a bit like a big old pumpkin.

0:28:030:28:08

So they've taken the pumpkin, removed the skin, dried it,

0:28:080:28:11

and that's your resonance box out of which the thing, these vibrations, will sound.

0:28:110:28:16

Which is quite fun, isn't it?

0:28:160:28:18

I've never sold one before. I was just caught by its unusualness

0:28:180:28:23

and thought, "Hey-ho, let's have a go."

0:28:230:28:25

Hold that thought. For the audience at home,

0:28:250:28:27

let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Nick's sitar.

0:28:270:28:31

-There you go, Colin.

-Thank you! You don't get many of these through the sale room.

0:28:320:28:37

How do you rate it?

0:28:370:28:38

-I think it's something that we're going to have a bit of interest in, because it's different.

-Yes.

0:28:380:28:45

Money-wise, valuation on it is going to be just guessing a figure,

0:28:450:28:49

except we haven't got many comparables to go with.

0:28:490:28:53

Once upon a time, it was nicely made,

0:28:530:28:55

but I can see down here lots of inlaying missing.

0:28:550:28:59

-Very expensive to get that restored.

-Yes.

0:28:590:29:02

What I'll do, I'll go with the auctioneer's favourite estimate when they really haven't got a clue.

0:29:020:29:07

-Which one's that?

-80 to 120.

0:29:070:29:10

I think that's quite tempting. £45 was paid.

0:29:100:29:13

You stick to your 80 to £120, Colin, and everybody's going to be absolutely delighted.

0:29:130:29:20

That's it for the Reds. Now for the Blues.

0:29:200:29:23

-What a shame - all these tiles. Every single one are smashed.

-Yes.

0:29:230:29:29

They've obviously been in a fireplace at some stage and, er,

0:29:290:29:32

-and they've had to do a little bit of a hatchet job to get them out.

-Yes.

0:29:320:29:36

They kept the good ones, and all the awful ones

0:29:360:29:39

-went into a bag of smashed fellows.

-Yes.

0:29:390:29:43

I don't think they'll go crazy for it. It's more crazy paving really.

0:29:430:29:47

-Yes.

-I did put an estimate on at 40 to 60.

0:29:470:29:51

I'm looking at them now, thinking perhaps I was a little ambitious.

0:29:510:29:55

I think it's going to be a struggle to get to 35.

0:29:550:29:57

-Moving on. Murano jug.

-Yes.

-That's at least sound, isn't it?

0:29:570:30:02

It is. Very nice thing. We've got very nice decoration on here.

0:30:020:30:05

Lovely colours. Big, bold, strong item.

0:30:050:30:08

-30 to 50 pounds estimate.

-£55 paid.

-OK.

0:30:080:30:12

That could be a struggle, too. We've got big struggles, in my view.

0:30:120:30:16

What about this Adams-style little candlestick? It's rather sweet.

0:30:160:30:20

I think it's rather a sweet little thing.

0:30:200:30:22

I mean, it's a typical piece of 19th-century plated ware,

0:30:220:30:27

done in the early Neoclassical style.

0:30:270:30:30

-Single stick on its own...25 to 40 pounds, I would think.

-OK, £20 paid.

0:30:300:30:35

So that is their sole guiding beacon of potential profit after three items.

0:30:350:30:41

Indeed. And that might make ten or 20 pounds' profit.

0:30:410:30:44

It might do it. Which won't make up for the losses on the other pieces,

0:30:440:30:48

so they are going to need their bonus buy. Let's have a look at it.

0:30:480:30:51

-Jan and Elaine, this is your bonus-buy moment.

-Yes.

0:30:510:30:55

David Harper took £190 of your well-earned pounds

0:30:550:30:59

and converted it into a stellar object.

0:30:590:31:02

-We hope!

-Let's hope so.

0:31:020:31:04

-OK, show us your wares!

-OK. I think you're going to like it.

0:31:040:31:08

-Ready?

-BOTH: Ready.

0:31:080:31:09

It's an oak barrel. Look at the grain and the wood. You've got that quarter cut.

0:31:090:31:14

So it's oak and then bound. It's got a carrying handle and a cork,

0:31:140:31:17

so it obviously contained liquid.

0:31:170:31:20

-Yes.

-But I think it's a cider barrel.

0:31:200:31:22

Something in the 19th century. You're a farm worker, you're out in the fields...

0:31:220:31:27

-So you'd take it off to lunch.

-Yes.

0:31:270:31:29

-You take a big chunk of cheese and bread and a barrel of cider.

-Sounds good!

0:31:290:31:33

Paints a lovely picture, don't you think?

0:31:330:31:36

It's a handmade thing. It's lovely quality.

0:31:360:31:38

-It has...

-But money... How much?

-Hang on! I'm still building it up!

0:31:380:31:42

-I realise the build up!

-You cannot recreate that colour.

0:31:420:31:45

-You're avoiding the answer.

-How much do you think I paid for it?

0:31:450:31:51

Erm... I guess you might've paid 50 or 60 pounds?

0:31:510:31:55

I think I probably would've paid 50 or 60 pounds, but I didn't.

0:31:550:31:59

-I paid 20.

-Oh, right.

0:31:590:32:01

-He's such a tease, isn't he?

-Yes! It looks a little better now, doesn't it?

0:32:010:32:06

He's all puffed up now! He only paid £20!

0:32:060:32:09

-An interesting item.

-Yes, very interesting.

0:32:090:32:12

For the viewers at home, let's find out what the auctioneer thinks about Dave's barrel.

0:32:120:32:17

-Now, Col, there we go.

-Thank you!

-Something to wet your whistle.

-Mm.

0:32:180:32:22

-Obviously you're getting this round in, then!

-I love it, don't you?

0:32:220:32:25

These barrels are great fun. Where do you think it's from? What do you think it's used for?

0:32:250:32:30

Er, well, it's going to obviously be a liqueur or a spirit.

0:32:300:32:35

It was noted for cider.

0:32:350:32:37

I think I'd want a little bit more cider than that if I was after a drink.

0:32:370:32:41

So brandy, port, something like that.

0:32:410:32:46

Nice bit of oak. Good strapping on it. Very well coopered.

0:32:460:32:50

I would've thought 25 to 40 pounds. That's a good-looking little lot.

0:32:500:32:54

David Harper paid £20 for it.

0:32:540:32:57

-And at £20, I think that's cheap.

-Absolutely.

0:32:570:33:00

-That should get them out of trouble.

-Should do. It should help, anyway.

0:33:000:33:04

-Good. Well, are you standing by?

-Indeed. Ready and raring to go.

0:33:040:33:08

Very exciting, Colin. Good luck.

0:33:080:33:10

-Claire and Pete, are you excited?

-BOTH: Yes!

0:33:180:33:22

We've got a full room. And Colin tells me

0:33:220:33:25

he has 220 bidders for this sale registered online. Amazing, isn't it?

0:33:250:33:30

First up is the high-ticket number, your Arts and Crafts candlesticks.

0:33:300:33:35

Lot number 92.

0:33:350:33:37

Late 19th century Arts and Crafts candlesticks,

0:33:370:33:40

very much in the style of W.A.S. Benson. Good-looking pair.

0:33:400:33:44

Who's going to start me at £100? 80 to go, then, surely?

0:33:440:33:46

-£80, anybody?

-Silence.

-£50?

0:33:460:33:49

50? Surely somebody in the room?

0:33:490:33:52

-Oh, dear.

-30? 30.

0:33:520:33:54

30 bid. Five anywhere else now? 35. Bid 40.

0:33:540:33:56

40. 40 bid. 45. 50?

0:33:560:33:58

They're moving slowly, but it's moving.

0:33:580:34:01

..45 bid. 50, anywhere else? Do I see 50?

0:34:010:34:04

-Can these people not spot a bargain?

-NICK: Obviously not.

0:34:040:34:07

-60 now.

-Hang on, it's going on.

0:34:070:34:09

..Just hovering this time. 55 bid. 60. £60 bid. 60.

0:34:090:34:14

Five again now, surely? At £60, it's the last call, then, at 60.

0:34:140:34:18

Sold this time at £60.

0:34:180:34:21

That is minus £80. That is a big hit.

0:34:210:34:23

I'm really sorry. I didn't see that coming.

0:34:230:34:26

The salt-glazed jug this time. 80 to go, then. £80 for the jug.

0:34:260:34:30

50? 40?

0:34:300:34:32

30?

0:34:320:34:33

-£30 bid.

-We've got a bit to make up.

0:34:330:34:36

35. 35 bid. 45 bid.

0:34:360:34:38

-Come on, come on, come on.

-You're in profit.

0:34:380:34:42

50. 50 all done and finished, then.

0:34:420:34:46

My bid's over here. Last call, then, selling at £50.

0:34:460:34:49

£50 is plus seven, which is a nice little profit, thank you.

0:34:490:34:53

You are now minus 73.

0:34:530:34:55

-Minus 73...

-A lot to make up, guys.

0:34:550:34:58

It's not over till it's over!

0:34:580:35:00

-Now, here comes the cabinet.

-Come on, cabinet!

0:35:000:35:03

Lot number 94 is the early 20th century

0:35:030:35:06

mahogany concave-sided and bow-fronted pedestal side cabinet.

0:35:060:35:11

Who's going to start me at 100 for it? £100, anybody? 50?

0:35:110:35:15

-£10?

-You're joking?

-I don't think he is.

0:35:150:35:19

Five bid. Eight bid. Ten bid. 12 bid. 15. 18. 20.

0:35:190:35:23

18 bid. 20 now. £20 bid. 22 bid? 25 bid?

0:35:230:35:27

28 now. 28.

0:35:270:35:29

Bid 30.

0:35:290:35:32

32?

0:35:320:35:33

35?

0:35:330:35:36

-38?

-SHE SIGHS

0:35:370:35:39

-Keep going. Keep going.

-It's doing better than the candlesticks!

0:35:390:35:45

..At 40, surely we've got another bid out of this? 40. Last call.

0:35:450:35:48

All done and finished at £40.

0:35:480:35:51

Brilliant piece of auctioneering. I thought it was going to sell for £5.

0:35:510:35:55

He sold it for 40, which is only minus eight,

0:35:550:35:58

-which takes you to minus 81.

-Oh!

0:35:580:36:01

So minus 81. What are you going to do about this sitar?

0:36:010:36:04

-I think we should go for it.

-I think we should.

0:36:040:36:06

-It's £45. You want to risk £45?

-Yes.

0:36:060:36:09

-You're minus 81. You might as well.

-Not a lot to lose, have we?!

0:36:090:36:12

-Definitely?

-Yes.

-Right. Having made that decision,

0:36:120:36:15

I can tell you that the auctioneer has estimated the sitar at £80 to £120.

0:36:150:36:20

-He really rates it.

-Good.

0:36:200:36:22

And if he's right, Nick makes £120, it will get you out of trouble.

0:36:220:36:26

-Back out of trouble.

-Where we want to be.

0:36:260:36:28

That's what's so much fun about the bonus buy.

0:36:280:36:31

We might make sweet music yet between us!

0:36:310:36:34

Steady on!

0:36:350:36:37

Lot number 98 is a 20th century Indian sitar.

0:36:370:36:42

Applied with bone, ebonized and brass decoration.

0:36:420:36:45

Very interesting instrument.

0:36:450:36:47

Who's going to start me at bottom estimate £80 for it? 80.

0:36:470:36:51

-£80.

-Come on!

-50 to go, then, surely?

0:36:510:36:54

£50, anybody? 50? 30?

0:36:540:36:56

30? Surely, surely? Yes, 30! 30 bid.

0:36:560:36:58

We're off.

0:36:580:37:00

35. Bid 40. 45 now.

0:37:000:37:03

-Keep going. Keep going.

-That's not much, is it?

0:37:030:37:06

45 bid. 50 bid.

0:37:060:37:07

55 bid. 60 bid.

0:37:070:37:09

NICK: Ooh! In profit.

0:37:090:37:12

..Bid 70.

0:37:120:37:13

-75.

-Come on!

-80 bid.

0:37:130:37:17

85 now.

0:37:170:37:19

Bid 90. 95?

0:37:190:37:21

-£100 bid.

-Yes!

-NICK: That's a bit more like it.

0:37:210:37:24

Hey, this is getting close now.

0:37:240:37:27

..At £100. If you don't bid, you're going to miss a "sitter"!

0:37:270:37:31

All done and finished at £100.

0:37:310:37:34

That is plus £55 for the sitar,

0:37:340:37:36

which means overall you are minus 26.

0:37:360:37:39

-No shame in that.

-No.

-Absolutely not.

0:37:390:37:41

Thanks to him! Well done, Nick.

0:37:410:37:44

-Jan and Elaine, do you know how the Reds got on?

-No, we don't.

0:37:550:37:58

Good. We don't want you to know.

0:37:580:38:01

-First up is your Delft tiles.

-Lot number 113.

0:38:010:38:04

A selection of Delft tiles.

0:38:040:38:07

Start me at £50. £50.

0:38:070:38:09

-JAN: I wish.

-£50 for some fine Delftware.

0:38:090:38:12

£10 for crazy paving?

0:38:120:38:14

-LADIES: £10!

-Come on, get on with it.

0:38:140:38:16

£10. Surely you're going to bid me. 12 anywhere else?

0:38:160:38:19

12. 15, sir. 15 bid. 18 bid. 20? £20 bid.

0:38:190:38:23

And two more. 22? 25? 25.

0:38:230:38:27

-Come on.

-It's like drawing teeth, isn't it?

0:38:270:38:30

And 30? No. £28 bid. 30 for it?

0:38:300:38:33

30, 30, 30!

0:38:330:38:35

32 do I see? 32 bid?

0:38:350:38:37

The internet.

0:38:370:38:39

38 bid. 40 now?

0:38:390:38:41

-You've made a profit.

-38 is the last call.

0:38:410:38:43

Selling on the internet at £38.

0:38:430:38:47

-38! Oh, my God!

-That is plus £3. How did that happen?

0:38:470:38:52

Lot number 114. Murano glass

0:38:520:38:55

Millefiori-designed jug there with very fine colourings.

0:38:550:38:58

Who's going to start me at £40 for it? 40? 30 to go, then. 30.

0:38:580:39:03

-It's such a pretty thing.

-I think that was the trouble.

-I know.

0:39:030:39:07

£10, anybody? Everyone now. Ten bid. 12.

0:39:070:39:10

-Come on.

-JAN: 12? Oh, no!

0:39:100:39:12

25? Five bid. 28, then? 30? 32 bid. 35 bid.

0:39:120:39:16

35 now. 32 bid. 35 again now. 32 bid.

0:39:160:39:19

Any more now? At 32, it's the last call, then.

0:39:190:39:21

Selling all done at £32.

0:39:210:39:23

-Not quite good enough. 32.

-Oh, I'm sorry!

-Minus 23.

0:39:230:39:28

115 is the single silver-plated candlestick

0:39:280:39:33

in the Neoclassical style.

0:39:330:39:35

-£100, anyone?

-Go on.

0:39:350:39:38

-JAN: Go on.

-30?

-Oh, dear.

0:39:380:39:41

£20 for it. 20. 10, sir?

0:39:410:39:44

-JAN: 10? No!

-This was my hope.

0:39:440:39:48

12 bid. 15 bid. 18 bid. 18 and 20. 20 bid. 22.

0:39:480:39:51

-You're in profit. You're in profit.

-Good.

0:39:510:39:55

Go on!

0:39:550:39:56

28 bid. 30 I've got. 32?

0:39:560:39:59

32 bid. 35 surely. 32 in the middle of the room. Are we all done?

0:39:590:40:03

We're selling this time - your bid, sir - at £32.

0:40:030:40:06

-That's brilliant!

-Well done.

-What a brilliant auctioneer.

0:40:060:40:09

You are plus 12 on that. Which means overall, you're minus eight!

0:40:090:40:13

-DAVID GROANS

-That's not bad at all!

0:40:130:40:16

-Well...

-Better than we thought!

-It's not bad.

0:40:160:40:18

-It's better than...

-Really? You were that confident?!

0:40:180:40:22

-It was those tiles.

-We were so worried!

-I've had nightmares about Delft tiles.

0:40:220:40:28

I must say, I think it is extraordinary

0:40:280:40:30

-that it went from crazy paving to £38 in only about eight bids!

-ALL: Yes!

0:40:300:40:36

Your bonus buy - what are you going to do? It could be a winning score, minus eight.

0:40:360:40:41

You could park it at minus eight. No shame in that. Or you could go with the little barrel.

0:40:410:40:46

-We want to go with the barrel.

-We'll go with the little barrel.

-We'll give that a go.

-Yes.

0:40:460:40:51

-Go with the barrel?

-We love the barrel!

0:40:510:40:53

-Here it comes.

-Lot number 119, the small barrel.

0:40:530:40:58

Very nice one there.

0:40:580:41:00

Who's going to start me at £30 for it? 30?

0:41:000:41:04

-£30 for the barrel.

-JAN: He's trying.

-He's doing his best.

0:41:040:41:07

Surely £20? Does nobody appreciate this coopering? £10?

0:41:070:41:11

JAN GROANS

0:41:110:41:13

-That has got to make money!

-Going again. We're off.

0:41:130:41:17

12 anywhere else? 10 bid. 12 now, do I see? 10 bid.

0:41:170:41:21

ALL: No, no!

0:41:210:41:23

..12 bid. 15 bid.

0:41:230:41:24

No? 15 now.

0:41:240:41:26

15 bid. 18 again? Last call. All done and finished at £15.

0:41:260:41:32

£15 it is. £15, girls. That is minus five.

0:41:320:41:36

-Which means overall, you are minus 13.

-Minus 13!

0:41:360:41:40

-That turned out to be a barrel of laughs!

-Oh, dear...

0:41:400:41:43

What an anticlimax for something so pretty.

0:41:430:41:47

-Oh, well.

-Oh, well.

0:41:470:41:48

Listen, minus £13 could be a winning score. Don't say a thing to the Reds.

0:41:480:41:53

-OK, we won't.

-Our lips are sealed.

-Promise, you two girls?!

0:41:530:41:56

Now, teams, have you been chatting to one another at all? No? Not at all?

0:42:040:42:08

I can reveal there's only 13 smackers between you.

0:42:080:42:11

It's needle-close today.

0:42:110:42:14

But the runners-up, I fear, today are the Reds.

0:42:140:42:18

REDS GROAN

0:42:180:42:21

Despite them making a profit of £55 on the bonus buy.

0:42:210:42:25

Can you imagine that? £55 profit from our leader here!

0:42:250:42:29

It was not enough to staunch the flow of losses

0:42:290:42:33

-from that ghastly pair of candlesticks!

-I know.

0:42:330:42:36

-Did you enjoy it?

-It was brilliant.

-Absolutely.

0:42:360:42:38

-Good for you, Pete?

-Yes.

-We've loved having you.

0:42:380:42:41

But the victors today are our girls in blue, who managed to win by only losing £13.

0:42:410:42:47

-Yes!

-Which is nothing, really.

-Nothing.

0:42:470:42:50

-It's a winning score. Congratulations.

-Thank you.

0:42:500:42:52

-Have you had a nice time, Elaine?

-Lovely.

-What about you, Jan?

-Yes.

-We've loved it, too.

0:42:520:42:57

It's been so fabulous, join us soon for some more bargain hunting.

0:42:570:43:01

Yes!

0:43:010:43:03

Subtitles By Red Bee Media Ltd

0:43:030:43:07

E-mail [email protected]

0:43:070:43:11

There are more fun and games with antiques as Bargain Hunt comes from Peterborough. One team buys an item without the advice of an expert, but will it make a profit or loss at auction? Presenter Tim Wonnacott visits the Stonor Park household in Oxfordshire to see a wonderful collection.